PIAGET'S CONCEPT OF FORMAL OPERATIONAL REASONING AND WHOLE BRAIN FUNCTION: EVIDENCE FROM EEG ALPHA COHERENCE DURING TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION

by John W. Sorflaten

An Abstract Of a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements  for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Education (Instructional Design and Technology) in the Graduate College of The University of Iowa

May 1994

Thesis co­supervisors: Professor Barry Bratton Professor Darrell G. Phillips

1

ABSTRACT No clear relationships have been drawn between Piaget’s concept of formal  operation reasoning and neuropsychological models of brain function such as left­right  hemisphere specialization.  At least one popular science educator suggests that formal  reasoning is solely a left­hemisphere function and fails to tap aptitudes for right  hemisphere intuitive and metaphoric thought.  On the other hand, Piaget’s writings  describe the “structured whole” and the need for “all possibilities” in a way that suggests  that formal reasoning indeed requires right as well as left hemisphere functions. An EEG alpha coherence index of F3F4 + F3C3 + F4C4 ­ O1O2 (FLR­O index)  was measured on 58 college students during a “standard cognitive state,” Transcendental  Meditation (TM). Greater mean FLR­O indexes were found for groups scored formal on  three clinically administered tasks: Shadows (testing for quantitative proportional  reasoning), Correlations, and Chemicals Combinations. The group scored formal on the  Communicating Vessels tasks, a test of the INRC group schema, demonstrated  significantly greater (p ≤ .05) FLR­O index than the non­formal group. As expected,  significantly more males passed the Shadows task than females.  Surprisingly, no  significant interaction was found between gender and task on the FLR­O index or any of  the individual derivations. These results give weak but positive support for the hypothesis. However,  additional support was found when studying the neuropsychological correlates of a 

2 formal operational “stage.” Subjects failing all four tasks were considered to lack the  logical relations characteristic of the formal stage. Fail group subjects measured less on  the FLR­O index than subjects who passed at least one of the tasks (p = .0558, and p =  .050 when adjusted for age and gender). These results lend credence to the hypothesis that  formal reasoning is a “whole­brain” activity. In a speculating on neuropsychological theory of equilibration and development  of formal reasoning, I suggest that improvement in frontal executive control enhances pre­ attentive orientation towards a task and simultaneous pre­attentive habituation to  distraction. This dual process supports accomodation and permits the cycle of  differentiation and integration to continue unimpeded leading, ultimately, to formal  operational reasoning. I suggest that EEG alpha anterior coherence represents temporal  and spatial coordination that supports improved information transfer and global brain  functioning. Abstract approved: _______________________________ Thesis supervisor _______________________________ Title and department _______________________________ Date

_______________________________ Thesis co­supervisor _______________________________ Title and department

3

_______________________________ Date

.

 

PIAGET’S CONCEPT OF FORMAL OPERATIONAL REASONING AND WHOLE BRAIN FUNCTION: EVIDENCE FROM  EEG ALPHA COHERENCE DURING TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION

by John W. Sorflaten

A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Education (Instructional Design and Technology) in the Graduate College of The University of Iowa

May 1994

 

Thesis co­supervisors: Professor Barry Bratton Professor Darrell G. Phillips

 

Copyright by JOHN W. SORFLATEN 1994 All Rights Reserved

Graduate College The University of Iowa Iowa City, Iowa

CERTIFICATE OF APPROVAL _____________________ PH.D. THESIS __________ This is to certify that the Ph.D. thesis of John W. Sorflaten has been approved by the Examining Committee for the thesis requirement for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Education at the May 1994 graduation

Thesis committee: ____________________________________ Thesis supervisor

____________________________________ Thesis co­supervisor

____________________________________ Member

____________________________________ Member

_____________________________________ Member _____________________________________ Member

2

3

To the memory of my mother and to my father.

4

5

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi The Science of Being and Art of Living 6 .  This inevitable flow of nature is a flow into which  the individual can consciously put himself to let nature work on him for his evolution in  accord with the natural flow of cosmic evolution.  All the laws of nature  function in the direction of evolution.There is no greater kindness than the kindness of nature.

7 .

 and who  insightfully advised me on the Piagetian theory and protocols. whatever it may have been. who graciously extended the  welcome and time of the U.  Jim Shymansky.ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to thank all those who have encouraged and supported this work. thesis supervisor. and Dr. Other members from the Division of Curriculum and Instruction include Dr. home of the  Instructional Design and Technology graduate program as well as the Visual Scholars  Program. the group of faculty advisors  who have encouraged me and who truly helped me leverage my own ideas.”  They funded the Visual Scholars Program at the  University of Iowa. and Dr.  They gave  me a place to stand. Curriculum and Supervision. led me to pursue and complete the Ph.  My parents. Science Education.  Special  thanks to Dr. of I. in the spirit of enlightened  science education.” whatever my  definition might be. thinking. which in turn provided me the time and resources to pursue research  into the “role of visuals in learning. Barry Bratton. and an immovable pivot. Darrell Phillips. let me chart my own path through the territory I chose to study. the thesis co­supervisor.  8 . and communication. Archimedes claimed he could move the world if he were given a place to stand. a  sufficiently long lever. who engendered that primal  cause. These  include Dr. of course. Science Education Department to this study.D.  I whole­heartedly thank the Eastman Kodak Company whose far­ sighted grant provided the “pivot. Lowell Schoer both from the  Division of Quantitative and Psychological Foundations of Education.  The lever in this analogy is.  I also thank my other  dissertation committee members who reviewed this work and. John McLure.

 but also with the right feeling behind the ideas. Last. who provided not only friendly  encouragement. Don Walter (now deceased). my heartfelt appreciation to Dr. Theresa Olson­ Sorflaten. Robert Thatcher.  Special thanks to Dr. William Coffman and Lida Cochran.  Over time. and Susanne Arass­ Vesely.  The award included funds toward research  expenses. Thor Yamada from the U. I wish to express my deepest appreciation to my wife. which honored me with the yearly local Young Researchers  award for an outstanding dissertation topic. but also valuable time during work hours for completing this work. William Vesely.  Also.  Inc. I extend my gratitude to Dr. Alan Gevins. Director at the time I was selected for the program. Kathryn  Alessandrini Lutz who served several years as the Director of the Visual Scholars  Program and Dr. Bikar Randhawa. who nurtured  my own progress even as they nurtured the Visual Scholars Program. and even be completed. who took time from his busy schedule to make a  delightful visit at my request. President of Human Factors International.   I also thank  the students who participated in the study.  This includes Dr. Additionally.All the above are from the College of Education. 9 . I’ve had the chance to meet with  various EEG authorities who graciously answered my questions and made me feel “at  home” including Drs. The “outside faculty” member of my  committee is Dr. of Iowa Hospital’s EEG facilities. who supervised the EEG recording at Maharishi International University as part  of their responsibilities in the International Center for Scientific Research. whose love and devotion allowed me to bring this work to a close. not only with the  right ideas. Thanks to each of my Visual Scholars Program advisors for believing that this  study could be interesting.  I also thank the Iowa City  Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa. Dulio  Giannitrapani and Hilton Stowell. and my employer over the last 6 years. Eric Schaffer.

................... 1 Justification .......4 Piaget’s Four Stages of Development.....................................................5 First Three Stages.................. 1 Theory................................. 14 Implications of Frontal Functions for the OR and Adaptive “Stability .....................................................................................................................................................7 Cognitive Evolution: Experience (Objects and Logico­ Mathematical)......9 Cognitive Evolution—Equilibration.................................9 The Direction of Cognitive Growth ­ Greater Equilibrium ...........................................................................................................10 10 .................................................................................................................................6 Developing the Structured Whole..............................................................................................................7 Cognitive Evolution—Social Transmission..................................................................................................... 210 CHAPTER INTRODUCTION 1 General Rationale ...............................................................8 Cognitive Evolution—Biological Maturation...........................................................................................................................5 The Fourth Stage: Formal Operational Reasoning......................... 180 Orienting and the “Transcending Reflex ..................TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Agreement on Value of “Wholeness ..............................................

........................................... 29 Reviews of Research on Formal Operational Tasks ......................................21 Statement of Research Hypotheses.................................34 Elementary and Middle School Subjects.............................................................................12 The Measurable Left Hemisphere............14 The Structured Whole and EEG Coherence......14 Agreement on Value of “Wholeness ...................... and  Achievement .................................................................... 33 Projection of Shadows Task...................... Gender................................................................................................Greater Adaptability....... 24 Reviews of Piaget’s Equilibration Model ................... Group Tests .......10 Logic and the Left Hemisphere ­ Fact vs...................................23 REVIEW OF RELEVANT LITERATURE 24 Writings of Jean Piaget .............................................................................................17 EEG Alpha Coherence and Psychological Measures.......15 EEG Coherence as Measure of Whole­Brain Integration ..................... Fancy.....33 College and 12th Grade Subjects.................... 29 Replication vs........................................................................................................................................... Spatial Skills................................................................................................................................................................. 33 Research with the University of Iowa Grouping Model. 14 EEG Studies of Piagetian Theory.......................18 Statement of the Problem.....................................................41 11 ........................

........................................................................43 Other Research on Spatial Reasoning and Gender................69 METHODS AND PROCEDURES 72 Pilot Study .................................................................... 51 University of Iowa Studies...................................................60 Anterior Coherence Positively Related to Intelligence............... 72 Sample Selection .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................52 Combinations of Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies Task ..................................... 60 Posterior Coherence Inversely Related to Intelligence...................... 56 EEG Coherence Studies .......................................................................Summary..........59 Studies Related to EEG Alpha Coherence and Intelligence.............51 Other Research Using the Correlations Task................................................ 53 Communicating Vessels Task ............................65 TM­Related Anterior Coherence Changes.65 EEG Alpha Coherence and Frontal Lobe Activation................. 58 Standard Cognitive State (Transcendental Meditation) and  EEG Coherence Studies........................................................ 73 12 .................................................................... 56 Brain Localization and Piagetian Studies .............43 Other Research Using the Shadows Task....................................................................................................47 Correlations Task ...................................

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................85 Projection of Shadows Task ........................87 Instructions.................73 Procedures.. 75 Chemicals Task ..........................78 Equipment............................................. 81 Communicating Vessels Protocol.........................................................................................78 Instructions.......................................... 75 Task Selection Criteria ..............83 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Communicating Vessels  Task..................................74 Task Measurement ........................82 Equipment........... 86 Projection of Shadows Protocol.............................................EEG Measurement .......................................................................................79 Narrative Scoring Criteria for Colored and Colorless  Chemical Bodies Task....................................................................................................91 Correlations Task 13 .........................................................87 Equipment...............................87 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Projection of Shadows Task .......................................................................................... 73 Equipment....................82 Instructions.............................................................................................................................................80 Communicating Vessels Task ................................................................................................................................................................... 77 Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies Protocol....

.............................................................................................................. 96 RESULTS 98 Results of Subject Selection ................................................102 Summary of Data .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................92 Equipment........................... 107 Analysis 2 ­ Relationship Between Gender and Task Performance ..........................................................................102 Summary of EEG Alpha Coherence Measures............................................................92 Instructions.. 102 Summary of Task Scores..................................................................... 101 Task Scoring Reliability............................................................................................................. 91 Correlations Protocol............................101 EEG Artifact Analysis.................................................................................................................................96 Analysis of Data ............................................................................................................. 99 Measurement Reliability .......... 115 Analysis 2 ­ Relationship Between Coherence Index and Task  Performance 14 ...........107 Analysis 1 ­ Unitary Composition of Task Index ....................... 98 Sample ......................................................................................................................92 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Correlations Task.........................................

........................................... Without Regard to  Task.................. by Gender.............................................................................. 146 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION 148 Review of Purpose and Procedures ................................................................. 119 Follow­up Analysis 1 ­ Analysis of Differences in Various  Coherence Measures Between Pass and Fail Subjects .................. 148 15 .................................................145 Follow­up Analysis 4 ­ Tests for Relationships Between  Preferences and Other Variables ...................................... 124 Follow­up Analysis 2: Tests for Relationships Between Preferences  and Task Performance .......................... 135 Differences in Preference.........144 Conclusions Regarding Gender.........135 Differences Between Males and Females Within Each Task  (Pass Groups Tested Separately From Fail Groups)................. Task Performance.......................................................................................................................................................................138 Differences Between Pass and Fail Groups (Female Groups  Tested Separately From Male Groups)..... 133 Follow­up Analysis 3: Tests for Relationships Between Preferences  and Gender ........................................................... 116 Analysis 3 ­ Relationship between Coherence Index and Task  Performance Controlling for Age and Gender ............................................................................................................... and  Preference Measures...........................................................................................................................................

..................... 161 Follow­up Analysis of Relationships Between Tasks and Other  EEG Measures ...................................................159 Task and EEG Alpha Coherence Index Relationships .......................... 166 Summary of Follow­up Analyses in Various Coherence  Measures: The Effect of the TM Instructional Set..............155 Inhelder and Piaget.................................................................................................................................................................................. 151 Proportion Passing the Tasks.151 Formal Stage Criterion.................................................................................................................................................................................... 172 Regulation of Selective Attention and the Mechanics of TM .....................................................156 EEG Coherence Measures.......................................173 Cognitive Effects of the Practice of TM............................................153 Combinations of Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies  Task.......................................................154 Communicating Vessels Task.............169 Limitations of the Study ......................................Discussion of the Data ................175 Development of ORs to Significant Events and Habituation to  Distraction...............................................................151 Correlations Task................................................................. 170 Long­term Effects of the Practice of Transcendental Meditation on  Cognitive Functioning: Toward an Organicist Reduction  Theory of Piaget’s Constructivist Principles .............................................................154 Hierarchical Ordering of Task Difficulty...........................177 Implications of Frontal Functions for the OR and Adaptive “Stability 16 ..........................................................................................................................................................151 Shadows Task..............................................

