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A New York Times Notable Book A San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of the Year In her astonishing new book Susan Casey captures colossal, ship-swallowing waves, and the surfers and scientists who seek them out.  For legendary surfer Laird Hamilton, hundred foot waves represent the ultimate challenge. As Susan Casey travels the globe, hunting these monsters of the ocean with Hamilton’s crew, she witnesses first-hand the life or death stakes, the glory, and the mystery of impossibly mammoth waves. Yet for the scientists who study them, these waves represent something truly scary brewing in the planet’s waters. With inexorable verve, The Wave brilliantly portrays human beings confronting nature at its most ferocious.
Published: VintageAnchor an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
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I picked up this book because everything about it intrigued me, the cover, the title, the photos, and so forth. The beginning of the book was fairly interesting and read a lot like fiction. It did take an unexpected turn a quarter of the way through as Susan Casey began following surfers around asking for their opinions and experiences with rogue waves. While that was fine, I think she devoted entirely too much of the book to a surfer's experience with waves. I had hoped that she would talk a lot more about massive ocean liners being overtaken by waves over 100 feet high. I would have liked to have heard the testimonials of the survivors of those rogue waves. In short, I feel like this book could have been MUCH shorter, which would have made it a more entertaining read because then Casey wouldn't have seemed like she was repeating herself everytime she jumped into a jeep with a bunch of surfers to chase a freak wave. I picked this up because I like the ocean; I find it terrifying, beautiful, and destructive. I will give Casey credit for depicting it as all those things in her book. Even if you don't read the entire book, I think you can pick out certain chapters and still keep up with the story.more
Interesting and at times riveting, The Wave is the story of the ocean's giant and rogue waves -- and the people who try to surf them.

Half the book focuses on the science of giant waves and their effects on coastal communities and shipping; the other half follows big wave surfing's best-known names as they traverse the globe in search of giant waves to surf -- including the mythical 100' monster.

The science portions are almost as interesting as the picture Susan Casey paints of Laird Hamilton, the world's premier (and best known) big wave surfer.

Hamilton and a close-knit of friends chase waves so big they almost literally can't be surfed, and to fall invites severe injury or even death (several big wave surfers died while Casey was writing the book).

It's a wholly worthwhile, very interesting read (even though I'll never go near the ocean again...).

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Recommended by Meghan at OlyReads Book Club. As with All the Devils Are Here, lost my bookmarks when the book checked itself back in.

Great writing; would have liked more science and/or shipping stories, although she does make the tales of the surfers quite compelling. Only afterwards did the macho/privileged nature of their adventures bug me. Then again, she's got quite a background as a sports writer, so maybe it's only natural.more
couldn't get into it but very well written; great for those who love the oceanmore
Don't be fooled... this isn't a scientific exploration of rogue waves, but a book on big wave surfing supplemented by a number of different perspectives on the devestation of big waves.Just like Devil's Teeth, Casey is at her best as a writer when she's inserting herself in the story and developing brilliant character studies of those around her. Laird Hamilton is the primary focus of this book. Hamilton is perhaps the world's most famous pioneer of big wave surfing. Casey's study of big wave surfing and its main protaganists is compelling, however the pace of the book is often interrupted as she searches for different perspectives on waves to broaden the book's reach.more
I had no idea water could be so strong. Entertaining like Krakauer's Into Thin Air, and informative in a Bill Bryson kind of way (minus the humor). A very good book and for many stretches a book difficult to set down. I can't recommend enough that when reading The Wave to be close to Youtube to check out video of some of the surfing spots Casey mentions. Casey's writing is very descriptive, but sometimes seems out of place and forced. However, I will give her the benefit of the doubt in saying that I think she used it to keep the reader's attention. Casey goes to great lengths to discuss the perils of ocean liners while out at sea, and goes to greater lengths to discuss surfers that work closer to shore. Both scenarios present very interesting information, but Casey's assertion that big-wave riders being able to help scientists in the study of waves is tenuous. Despite some of the easily forgotten flaws, this book is awesome. One of it's central themes is climate change (whether man made or not) and how rising ocean levels are effecting us socially, economically, and, becoming of even greater importance and magnitude, geographically.more
An introduction to what really goes on beneath the waves. Despite my love for beaches and swimming in the sea, I'd never really given much thought to waves except that to me, they ranged from gentle rolls, exciting crests to thunderous and dangerous walls. What I got out of this book was an engaging look at Laird Hamilton and his surfing philosophy, some really interesting interviews with scientists on how global warming is likely resulting in larger waves being formed, including some freakishly sudden waves that seemingly leap out without warning, and an armchair journey around the globe to visit some of the world's big waves and the big named surfing stars who flock in to try and conquer them, the failure of which sometimes end tragically.more
i was less interested in the surfing part of this. as i was listening it took me half the book to figure out that tow surfing was not toe surfing. but the tsunami and rogue wave part was interesting.more
Having picked this up on the strength of her sympathetic bubbly interview in The Daily Show, I was a bit disappointed by the book. There are in fact two contradictory themes in the book. The first is a surfer chick's adventure story seeking the crazy men chasing dangerous waves in the mold of the great flick "Point Break". This is a story about the development of sport technologies as well as its commercial exploitation. The surfer as a rebel and outsider, dangerous to society and to himself, is turned into a branded circus exhibit. A bit more reflection and distance, and a bit less drooling and objectifying, could have improved that theme.The second theme, exemplified by the movie "The Perfect Storm", I found much more interesting. Tsunami and freak waves caused by earthquakes are catastrophic events of extremely low frequency. As few of their victims survive such an onslaught, there is a scarcity of both data and awareness. The sea (and especially the Pacific Sea) is still a dangerous place where minute inattention can spell doom for a ship, its cargo and its crew. As long as commercial insurance and the life of a ship's Third World crew remains cheap, ships will not be built to withstand such freak accidents. The author at least whetted my appetite to read more about meteorological disasters which are bound to increase due to the human propensity to build closer to the sea and the global climate changes.more
I found the story a bit hard to follow at times, though at the beginning of the book I was intrigued by the information provided about big waves: where and when they have occurred, who was chasing them, why, etc.As I read on, however, I was disappointed by what seemed a dwindling of facts and figures and science. It's not that I love facts and figures, and I know they can cause a narrative to get bogged down, but it seemed like the book jumped to giving a little information about the surfers, a little about waves, a lot about following Laird Hamilton and his crew, a tiny about wave research and wave impact, some more about following the surfers, a bit about scientists tracking the waves, and a bunch more about following Hamilton's crew.I got the feeling that the author tried to cover too much and as a consequence didn't cover anything satisfactorily. Even at first, I was okay with following the surfers and their highs and their pursuit of the waves, but after a while, it seemed to be the same story over and over again, with very little keeping my interest in them.I rated the book a 4, though I really would have preferred to give it a 3.4 or 3.5.more
