Reader reviews for Paradiso

This part works beautifully as a counterpart to the Inferno -- rrrrrrright up until the part where he decides that calling something indescribable is a substitute for descriptions.I mean, who does he think he is, Lovecraft?
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As I recall, this one kind of dragged. Or maybe it got a bit too religious for me.
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The Divine Comedy epitomized medieval attitudes. From historical perspectives, this work serves as a window into the mentality of late middle ages in Italy, on the brink of the Renaissance. Scholastic thinking informs Dante's approach.
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Although, the weakest of the three, Paradiso is still quite amazing for its portrayal of heaven in all its layered complexity. Naturally it is not as vexing or interesting at Purgatorio or Hell but still interesting to see who Dante wanted to place there. Plus, the ending is just hilarious. Again, this translation is great. The Hollander's have outdone themselves. I wonder what they do now.
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Eh, this book was the least interesting of [book: The Divine Comedy] to me. Like [book: Purgatorio], it had some beautiful imagery, but just got pretty boring.
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Of the 3 parts this is the least interesting. I know Dante comes from the 13th and 14th centuries and this may seem unfair but it left me with visions of Mussolini styled fascist spectacles. Too overwrought and too syncophantic for my blood--what is left is Dante's talent and beautiful use of language which is something but going to Hell and Purgatory is a lot more worthwhile than going to Heaven in this case.
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I have not read a huge number of translations of Dante, but of the one's that I've read Musa's is by far the best. Extremely readable but also quite complex. I would recommend this translation to anyone.
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Not the correct edition, since I don't know who the translator of my copy was. My apologies.

For some reason, I found Paradise harder to read than the other two sections. Still, well worth the effort for the beautiful language, and how it makes other people's references to Dante fall into place!
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I read this for my Medieval Intellectual History class. I found it fascinating, especially as a meditation on relationship between Dante the Christian and Dante the poet and where they overlap and where they don’t and how the shaping of the identity of one ties into the shaping of the identity of the other. Also, it was odd to read it while finishing my thesis, because now I think I could write an essay about the ways in which the Paradiso shaped Monna Innominata. [April 2011]

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(Review is of the Penguin Classics translation by Mark Musa, and applies to all three volumes, Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradisio) I would not think to quibble with reviewing Dante himself - Dante is a master, and doesn't need my endorsement. I will say, however, that Musa's translation is an exceptionally sensitive one, and his comprehensive notes are an invaluable aid to the reader less familiar with Dante's broad spheres of reference. Musa is clearly a devoted scholar of Dante, and his concern for Dante's original meaning and tone is evident. This is one of the best translations of The Comedia available.
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