............................................................................................................ 200 The Question of Bilateral Occipital Coherence.....................................................204 TOWARD A NEUROPSYCHOLOGY OF EQUILIBRATION   210 Orienting and the “Transcending Reflex ..................................................................................191 Summary of the Theory.......................200 The Question of Information Transfer....... 226 A Role for Coherence in Accommodation and Reequilibration   ............................................................... 222 Decentration Consists of Resistance to Involuntary ORs  . 214 ORs Support Cognitive Success ......................................................................................................................................... 229 Relationships Between EEG Alpha Coherence and Increased EPs  for Voluntary ORs 17 .............................................................................219 IQ and Evoked Potentials (EPs) in Relation to Orienting ......................215 Stable Evoked Potentials Support ORs .....................................................................................................................183 Educational Implications of theTheory................................................................................................................................ 210 The Adaptive Significance of the Orienting Response  .................... 180 “Integration of the Transcended in its Transcendence........................................................ 220 Gating Out Distractions ........................196 Recommendations for Future Research ............................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................9 The Direction of Cognitive Growth ­ Greater Equilibrium ... 1 Theory........6 Developing the Structured Whole.........................7 Cognitive Evolution—Social Transmission....................................... Fancy........................................................................................9 Cognitive Evolution—Equilibration..........................................................4 Piaget’s Four Stages of Development...............................12 Page 18 ......5 The Fourth Stage: Formal Operational Reasoning.... 232 Conclusion–A Neuropsychology of Equilibration Processes in the  Context of TM .. 234 LIST OF TABLES Table INTRODUCTION 1 General Rationale ................................................10 Logic and the Left Hemisphere ­ Fact vs..............8 Cognitive Evolution—Biological Maturation...........................................................................................................................................................5 First Three Stages......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 1 Justification ..................................................................................7 Cognitive Evolution: Experience (Objects and Logico­ Mathematical)..........................10 Greater Adaptability..........

...... 33 Projection of Shadows Task..........................................................................................43 Other Research Using the Shadows Task............................. and  Achievement ........................................................................................................................................................ 24 Reviews of Piaget’s Equilibration Model ...........14 Agreement on Value of “Wholeness ..............14 The Structured Whole and EEG Coherence.................................................. Spatial Skills...................................................................................................................... 33 Research with the University of Iowa Grouping Model.....................23 REVIEW OF RELEVANT LITERATURE 24 Writings of Jean Piaget ...........................21 Statement of Research Hypotheses......................15 EEG Coherence as Measure of Whole­Brain Integration .......The Measurable Left Hemisphere................................................................ 14 EEG Studies of Piagetian Theory...........41 Summary.....................34 Elementary and Middle School Subjects...........................17 EEG Alpha Coherence and Psychological Measures...................................... Gender..................................................................................................................................18 Statement of the Problem............... 29 Replication vs........................................................................... Group Tests ...............................................33 College and 12th Grade Subjects..........................................................43 19 .............................. 29 Reviews of Research on Formal Operational Tasks ...

.............................. 56 Brain Localization and Piagetian Studies ............................................................65 EEG Alpha Coherence and Frontal Lobe Activation.......................69 METHODS AND PROCEDURES 72 Pilot Study ....47 Correlations Task ............. 56 EEG Coherence Studies .................... 58 Standard Cognitive State (Transcendental Meditation) and  EEG Coherence Studies..........................................................................52 Combinations of Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies Task .......................................................60 Anterior Coherence Positively Related to Intelligence................................................................. 51 University of Iowa Studies.......................................................................59 Studies Related to EEG Alpha Coherence and Intelligence...................................................................................................51 Other Research Using the Correlations Task. 73 EEG Measurement 20 .........................................................65 TM­Related Anterior Coherence Changes.......................................................................................................... 53 Communicating Vessels Task ...................................................................... 72 Sample Selection .. 60 Posterior Coherence Inversely Related to Intelligence................................................................................................................Other Research on Spatial Reasoning and Gender.............

.......................................83 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Communicating Vessels  Task................................................................................ 81 Communicating Vessels Protocol........87 Instructions..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................74 Task Measurement .................................73 Procedures..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................78 Equipment..91 Correlations Task 21 ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................87 Equipment................. 86 Projection of Shadows Protocol............................................................................................82 Equipment...........................................................................................79 Narrative Scoring Criteria for Colored and Colorless  Chemical Bodies Task......................85 Projection of Shadows Task ...................................80 Communicating Vessels Task ...................................... 77 Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies Protocol........................ 75 Chemicals Task ........................................................78 Instructions.. 75 Task Selection Criteria .......87 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Projection of Shadows Task .................................. 73 Equipment..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................82 Instructions...................

....................................................Data Summary: Number and Proportion of Subjects Passing Each Task............................................................................................................................ 91 Correlations Protocol........................Percentage Agreement on Pass/Fail Ratings By Two Independent Judges (N=14) ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................96 Analysis of Data ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 99 Measurement Reliability ................................... 98 Sample .......... 102 Summary of Task Scores................Description of Color Schemes for Correlation Task............103 3.....101 EEG Artifact Analysis.........102 2.....................................................................................................................................................105 Summary of EEG Alpha Coherence Measures......... the  Combination of Tasks................................... 96 RESULTS 98 Results of Subject Selection .................Data Summary:  Number of Subjects Scoring Each Level For Each of the Four  Tasks and the Formal Stage Criterion................95 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Correlations Task.....................92 Equipment................................92 1....................................107 Analysis 1 ­ Unitary Composition of Task Index 22 . 101 Task Scoring Reliability..................................92 Instructions.....................102 Summary of Data ....... and the Formal Stage Criterion.............................................................104 4.......................................

..............................................................................110 Analysis 2 ­ Relationship Between Gender and Task Performance ...................... 124 12....120 11............................... 115 Analysis 2 ­ Relationship Between Coherence Index and Task  Performance ................Analysis of Relative Difficulty of Task Pairs: McNemar Chi­Square Test for the  Equality of Two Correlated Proportions (with Bonferroni  Correction)...............127 13.Results of Tests of the Assumption of Homogeneity of Slopes for Age as a  Covariant with Task and Gender.......118 Analysis 3 ­ Relationship between Coherence Index and Task  Performance Controlling for Age and Gender ................Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Coherence Index Means between  Pass and Fail Groups.. 116 8.................................... 107  5........................................................................................109 '7......117 9.....................................................................................................................................................122 Follow­up Analysis 1 ­ Analysis of Differences in Various  Coherence Measures Between Pass and Fail Subjects ...................................................................................Data Summary:  EEG Data By Gender ... 119 10............  Controlling for Age and Gender......................................................................................108  6........Results of Analysis of Covariance in Coherence Index Between Tasks..................................................................Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Vessels Task Pass and Fail Groups*...................................................................................Data Summary:  EEG Data By Total Subjects......Analysis of Differences in Male and Female Performance on the Four Tasks.........................................128 23 .........................Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Formal Stage Criterion Pass and Fail Groups*....................

..........Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Correlations Task Pass and Fail Groups*. 146 21... 133 Follow­up Analysis 3: Tests for Relationships Between Preferences  and Gender ................................................................140 20......................136 18....................14...Results of Tests of Differences in Preference Measures Between Task Pass and  Fail Groups..................................................................................................131 Follow­up Analysis 2: Tests for Relationships Between Preferences  and Task Performance ............144 Conclusions Regarding Gender..........................129 15.145 Follow­up Analysis 4 ­ Tests for Relationships Between  Preferences and Other Variables ................................................................................................... by Gender...130 16.........................................Results of Tests of Gender Differences in Preference Measures Taken  Separately for Each Task Pass Group....... and  Preference Measures...............Results of Tests for Relationships between Preference Measures and Non­task  Variables: EEG Coherence Derivations and Ratios........................................ Without Regard to  Task....................................................................................................................................138 Differences Between Males and Females Within Each Task  (Pass Groups Tested Separately From Fail Groups)................................ 135 Differences in Preference...138 19..........................................Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Shadows Task Pass and Fail Groups*..........Results of Tests of Differences in Preference Measures Between Male and  Females ...Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Combination Task Pass and Fail Groups*..142 Differences Between Pass and Fail Groups (Female Groups  Tested Separately From Male Groups)............................................135 17...........................................Results of Tests of Gender Differences in Preference Measures Taken  Separately for Each Task Fail Group..147 24 ............... Task Performance..........

.......169 Limitations of the Study ....159 22............................................................................................... 166 24...................... 151 Proportion Passing the Tasks.......................................................................... Wallace...................................................................................156 EEG Coherence Measures...............................151 Correlations Task. and Wallace  (1983).......................153 Combinations of Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies  Task...........160 23..........Coherence Results for Nidich...........................................................168 Summary of Follow­up Analyses in Various Coherence  Measures: The Effect of the TM Instructional Set........................................................................................DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION 148 Review of Purpose and Procedures ........................151 Formal Stage Criterion...............161 Task and EEG Alpha Coherence Index Relationships ................................. 170 25 ..Results Summary: EEG Component Measures By Task for p Values Less than  ......... and Dillbeck (1982) .151 Shadows Task........................................................... Ryncarz.................................18 for All Subjects Together............................................................................................................................................... Abrams.... 148 Discussion of the Data ....................................................................................... Orme­Johnson.........Coherence Results for Orme­Johnson......... 161 Follow­up Analysis of Relationships Between Tasks and Other  EEG Measures .........................................................154 Hierarchical Ordering of Task Difficulty.154 Communicating Vessels Task..............................................155 Inhelder and Piaget...........................................................................................

.................. 172 Regulation of Selective Attention and the Mechanics of TM ............................................... 220 26 .............. 210 The Adaptive Significance of the Orienting Response  .......196 Recommendations for Future Research .200 The Question of Information Transfer...............................................................................215 Stable Evoked Potentials Support ORs ................................................................. 214 ORs Support Cognitive Success ..........................................Long­term Effects of the Practice of Transcendental Meditation on  Cognitive Functioning: Toward an Organicist Reduction  Theory of Piaget’s Constructivist Principles .................................................219 IQ and Evoked Potentials (EPs) in Relation to Orienting .............................183 Educational Implications of theTheory.....................................................................173 Cognitive Effects of the Practice of TM....................................................................................................................................................................175 Development of ORs to Significant Events and Habituation to  Distraction............................................................................................. 200 The Question of Bilateral Occipital Coherence..204 TOWARD A NEUROPSYCHOLOGY OF EQUILIBRATION   210 Orienting and the “Transcending Reflex ..................................................................................................................................................... 180 “Integration of the Transcended in its Transcendence...........................................................................191 Summary of the Theory...177 Implications of Frontal Functions for the OR and Adaptive “Stability ......................................................................................................................................................

...........6 Developing the Structured Whole..............7 27 Page .........................................................................................................................Gating Out Distractions ...............................................................................................................................5 First Three Stages....................... 234 LIST OF FIGURES Figure INTRODUCTION 1 General Rationale ......... 1 Justification .......... 222 Decentration Consists of Resistance to Involuntary ORs  ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 226 A Role for Coherence in Accommodation and Reequilibration   ........................................................................5 The Fourth Stage: Formal Operational Reasoning......... 229 Relationships Between EEG Alpha Coherence and Increased EPs  for Voluntary ORs .................................................. 1 Theory........................................................................... 232 Conclusion–A Neuropsychology of Equilibration Processes in the  Context of TM ............................................................................................................4 Piaget’s Four Stages of Development...........................................................................

............. Group Tests .Cognitive Evolution: Experience (Objects and Logico­ Mathematical)........................................................................................................................................................15 EEG Coherence as Measure of Whole­Brain Integration ..................... 33 28 ...................18 Statement of the Problem.................................................9 Cognitive Evolution—Equilibration...........................................................14 The Structured Whole and EEG Coherence..14 Agreement on Value of “Wholeness ........................................................................................................................23 REVIEW OF RELEVANT LITERATURE 24 Writings of Jean Piaget ............ 29 Reviews of Research on Formal Operational Tasks ...........................................................................................7 Cognitive Evolution—Social Transmission......... Fancy..........................10 Greater Adaptability............................................................................................21 Statement of Research Hypotheses........................................................................................9 The Direction of Cognitive Growth ­ Greater Equilibrium .... 14 EEG Studies of Piagetian Theory...........................................................................17 EEG Alpha Coherence and Psychological Measures.............................................................10 Logic and the Left Hemisphere ­ Fact vs.................... 29 Replication vs... 24 Reviews of Piaget’s Equilibration Model .12 The Measurable Left Hemisphere..................................................................................................................................................8 Cognitive Evolution—Biological Maturation..........

........................................................... 33 Research with the University of Iowa Grouping Model............. 56 Brain Localization and Piagetian Studies ..........69 METHODS AND PROCEDURES 72 29 .............65 TM­Related Anterior Coherence Changes....... 60 Posterior Coherence Inversely Related to Intelligence... 58 Standard Cognitive State (Transcendental Meditation) and  EEG Coherence Studies................................43 Other Research Using the Shadows Task.............................................................................................. 53 Communicating Vessels Task .................................43 Other Research on Spatial Reasoning and Gender...........................................................................52 Combinations of Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies Task . and  Achievement ...................................................... Gender...................33 College and 12th Grade Subjects........................................................................................................................Projection of Shadows Task...................................... 56 EEG Coherence Studies ............. 51 University of Iowa Studies............. Spatial Skills.........................................................................................................................................................65 EEG Alpha Coherence and Frontal Lobe Activation..................41 Summary...34 Elementary and Middle School Subjects..............................................51 Other Research Using the Correlations Task...................................59 Studies Related to EEG Alpha Coherence and Intelligence...................................47 Correlations Task ..........................................60 Anterior Coherence Positively Related to Intelligence.....................

................................................. 73 EEG Measurement .. 81 Communicating Vessels Protocol........ 75 Chemicals Task ............................................................................................................................................ 77 Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies Protocol..................................................................................................................79 Narrative Scoring Criteria for Colored and Colorless  Chemical Bodies Task.................78 Instructions.........................................................................74 Task Measurement ........78 Equipment..................................................................................................................................................85 Projection of Shadows Task ....................Pilot Study ..... 86 30 ....................................................................................................................................................................83 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Communicating Vessels  Task........................................................................................................................................................................... 73 Equipment.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................82 Instructions..........................73 Procedures...................................................................................80 Communicating Vessels Task ................................................................................................ 75 Task Selection Criteria ......................82 Equipment............... 72 Sample Selection ..........................................

......................................101 EEG Artifact Analysis......................102 2............87 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Projection of Shadows Task .......87 Instructions..................................................87 Equipment.............................. 96 RESULTS 98 Results of Subject Selection .........................................Projection of Shadows Protocol...................92 Instructions.................. 99 Measurement Reliability ........................................................................ 91 Correlations Protocol..............................................................................................................................................96 Analysis of Data ........................................................ 101 Task Scoring Reliability........................................92 Equipment...................................................................................................................................................................................... 102 Summary of Task Scores..103 31 ........................................................................................................................................................................92 1........................................................................................................................................................................................Percentage Agreement on Pass/Fail Ratings By Two Independent Judges (N=14) .......102 Summary of Data .........................................................Description of Color Schemes for Correlation Task...............................................91 Correlations Task ...................................................................................................... 98 Sample ......................95 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Correlations Task......................................................................