Sea monsters exist. They break ships in half and pull them below the waves. Sometimes they swallow them whole. Most who encounter them never return to tell the tale and those few who do, until very recently, were rarely believed.I am referring to rogue waves, which until only the last decade or so, have been dismissed as myths, merely sailor’s tall tales. Only in roughly the last ten or fifteen years has the existence of rogue waves been fully documented and accepted by oceanographers. Scientists are only beginning to gain some understanding of how and where the waves rise up from the oceans to crush the unfortunate and the unlucky.I am intrigued, fascinated and a bit frightened by rogue waves, so when I saw Susan Casey’s new book, “The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean” I was excited. I want to learn more a about rogue waves and this book looked like it could tell me what I wanted to know. Sadly, was I wrong. Very wrong.Casey’s book is a hyper-kinetic jumble which primarily focussed on surfing. Yes, surfing. And not just any surfing but specifically an extreme form of surfing involving jet skis called “tow surfing.” What does this have to do with rouge waves? As far as I can tell, absolutely nothing.We should first define out terms. From Wikipedia, not Ms. Casey’s book, the following definition: “rouge waves (also known as freak waves, monster waves, killer waves, extreme waves, and abnormal waves) are relatively large and spontaneous ocean surface waves that occur far out in sea, and are a threat even to large ships and ocean liners. In oceanography, they are more precisely defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height (SWH), which is itself defined as the mean of the largest third of waves in a wave record. Therefore rogue waves are not necessarily the biggest waves found at sea; they are, rather, surprisingly large waves for a given sea state. Rogue waves are not tsunamis, which are set in motion by earthquakes [and] travel at high speed, building up as they approach the shore. Rogue waves seem to occur in deep water or where a number of physical factors such as strong winds and fast currents converge.“Ms. Casey spends most of her book following around a band of extreme surfers who travel the world looking for those places where ocean swells collide with reefs and generate huge breaking waves. This is all well and good except that breaking waves and crazy surfers have nothing to do with rogue waves. She also spends considerable time on tsunamis, often shifting directly from a discussion of rouge waves to tsunamis, unaware or unconcerned that the two have relatively little to do with one another.It only gets worse when she starts discussing ships. She seems to know that there are ships called bulk carriers, that they sink frequently and that having hatch covers ripped off in heavy weather is a bad thing. Beyond that things get really fuzzy. She does mention he sinking of the LASH ship MS München, but she calls it a container ship, rather than a barge carrier with a load cargo of steel products stored in her 83 lighters. In this case, the details do matter. It appears highly likely that the München was struck by a rogue wave. What is known of her sinking is a fascinating if horrifying tale, which Ms. Casey chooses not to tell.She goes on at greater length regarding the sinking of the MV Derbyshire, which may or may not have been sunk by a rogue wave. A study performed in 2000 suggests the Derbyshire sank due to progressive flooding in a typhoon. An excellent animation of how the ship is believed to have sunk can be found here for anyone who may be interested.Ms. Casey also seems to have a touch of xenophobia regarding the ship’s crews. Her repeated references to “third wold crews” do not appear complimentary. In discussing the Derbyshire she notes, “unlike other lost ships, this one wasn’t flying a Liberian flag and manned by Laotian sailors.” Elsewhere she comments on the global crew shortage: “This lack of expertise was especially troubling given the next-generation ships, floating colossi with complex computer navigation systems to master, not always a snap when the manual’s written in German and you speak only Tagalog.” Obviously crew training is important but it is hard to tell if she is making that point or simply insulting Philippine mariners. And like so much else in the book, it has very little to do with rouge or freak waves.Ms. Casey is the editor of Oprah Winfrey’s magazine “O” and the Wave reflects a certain style of personality driven journalism. Often the book feels like a series of profiles of the surfer dudes who surf huge waves and the scientists who study the huge waves. After several chapters of following the surfers doing insane things on massive breakers, Ms. Casey finally goes to a conference on waves where we meet the scientists, learn that the math they use is really complicated and very little else. She never does the hard work of finding someone to translate the scientific jargon and mathematics into language understandable to the layman. Mostly she appears bored, preferring to be back out with the surfers. “The presentations continued in a blur of wave theory while outside the real waves grew. Surfers streaked past, filling the windows.”We do get nice little portraits of each scientist and surfer. At the conference we come to know more what the scientists look like and wore more than what they are working on. Just two examples of many:Peter Janssen was up next, and he unfolded his tall, wiry frame from his chair and strode to the podium. He had wild gray hair, a peppery beard, and a strict, professorial appearance that seemed intimidating until you noticed the sparkle in his eyes.It was impossible not to like Cavaleri, a whip-smart man in a no-nonsense plaid shirt, his sleeves rolled up, his caterpillar eyebrows jumping around on his face, his hands swimming through the air.And so on and so on.In the end “The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean” comes off as primarily a travelog of a journalist hanging with lots of surfer dudes and a few scientists. If you want to learn about the people who do crazy things on surf boards on huge waves, then this is the book for you. If you want to learn anything about rogue or freak waves, you are better off just doing a Google search.more
Explores the world of elite surfers who follow the biggest waves in the world while they search for the elusive hundred-foot plus waves. It's as close as most of us will ever get to riding a wave like that. And why do the waves get so large, and are they wreaking havoc on ships more often ? It's all explained in her interviews with wave scientists, ship recovery captains, and other ocean specialists. The science is painless and interesting. A great book to read on a winter weekend while you imagine those blue crashing waves.more
Mariners have always told tales of giant waves swallowing ships without a trace. The Bermuda Triangle and the North Atlantic are famous for the mysterious disappearance of ships. Waves of increased size and intensity are among the predicted consequences of global warming. Against this background, Susan Casey has written about the history of giant waves, the science of predicting these waves, and the extreme surfers who travel the globe in search of monster waves.Casey gained access to an amazing array of wave specialists, from meteorologists and oceanographers to ship captains and insurance underwriters. Wave science requires intense mathematics, and the science was dumbed down for public consumption, but the interviews with technical experts were among the best parts of this book.The sections describing historical giant waves and modern wave science are interspersed with sections on the extreme surfer community. Casey obviously has an affinity for these surfers, who are supported by corporate sponsors as they pursue record rides. I found these sections less interesting, partially because I don’t surf, and partially because many of these people seem to have far more bravado and sense of entitlement than actual athletic ability.I obtained The Wave from LibraryThing’s Early Reviewers program.more
This book is utterly fascinating, even for readers who have no interest in surfing or oceanography. Casey has presented an extremely well-researched work that includes information on global warming and environmental consequences and the extreme sport of tow surfing. I loved the conversational, easygoing tone to the novel, which helped immensely in getting through some of the more depressing anecdotes. I will definitely recommend this book to others.more
