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From the Publisher

The first book to present medical evidence that mineral springs can prevent and cure disease--and to tell you which spas are most effective

• Lists more than 200 of the best hot springs and mineral springs in the world and the health conditions best treated at each, with a special emphasis on springs in the U.S. and Canada

• Reviews additional healing techniques that best complement bathing in and drinking medicinal waters--such as acupuncture, homeopathy, fasting programs, and fitness training

• Includes photos of everything from famous spas to little-known hot springs

The Fountain of Youth does exist! Author Nathaniel Altman shows that "taking the waters" is a powerful healing tool that rejuvenates the body and prevents a host of illnesses.  Until now, it's been the best-kept secret for promoting and maintaining health and vitality.

The use of natural mineral spring water for the prevention and cure of disease dates back 5000 years to the Bronze Age. Hot springs reached their heyday in the United States in the latter part of the 19th century and were well attended until the early 1940s. Balneotherapy--using natural mineral spring water for the prevention and cure of disease--continued to thrive elsewhere in the world and is making a big comeback in the United States. It is an accepted form of mainstream medicine in Europe and Japan, where an abundance of medical evidence shows that in addition to relieving stress, certain mineral waters can help the body heal itself from heart, liver, and kidney problems, skin diseases, asthma, digestive disorders, arthritis, and a host of other health problems.
Published: Inner Traditions on
ISBN: 9781594775437
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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