........................Data Summary:  Number of Subjects Scoring Each Level For Each of the Four  Tasks and the Formal Stage Criterion............Data Summary:  EEG Data By Gender ............................... and the Formal Stage Criterion....................104 4... 116 8......................................................................109 '7.........................................................................................................3.Analysis of Relative Difficulty of Task Pairs: McNemar Chi­Square Test for the  Equality of Two Correlated Proportions (with Bonferroni  Correction)......Results of Tests of the Assumption of Homogeneity of Slopes for Age as a  Covariant with Task and Gender...............................................................120 11.Data Summary:  EEG Data By Total Subjects.......... 119 10..........................................................110 Analysis 2 ­ Relationship Between Gender and Task Performance .......................................................................................................................122 Follow­up Analysis 1 ­ Analysis of Differences in Various  Coherence Measures Between Pass and Fail Subjects .................Analysis of Differences in Male and Female Performance on the Four Tasks......Data Summary: Number and Proportion of Subjects Passing Each Task..........................Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Coherence Index Means between  Pass and Fail Groups..............105 Summary of EEG Alpha Coherence Measures...............................................118 Analysis 3 ­ Relationship between Coherence Index and Task  Performance Controlling for Age and Gender ................. 124 32 ...............Results of Analysis of Covariance in Coherence Index Between Tasks....................... the  Combination of Tasks....... 115 Analysis 2 ­ Relationship Between Coherence Index and Task  Performance .........................................108  6................  Controlling for Age and Gender...117 9............................................................................................107 Analysis 1 ­ Unitary Composition of Task Index ......................................................................................... 107  5...

..........Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Vessels Task Pass and Fail Groups*............136 18..............................................12................................................................................................Results of Tests of Differences in Preference Measures Between Male and  Females ........129 15..............Results of Tests of Gender Differences in Preference Measures Taken  Separately for Each Task Fail Group...........140 20.....145 Follow­up Analysis 4 ­ Tests for Relationships Between  Preferences and Other Variables 33 ...........................Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Formal Stage Criterion Pass and Fail Groups*.....128 14...........................130 16..........................................................................................144 Conclusions Regarding Gender......................... 135 Differences in Preference...............138 Differences Between Males and Females Within Each Task  (Pass Groups Tested Separately From Fail Groups)..142 Differences Between Pass and Fail Groups (Female Groups  Tested Separately From Male Groups)...............................................Results of Tests of Differences in Preference Measures Between Task Pass and  Fail Groups..........................................Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Correlations Task Pass and Fail Groups*.......135 17...........Results of Tests of Gender Differences in Preference Measures Taken  Separately for Each Task Pass Group.. by Gender................................................................131 Follow­up Analysis 2: Tests for Relationships Between Preferences  and Task Performance .............. Without Regard to  Task............Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Combination Task Pass and Fail Groups*..127 13.........................................................138 19.............Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Shadows Task Pass and Fail Groups*...... and  Preference Measures...... Task Performance..................................... 133 Follow­up Analysis 3: Tests for Relationships Between Preferences  and Gender .............

..... 166 24....18 for All Subjects Together...................................................................................Results of Tests for Relationships between Preference Measures and Non­task  Variables: EEG Coherence Derivations and Ratios.................. 161 Follow­up Analysis of Relationships Between Tasks and Other  EEG Measures ........................ and Dillbeck (1982) ................................................161 Task and EEG Alpha Coherence Index Relationships .......................................151 Shadows Task....................................................................................................................................................................... 148 Discussion of the Data ................................................................... Orme­Johnson..................... 146 21.... 151 Proportion Passing the Tasks............................................................................156 EEG Coherence Measures.Coherence Results for Nidich.............................................155 Inhelder and Piaget...... Ryncarz.................................................................................................................................................................................154 Hierarchical Ordering of Task Difficulty........................................ and Wallace  (1983)........ Abrams....................................... Wallace.........................168 34 ..............................................................................151 Correlations Task.....................159 22....................................154 Communicating Vessels Task..............147 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION 148 Review of Purpose and Procedures ..................................160 23...........................Coherence Results for Orme­Johnson..151 Formal Stage Criterion..153 Combinations of Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies  Task......................Results Summary: EEG Component Measures By Task for p Values Less than  ..............

............................................................................200 The Question of Information Transfer......................173 Cognitive Effects of the Practice of TM.........................................Summary of Follow­up Analyses in Various Coherence  Measures: The Effect of the TM Instructional Set.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................191 Summary of the Theory...169 Limitations of the Study ...................................................... 170 Long­term Effects of the Practice of Transcendental Meditation on  Cognitive Functioning: Toward an Organicist Reduction  Theory of Piaget’s Constructivist Principles ..................................................175 Development of ORs to Significant Events and Habituation to  Distraction............................. 214 35 .....204 TOWARD A NEUROPSYCHOLOGY OF EQUILIBRATION   210 Orienting and the “Transcending Reflex ...................................................... 210 The Adaptive Significance of the Orienting Response  .............................................177 Implications of Frontal Functions for the OR and Adaptive “Stability .......................................................... 180 “Integration of the Transcended in its Transcendence...........................................................183 Educational Implications of theTheory....... 172 Regulation of Selective Attention and the Mechanics of TM ........................................................................196 Recommendations for Future Research ........................................................ 200 The Question of Bilateral Occipital Coherence.....

................... 222 Decentration Consists of Resistance to Involuntary ORs  . 234 36 ........................ORs Support Cognitive Success .................................................................................. 226 A Role for Coherence in Accommodation and Reequilibration   ...............................................................219 IQ and Evoked Potentials (EPs) in Relation to Orienting ............................................................................. 220 Gating Out Distractions ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 232 Conclusion–A Neuropsychology of Equilibration Processes in the  Context of TM .......................................... 229 Relationships Between EEG Alpha Coherence and Increased EPs  for Voluntary ORs .................................................215 Stable Evoked Potentials Support ORs ..............................................................................................

  Indeed it is difficult to imagine that a  relationship does not exist between these two theoretically attractive and empirically  convincing trends.  While no literature has yet developed measures of one theory in terms  of the other. specifically in terms  of hemispheric lateralization of brain function. Bogen. specifically in terms of Piaget’s  theory of formal operational reasoning. although not sufficient. .1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION   General Rationale   The object of this research is to examine the possible relationship between two  major currents of educational theory that have developed over the last two decades. condition for development of formal operational thinking. if not sufficient.  The second trend involves a genetic­ epistemological approach to cognitive development. condition for the  presence of the formal operational stage of logical thought (p. 281). Inhelder and Piaget (1958) expressed the opinion that maturation of the  nervous system must certainly be a necessary.  The  first trend involves a neurophysiological approach to cognitive skills. The primary purpose of this research is to test the hypothesis that some degree of  neurological coordination between the two hemispheres can be defined which is at least a  necessary.   Justification   Research on so­called “split brain” patients began in earnest with publications by  Gazanniga. and Sperry on the effects of surgical sectioning of the corpus  collosum—the nerve fiber bundle which connects the two major masses of brain tissue.

  An entire issue of the UCLA Educator   (1975). they  also presuppose development of neurological functioning as a necessary condition of  rational thinking (Educational Policies Commission. Waber points to evidence that frontal lobe activity modulates left and  right hemisphere biases that lead to differences in “cognitive styles” such as field  dependent vs. edited by M. Inhelder and Piaget postulate an important role for  neurological development in the growth of logical thinking. it belongs to the realm of  .2 Since these studies voluminous research has been done on both sectioned and  normal subjects toward the end of determining hemispheric correlates of psychological  attributes. frontal/posterior and  cortical/subcortcial. Wittrock. one of the  original researchers on split­brain patients found great encouragement for education now  that it has a fact about the brain—lateralization—from which we can begin to  systematically develop educational pedagogy. was devoted to educational applications of lateralization  studies. Waber  (1989) explores the educational implications of not only left and right hemisphere  functioning.  Neurological approaches to educational issues have stimulated wide­spread  interest by educators and researchers since the mid­seventies. independent and impulsive vs.  More recently. 1961).  It should be noted that  logical thought is not solely the province of scientific reasoning. Further interest was exemplified by the International Visual Literacy Association  which devoted its 1979 conference to the theme of integrated brain functioning and the  American Educational Research Association which has a special interest group devoted to  “Mind/Body Education.  Bogen (1975).  To whatever degree that  educators advocate the ability to think rationally as the central goal of education.C. but also two other “axes” of brain function. reflective behaviors. As already mentioned.” including left/right hemisphere studies.

Note that debate can be raised regarding the precise definition of “formal  operation reasoning.  Even more dramatic is the evidence that 50% or more of college undergraduates  may not possess formal operations reasoning (Haley and Good.  1978).3 daily adult logical discourse as well. it will  be important to seek neurological evidence of maturational differences in early college  populations. above and beyond success or failure on a test of a single logical  structure. 1985.  Such reports imply that a subject may not  have attained a “stage” of formal reasoning. Piaget and Garcia. Unruh. p. Failure on any given task should not be taken  as evidence for lack of “formal reasoning. single logical  structure. Therefore.  However.  (Which one should we so privilege?)” (Italics by the author. Piaget has indicated that “the   developmental stages are not established by the development of single logical structures   as such.  Therefore.  1991. Kraft. many high  school students still have not attained the stage of formal operations (Haley and Good. defines a “stage?”  Piaget‘s approach suggests a wider perspective. of which Piaget has identified ten. Dilling. 1976.  one that inquires whether the subject has undergone a re­organization of cognitive  structures in general. such reports are misleading since  often they are based on the proportion of subjects passing a test of a given.  What.”  For example. 1976.  Such evidence may come from studies of hemispheric brain functioning  with special reference to interhemispheric activity and Piagetian stages of logical  development (Dennen. 130). 1976). and for this reason has been adopted as an explicit  educational goal by various educators and curriculum authorities.  1976). ” especially in the context of reports that 50% or more of college  undergraduates may lack formal reasoning. then. Wheatley and Mitchell. an issue arises when after 8 to 10 years of formal education.  Garcia writes “Here we find the core of the problem we are discussing: Each  .

  Piaget and Garcia. time­dependent. p.4 stage cannot be conceived as simply a natural growth of the preceding one.  The skills involved in such “left­hemisphere tasks” tend to reflect  processes associated with linear. p.. there is a convergence of various structural fragments in what we  referred to above as a “structural kernel. Garcia explains: Logical relations are not built in isolation. (Piaget and Garcia. 1991.  This is the thrust of the current study. nor are they constructed all at  once..  It seems reasonable that the  aptitudes used in logical thinking fall somewhere on this left­right hemisphere  . each stage re­ organizes the whole of the instruments already used by the subject” (Italics by the author..” and.(L)ogical relations are slowly being built up as fragments of structure which  are gradually coordinated among themselves until some new structures with more  coherent internal organization emerge. 136). I will examine both “stage” development and four  of the structures subsumed within the stage of formal operational reasoning. Theory One outcome of hemispheric brain functioning research has been heightened  awareness that current educational practices may discriminate against students who lack  aptitude in the verbal­analytic mode of instruction which predominates in most  classrooms today.).  Appositional cognition excels at time­independent processing such as configuration  recognition and facial or figural pattern recognition (Ibid.The way such coordinations take place  represents a very complex process not yet studied in full detail.  The stage is therefore not defined by any of those single lines of development but  rather by what the child is able to do with all the fragments of structures he has  built so far. “appositional” cognition (Bogen.  At a given  moment.26). as already pointed out. p. 140) The “emergent” properties of stages reflect a discontinuity that may ultimately be  best explained by research into neurological readiness for higher stages of reasoning. 1991. or time­ordered stimulus or production  sequences such as speech or mathematical calculation.. 1975.  This is termed "propositional"  cognition in contrast to right hemisphere. each  “fragment” may find itself at a different “level of development“ from the others. Further.

  The  following will first discuss important aspects of Piaget’s theory of cognitive development. The second stage of development continues the child’s developing understanding  of his environment in terms of his actions on objects.  At least one educational researcher who utilizes left/right brain explanations  of pedagogical theory has suggested that formal operational reasoning is a left­brain  process (Samples. there are many theoretical and empirical reasons to  suspect that a formal system of logical thought is very much a whole­brain process. . or symbolic representation of objects and events.  The child  realizes that objects continue to exist even though they pass from view. he cannot  mentally predict what will happen during the process of transforming something. pre­operational.  Intellectual development begins  with the stage of sensory­motor orientation. 1975).  then relate it to brain functions.  However.5 continuum.  During this stage.  and formal operational stages. the stage is called pre­operational  thought.  This is primarily manifested in the  development of language. Piaget and his colleagues amassed evidence of  four major stages of intellectual development: the sensory­motor.  Since  the child cannot yet deal with mental operations. As will be demonstrated. the  child mentally represents his world in terms of static configurations.  concrete operational. that is. beginning at birth and  lasting until roughly 18 months. the child begins to separate objects from one another and  find relationships between his physical actions and their effects on objects. Piaget’s Four Stages of Development   First Three Stages   Over several decades of research.

  A useful generalization is that the concrete operational thinker subordinates any thought  of what is possible to the actuality of his concrete experience. is characterized by the  generalization that actuality is subordinated to what is possible. as is done by the formal  operational thinker.  This is exemplified by  the system of formal logic and the possible relationships between two variables such as  “p” and “q. water poured from a short squat beaker into a tall thin beaker will be known to  maintain the same amount of water. the  operations remain uncoordinated between themselves. is termed concrete operational. further. or none at all. Making use of such combinations can result from either trial and error  experimentation. the next stage. the four together. as is done by the concrete operational thinker.  Thus.  The formal operational thinker will feel quite spontaneous in this  . or by mentally combining  the variables in a hypothetical­deductive mode of thought.” and “q” with its negation  “not­q” there exist 16 possible combinations depending on whether the pairs are taken  one­by­one.  Prior to this.  Also. two­by­two.  Logical thought  derives from possession of the implicit set of relationships represented by this integrated  “structured whole.  However.6 After about seven years. these operations are limited at first to  experience of concrete objects rather than their mental representations. for  example.”  For instance. the ability to deal in terms of classes and ordered  relationships implies operational ability. the child begins to apprehend mentally the operational  process of objects transforming or changing from one configuration to another.  The child’s ability to  grasp such transformations and. This stage.   The Fourth Stage: Formal Operational Reasoning   In contrast. given “p” and its negation “not­p. three­by­three. formal operations. the child would have said the amount of  water had changed as it was poured from one beaker to the other. which lasts until adolescence or later.” as Piaget calls it.