Susan Casey is on the hunt for the elusive and destructive giant wave. These massive and calamitous giants are a seafarer's most unpredictable enemy and have been responsible for untold devastation and ruin through the ages. Rumors of these giant waves have abounded for centuries, but because the equipment with which to measure them has only been in existence for a short time, these tales have remained just rumors. As Casey explores the possibility of giant waves, she immerses herself into the tow surfing culture, a group of extreme surfing daredevils led by Laird Hamilton, who use jet skis to launch themselves into the paths of 80 foot waves, and travel hundreds of miles to find the elusive hundred-footer they long to ride. Casey also seeks out scientists and wave specialists to educate herself and her readers on the phenomenon of these monstrous waves and finds what the formation of these rouges says about climate change and undersea plate tectonics. Shifting perspectives between the hair-raising exploits of the tow surfers and the more sedate offices of some of the foremost wave researchers, Casey sheds light on a little known and frightening phenomenon lurking in the troubled ocean.I have a very strange relationship with non-fiction. Though I'm usually very choosy when it comes to non-fiction reads, I've lately begun to branch out due to my success with the genre and find that I'm really receptive to non-fiction as a whole. It gives my brain a little more to chew on, and though I am not an expert in retaining the facts these books present, I find that non-fiction gives me a lot of information about previously untried subjects. All that being said, there are just some books that I find too dense and scientific to be able to properly enjoy and understand, and though there were sections of this book that I devoured, there were others which I fear went right over my head. I'm certainly no expert on the ocean, or waves for that matter, and though Casey did an amazing job elucidating her subject matter, I had some periods of utter confusion while reading this book.What I really enjoyed about this book was the focus on the tow surfers. These were serious dudes who respected the ocean and its massive waves but were not afraid to put their lives on the line to catch the perfect monster curl. I had a lot of respect for Hamilton and his crew and was holding my breath each time they paddled out and got on their boards. There was a lot of carnage in these sections and Casey had a way of making these recollections seem breathtaking and sometimes surreal. It seems crazy to me that these men were willing to take these kinds of risks, but Casey and the surfers explain it in a way that is completely understandable, and as a reader, I could accept that though the risks were great, the thrill of the ride and the hunt for the perfect wave could be life-altering for the surfers.When the book got into the realm of explaining the science behind rouge waves, I began to feel a little lost. There was a lot here to digest and some of it went beyond a lay person's capacity for understanding. I did get a majority of the reasoning and science, but at times I tuned out a little and became frustrated by the heavy extrapolating. Casey explains how these unpredictable waves have caused massive devastation in the form of tsunamis and how even big oil corporations can be taken unaware and adversely affected. It seems a lot of the early wave science was trial and error, and I gathered that there is no real way for anyone to know exactly when a giant wave could come rolling in. Estimations and plotting can be done, but the prediction of giant waves is not an accurate science as of yet. When Casey speaks to Al Osborne, he does a great job explaining just how a rouge wave forms and acts, and it was in this easy and common description that I began to appreciate the nuances of waves and the terrible power they wield.Not only does Casey talk with the tow surfers and the scientists, she also speaks with people who have been a witness to the giant waves and finds out just what living through one of these events is like. It sounds truly terrifying and I found it amazing that there are people who have not only seen a giant wave, but who have survived it. There was also, apparently, a contest sponsored by a well known surfing company to award a monetary prize to the surfer who successfully rode a hundred-foot wave. This stuck me as insanity, and because of this, many surfers were seriously injured. The Laird Hamilton faction most intelligently frowned upon this contest, but it didn't stop some surfers from trying to ride a wave they most certainly weren't ready for. These bits of the book were like candy to me, and I couldn't help reading them over and over, trying to gauge the monstrosity that can come from a hundred-foot wave.Though this book was a little harder for me to digest than most of the non-fiction I've read, I still consider it a great success because I learned so much about rouge waves and the people who've encountered them, either in their work or in their play. While some of the sections that revolved around the science behind the waves was rather intimidating, the exploits of the tow surfers really made me want to stick with the book and continue on the journey. Casey has done something marvelous in this book, and readers who love unpredictable non-fiction will love it. As for me, well, I just want to shake Laird Hamilton's hand.more
When I decided to read The Wave I wasn’t quite sure what to expect. The ocean, waves and the science behind them was a subject I was interested in but I didn’t see how someone could write an entire book about them. It didn’t take me long to find out. This book sucked me in immediately. There is a lot to learn about our oceans and the people who study them, sail them and surf them. In one word, fascinating.This is not a dry facts and figures science book. Susan Casey writes in a wonderfully descriptive and engaging style. The book reads like a novel but at the same time you are digesting scientific data and amazing facts. She makes the science easy to understand and the descriptions of the surfers, the waves and the rough seas come to life.The author traveled with surfer Laird Hamilton and his friends, all extreme surfers that seek out giant waves. These are not just any big waves, they are 60, 70 and even 100 foot high waves. They are not the kind of waves one can paddle out to; they require the surfer to get a tow with a jet ski and have a teammate to rescue them when they hit the surf. There is little margin for error. They risk serious injury and even death when slammed by the force of one of these waves. Their amazing adventure is told in alternating chapters with the story of the scientists and their aspirations to understand how and why these giant waves are formed.Every two years wave scientists gather at a conference to exchange information on wave research. This has become a hot topic since the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and the recent concerns of how climate change could affect the world’s oceans. The warmer the water the more volatile the seas become with more destructive storms and larger waves. It is also theorized that with the sea level rising due to the melting of the ice cap there is more pressure on ocean bottom resulting in a greater number of underwater earthquakes and, as a result, tsunamis. Again, fascinating stuff.Each year more than two dozen large ships and their crews go missing. It usually gets explained away as bad weather and is never studied in the same way an airplane crash is analyzed. These scientists want to change that and are now investigating disappearing ships. The author meets with many of the scientists, attends their conventions and explains the research to us in such a clear way that we don’t have to know calculus or chaos theory to understand it. I had no problem following along and I haven’t taken a science or math class in years.If you enjoy reading about adventure I highly recommend this book. You may not want to go on a cruise or a swim in the ocean after you read it but I know you will be amazed, awed and entertained.more
“Catch a wave and you’re sitting on top of the world.” Yes, that’s the Beach Boys and if Brian Wilson would have caught a glimpse of one of these monster waves, he might have started hitting the LSD much earlier. Like the title suggests, this is a book about waves, mostly of the freakishly large variety. Casey travels the world, visiting scientists and other experts, trying to find some answers to the origins of these deadly rogues, that can turn a super cargo ship, into a crumpled beer can in a matter of seconds, but even with satellite tracking and other advanced technology, these answers can be elusive. The one thing that is clear though, due to climate change, the oceans are getting warmer and more volatile. The author ends up zeroing in on the big-wave surfing community, a ballsy group of mavericks, who hunt down these “giants”, for the ultimate thrill. Her descriptions of what is called tow-surfing, (where the surfer is hauled up to the wave by jet ski) are very exciting and quite scary. “Everything‘s okay until it isn’t.” goes a famous saying, which seems to sum up this dangerous sport, very nicely. Recommended.more
Entertaining, but too much Susan Casey, too much macho fetishism.more
When I first started reading this book I thought it was going to be a lot of statistics and repeatative information. I put the book down for several weeks. I finally picked it up again and was pleasantly surprised. After the first section talking about the number of ships sunk by rogue waves and the waves in general the book took a turn for the better and turns out to be more of a surfers story emphasis on chasing rogue waves around the world. Not knowing much about surfing, this story of world class athletes and the intenisty of their sport was quite interesting and informative. The book is well written though a bit repetative but worth the time to readmore
Was not a huge fan of the book. I found the descriptions and stories to be awfully long winded and repetitive. On the cover, the author is compared to Jon Krakauer and I cannot disagree more.more
I read the Devil's Teeth by Casey and enjoyed it. It did, however, like this book, tend to get a little long winded. She does a great job putting you in her place with lots of description. In this particular book, I would have loved a photo of each location she visited. This may happen, I'm not sure, since this is an ARC, but I feel it is necessary to get a full grasp of her narrative. I agree with EclecticEccentric's review that each chapter is a different location, but the gist is the same. There is a lot of speculation about waves, and lot scientists haven't figured out. The characters are basically the same, and although they deserve recognition for their bravery, they are putting themselves in danger for the thrill. I appreciate their depth in feeling for our oceans, but they are not heroes, in the sense of Firefighters, Doctors, Nurses, Police Officers, or the Military. Casey does put the human element into the book with the surfers, but continues to stress how much we don't know about the science of waves. Maybe the book should have been titled "Big Wave Surfers" and left the science to a minimum. It is obvious that she did exhaustive research on the subject, and although she gave us factoids, the focus seemed to be more on Laird Hamilton and his buddies. After a while I felt I needed to skim (which is not good) to get to something new.more
I wasn't sure if a book about waves could hold my interest for 300+ pages but I was wrong. Susan Casey's book The Wave takes a look at waves from many perspectives including a a very large focus on big wave surfing. It's jam packed with interesting facts about the monsters of the sea. I was shocked to read how many ships are lost at sea every week due to rogue waves which continue to get bigger and bigger. Much of the book is focused on the surfers that really risk their lives in pusuit of their passion of riding the biggest waves possible. The surfers focus is on Laird Hamilton the King of big wave surfing. I had no idea how dangerous this sport really is and how consumed the surfers are in finding the big waves. There are some great stories of ships lost at sea and the devastation and destruction caused by these massive waves. In Alaska there was a wave over 1700 feet high that completely wiped out a piece of the coast line. I would recommend this book for anyone interest in the sea or big wave surfing. However after meeting you may change your mind about taking a cruise.more
Wow! What a ride! This is a great book!I grew up in land-locked Oklahoma. I married a guy from Florida who spent as much time surfing as he did going to college. On our honeymoon, he tried to introduce me to the ocean. The waves were up to my armpits and he tried to get me to swim through one to get past the break. I didn’t make it. I just remember my head lying on the sand and not being able to get up. When the wave finally retreated I pulled myself up and got out of the water as quickly as I could. That was it. From that point on in my life I only went in up to my knees.That’s part of the reason I started this book with both anticipation and fear. The idea of someone actually wanting to ride a 100-foot wave fascinated me, but if a 4-foot wave could unhinge me, what would descriptions of a pounding by a 100-foot wave do?The book did not disappoint. The stories that Susan Casey tells of Laird Hamilton and his buddies taking on these giants of the oceans were breathtaking. I enjoyed learning about the mechanics of tow surfing and getting into the heads of the surfers as they do things that humans are not supposed to be able to do.When I started the book I wondered how much there could be to say about waves, but Casey did a great job mixing up the stories of surfing with interviews with experts studying how these waves are generated and what can be done to help those responsible for steering giant ships through them and rescuing those who get caught in them. Even those chapters kept me up at night wanting to see what happened next.And one other kudo to Casey. This is a book of superlatives. Describing ultimate waves, the scientists that study them, and the brave but wacky surfers that ride them over and over again could have degenerated into a book of clichés, but Casey didn’t let that happen. She did a great job keeping the similes and metaphors fresh throughout. Great book! Highly recommended!more
This is a book about surfing. It's a book about surfing at the extremes of human ability. The people Casey encounters are crazy in an admirable kind of way - they are utterly dedicated to the experience of surfing big waves and are willing to suffer pain, injury, even death in to achieve the experience.The book has a few historic anecdotes and some weak science (not the author's fault, wave science requires serious math), but its strength is the depiction of the people and places involved in the quest to find and surf the biggest wave humanly possible. Worth reading.more
I normally LOVE books about the ocean, ships, or basically anything nautical......but I couldn't get into this one. From the looks of the reviews below, I'm alone on this one, but it just didn't interest me as much as I thought it would. Sure, the descriptions of the big wave surfers and their dare devil rides were fascinating, but the rest of the book wasn't nearly as gripping. I found myself losing focus pretty early on.This is the first book of Casey's that I've read, so maybe I'll try another one and see how that goes. But as of now, The Wave is not a book I'll be rereading anytime soon.more
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Reviews

I picked up this book because everything about it intrigued me, the cover, the title, the photos, and so forth. The beginning of the book was fairly interesting and read a lot like fiction. It did take an unexpected turn a quarter of the way through as Susan Casey began following surfers around asking for their opinions and experiences with rogue waves. While that was fine, I think she devoted entirely too much of the book to a surfer's experience with waves. I had hoped that she would talk a lot more about massive ocean liners being overtaken by waves over 100 feet high. I would have liked to have heard the testimonials of the survivors of those rogue waves. In short, I feel like this book could have been MUCH shorter, which would have made it a more entertaining read because then Casey wouldn't have seemed like she was repeating herself everytime she jumped into a jeep with a bunch of surfers to chase a freak wave. I picked this up because I like the ocean; I find it terrifying, beautiful, and destructive. I will give Casey credit for depicting it as all those things in her book. Even if you don't read the entire book, I think you can pick out certain chapters and still keep up with the story.more
Interesting and at times riveting, The Wave is the story of the ocean's giant and rogue waves -- and the people who try to surf them.