7 thought process.  If he is able to proceed to the heart of the problem, generate all possible  relations of variables, and outline for himself a systematic experimental procedure to test  the truth value of each relation, then that individual has access to a formal system of  logical thought.  Such an individual can perform mental operations which relate logical  operations one to another.  Access to this second­order ability to perform operations on  operations is the hallmark of the formal operational stage. [In formal thinking, the subject seeks all possible combinations] so as to select the  true and discard the false.  In the course of this selective activity he intuitively  constructs a combinatorial system.  It is for this reason that he repeatedly passes  from one propositional operation to another.  [Propositional operations]...form a  system or structured whole: such as the lattice or the group INRC  (Piaget, 1957, p.  39).   Developing the Structured Whole   To fully understand what Piaget means by the “structured whole,” I turn to the  factors which Piaget has identified as contributing to the development of intelligence.  The most important of these in terms of a theory of formal operations will be covered last  under the topic of “equilibrium.”  Piaget suggests four main factors supporting the  process of cognitive evolution: experience, social transmission, maturation and  equilibrium. Cognitive Evolution: Experience (Objects and Logico­   Mathematical)   Experience has two forms: object­oriented experience and logico­mathematical  experience.  Object­oriented experience involves situations over which the child has no  overt control such as the conditions of his environment, objects present within his field of  activity, cognitive challenges, etc.  Logico­mathematical experience involves events  which the child constructs for himself and which are applied to objects or events around  him.

8 Experience with objects can lead to figurative knowledge, (i.e. knowledge about  objects) or logico­mathematical knowledge, (i.e. knowledge of what can be done with  objects).  For instance, the child who has pebbles before him utilizes figurative knowledge  by using the color names or shape names.  The child utilizes operational or logico­ mathematical knowledge when he experiments in classifying the rocks by color or shape  or when he applies the number system to the succession of pebbles to see how “many”  pebbles are present.  Through both kinds of experience the child eventually gains the  ability to “undo” an action mentally, leading to development of internal representations,  operations and ultimately operations on operations.  Action on objects particularly aids  the child in eliminating contradictions in his thought and building consistency among his  mental structures.   Cognitive Evolution—Social Transmission   Accompanying the child’s experience with objects and logico­mathematical  concepts is the process of social transmission.  The child’s attention is guided by the  values and challenges presented in his social environment.  Social transmission can occur  via example, verbal precept, or any other means of acculturation.  Piaget has suggested  that many of the ills of modern education can be traced to over reliance on verbal modes  of information transfer when dealing with pre­operational and concrete operational  students (Piaget, 1970, p. 72).  Faced with teacher­centered, verbal learning, Piaget  suggests that many students substitute memorization of concepts and relationships in  place of operational comprehension of the logico­mathematical elements involved.  As  many educators are finding, rote learning remains a fragile companion, and students  forget verbally founded “facts” because they have not developed the abstract reasoning  abilities necessary to support verbalization.  For these reasons, curriculum developers 

9 have advocated experience­based learning, typically referred to as inquiry­based or  discovery mode learning (Lawson and Renner, 1975; Matthews, Phillips, Good, 1977).   Cognitive Evolution—Biological Maturation   However, a problem remains with experience­based learning.  The problem is that  certain experiences will be meaningful only if the information­processing capacity of the  central nervous system is sufficiently developed to accommodate to a challenging  situation.  Thus the study of the growth of logical thinking presupposes a developmental  sequence of neurological learning readiness as a necessary, but not sufficient condition of  growth.  Without such biological maturational readiness, no amount of instructional  planning, either student­centered or teacher­centered, can bring about advanced stages of  reasoning.   Cognitive Evolution—Equilibration   Neurological readiness returns us to our main topic of discussion: equilibration.  Piaget specifically addresses the role of nervous system maturation in relation to the  abstract psychological processes associated with formal structures as follows: If someone wanted to say that an a priori form of reasoning accounts for the  development of formal structures, he would have to accept the burden of proof of  the fact that this a priori form emerges so late.  Of course, he could always call on  the effect of a late­maturing nervous structure, and such a structure is probably a  necessary condition for the development of combinatorial operations.  But the  neurological explanation cannot in itself be sufficient because the occurrence of  transitional phases shows that the new operations derive from earlier ones.  Given  this fact, it must be that a continuously operating equilibration factor plays a role  beyond that of purely internal conditions of maturation, and the problem is to  understand how a tendency toward equilibrium or its results can lead the subject  to organize a formal combinatorial system.  (Inhelder and Piaget, 1958, p. 281). Piaget’s discussions of equilibrium cover several chapters in The Growth of   Logical Thought  (Inhelder and Piaget, 1958) and he utilizes a monograph Logic and   Psychology (1957) and a book The Development of Thought (1979) to develop the concept 

10 fully.  It seems reasonable to cover the most salient points as they relate to our specific  topic of interest (the “structured whole”) and let other definitions and lines of reasoning  be read in their original sources. The “Structured Whole” The most direct path to understanding the structured whole emerges from our  previous discussion of the combinatorial system.  That is, a subject who is formal  operational actively seeks to construct all possible combinations of the variables at hand  in order to systematically test each for its truth value.  This method of problem solving is  so powerful that philosophers of science have independently given it a descriptive title:  hypothetical­deduction.   The Direction of Cognitive Growth ­ Greater Equilibrium   As Piaget has shown through many studies of child reasoning, hypothetical­ deductive reasoning does not appear until adolescence (and, as we have seen, even later in  many college students).  Piaget’s research specifically attempts to trace the causal origins  of the development of formal operations.  He concludes that formal thinking represents  the most stable form of adaptive response to the logico­mathematical environment.  In  this sense, stability, or equilibrium in cognitive structures, takes on a causal role in  structural evolution by directing cognitive growth toward greater stability or greater  equilibrium.   Greater Adaptability   The drive toward equilibrium is initiated by the subject and not by his  environment.  Cognitive adaptation in any other direction does not diminish  contradictions or increase the success of rational thought as much as the direction toward  the system of formal operations.  Thus Piaget suggests that operational equilibrium 

11 increases in adaptive mobility as it increases in stability.  Growth in this direction of  increased number of possible transformations results from the use of mental reality or  mental representations of reality (Inhelder and Piaget, 1958, p. 331).  Therefore,  equilibrium may have a neurological basis in the sense that any organism must have some  drive toward adaptive or “coordinated behavior”: The empirical reality behind [symbolic logic] is the field of coordinated behavior.  The concept of equilibrium proves indispensable to causal explanation from this  standpoint; it makes it possible for us to understand how at a given level of  development intelligence takes up simultaneously all of the directions opened up  in this field as a function of the potential transformations which characterize it [as  a “structured whole”], as well as of the portions already structured.  If  neurological considerations come to round out our explanation at some later  date...these laws of equilibrium will prove to be more general than when linked to  behavior patterns alone (Ibid., p. 333). The Boundaries of Awareness Piaget notes that a subject will not be aware of the general structure as a totality  because the totality is formed out of simple possibilities.  Only the operations and  operational schemata actually used in some performances are manifest at any one time.  “The others must exist only as latent transformations which may appear in performance in  the appropriate situation.” (Ibid., p.330). Logic Governed by “Field” of Structured Whole Thus we can conclude this outline of Piaget's theory with remarks regarding the  necessary relationship between the development of cognition and the structured whole of  propositional logic. The different schemata [of formal operations which subjects acquire] imply not  merely isolated propositional operations, but the structured wholes   themselves...which propositional operations exemplify.  The structured whole,  considered as the form of equilibrium of the subject’s operational behavior, is  therefore of fundamental psychological importance, which is why the logical  (algebraic) analysis of such structures gives the psychologist an indispensable  instrument of explanation and prediction....[The state of equilibration is] one in  which all the virtual transformations compatible with the relationships of the 

 the logical  structures correspond precisely to this view.  Both researchers would agree that  experience also influences the degree to which brain function potential is manifested  developmentally. however.  Learning of  almost any idea is likely to be better if both methods are used. Thus.  41 & 45) The notion of two largely lateralized modes of thought suggests that teaching by  either precept or percept affects primarily one or the other hemisphere.  (Piaget. these structures are essentially reversible. there appears to be some disagreement about the  precise relationship between the development of logical thought and the correlates of  .  When  starting from an actually performed propositional operation. these structures  appear in the form of a set of virtual transformations. without being conscious of them.  Both Piaget and Bogen suggest that development of intelligence can be  influenced by the types of experience gained by students. on the one hand. 1957.  Since education is  effective only in so far as it affects the working of the brain. that is  to say. and arithmetic will  educate mainly one hemisphere. 27).  From a psychological point of view. or endeavoring to  express the characteristics of a given situation by an operation.  On the other. 1975. he cannot proceed  in any way he likes.  On the one hand.  Both researchers imply that  experience is mediated by neurological functioning. pp. consisting of all the  operations which it would be possible to carry out starting from a few actually  defined operations. the virtual transformations which they permit are always self­compensatory  as a consequence of inversions and reciprocities. as it were.  He finds himself. in a field of force governed by  the laws of equilibrium. Fancy   On the other hand. carrying out transformations or operations determined not  only by occurrences in the immediate past. we find an important link between Piaget’s emphasis on  experience with objects and Bogen’s previously mentioned emphasis on right­brain  education. we can see that an  elementary school program narrowly restricted to reading. p.   Logic and the Left Hemisphere ­ Fact vs.  In this way we can explain why  the subject is affected by such structures. writing. but by the laws of the whole  operational field of which these past occurrences form a part. leaving half of an individual’s high­level potential  unschooled (Bogen.12 system compensate each other.

  Robert Samples  (1975) suggests that Piaget’s developmental hierarchy deals only with left­brain  rationality to the exclusion of right­brain skills.  The results are obvious. by the hierarchies of intellectual development of Piaget. that this Type 2 verbal  reasoning process does not operate to control the actual reasoning behavior. many of the kinds of  mindwork best labeled as inventive and integrative in the metaphoric styles are  common. who have a natural tendency to deal with mindwork that  includes all four metaphoric styles.The striking point is. p.  It appears that part of Samples’ error results  from equating  “reasoning skills” with the sort of verbal learning we have already seen  criticized by Piaget. Of course.235­236). which are non­verbal and non­introspectible but control actual  selections.  It is  interesting to note that the Type 2 process corresponds much more closely to the  common­sense reasoning. .  Children. In early stages of development. 1975. and Type 2. verbal processes which underlie the rationalization.  (p.23).  But it serves our research interest here to closely examine the reason  Samples chooses to link reasoning skills with left­hemisphere propositional aptitudes.  the counterparts of Piaget’s concrete operational and formal operational stages  (Samples.  At least one researcher appears to  equate reasoning skills with left­hemisphere educational practices.. are trained to focus comparative and symbolic. of course. according to Piaget. Other writers also have questioned whether “meaning” in its essential nature is  solely sequential.  Yet inherent in the philosophy of Piaget’s thinking is the developmental  thrust to get past those stages into more concrete and formal logical operations. systematically wean out the metaphoric  strategies.  The outcome of this examination will suggest that formal operational reasoning actually  has a large component of what Bogen would call right­brain appositional aptitude and  ultimately reflects whole­brain processes. Samples ultimately advocates development of both sets of skills in  educational settings.. and thus by a  dominance of left­hemisphere approaches.  Schools led by the psychological prejudices of cognitive  psychology.. here identified as metaphoric thought.  Evans (1980) cites the dual­process theory of Wason and Evans (1975)  that proposes two different kinds of thinking: Type 1 processes.  Samples ignores the need for a “structured whole” to underlie any  reasoning skills demonstrated verbally.13 logical thought relative to left/right brain lateralization.

e. not necessarily in terms of  origins of complexity.  The right cerebral hemisphere. as it has been called. so logical  and so verifiable.  metaphoric and inventive capacities of the mind. logical thought.  He says: Because the cognitive domain. it infatuated those who measured.  Two reasons substantiate  this contention: 1) Piaget’s theory suggests that formal operational thought proceeds upon  access to a “structured whole. multiple variables processed simultaneously and 2)  research using brain­wave recording techniques indicates that.  Language.” Samples ostensibly  refers to the non­linear. the right brain may  be engaged in thinking about the problem.  Each alternative has its  pedagogical implications. 19­20) In speaking of “handling multiple variables simultaneously.14   The Measurable Left Hemisphere   Samples (1975) suggests that propositional (or left­brain) learning predominates in  education because it is easier to measure and evaluate for progress.  I contend that Samples has confused the process of speaking  about logical thought with the process of doing logical thought.  It appears  that Samples does not equate that sort of mental process with the “cognitive domain” of  rational. in fact. pp. 1976) The Structured Whole and EEG Coherence   Agreement on Value of “Wholeness”   Various statements by Piaget and Samples indicate that both agree on rational  thought requiring some version of “wholeness. is far more  elusive. a right­brain process.  It is. linear reasoning. time­independent properties of appositional thought.  obviously capable of handling multiple variables simultaneously. far easier to deal  with the functions of the left cerebral hemisphere.” i. although the left brain is  engaged in speaking about a problem solution during a Piagetian task. (Kraft.”  This joint conclusion by opposing  parties leads to a testable hypotheses regarding whether logical reasoning is a left­brain  process.  The result was a detour that took educators’ attention away from intuitive. . on the other hand. arithmetic and mathematics are much easier to  measure and evaluate. but primarily because of the nature of visible cues. or a whole­brain process.  (Ibid. was so rational.