Half the book focuses on the science of giant waves and their effects on coastal communities and shipping; the other half follows big wave surfing's best-known names as they traverse the globe in search of giant waves to surf -- including the mythical 100' monster.

The science portions are almost as interesting as the picture Susan Casey paints of Laird Hamilton, the world's premier (and best known) big wave surfer.

Hamilton and a close-knit of friends chase waves so big they almost literally can't be surfed, and to fall invites severe injury or even death (several big wave surfers died while Casey was writing the book).

It's a wholly worthwhile, very interesting read (even though I'll never go near the ocean again...).

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Recommended by Meghan at OlyReads Book Club. As with All the Devils Are Here, lost my bookmarks when the book checked itself back in.

Great writing; would have liked more science and/or shipping stories, although she does make the tales of the surfers quite compelling. Only afterwards did the macho/privileged nature of their adventures bug me. Then again, she's got quite a background as a sports writer, so maybe it's only natural.more
couldn't get into it but very well written; great for those who love the oceanmore
Don't be fooled... this isn't a scientific exploration of rogue waves, but a book on big wave surfing supplemented by a number of different perspectives on the devestation of big waves.Just like Devil's Teeth, Casey is at her best as a writer when she's inserting herself in the story and developing brilliant character studies of those around her. Laird Hamilton is the primary focus of this book. Hamilton is perhaps the world's most famous pioneer of big wave surfing. Casey's study of big wave surfing and its main protaganists is compelling, however the pace of the book is often interrupted as she searches for different perspectives on waves to broaden the book's reach.more
I had no idea water could be so strong. Entertaining like Krakauer's Into Thin Air, and informative in a Bill Bryson kind of way (minus the humor). A very good book and for many stretches a book difficult to set down. I can't recommend enough that when reading The Wave to be close to Youtube to check out video of some of the surfing spots Casey mentions. Casey's writing is very descriptive, but sometimes seems out of place and forced. However, I will give her the benefit of the doubt in saying that I think she used it to keep the reader's attention. Casey goes to great lengths to discuss the perils of ocean liners while out at sea, and goes to greater lengths to discuss surfers that work closer to shore. Both scenarios present very interesting information, but Casey's assertion that big-wave riders being able to help scientists in the study of waves is tenuous. Despite some of the easily forgotten flaws, this book is awesome. One of it's central themes is climate change (whether man made or not) and how rising ocean levels are effecting us socially, economically, and, becoming of even greater importance and magnitude, geographically.more
An introduction to what really goes on beneath the waves. Despite my love for beaches and swimming in the sea, I'd never really given much thought to waves except that to me, they ranged from gentle rolls, exciting crests to thunderous and dangerous walls. What I got out of this book was an engaging look at Laird Hamilton and his surfing philosophy, some really interesting interviews with scientists on how global warming is likely resulting in larger waves being formed, including some freakishly sudden waves that seemingly leap out without warning, and an armchair journey around the globe to visit some of the world's big waves and the big named surfing stars who flock in to try and conquer them, the failure of which sometimes end tragically.more
i was less interested in the surfing part of this. as i was listening it took me half the book to figure out that tow surfing was not toe surfing. but the tsunami and rogue wave part was interesting.more
Having picked this up on the strength of her sympathetic bubbly interview in The Daily Show, I was a bit disappointed by the book. There are in fact two contradictory themes in the book. The first is a surfer chick's adventure story seeking the crazy men chasing dangerous waves in the mold of the great flick "Point Break". This is a story about the development of sport technologies as well as its commercial exploitation. The surfer as a rebel and outsider, dangerous to society and to himself, is turned into a branded circus exhibit. A bit more reflection and distance, and a bit less drooling and objectifying, could have improved that theme.The second theme, exemplified by the movie "The Perfect Storm", I found much more interesting. Tsunami and freak waves caused by earthquakes are catastrophic events of extremely low frequency. As few of their victims survive such an onslaught, there is a scarcity of both data and awareness. The sea (and especially the Pacific Sea) is still a dangerous place where minute inattention can spell doom for a ship, its cargo and its crew. As long as commercial insurance and the life of a ship's Third World crew remains cheap, ships will not be built to withstand such freak accidents. The author at least whetted my appetite to read more about meteorological disasters which are bound to increase due to the human propensity to build closer to the sea and the global climate changes.more
I found the story a bit hard to follow at times, though at the beginning of the book I was intrigued by the information provided about big waves: where and when they have occurred, who was chasing them, why, etc.As I read on, however, I was disappointed by what seemed a dwindling of facts and figures and science. It's not that I love facts and figures, and I know they can cause a narrative to get bogged down, but it seemed like the book jumped to giving a little information about the surfers, a little about waves, a lot about following Laird Hamilton and his crew, a tiny about wave research and wave impact, some more about following the surfers, a bit about scientists tracking the waves, and a bunch more about following Hamilton's crew.I got the feeling that the author tried to cover too much and as a consequence didn't cover anything satisfactorily. Even at first, I was okay with following the surfers and their highs and their pursuit of the waves, but after a while, it seemed to be the same story over and over again, with very little keeping my interest in them.I rated the book a 4, though I really would have preferred to give it a 3.4 or 3.5.more