 in a discussion of conservation of motion  in a horizontal plane. hypothesis.  In fact.  Utilizing a psychomotor “torque test” for hemispheric  dominance. Piaget explains the cause of failure in the concrete operational  subject.15 Piaget discusses the transition from the concrete to formal operational stage in  terms of access to the interconnected set of 16 propositional operations (the structured  whole). In comparison to Samples’ passage on right­brain aptitudes. 129) (My italics).  He suggests that right­hemisphere learning activities  may aid understanding in courses such as physics and astronomy. Unruh concluded that the Piagetian model does not refer to development of  the analytical hemisphere alone..” says Piaget.” as Samples puts it. Additional evidence of right­brain involvement in logic comes from experimental  findings by Unruh (1978). CHAP discovers the factor of air resistance but fails to think of the  friction for the heavy balls” (Ibid.  In this sense.  Thus. at least three studies have sought  electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence of “whole brain” correlates to performance on  Piagetian tasks.  He writes. instead of being limited to deductions  from the actual immediate situation” (Inhelder and Piaget.  For example. .  Piaget uses the same line of reasoning about reasoning as Samples. “Time after time he fails to determine all the relevant variables   simultaneously.  But interestingly.  “Henceforth. p.   EEG Studies of Piagetian Theory   From a neurological point of view. Piaget indicates  logical thought seems to have a necessary (but perhaps not sufficient) component of  right­brain aptitude. Samples still feels Piaget’s theory only covers half the brain. p. 1958. Piaget uses terminology  similar to Samples’ own phrases. 16). it appears that  Piaget’s concept of the structured whole is no different than the capacity of “handling  multiple variables simultaneously. “[formal] thought proceeds from a combination of  possibility. and deductive reasoning.

 however. Mitchell.  The author  concluded that: even while high performers gave verbal responses. In Kraft’s (1976) study the subjects were six to eight years old and the measure  was also a computer analyzed log Left/Right alpha power ratio. the tasks were accompanied by  left­brain activity. formal operational university  students showed greater left hemispheric activity during a series of cognitive tasks than  concrete operational students. dealt with concrete operations.  High performers tended.)  The influence of verbal activity was controlled in another study  done in Wheatley’s laboratory by Kraft (1976. however. to show less left­brain  specialization than low performers during the verbal response period. 1980).  However. Languis and  Wheatley.  During  the spatial­visual period of the problem solving tasks.  During the subsequent verbal response period.  However. subjects demonstrated right­brain  activity. whereas  thought alone may not.  The findings seem to support Samples’ contention that formal operational thought  requires greater left­hemisphere activity than other modes of thought.16 In a study by Dilling.  Piagetian tasks are behavioral measurements of interhemispheric communication  and selective inhibition and further. published in Kraft. the  findings must be considered in light of the restricted number of subjects (six concrete  operational and seven formal operational) and the fact that the findings held only for  alpha readings over the temporal region and not the central region. This second study. that the ontogeny of Piagetian stages is a  behavioral index of maturing neural fibers (between the left and right cerebral  .  Readings were taken  during the problem­solving events and no information was presented regarding the  amount of verbal activity relative to thinking activity given during the EEG trials.  The EEG measure was log Left/Right alpha power ratio. they utilized greater ability to  tap the visuo­spatial right hemisphere’s knowledge about the stimulus. Wheatley and Mitchell (1976).  (Greater verbal activity will necessarily cause greater left­hemisphere activity.  Therefore. measures were  taken during the thinking phase as well as the speaking phase of problem solving.

  However.  (Kraft. called  “coherence. coherence is a mathematical function which describes covariation  between two frequency bands.  Coherence expresses the electrical activity of one EEG record as a linear  transformation of activity in another EEG record (Walter. implying less  specialization of the left hemisphere under speech conditions. there is no direct  evidence of the degree to which either or both hemispheres contribute to performance  For this it is necessary to utilize a different computer analysis of EEG data.  Coherence is typically computed by decomposing the complex EEG wave form into  its component sine waves. one EEG  record is compared with its counterpart in terms of the change in phase angle between the  sine waves over a given period of time. 1963).   EEG Coherence as Measure of Whole­Brain Integration   Briefly.17 hemispheres and from the reticular activating system to the two hemispheres)  which facilitate these processes.”  Also.  It will be covered below. The Kraft (1976) and Dilling. then.  Within each band. EEG “coherence” can provide  such evidence. 1976) This speculation is inferred on the basis that subjects who performed better had  higher left/right alpha power ratios during solution presentation.  The sine waves are grouped by adjacent frequencies within an  experimenter defined bandwidth (2 to 5 Hz. there is no direct evidence of interhemispheric “communication” or  transmission of any signal between hemispheres. is an index of the degree of  stability in the phase angle estimated to relate two EEG records.  Coherence. . 1985). typically).  It has the same interpretation as a squared correlation  coefficient.  No causal link  between L and R hemisphere activity is shown.  (1976) studies merely show L/R ratio covariance with task performance.  Again. et al. The third Piagetian EEG study used measures of formal reasoning and EEG alpha  coherence (Dennen. An EEG record can be a single recording site on the scalp or a combination of  sites.

 with at least two early studies  advancing the possibility of coherence measured during the practice of Transcendental  Meditation as an index of intellectual advantage.  Flexibility.  This finding indicated that both vigilance and adaptive  advantage were possibly associated with coherence. SAT Verbal. and Rosenberg.  Wallace. grade point average. and Originality on the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking. cats who  responded correctly to stimuli showed greater coherence over the 2­10 Hz band than cats  making incorrect responses. One study found  that alpha frontal bilateral coherence was significantly (p <. and Hendrix.  Initial studies of coherence for the space program investigated learning in cats  (Adey. Coherence was initially used to study vibration in aircraft and geological  structures.  Another study found that alpha  bilateral frontal coherence (F3F4) correlated positively with measures of Fluency.  Most of these studies used EEG  measurements identical to those used in the current study.  Additionally. it is the intrinsic nature  of coherence to reflect anatomical integration and information transfer between brain  areas as measured by EEG.   EEG Alpha Coherence and Psychological Measures   Studies on humans have continued over the years. verbal form. Lukenbach.  The researchers found that after training.  See Figure 1 for the  placements of the various leads mentioned in the following discussion.  One may consider coherence as a  measure of the variance of one record accounted by variance in the other record.  . verbal IQ and moral reasoning (Orme­Johnson. Dillbeck.05) correlated with SAT  Math.18 Coherence is influenced by changes in frequency or phase between two EEG  records and is unaffected by differences in amplitude. Walter. 1979). much in  the same sense that the Pearson product­moment correlation coefficient squared  expresses the variance shared between two variables. 1961). and was adopted for monitoring vigilance in the Gemini space program  astronauts.

 performance on a concept­learning task was better for subjects who had  higher measures of alpha frontal coherence (Dillbeck.D.  Dennen did find. 1981). however. and subtracted Occipital coherence  (FLR­O). Dillbeck.  In a  third study.  The FLR­O coherence index suggests that a simplistic acceptance of coherence as  interhemispheric “communication” may be unwise because O coherence is inversely  related to “CNS maturation” for these authors.  1982).  Together they provided  a multiple R of .  1981). Ball. Right derivations.58 (p = . in a Ph. alpha coherence correlated negatively with the same test at the O1O2  derivations (Orme­Johnson and Haynes. thesis for the University of Florida. that  Dennen used a paper and pencil test of formal and concrete reasoning. Left.  They concluded that “the Coherence Index may be a very  general index of CNS maturation” (Orme­Johnson. Alexander.  Dennen  used 349 undergraduate students whose EEG measures were taken during TM at the same  university as the previously cited coherence studies.005). A fourth study used a coherence index which summed alpha coherence values  greater than .  . Dennen (1985).  This implies that bilateral occipital  coherence has functional significance different from bilateral frontal coherence. Orme­Johnson.  I note.  Therefore. the coherence measures  and subject selection are certainly comparable.95 for Frontal. and Wallace. found no  significant linear relationship between Piagetian cognitive performance and the EEG  alpha coherence index nor individual measures of coherence.  The authors found this index to be positively related to the subjects’ grade  point average of 20 courses and negatively related to neuroticism.  A purely verbal  approach to examining Piaget’s concepts of intelligence may impose sufficient limitations  on strategies used by the subjects as to eliminate the expected EEG differences. Wallace.19 However.

20   Figure 1.  Placement of the Derivations Used in TM EEG Alpha Coherence Studies .

  This may be  termed “whole­brain” functioning. F+L+R minus O) remains to be discussed in the context of an extended  theory presented in Chapter Five. the proportionality schema. and O.  Coherence is combined across the four major EEG derivations as  follows: .  Increased  hemispheric communication or interaction is suggested by increased bilateral frontal  coherence. EEG coherence is defined for each subject as the mean coherence within the alpha  band.  The inverse correlation of bilateral occipital coherence with the anterior  derivations (viz. that physics majors.  The dependent variable will be  the FLR­O coherence index measured during eyes­closed TM. a composite measure of  alpha coherence will be used: FLR­O.95 Hz). In summary. displayed higher left. and the correlation schema.  Subjects  will be grouped according to pass or fail for each task.  In order to decrease between groups variance. R.21 however. neurophysiological evidence from this sample of studies using a  “standard cognitive state” of TM as well as Kraft’s (1976) study implies that the growth  of logical thought (and learning) reflects the activity of both hemispheres and is not  solely the province of left­brain functioning.  These conclusions are based on studies of left­right  hemisphere alpha power ratios as well as coherence for F. L.    Statement of the Problem   The present study tests the relationship of formal operational reasoning and EEG  alpha coherence. as proposed by Samples.  The formal structures tested in this project include the  combinatorial operations schema. right. (9­11. compared to other majors. and  frontal coherences during TM.  This measure also represents “whole­brain”  functioning acknowledging the as­yet­unexplained negative relationship with occipital  and lateral coherence. the INRC group structure (as found in the mechanical  equilibrium schema).

  Since prior research indicates a negative correlation between  occipital coherence and creativity. Transcendental Meditation.  I will assume that subjects  who fail all four tasks lack evidence of the cognitive reorganization characteristic of  formal reasoning.  Since gender and possible age  differences are expected to interact with task performance. . all EEG measures will first be  tested with no correction for gender and age.  Follow­up analysis will also test for  relationships when alpha coherence is normalized with respect to gender and age prior to  applying any statistical tests.  A single index of coherence is computed as  the sum of the frontal bilateral derivation and the two homolateral derivations minus the  occipital coherence. The study will evaluate the relationship between the Coherence Index and  evidence for attainment of the “stage” of formal reasoning. To allow comparisons with previous coherence research and to provide a standard  cognitive state suitable for further replications.  This is also the same cognitive state  used in the previously described research by Orme­Johnson. EEG measures are taken while the  subjects practice a standardized.22 Coherence Index = (F3F4) + (F3C3) + (F4C4) ­ (O1O2) I shall abbreviate this as CI = FLR­O. the occipital coherence is subtracted  from the three preceding coherence values. The study evaluates the strength of the relationship between the scores on each of  the formal operational tasks and the Coherence Index. and readily available closed eyes  meditation technique. commonly taught. as well as GPA. Dillbeck. and other  researchers. Dennen.

 Shadows.  Shadows. and Correlations.  The formal operational  stage is defined as passing at least one of these four tasks: Communicating Vessels. Ho2: There is no significant positive relationship between the FLR­O Coherence  Index and a pass­fail measure of the formal operational stage.23   Statement of Research Hypotheses   Ho1: There is no significant positive relationship between the FLR­O Coherence  Index and pass­fail measures of formation operational reasoning in any of these four  tasks: Communicating Vessels. and Correlations. Combinations. Combinations. .

  deductive models and neurology. but in the final analysis the  hope of isomorphism between the organicist schemata and the logico­ mathematical schemata used in abstract models (p. 1968).  He endorses Fessard’s idea of an interdependent lattice of  neurons.  Piaget  agrees with the organicist reduction trend of modern psychology. This  program of research is discussed and advocated in Piaget’s chapter. “whose elements have identical properties”  and which support “the possibility of introducing a certain homeostatic stability” amidst  “new functions being established between already­formed connections” (p. Volume I History and Method (Piaget. “Explanation in  psychology and psychophysiological parallelism” in Experimental Psychology: Its Scope   and Method. 173).24 CHAPTER II REVIEW OF RELEVANT LITERATURE   Writings of Jean Piaget   This dissertation examines the relationship between some formal operational  structures and physiological measures of EEG coherence. We can now interpret this complementarity by basing it on deeper reasons:  if parallelism between facts of consciousness and physiological processes  is isomorphism between the implicative systems of meanings and the  causal systems of the material work. Of  particular interest is Piaget’s recognition of neural interconnection as a source of  psychological structure. . thereby qualifying as an  attempt at an “organicist reduction” explanation of abstract constructivist structures. if not more. not only a complementarity. like the brain’s reticular formation. 190). it is then evident that this parallelism  involves equally.  He then suggests that a  scientific explanation explains at least a complementary relationship between abstract. Fraise. and Reuchlin.

 the reasons for  disequilibration.  Piaget acknowledges neurophysiological  mechanisms that influence knowledge of the object. Piaget concludes that while success  is “effective utilization. Equilibration of Cognitive Structures (Piaget.. and causal mechanisms of equilibrations and re­equilibrations.  He cites Pribram’s findings that the  cortex exercises selective attention. 222). understanding brings out the reason of things (because). the “world of possibilities.. In The Grasp of Consciousness (Piaget.. admitting some stimuli and eliminating other stimuli. most of Piaget’s work examines in one form or another the  development of the facts of consciousness.  (See the  critical review by Pascual­Leone. Piaget culminates this line of research in the development of knowledge in The   Development of Thought. 1988 that suggests that while the book describes the  varieties of equilibration. it fails to describe a causal mechanism. 1976) Piaget begins exploring  these issues by describing how the child’s actions themselves embody knowledge. indefinitely.  The theme is continued.  But only later writings attempt to explicate in  detail the laws that underlie the increasing capacity of intelligence to describe the  objective world.  “In these  (psychological) centrations.  Here. 1977). we again find  distortion caused by the overestimation of the importance of the characteristics of the  .  Piaget identifies this phenomenon as an analog of perceptual centration. with reference to conscious processes  in Success and Understanding (Piaget. 1978)...it goes  on to knowledge that can dispense with action.. which are abstract and no longer perceptual.necessarily transcend the  bounds of action. albeit  of an unconscious nature..  Piaget  discusses the types of equilibration processes that give rise to structures..”  As the subject constructs operations on  preceding operations.25 As a biologist. but rather builds on the body of prior research to expand  on the mechanics of cognitive development.the world of ‘reason’ spills over into the world of possibilities and thus  surpasses the given reality” (p..) This work itself  contains no clinical interviews.

. 144). right­ hemisphere activity (but not mentioned by Piaget). Cf. the subject invokes a compensation: “the action in the  opposite direction which will conquer this rejection. Piaget notes  that subception is probably not “unconscious” perception. I give Piaget’s explanation in full: For example.  which tend to penetrate into the field of recognized observables.  Because this characterizes non­verbal. these mechanisms indicate the necessity  for neurophysiological mechanisms of inhibition to overcome habits or impulses that  otherwise erroneously represent an object or its status. I often take out my watch and look at the hands without  verbal translation.  An erroneous conceptualization  creates a “disturbance” by virtue of rejecting or repressing the true state of the object. 1960.(T)he  disturbance can be attributed to the nascent power of these elements. Eriksen. 146).  For our purposes.. (p. since there was memory  with delay.” and therefore without the integration which  would make it knowledge (as opposed to a mere perception).26 objects of attention and the devaluation of the others which are not centered” (p.  To  ameliorate such disturbance. 146). and the  compensation will then consist in modifying the disturbance until it  becomes acceptable (p. Of importance to our study of left and right hemisphere differences.  My  visual perception therefore was not unconscious. Further discussion sheds light on the constructive mechanisms used to overcome  disturbances in equilibrium..  Piaget suggests that the individual unconsciously perceives all the important  characteristics of the objects (via “subception”. Since it is not before me I take out my watch again a  few minutes later and then remember having previously looked at it.  and that normal regulations will ultimately lessen the repression of the elements which earlier were set aside. not cited by Piaget). but suggests a primary state of consciousness without  conceptualized “awareness.”  Reinforcement of such  . but rather “perception of which  our consciousness is simply short and evanescent for lack of integration into the  conceptualized consciousness” (p. 144).

  Piaget acknowledges the power of such regulations  as being formative. From   Childhood to Adolescence (Inhelder and Piaget. Piaget provides many illuminating  insights into issues a biological model should address. of this  dissertation. “Combinations of Colored and  Colorless Chemical Bodies. 1980). 9. it imposes a reorganization. originally published in French in 1974.  the year prior to the French publication of The Development of Thought. Piaget explores similar themes of cognitive growth in Adaptation and Intelligence­ .”  and “Random Variations and Correlations.  However.  . of this  dissertation. Design of the tasks was taken  from chapters 7. formal reasoning. Chapter 3. and on a restricted terrain. 13. Organic Selection and Phenocopy (Piaget. Chapter 1. 153).  While not using  organic reduction per se with regard to intelligence.” “The Projection of Shadows. which  is a construction” (p. and 15. respectively titled. Guidance in the definitions of equilibration.  constructive processes of intelligence through analogy to the processes of phenotypic  exploration of opportunities for survival in any new environment.  Details on the tasks will be given in the Methods section. “since conquering the repression involves a modification of the  opposing conceptualization.  The volume attempts to clarify the adaptive. with particular regard to the  processes of phenotypic adaptation representing equilibration processes between the  organization and its environmental niche. and in the  construction of the four tasks was found in The Growth of Logical Thinking.  Adaptation and Intelligence pursues the analogical parallels between the laws of cognitive  development and development of non­human organisms. 1958).27 compensation is accomplished via regulations that become more operational over the  period of dissolving the disturbance.”  Details on formal reasoning and  equilibration processes were given in the Introduction section.” “Communicating Vessels.

 see Campbell and Bickhard (1987). The latter book provides insight into limits  that Piaget would put on a “reductionist” course of explanation. but  rather there is reciprocal assimilation such that the higher can be derived from the  lower by means of transformation. and the  reaction was an anti­reductionist vitalism. whose sole merit was the entirely  negative one of denoucing the illusions engendered by such premature  reductions. Bereiter (1985).In short. The failures of causal  reductionism in the field of the natural sciences.. Boom (1991). The problem with  reductionism is that on face value.. it suggests that higher level structures are “explained”  by lower level structures or regulations.. In cases where it has been possible to resolve the problem. and Piaget‘s (1972)  book The Principles of Genetic Epistemology. those of deductive reductionism  with respect to the limits of formalization and the relationships between  mathematics and logic: these all spell the failure of the ideal of a complete  deduction implying preformation. the end result  has been a situation surprisingly in agreement with constructivist hypostheses:  between two structures of different levels there can be no one­way reduction. The relationship of  equilibration and the development of novel structure is covered in a dialog between  several writers: Juckes (1991).  given rise to a new mechanics. attempts that failed to note the  possibility of change in a discipline which is continually being modified. the construction of new structures seems  to characterize a general process which is constitutive in character and not  reducible to a method for achieving a predetermined end. which is  becoming increasingly vindicated (pp 92­93). the  refutation of reductionism provides a basis for constructivism. Reciprocally.. In the biological field there have been attempts to reduce living processes  to known physico­chemical phenomenon. Bereiter (1991) and Pascual­Leone (1991). and novelty would only  consist in a successful explication of preexisting relationships. and the success of constructivism.  .  For additional discussion on the the question of the origin of “novel” Piagetian  structures. 9)..28 Other sources of Piaget’s discussion of equilibrium and equilibration include  Piaget’s (1977) article Problems of Equilibration  in which he indicates that “self­ regulation is the important idea for us to take from biology” (p. From both these views every ‘new’ structure should be preformed: either  within the simplest element or within a complex one. while the higher enriches the lower by  integrating it. In this way electro­magnetism has enriched classical mechanics.

  Renner.  Moessinger (1978) provides a concise tutorial on Piaget’s key ideas from the book  Development of Thought. and continues with accommodation  leading to a new organization and a more stable form of equilibration.29   Reviews of Piaget’s Equilibration Model   The issues of equilibration are made more palpable in several tutorial articles. 18).  The learning begins  with assimilation that leads to disequilibration. including the relationship between the subject and the  object. Abraham. self­regulating adaptive system.  It addresses the history of Piaget’s model and some criticisms levied against  it.  Parkins (1987)  outlines the concept of equilibration in control system terms alluding to left/right  hemisphere differences.  Lawson (1982) applies Piaget’s concepts of equilibration to biology instruction and  evolution. Gallagher (1977) gives a tutorial  relating the concept of equilibration to its conceptual roots in biology.  It is particularly helpful in explaining notions surrounding  the types of equilibrium.  Furth (1977) suggests that Piaget’s account of equilibration is “biologically and  humanly relevant” to students of psychology (p.   Reviews of Research on Formal Operational Tasks   Haley and Good (1976) point out the discrepancy between demands for formal  reasoning in introductory college biology textbooks and the lack of formal reasoning  among many students. Brent (1978) summarizes the implications of Piaget’s equilibration in the  context of Prigoine’s model of “dissipative structures” as a means by which complex  non­equilibrium systems paradoxically manifest self­organization. and Birnie (1986) analyzed student teaching dialogs  from a 12th grade physics class to illustrate a cycle of learning.  They cite results from seven studies using subjects of college  age or above and six studies using high school students. He makes his points in the form of several cybernetic control  flow charts that illustrate a self­correcting. logic and  cybernetics.  Acknowledging variation in  .

 the authors conclude: 1) the interview  method determines reasoning levels more effectively than group­administered tests. those who demonstrated formal reasoning on tests in many cases failed to do  so on course work.  It is a cornucopia of research abstracts and short monographs  classified by categories for easy access. using several volumes to present  their monumental work. age groups. Chiappetta cites Piaget’s (1972) extension of  developmental period of formal reasoning from 11 ­ 15 years to 15 ­ 20 years. Chiappetta (1977) reviewed ten studies of high school and college students and  concluded that in addition to the overall low percentage of formal reasoning among  students. Chiappetta suggests. and the proportion of subjects passing the  task.30 tasks and procedures.  In light of this.  Implying. paying particular attention to their (many) methodological  flaws. that science educators must  “build” such structures in their students by introducing concepts in concrete operational  form. More recently. such as inconsistent scoring criteria across tasks  by the same investigator or cumulative scoring across several tasks 3) the unity of  .  He  emphasizes Piaget’s qualification that young adults use formal structures in relation to  their area of specialization. Nagy and Griffiths (1982) reviewed a large number of Piagetian  formal reasoning studies.5% of the tested 11th and 12th graders used formal reasoning. they point out that between 11­61% of the tested college subjects  and an average of only 44.  Ranging over many significant topics.  Similar passing rates are presented in a review by Blash and Hoeffel (1974) who  thoughtfully lists studies by task. 2)  even interview methods have pitfalls.  The section on formal operations is  informative. Modgil and Modgil (1976) have the distinction of compiling the most complete  review of Piagetian studies and monographs to date.

 16 dealt with proportional reasoning­type  tasks and 10 dealt with combinatorial­type tasks. 3) lack of lateralization or hemisphere specialization  may be related to lower developmental levels. low mental capacity.  Taken together. English.  There  was no difference between the 17­year­old and under group compared with over 17­year­ olds.6 percent.31 formal schema cannot be easily determined with factor analysis. but probably demands  a method based on “consistency of classification” (p.)  Meehan did not present an overall pass rate for any of the tasks or groups of tasks. but weakly related to achievement in the science classroom.  The most reliable finding of sex differences was for the proportional reasoning  problems. Projection of Shadows. 5) the jury is still  out on the efficacy of training students in formal reasoning skills. 535). 609).2 percent and 31. history. field dependence.  Note  that 34 cases used paper­and­pencil measures of formal operations and 108 cases used  manipulative measures. Twenty­ seven studies dealt with propositional logic. with a percent non­overlap of the male and female distributions falling between  22. Meehan (1984) examined the literature between 1972 and 1982 and found 53  studies of formal operational reasoning for her meta­analysis of sex differences. . 609). 4) level of development is  clearly. Lawson (1985) reviews a large number of studies of formal reasoning and  concludes that: 1) lack of formal reasoning is a probable cause for lack of ability in “the  sciences. and perhaps by an  impulsive cognitive style” (p. 2) formal reasoning is hindered by “intellectually  restrictive social environments. she found performance  advantages for males with one to five percent of the variance explained by gender.  (This group of tasks included three of the tasks in the  current research: Communicating Vessels. social studies. and Correlations. mathematics. and in everyday contexts such as  comparative shopping” (p.

 mechanical  equilibrium. that the development of processing capacity is  overdue for intensive investigation” (p.  Halford’s review is unique in mentioning neurophysiological evidence of brain and  hemisphere maturation that appear to support Piaget’s idea that certain structures can be  attained at lower age limits. Bart and Mertens  found that combinations was a prerequisite to the proportions and mechanical equilibrium  schemas.  In  .  Bart and Mertens  (1979) used her data for an “ordering theoretic” analysis and confirmed that the tasks  within schemes were empirically equivalent and that some common structure underlies all  the tasks. proportionality. to study these  five schema: combinations. While not a review.  Martorano ordered the proportion of passing performance of the ten tasks and found that  tasks that tapped the same schema appear adjacent to one another. 8. and correlations. 348). per se.  This evidence suggests that “attempts to dismiss Piaget’s  theory may be premature. multiplicative compensation. Martorano’s (1977) interview­based research deserves  some mention for its attempt to determine (“review”) relationships between a large  number of formal schemas.32 Dennen (1985) lists some Piagetian studies in which young and middle­aged  adults outperform older adults in a variety of problem­solving tasks. over two meetings. and furthermore.  Thirty­three percent of the subjects showed  differences by two substages and 61% demonstrated differences by three substages.  10.  She concluded that a given subject  did not score similarly across all the tasks.  Relative to the schemas examined in the current research. and 12.  She used interview protocols to study females in grades 6.  The correlation schema was also prerequisite to mechanical equilibrium.  She focused on females to overcome issues of  inconsistency in findings due to gender differences. Halford (1989) reviews research that questions whether Piaget’s models of  cognitive development are as explanatory as more recent “neo­Piagetian” theories.  She administered ten tasks to each subject.

 Gender. the last schema to be attained.  construction. and scoring procedures between group and interview formal reasoning tests.33 another analysis.  Research from a variety of  institutions has linked this measure of proportional reasoning with differences between  males and females and with associated gender differences in spatial and mathematical  reasoning. Projection of Shadows Task. patterns of science achievement. hemisphere or training  differences between genders.  This makes for difficult  comparison between Piaget’s work and structural relationships between tasks.  Given these issues and owing to the differences in purpose. and unequal acquisition of prerequisite concrete spatial  structures (the “genetic­epistemological” hypothesis). investigators attempt to make sense of this “complex” through  discussion of gender­roles. Spatial Skills.  this review only includes results of interview studies that replicate the original tasks  found in Inhelder and Piaget (1958).   Replication vs. and    Achievement   Research with the University of Iowa Grouping Model The Shadows task has attracted a “complex” of issues.  Meehan  (1984) compared the percentage of studies that demonstrated male performance  advantages in manipulative versus paper­and­pencil formats. Group Tests   Nagy and Griffiths (1982) indicate in their review that written tests fail to give the  same details on cognitive function as clinical interviews.08.  Phillips (1980) indicates that a multiple choice question allows subjects to get  “correct” answers by chance. proportions was shown to precede the schema of mechanical  equilibrium.  This review gives an insight into  .  p < .  Obviously.  She concluded that females  have more difficulty with manipulative tasks of formal operations than males.

  Two other tasks. if at all.  This  .  Statistically  significant gender differences were found in three of the other tasks: Symmetric Speeds. Wavering.34 the relatedness of these issues as discussed by the various authors.   College and 12th Grade Subjects   Poduska (1983) (also see Poduska and Phillips.  The UI research gained  strength by using a reasonably consistent set of task protocols and scoring criteria across  the studies (Phillips. Wavering (1984). and  Time showed no gender differences. and Doyle (1980).  The proportional schema of the Shadows task and its  structural prerequisites or correlates are studied in Poduska (1983). Several studies at the UI or by former students have used the Shadows task to  study the formal operational schema of proportional reasoning. 1981). Treagust (1980. Perry. indicating that the proportional schema is passed late. Only eight of the 67 male subjects (12%) and none of the 33 females passed the  Shadows task.  The Shadows task was included because it uses the formal operations schema of  proportions (as required for “miles per hour”). The authors found that students who had previously  completed one or more physics courses passed more tasks than those who hadn’t. and One­to­many (Circular) Speeds. Ibe (1985).  These studies explored  the contingent relationships between specific concrete and formal structures guided by  Phillip’s (1992) grouping model (see Figure 2) as well as by Inhelder and Piaget’s (1958)  description of formal reasoning schema and associated tasks. Poduska and Phillips  (1986). Distance. Morgan  (1979). Kelsey.  Asymmetric Speeds. and Birdd (1986).  The Science  Education Center at the University of Iowa (UI) has been particularly active in pursuing  these issues from the genetic­epistemological point of view. 1982). 1986) examined the order of  acquisition of structures that contributed to the concept of “speed” among freshmen and  sophomore community college students from five math and non­math oriented science  courses.