Sea monsters exist. They break ships in half and pull them below the waves. Sometimes they swallow them whole. Most who encounter them never return to tell the tale and those few who do, until very recently, were rarely believed.I am referring to rogue waves, which until only the last decade or so, have been dismissed as myths, merely sailor’s tall tales. Only in roughly the last ten or fifteen years has the existence of rogue waves been fully documented and accepted by oceanographers. Scientists are only beginning to gain some understanding of how and where the waves rise up from the oceans to crush the unfortunate and the unlucky.I am intrigued, fascinated and a bit frightened by rogue waves, so when I saw Susan Casey’s new book, “The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean” I was excited. I want to learn more a about rogue waves and this book looked like it could tell me what I wanted to know. Sadly, was I wrong. Very wrong.Casey’s book is a hyper-kinetic jumble which primarily focussed on surfing. Yes, surfing. And not just any surfing but specifically an extreme form of surfing involving jet skis called “tow surfing.” What does this have to do with rouge waves? As far as I can tell, absolutely nothing.We should first define out terms. From Wikipedia, not Ms. Casey’s book, the following definition: “rouge waves (also known as freak waves, monster waves, killer waves, extreme waves, and abnormal waves) are relatively large and spontaneous ocean surface waves that occur far out in sea, and are a threat even to large ships and ocean liners. In oceanography, they are more precisely defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height (SWH), which is itself defined as the mean of the largest third of waves in a wave record. Therefore rogue waves are not necessarily the biggest waves found at sea; they are, rather, surprisingly large waves for a given sea state. Rogue waves are not tsunamis, which are set in motion by earthquakes [and] travel at high speed, building up as they approach the shore. Rogue waves seem to occur in deep water or where a number of physical factors such as strong winds and fast currents converge.“Ms. Casey spends most of her book following around a band of extreme surfers who travel the world looking for those places where ocean swells collide with reefs and generate huge breaking waves. This is all well and good except that breaking waves and crazy surfers have nothing to do with rogue waves. She also spends considerable time on tsunamis, often shifting directly from a discussion of rouge waves to tsunamis, unaware or unconcerned that the two have relatively little to do with one another.It only gets worse when she starts discussing ships. She seems to know that there are ships called bulk carriers, that they sink frequently and that having hatch covers ripped off in heavy weather is a bad thing. Beyond that things get really fuzzy. She does mention he sinking of the LASH ship MS München, but she calls it a container ship, rather than a barge carrier with a load cargo of steel products stored in her 83 lighters. In this case, the details do matter. It appears highly likely that the München was struck by a rogue wave. What is known of her sinking is a fascinating if horrifying tale, which Ms. Casey chooses not to tell.She goes on at greater length regarding the sinking of the MV Derbyshire, which may or may not have been sunk by a rogue wave. A study performed in 2000 suggests the Derbyshire sank due to progressive flooding in a typhoon. An excellent animation of how the ship is believed to have sunk can be found here for anyone who may be interested.Ms. Casey also seems to have a touch of xenophobia regarding the ship’s crews. Her repeated references to “third wold crews” do not appear complimentary. In discussing the Derbyshire she notes, “unlike other lost ships, this one wasn’t flying a Liberian flag and manned by Laotian sailors.” Elsewhere she comments on the global crew shortage: “This lack of expertise was especially troubling given the next-generation ships, floating colossi with complex computer navigation systems to master, not always a snap when the manual’s written in German and you speak only Tagalog.” Obviously crew training is important but it is hard to tell if she is making that point or simply insulting Philippine mariners. And like so much else in the book, it has very little to do with rouge or freak waves.Ms. Casey is the editor of Oprah Winfrey’s magazine “O” and the Wave reflects a certain style of personality driven journalism. Often the book feels like a series of profiles of the surfer dudes who surf huge waves and the scientists who study the huge waves. After several chapters of following the surfers doing insane things on massive breakers, Ms. Casey finally goes to a conference on waves where we meet the scientists, learn that the math they use is really complicated and very little else. She never does the hard work of finding someone to translate the scientific jargon and mathematics into language understandable to the layman. Mostly she appears bored, preferring to be back out with the surfers. “The presentations continued in a blur of wave theory while outside the real waves grew. Surfers streaked past, filling the windows.”We do get nice little portraits of each scientist and surfer. At the conference we come to know more what the scientists look like and wore more than what they are working on. Just two examples of many:Peter Janssen was up next, and he unfolded his tall, wiry frame from his chair and strode to the podium. He had wild gray hair, a peppery beard, and a strict, professorial appearance that seemed intimidating until you noticed the sparkle in his eyes.It was impossible not to like Cavaleri, a whip-smart man in a no-nonsense plaid shirt, his sleeves rolled up, his caterpillar eyebrows jumping around on his face, his hands swimming through the air.And so on and so on.In the end “The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean” comes off as primarily a travelog of a journalist hanging with lots of surfer dudes and a few scientists. If you want to learn about the people who do crazy things on surf boards on huge waves, then this is the book for you. If you want to learn anything about rogue or freak waves, you are better off just doing a Google search.more
Explores the world of elite surfers who follow the biggest waves in the world while they search for the elusive hundred-foot plus waves. It's as close as most of us will ever get to riding a wave like that. And why do the waves get so large, and are they wreaking havoc on ships more often ? It's all explained in her interviews with wave scientists, ship recovery captains, and other ocean specialists. The science is painless and interesting. A great book to read on a winter weekend while you imagine those blue crashing waves.more
Mariners have always told tales of giant waves swallowing ships without a trace. The Bermuda Triangle and the North Atlantic are famous for the mysterious disappearance of ships. Waves of increased size and intensity are among the predicted consequences of global warming. Against this background, Susan Casey has written about the history of giant waves, the science of predicting these waves, and the extreme surfers who travel the globe in search of monster waves.Casey gained access to an amazing array of wave specialists, from meteorologists and oceanographers to ship captains and insurance underwriters. Wave science requires intense mathematics, and the science was dumbed down for public consumption, but the interviews with technical experts were among the best parts of this book.The sections describing historical giant waves and modern wave science are interspersed with sections on the extreme surfer community. Casey obviously has an affinity for these surfers, who are supported by corporate sponsors as they pursue record rides. I found these sections less interesting, partially because I don’t surf, and partially because many of these people seem to have far more bravado and sense of entitlement than actual athletic ability.I obtained The Wave from LibraryThing’s Early Reviewers program.more
This book is utterly fascinating, even for readers who have no interest in surfing or oceanography. Casey has presented an extremely well-researched work that includes information on global warming and environmental consequences and the extreme sport of tow surfing. I loved the conversational, easygoing tone to the novel, which helped immensely in getting through some of the more depressing anecdotes. I will definitely recommend this book to others.more