35 was attributed to “self­selection” of science courses by subjects who possessed the mental  structures enabling them to understand it.  They felt the gender­related effects on the  .  The authors found it notable that a large  percentage of subjects did not pass the tests.

 1992).36 Figure 2. .  Chart of Concrete Operational Structures ( From Phillips.

  They investigated  101 students from grades 6. 10. 1984) studied the interrelationships among three formal schemas:  probability. consisting of data constructed out of raw scores from the  . Perry. proportions.  Only the 12th  grade results are of interest in the current discussion. tilt of a cone (32%) and EU8.  location of a point (32%). 9.  The two concrete spatial  structures were passed by less than half as many: PRO8.  Student  involvement as well as discussion would support development of these important mental  structures.  The authors note that these rates of formal reasoning are much  lower than reported elsewhere “and may be due in part to the individual interview format  which permits greater exploration of reasons in contrast to the written instrument format”  (p.37 speed tasks lacked ready explanation and pointed to the need for more research. Wavering.  such as in “stereochemistry. although the Shadows  task approached significance. and correlations in grades 8. and Birdd (1986) investigated the spatial and logical  prerequisites to the formal schema of proportional reasoning (used in the Shadows task)  and the schema for control of variables (used in the flexible rods task). phases of the moon. Kelsey. and 12. Very few 12th graders passed the formal tasks: Shadows (6%)  and Flexible Rods (6%).  For example. tested with the tilt of a cone task. 330). 330). Only the grade 12  results are of interest here.  demonstrated significant gender differences across all the grades.  Student activities should  include building models and then making drawings of systems being taught.  The authors conclude that spatial reasoning skills must be  encouraged in the classroom.  Only one of the projective structures. Wavering (1979. 68% of the 12th graders  demonstrated the concrete logical structure of seriation (LG8). the Shadows task measures reasoning needed  to graph data and the two concrete spatial structures are needed for using perspective. and 12 (half were female in each grade). and other concepts that require  reasoning about the orientation of objects in space” (p.

 direct proportions. as demonstrated in  the Mr.  I believe the interpretation should hinge  on subsequent statements by Inhelder and Piaget which suggest that the notion of  proportions has a qualitative form as well as a later. 90). 324) statement about the sequence of these schemata is  “very vague and open to interpretation” (p.  the subject acts in conformity with a sort of schema of expectations.38 dissertation. Short task.  Wavering writes that his results suggest that the higher levels of proportional reasoning. 15% (three females and one  male) passed the Shadows task. and 24% (two females and five males) passed the quantification of probabilities  task. 10% (one female and two males) passed the correlations  task.  In the former case.  The Farrell and Farmer  (1985) study discussed below indicates that indeed.  Out of 29 seniors (14 females and 15 males). neither Hensley nor Wavering found gender  differences in Shadows task performance when considering the three grades together. p.  Wavering compared the scores of the Shadows task from all three grades with  Hensley’s (1974) results on the same task and found a near­significant difference. a considerably larger pass  rate than Wavering’s 15% pass rate.  . the schema of probability was acquired  before the schemata of proportions and correlations. consisting of  operations which he could perform to demonstrate the compensation.  Of the 30 students in  Hensley’s 12th grade group (50% female). to  Piaget’s theory. is attained earlier than the combination of direct and  inverse proportions required by the Shadows task.  In any event. develop after the correlations structure  because the latter only requires direct proportional reasoning.  This is contrary. in which correlation derives from probability and proportions structures.  requiring both direct and inverse reasoning.  Last. quantitative form. Tall and Mr.  Wavering concluded that among his subjects. he notes. 11 passed (37%). Wavering indicates that  Inhelder and Piaget’s (1958. The  near difference may be related to the 12th grade passing rates.

  This is probably  demonstrated by Wavering’s subjects in that the scoring procedure for the Shadows task  requires a metric.  but prior to the quantitative sense of proportional reasoning. 1958).  No females passed. 1985. 328). Ibe studied 8th. one (male) out of 31 (3%) passed the Shadows task. Ibe studied two projective groupings: PRO4. 324) (italics mine).39 which is taken for granted. One­to­ . 10th.  Of the 12th  graders (13 males and 18 females). Therefore. is the equivalence of the  relations connecting two terms A and B to the relations connecting two  other terms X and Y (Ibe. p. quantitative approach for its solution. then they must be closely related to  proportionality which. correlations may be attained after the qualitative sense of proportions. In other words. p. this qualification is  suggested by the sentence Wavering referred to: “Correlation is a notion which derives  simultaneously from that of probability and from a structure close to the one governing  proportions” (Inhelder and Piaget. position. and 12th grade students. the compensation is in this way  recognized as possible and often as necessary before the operational  procedures which could justify it are made explicit (p. Ibe (1985) studied the prerequisite schema to proportional reasoning in a search  for relationships between spatial reasoning and proportionality (a relationship suggested  in Inhelder and Piaget. Ibe cites Piaget and Inhelder’s (1967) opening to Chapter 13 of The Child’s   Conception of Space which indicates the close relationship of Euclidean and projective  structures. in its general logical form. One­to­One Multiplication of Projective  Relations (Tilting Straw task).  Ibe develops an argument to show they are both closely related to the concept  of proportionality: If the projective and Euclidean structures enable a subject to judge the  shape. 1958.  In fact. One­to­One Multiplication of  Projective Elements (Mountains task) and PRO8. and size of an object. 79).  He also included two Euclidean groupings: EU4.

 that the “personal­historical” explanation of male spatial superiority may be  inadequate. with significantly higher scores for males on two of the projective  groupings PRO5 and PRO8 and two of the Euclidean groupings EU5 and EU7.40 One Multiplication of Euclidean Elements (Conservation of Interior Volume) and EU8.  Rather. and 12 (50% of each grade were female). 10. 82).  Treagust  recommends that female students be taught more like male students to reduce differences  in spatial abilities and insure future employment parity with males in areas like science. and architecture.  Using ordering analysis among the five tasks. 1978). In a similar vein and as part of the UI research program. he found males scored higher in all  six structures. in follow­up to various findings of male dominance in science attainment  (National Assessment of Educational Progress. and results of other UI grouping  research.  The study found no gender differences across grades 8. 1982)  studied gender­related differences in three projective and three Euclidean concrete  structures. p.  engineering. the lack of gender differences in elementary school subjects coupled  with the consistency of gender differences on the six tasks of his research suggests that a  “genetic epistemological” account serves better. 10. Ibe  comments: “The finding of no gender difference contradicts as many previous findings as  it agrees with” (p.  Treagust  concludes from the pattern of results across grades. 95).  In his dissertation. and 12.  Using 108 subjects across  grades 8.  Multiplication of Placement and Displacement Relations (Location of a Point in Two or  Three Dimensions). 1977. Ibe found that both the  projective and Euclidean structures were logical prerequisites to proportional reasoning in  the Shadows Task. Treagust (1978) cites authors that  . Treagust (1980.  Treagust writes: “It is possible that the  apparently slower development in spatial conceptualization by females is a contributing  factor to their reported lower attainment of skills than that of males in handling science  information at the senior high school level and in later years” (1985.

 150­151). Doyle (1980) reports a study of spatial skills that focuses on the eight concrete  projective grouping using 100 students in grades 3. such as between 7 and 12­14. it is  reasonable to investigate whether prerequisite concrete spatial structures can be found at  earlier ages. and 9. did not seem hereditary (pp.  Euclidean or not.  He also indicates that Piaget explicitly suggested that spatial structures.   Elementary and Middle School Subjects   Given the low rate of success in finding evidence of proportional reasoning in the  Shadows task. and Symmetrical Interval Relations (PRO6). with boys performing better. 1992) that stimulated  both the above research on older students and following research on younger students.  One­to­Many Multiplication of Relations (LG7) .  Complementary Perspective Relations (PRO2).  These included Additional and Subtraction of Projective Elements (PRO1). 6. and One­to­one Multiplication of  Relations (LG8). five of the  structures had been “completed” (over 75% of the subjects had attained the mental  structure). and some evidence of females falling behind male performance. when Piaget found them to develop.41 suggest a sex­linked gene favorable for spatial abilities in about 50% of males and 25% of  females. Rectilinear Order (PRO5). One­to­Many Multiplication of Elements  (PRO3).  The  incomplete structures were One­to­One Multiplication of Projective Elements (PRO4).  By grade nine.  Doyle suggests that the lack of  overall gender differences fails to support the notion of greater mathematical and spatial  abilities reported in Maccoby and Jacklin’s (1974) book The Psychology of Sex   . do gender differences begin at ages earlier than adolescence?  Much research at  the UI Science Education Center has focused on clarifying and evaluating the presence of  concrete structures that comprise the “grouping model” (Phillips.  We may  also ask.  The only structure to exhibit significant gender differences was  Rectilinear order (PRO5).

 151). 29.  Morgan concluded that although there were some differences  between studies in the proportions of students attaining the various concrete projective  and Euclidean operations. 146).  Morgan suggests that student passivity in modern society  conflicts with Piaget’s premise that knowledge is derived from action. 147). it is obvious that subjects in these studies develop much more  slowly than expected when compared with Piaget’s pass criterion of 75% for subjects at a  given age. in which he concluded that there were few results indicating  significant relationships between gender and task performance. females in general may appear to perform more  . Maccoby and Jacklin also suggest that gender differences in  spatial skills do not become pronounced until later adolescence. but in the much deeper sense of the assimilation of reality into  the necessary and general coordinations of action (Piaget. nature of subject’s hobbies. and the large amount of time devoted to  watching television” (p. p. p.  This is less strong than Treagust’s (1978) view after  reviewing the same research. and that females may be “caught in the middle” between  passive activities given both genders in school. as well as encouragement toward passive  activities by sex­role stereotypes. 1969. Morgan notes a  confounding element.  Morgan suggests that “the lack of such structures could be a result of formal  schooling practices.  However. Morgan (1979) also reviews the findings of gender differences across several  studies at the UI and concludes. namely that a large percentage of all subjects (male and female)  failed to develop the structures. not in the sense of simple associative  responses.42 Differences.  Thus.  However.. Other findings of the “grouping model” research are described and summarized  by Morgan (1979) who conducted an analysis similar to Doyle’s but across all eight  Euclidean groupings. “The relationship between task performance and sex  differences is not clear” (p.  cited in Morgan.

  Therefore. the task protocols and passing rates will be less  comparable than in the preceding studies. and with statistical significance in enough structures to support other  findings in the psychometric literature on male superiority in spatial tasks. the pass rate ranged  from 3% to 37%.  Among high school seniors and college underclasspersons. farming. which are only partially attained among even high school  students.  Again.  It also requires acquisition of both projective and Euclidean  concrete spatial structures. 150). although  occasionally found.  Among college  males the passrate was 12%. in which roughly 50% of the subjects were female.  High school students demonstrated some gender differences.   Summary   The above findings indicate that proportional reasoning is a high­level structure  that follows development of correlations and probability. 1974). this supports the psychometric literature that indicate spatial  skills are not differentiated by gender among early adolescents and younger (Maccoby  and Jacklin.  in many cases. owing. probably because it requires a  quantitative approach. and carpentry” (p. to the lack of subjects passing the tasks.  However. auto repair. .  Among  elementary and middle school students. among the college  students studied by Poduska (1983) none of the 33 females passed the Shadows task.43 poorly than males. at least with higher pass  rates for males. Other Research Using the Shadows Task The following studies using the Shadows task are not part of the University of  Iowa research program. gender differences are less pronounced. with exceptions he observed among females who conduct hands­on  hobbies such as “woodworking.  Gender differences are difficult to detect statistically.

  Males scored significantly better on the science  examination and Shadows task. and to be able to show some  understanding of the connection between the principle and the correct placement” (p. of the remaining  21 average 14 year­old students (who had not failed science or math). of the 23 gifted 16­17 year­olds. 14­55 years old. regular students who had not failed science or math.  293).  Males  scored better than females by a factor of four for the 16­17 year­old groups.  He examined the relationship between spatial reasoning  and proportional reasoning in 6th form (11th grade) New Zealand students certified for  university entrance. and by a  factor of three among the adult group.  34 S’s took the Card Rotation Test and Surface Development Test for  spatial reasoning as well as Piaget’s Balance and Shadows tasks. 10.  There were no significant gender differences on the  Balance task or on either measure of spatial ability. of the 40 16­17 year­ olds. Of the 12  adults.  and 12th grade females.  All tests except the Card  Rotations Test correlated significantly with the science portion of the university  certification examination and with a composite score of the Balance plus Shadows tasks. 55% passed at level IIIA or better. Martorano (1977) gave the projection of Shadows task to middle class 6.  Piburn suggests these results support  . 8. 35% passed. none passed.  It is possible that Dulit used easier criteria for  scoring than the UI experiments since he makes no mention of requiring subjects to  physically measure the diameter of the rings.  Of the 20 in grade twelve. Piburn (1980) reviewed the evidence that spatial and visual imagination are  important for science studies.  She doesn’t give a task protocol but does mention that passing the Shadows task required  use of a metric system of calculating proportions.  both tests of proportional reasoning.44 Dulit (1972) used the Shadows task with 96 subjects. 33% passed.  They only needed “to make some verbal  statement equivalent to the proportionality principle. 57% passed.