Susan Casey is on the hunt for the elusive and destructive giant wave. These massive and calamitous giants are a seafarer's most unpredictable enemy and have been responsible for untold devastation and ruin through the ages. Rumors of these giant waves have abounded for centuries, but because the equipment with which to measure them has only been in existence for a short time, these tales have remained just rumors. As Casey explores the possibility of giant waves, she immerses herself into the tow surfing culture, a group of extreme surfing daredevils led by Laird Hamilton, who use jet skis to launch themselves into the paths of 80 foot waves, and travel hundreds of miles to find the elusive hundred-footer they long to ride. Casey also seeks out scientists and wave specialists to educate herself and her readers on the phenomenon of these monstrous waves and finds what the formation of these rouges says about climate change and undersea plate tectonics. Shifting perspectives between the hair-raising exploits of the tow surfers and the more sedate offices of some of the foremost wave researchers, Casey sheds light on a little known and frightening phenomenon lurking in the troubled ocean.I have a very strange relationship with non-fiction. Though I'm usually very choosy when it comes to non-fiction reads, I've lately begun to branch out due to my success with the genre and find that I'm really receptive to non-fiction as a whole. It gives my brain a little more to chew on, and though I am not an expert in retaining the facts these books present, I find that non-fiction gives me a lot of information about previously untried subjects. All that being said, there are just some books that I find too dense and scientific to be able to properly enjoy and understand, and though there were sections of this book that I devoured, there were others which I fear went right over my head. I'm certainly no expert on the ocean, or waves for that matter, and though Casey did an amazing job elucidating her subject matter, I had some periods of utter confusion while reading this book.What I really enjoyed about this book was the focus on the tow surfers. These were serious dudes who respected the ocean and its massive waves but were not afraid to put their lives on the line to catch the perfect monster curl. I had a lot of respect for Hamilton and his crew and was holding my breath each time they paddled out and got on their boards. There was a lot of carnage in these sections and Casey had a way of making these recollections seem breathtaking and sometimes surreal. It seems crazy to me that these men were willing to take these kinds of risks, but Casey and the surfers explain it in a way that is completely understandable, and as a reader, I could accept that though the risks were great, the thrill of the ride and the hunt for the perfect wave could be life-altering for the surfers.When the book got into the realm of explaining the science behind rouge waves, I began to feel a little lost. There was a lot here to digest and some of it went beyond a lay person's capacity for understanding. I did get a majority of the reasoning and science, but at times I tuned out a little and became frustrated by the heavy extrapolating. Casey explains how these unpredictable waves have caused massive devastation in the form of tsunamis and how even big oil corporations can be taken unaware and adversely affected. It seems a lot of the early wave science was trial and error, and I gathered that there is no real way for anyone to know exactly when a giant wave could come rolling in. Estimations and plotting can be done, but the prediction of giant waves is not an accurate science as of yet. When Casey speaks to Al Osborne, he does a great job explaining just how a rouge wave forms and acts, and it was in this easy and common description that I began to appreciate the nuances of waves and the terrible power they wield.Not only does Casey talk with the tow surfers and the scientists, she also speaks with people who have been a witness to the giant waves and finds out just what living through one of these events is like. It sounds truly terrifying and I found it amazing that there are people who have not only seen a giant wave, but who have survived it. There was also, apparently, a contest sponsored by a well known surfing company to award a monetary prize to the surfer who successfully rode a hundred-foot wave. This stuck me as insanity, and because of this, many surfers were seriously injured. The Laird Hamilton faction most intelligently frowned upon this contest, but it didn't stop some surfers from trying to ride a wave they most certainly weren't ready for. These bits of the book were like candy to me, and I couldn't help reading them over and over, trying to gauge the monstrosity that can come from a hundred-foot wave.Though this book was a little harder for me to digest than most of the non-fiction I've read, I still consider it a great success because I learned so much about rouge waves and the people who've encountered them, either in their work or in their play. While some of the sections that revolved around the science behind the waves was rather intimidating, the exploits of the tow surfers really made me want to stick with the book and continue on the journey. Casey has done something marvelous in this book, and readers who love unpredictable non-fiction will love it. As for me, well, I just want to shake Laird Hamilton's hand.more
When I decided to read The Wave I wasn’t quite sure what to expect. The ocean, waves and the science behind them was a subject I was interested in but I didn’t see how someone could write an entire book about them. It didn’t take me long to find out. This book sucked me in immediately. There is a lot to learn about our oceans and the people who study them, sail them and surf them. In one word, fascinating.This is not a dry facts and figures science book. Susan Casey writes in a wonderfully descriptive and engaging style. The book reads like a novel but at the same time you are digesting scientific data and amazing facts. She makes the science easy to understand and the descriptions of the surfers, the waves and the rough seas come to life.The author traveled with surfer Laird Hamilton and his friends, all extreme surfers that seek out giant waves. These are not just any big waves, they are 60, 70 and even 100 foot high waves. They are not the kind of waves one can paddle out to; they require the surfer to get a tow with a jet ski and have a teammate to rescue them when they hit the surf. There is little margin for error. They risk serious injury and even death when slammed by the force of one of these waves. Their amazing adventure is told in alternating chapters with the story of the scientists and their aspirations to understand how and why these giant waves are formed.Every two years wave scientists gather at a conference to exchange information on wave research. This has become a hot topic since the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and the recent concerns of how climate change could affect the world’s oceans. The warmer the water the more volatile the seas become with more destructive storms and larger waves. It is also theorized that with the sea level rising due to the melting of the ice cap there is more pressure on ocean bottom resulting in a greater number of underwater earthquakes and, as a result, tsunamis. Again, fascinating stuff.Each year more than two dozen large ships and their crews go missing. It usually gets explained away as bad weather and is never studied in the same way an airplane crash is analyzed. These scientists want to change that and are now investigating disappearing ships. The author meets with many of the scientists, attends their conventions and explains the research to us in such a clear way that we don’t have to know calculus or chaos theory to understand it. I had no problem following along and I haven’t taken a science or math class in years.If you enjoy reading about adventure I highly recommend this book. You may not want to go on a cruise or a swim in the ocean after you read it but I know you will be amazed, awed and entertained.more
“Catch a wave and you’re sitting on top of the world.” Yes, that’s the Beach Boys and if Brian Wilson would have caught a glimpse of one of these monster waves, he might have started hitting the LSD much earlier. Like the title suggests, this is a book about waves, mostly of the freakishly large variety. Casey travels the world, visiting scientists and other experts, trying to find some answers to the origins of these deadly rogues, that can turn a super cargo ship, into a crumpled beer can in a matter of seconds, but even with satellite tracking and other advanced technology, these answers can be elusive. The one thing that is clear though, due to climate change, the oceans are getting warmer and more volatile. The author ends up zeroing in on the big-wave surfing community, a ballsy group of mavericks, who hunt down these “giants”, for the ultimate thrill. Her descriptions of what is called tow-surfing, (where the surfer is hauled up to the wave by jet ski) are very exciting and quite scary. “Everything‘s okay until it isn’t.” goes a famous saying, which seems to sum up this dangerous sport, very nicely. Recommended.more
Entertaining, but too much Susan Casey, too much macho fetishism.more
When I first started reading this book I thought it was going to be a lot of statistics and repeatative information. I put the book down for several weeks. I finally picked it up again and was pleasantly surprised. After the first section talking about the number of ships sunk by rogue waves and the waves in general the book took a turn for the better and turns out to be more of a surfers story emphasis on chasing rogue waves around the world. Not knowing much about surfing, this story of world class athletes and the intenisty of their sport was quite interesting and informative. The book is well written though a bit repetative but worth the time to readmore
Was not a huge fan of the book. I found the descriptions and stories to be awfully long winded and repetitive. On the cover, the author is compared to Jon Krakauer and I cannot disagree more.more
I read the Devil's Teeth by Casey and enjoyed it. It did, however, like this book, tend to get a little long winded. She does a great job putting you in her place with lots of description. In this particular book, I would have loved a photo of each location she visited. This may happen, I'm not sure, since this is an ARC, but I feel it is necessary to get a full grasp of her narrative. I agree with EclecticEccentric's review that each chapter is a different location, but the gist is the same. There is a lot of speculation about waves, and lot scientists haven't figured out. The characters are basically the same, and although they deserve recognition for their bravery, they are putting themselves in danger for the thrill. I appreciate their depth in feeling for our oceans, but they are not heroes, in the sense of Firefighters, Doctors, Nurses, Police Officers, or the Military. Casey does put the human element into the book with the surfers, but continues to stress how much we don't know about the science of waves. Maybe the book should have been titled "Big Wave Surfers" and left the science to a minimum. It is obvious that she did exhaustive research on the subject, and although she gave us factoids, the focus seemed to be more on Laird Hamilton and his buddies. After a while I felt I needed to skim (which is not good) to get to something new.more
I wasn't sure if a book about waves could hold my interest for 300+ pages but I was wrong. Susan Casey's book The Wave takes a look at waves from many perspectives including a a very large focus on big wave surfing. It's jam packed with interesting facts about the monsters of the sea. I was shocked to read how many ships are lost at sea every week due to rogue waves which continue to get bigger and bigger. Much of the book is focused on the surfers that really risk their lives in pusuit of their passion of riding the biggest waves possible. The surfers focus is on Laird Hamilton the King of big wave surfing. I had no idea how dangerous this sport really is and how consumed the surfers are in finding the big waves. There are some great stories of ships lost at sea and the devastation and destruction caused by these massive waves. In Alaska there was a wave over 1700 feet high that completely wiped out a piece of the coast line. I would recommend this book for anyone interest in the sea or big wave surfing. However after meeting you may change your mind about taking a cruise.more
Wow! What a ride! This is a great book!I grew up in land-locked Oklahoma. I married a guy from Florida who spent as much time surfing as he did going to college. On our honeymoon, he tried to introduce me to the ocean. The waves were up to my armpits and he tried to get me to swim through one to get past the break. I didn’t make it. I just remember my head lying on the sand and not being able to get up. When the wave finally retreated I pulled myself up and got out of the water as quickly as I could. That was it. From that point on in my life I only went in up to my knees.That’s part of the reason I started this book with both anticipation and fear. The idea of someone actually wanting to ride a 100-foot wave fascinated me, but if a 4-foot wave could unhinge me, what would descriptions of a pounding by a 100-foot wave do?The book did not disappoint. The stories that Susan Casey tells of Laird Hamilton and his buddies taking on these giants of the oceans were breathtaking. I enjoyed learning about the mechanics of tow surfing and getting into the heads of the surfers as they do things that humans are not supposed to be able to do.When I started the book I wondered how much there could be to say about waves, but Casey did a great job mixing up the stories of surfing with interviews with experts studying how these waves are generated and what can be done to help those responsible for steering giant ships through them and rescuing those who get caught in them. Even those chapters kept me up at night wanting to see what happened next.And one other kudo to Casey. This is a book of superlatives. Describing ultimate waves, the scientists that study them, and the brave but wacky surfers that ride them over and over again could have degenerated into a book of clichés, but Casey didn’t let that happen. She did a great job keeping the similes and metaphors fresh throughout. Great book! Highly recommended!more
This is a book about surfing. It's a book about surfing at the extremes of human ability. The people Casey encounters are crazy in an admirable kind of way - they are utterly dedicated to the experience of surfing big waves and are willing to suffer pain, injury, even death in to achieve the experience.The book has a few historic anecdotes and some weak science (not the author's fault, wave science requires serious math), but its strength is the depiction of the people and places involved in the quest to find and surf the biggest wave humanly possible. Worth reading.more
I normally LOVE books about the ocean, ships, or basically anything nautical......but I couldn't get into this one. From the looks of the reviews below, I'm alone on this one, but it just didn't interest me as much as I thought it would. Sure, the descriptions of the big wave surfers and their dare devil rides were fascinating, but the rest of the book wasn't nearly as gripping. I found myself losing focus pretty early on.This is the first book of Casey's that I've read, so maybe I'll try another one and see how that goes. But as of now, The Wave is not a book I'll be rereading anytime soon.more
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