 and does not contain items which  are obviously either spatial or require proportionality concepts” (p. and 12th grade  classes across five upstate New York school districts. he found that 81% scored formal on the Shadows task (as well. he writes.  He used five tasks for the schema  of proportions.  Among the early  college students.84.  but in any event. 11.  The  other four correlated with the total score between r =.  In comparing each of the five tasks to the total score for the  schema across all age groups.74 (Balance task r =. 11th and 12th graders. including the Balance and Shadows tasks.  Bady acknowledges the high correlations to be a function of including the target score in  the total score. 9th  and 10th graders. he was not sure of the mechanism  because the science examination “is nonmathematical. Farrell and Farmer (1985) performed an “in­depth” study of proportional  reasoning in 901 college­bound math and science students from 10.45 the notion that proportionality measures involve an element of spatial reasoning different  from other schemas of formal thought. the Shadows task was the most correlated. Bady (1978) attempted to validate the notion that several tasks can test for the  same schema.  And yet none of these females scored formal on the  composite balance plus Shadows tasks measure.  However.55).  Piburn suggests  that the Surface Development test (r =. r =.  This merits more research.  Piburn notes that females can have spatial skill  equivalent to males: equal numbers of male and females scored in the upper quartile of  the Surface Development Test. which resulted in scores being similar.52 and .  They investigated the relationship  . 446). and early college students. curriculum design for the sciences must include more work to develop  spatial reasoning.42 with total score for Balance plus Shadows  tasks) involves transformations of perspective central to the development of logical  thought on through to formal reasoning. 81%  passed the Balance task).  He used three age groups.

 administration of the Shadows task identified 24.3% of  females passed) a significant difference favoring males was found on the first test for  direct proportions (58.  Therefore. this  superiority vanished when subjects equally proficient at direct proportions were  compared again with the Shadows task. may.  For collaborating evidence.  However.46 between gender and course experience on the development of proportional reasoning.4% of females passed. the Shadows task itself.5% females passed).  First. students passing the test of direct proportions  were shown to have taken more science and math courses than those not passing. and  . but stem from some other source. Among students who passed the test for direct  proportions. indicate that gender differences  are not spatial in origin. or not.2% males and 47. they suggest. the absence of this  relationship among the students passing the more advanced Shadows test indicates that  learning fails to promote development after a point.  However. the  authors acknowledge the oft­noted male superiority in spatial tasks. calculating the  percentages passing for each gender across both tests (not done by the authors) indicates  that 12.  as a task with definite spatial components.4% of the original sample of males passed and only 5. the authors also found no differences between genders in the number of  science or mathematics courses. a general test for direct proportions using the Mr. in fact.  The  authors conclude that learning and development are related—more courses in science and  math accompany greater cognitive development. including the Shadows task. perhaps related to direct  proportions.2% as early or late formal.  Of a subsample of  128 students. Tall and Mr.3% males and 11.  However. the authors cite Linn and Pulos (1983)  who used several proportional reasoning measures.  More intensive developmental  instruction is required even in advanced courses. Short puzzle  identified 53% of the students who used direct proportional reasoning.  Regarding gender differences. a  difference of more than a factor of two.  However.  While no gender differences were found on the Shadows task (21.

 stereotypes.  However. including spatial ability. In conclusion. the literature suggests that males acquire the schema of proportions  earlier than females.  Of course.  Females  .  verbal and quantitative) and concludes that.  She  concludes that the two sources of gender differences are sufficiently intertwined to make  it impossible to assign a percentage of the variance that each contributes. both sources arise out of the ontogenetic unfolding of  genetic and hormonal influences.  Her self­defined  objective is to review evidence.  She suggests that the composition of college­age experimental  subjects is changing as women engage themselves in traditionally male­oriented  occupationals. the exact nature of the influence of psychometrically­ defined spatial skills upon proportional reasoning is not clear and remains to be  investigated. however. the  main sources include psychosocial influences such as sex­differentiated life experiences  and their concomitant beliefs.  1) Piaget’s water level test using a drawing of a tipped empty glass.47 found that although males performed better.  However. indeed. and self­concepts and such  biological influences as cerebral lateralization. Halpern finds research to indicate that sex differences are diminishing in effect  size over the years. suggesting that there will always be an  interaction with biological tendencies for or against spatial skills. they are substantive. Other Research on Spatial Reasoning and Gender Halpern (1992) reviews studies of gender­related cognitive differences (spatial. hoping to reach some conclusion about the origin of  gender differences: whether they arose from biological or psychosocial causes. including preference for verbal or spatial  modes of thought. the superiority could not be accounted for by  various measures of aptitude.  She qualifies this.  Three spatial tests  appear to display differences that may be “immune” to any currently known psychosocial  moderation. expectations.

  Females scored as well  as males on the non­physical task and significantly worse than males in the physical task.  Meanwhile. and quantitative ability differences are  intermediate” (p. males score  considerable higher on mental rotation tests of a three­dimensional object (illustrated in a  two­dimensional drawing). 66).   Halpern mentions that a “popular  hypothesis” suggests that visual­spatial differences underlie sex differences in quantitative  ability.  Also.  She indicates that “verbal ability differences are  small.  2)  Novel tests that require spatial visualization. female elementary  teachers must understand that spatial performance in themselves (and students) may lag  . Golbeck (1986) investigated development of a Euclidean system of coordinates  among college undergraduates (32 males and 32 females) using the water level task to test  for concepts of horizontality and the van­on­the­hill task to test for complementary  concepts of verticality.  3)  The rod and frame test in which males more accurately  position a rod vertically within a distant tilted frame.  Golbeck created  “non­physical” versions of both tasks in an attempt to determine if females suffer a  performance deficit on the tasks (owing to lack of familiarity with the situation) or a  competence deficit (lack of the underlying Euclidean structure).  Subjects were asked to draw how a light bulb and cord would  appear in a drawing of a van going up a hill at differing degrees of tilt..48 fail to draw the water level line horizontally and tend to draw it in the direction in which  the glass is tipped. Halpern also concludes that the verbal superiorities of young  females is probably biological in origin. but that they may be delayed in its acquisition.  Several educational implications  are given: educators must not succumb to lower expectations for females which in turn  could result in lower achievement (several studies are cited). her review suggests that empirical evidence is sometimes. but not  always. visual­spatial ability differences are large.  Golbeck claims this indicates that females indeed possess the necessary Euclidean  structure. found.  However.  E.g.

 appears flawed by Golbeck’s design of  the non­physical version of the tasks. Pallrand and Seeber (1984) found that 11 hours of training for 81 students (11. was not related to spatial skills as measured by the water­level test among 171  right­handed females aged 17 ­ 58. In a metastudy of sex differences in formal reasoning. and Correlations.  The premise of the study. however.  Finally. spatially­oriented.  This contradicted earlier findings by  Waber (1977) who used a block design test. and included a sample response with a correctly drawn   line illustrated in the example. (mean age 26. orientation.  She cites Piaget and Inhelder’s (1967) suggestion that a  relationship exists between spatial imagery and formal reasoning on the Shadows task.49 their competencies and compensatory measures should be invoked in the classroom. a standard spatial abilities test. and visualization skills. she used tilted rectangles instead of  drawings of the physical objects. hands­on science experiences are important to spatial  development.  At best.  Essentially. Vessels.  She  examines whether the advantage is due to differences in underlying “competence” in the  domain.  Meehan cites research on the topic and  concludes that competencies may indeed underly differences in performance in  proportional reasoning. but especially  on tasks using propositional reasoning: Shadows.1%  female) in a calculus­based 10­week introductory physics class for college undergraduates  improved perception. this tested for competency to imitate an example  rather than competency in the Euclidean structure.6). Meehan (1984) found that  males performed significantly better than males across all types of tasks. Strauss and Kinsbourne (1981) found that age of menarche. or differences in “activation/utilization” such as lack of familiarity with  traditionally male­oriented “scientific” apparatus. and a version  of the embedded figures test. a measure of  maturation.  Meehan cites additional evidence for this claim.  The training consisted of  .

 groups of  prospective secondary and elementary math teachers) but who had several courses in  math did not differ in spatial ability. implying “cognitive  abilities other than those associated with mathematical ability are utilized in an  introductory physics course” (p. scored higher on spatial visualization than prospective elementary  math teachers.  These differences did not extend to scholastic aptitude.  Physics class test items that demonstrated the  enhanced visual­spatial skills were lab work and multiple­choice items requiring  graphical analysis. which showed no  relation to spatial visualization ability. Martin (1967­1968) evaluated 530 math teachers and college students in teacher  preparatory courses. (science or art/industrial arts vs.  Students who had equivalent math skills. .50 “drawing outside scenes by viewing through a small square cut in a piece of cardboard. with  more math training.”  Students in different fields. 512).  Other activities included a short course in geometry  and the “Relative Position and Motion” module from SCIS.  They were encouraged to draw the dominant lines of the scenery and to reduce the scene  to its proper perspective” (p.  although not so much.  Those with mathematics background had greater spatial  visualization skills than those without based on the differential “Aptitude Test of Space  Relations. but who dropped out of  the physics class scored less on the pre­test than those who stayed.  The authors also found that  the 10 weeks of physics training in control classes also improved the tested skills.  The experimental intervention also was associated  with significantly higher course grades. 510).  Prospective teachers at the secondary level.

  She  found that the Correlations task was the easiest of four formal tasks.  Out of the 29 12th grade subjects. and 17% passed the Floating Bodies task. again there were no gender  difference.  Wavering found that the proportion of subjects passing Correlations  was not statistically different than for the Shadows tasks.  Using  other evidence from the study. 42% passed the Flexibility of Rods  task.  Wavering also compared scores from his 12th grade  subjects with Rubley’s (1972) correlation scores for 11th and 12th grade science students. compared with  females. not correlational.  43%  passed the Conservation of Displacement Volume. fail. passed by 57%. and is adopted in  my present research reported here. perhaps memorized from prior reading. Rubley identified 27% of her 60 subjects as pass compared with Waverings  10%.  However. Rubley suggests the higher male performance may be due  to greater science knowledge.  (The lack of statistical difference is probably due to Wavering’s use of five levels  for his Chi­square test rather than comparing pass vs. but the only difference to reach significance was the Floating Bodies task.  discussed above.51   Correlations Task   University of Iowa Studies Rubley (1972) studied four tasks of formal reasoning and their relationship with  dogmatic attitudes among 60 11th and 12th grade chemistry students (50% female). and.  This strategy allowed greater  fidelity in establishing contingent relationships between target schemas.  Note that  Wavering decided to classify level IIIA subjects as non­pass because IIIA only indicates  possession of proportional reasoning.  More males passed each of the tasks than  females. 3 (10%) were level IIIB or IIIC. Wavering (1979) also studied Correlations in addition to the Shadows task.  No significant difference was found comparing the two score sets across the levels 0 to 4.) Wavering notes that Rubley’s  .

Dulit (1972) studied correlational reasoning (as well as proportional reasoning. 35 females. a selected sample. of  the 21 average 14 year­old students (who had not failed science or math).”  If  their answer was right. 25% passed.  No clear definition of the scoring criteria was given. since the Piagetian criteria do not  require awareness of the underlying formal mechanisms” (p. Other Research Using the Correlations Task Lovell (1961) replicated the Correlations task of Inhelder and Piaget (1958).  Of  20 least able 15­18 year­old secondary school students. “I scored them as formal. thus resulting in a lower pass rate. where only females passed. 30 males. “saying very little by way of explanation. Ross (1973) studied correlational reasoning (among three other formal tasks) in 65  university undergraduates. which is equivalent to Waverings criteria (and mine) for passing the  Correlations task.  however. displaying only  direct proportions on the Correlations task. ignores Piaget’s requirement that subjects explain their rationale which in turn  indicates possession of the schema being evaluated.  Of additional interest is Dulit’s  . and of the  26 ablest students.  9.52 subjects were taken from chemistry classes. 17% passed.  Males performed better by a factor of two or more in each group except among the  average 14 year­olds.  Dulit’s scoring.4% of subjects “passed. average age 20. only five (25%) passed. 62% passed. 10% passed. while his subjects  represented all levels of ability.  In addition to the scoring liberties  mentioned above for the Shadows task.  of 36 16­17 year­old regular students who had not failed science or math. 20 (77%) passed. a total of 98.” Martorano (1977) found 55% of the 20 12th grade females passed the Correlations  task at III or better.2% passed at  formal level two.3 years.  reviewed above). Dulit mentions that some subjects were  “inspirational” and would leap at a solution.  When Ross included subjects who scored level IIIA. of 21 gifted 16­17 year­olds. 299).  Of the 12 adults.

 Ross gave  his subjects the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking to evaluate correlations of the  subfactors with scores on the formal reasoning tasks. Combinations of Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies      Task Ross (1973). in spite of the fact there was no significant  difference in their ACT scores and in spite of the fact that females had significantly  higher GPAs. the rule used by Doyle (1980)  above.  Adolescents who  failed to function at the formal stage were simply not reported (Dulit.”  Protocols were used simply as illustrations. Ross found a  significant difference. Inhelder who confirmed that “indeed not all cases were   reported” (italics are Dulit’s) thus.  There was no intention to speak to the question of “frequency” or  “incidence. invalidating any attempt to compare pass rates with  Piaget and Inhelder’s original research!  In other words.  Ross invokes Elkind’s (1962) suggestion that gender differences appear in  the science­oriented tasks due to female aversion to taking on the masculine roles  associated with science activities. as suggested by Piaget (1972).53 concern regarding the failure of his subjects to pass the tests of formal reasoning with the  same ease as Inhelder’s and Piaget’s original subjects. According to Inhelder.  Since females did well on the ACT and GPA scores.  When  comparing males and females on five tests of formal reasoning together.  Of interest. in the same study described above for the Correlations task. favoring males. found  75% of his 65 undergraduate subjects passed the Chemical Combinations task. p. to define “completion” of a mental structure for an age group cannot be applied to  tests of formal reasoning.  Five factors were generated from  .  297).  Ross feels that females would score much better if tested for formal reasoning within their  vocational or profession specialty.  Doyle defined “completion” as occurring when 75% of the  subjects passed the task.  Dulit reports a personal  communication with Dr.

 in an order theoretic  re­analysis of Martorano’s data found that pass scores on the Chemical Combinations task  were not contingent upon passing any other task except the Colored Tokens task. Kolodiy (1975.3292). 1976).5% of the subjects  were classified formal.  No gender breakdown was given. . 1977) studied the growth of reasoning by comparing formal  reasoning skills of motivated science students and science majors in the 10th grade and in  freshman and senior years of college. also a  combinatorial schema. and none of the formal tests appeared in  either of the two factors that loaded the Torrance subscales.7781). in that he comments that the  “chemicals and simple balance tasks lend themselves to solution by trial and error” (p. Ross.3366) and SAT math ( r  =.54 the 14 variables (many for only 65 subjects!). and both were significantly lower in  development than college seniors (64% “passing”). Joyce (1977) studied 66 upper­class college students in a science education  curriculum. SAT verbal (r =. Hauling Weight on an Inclined Plane.  Ross concluded that formal  reasoning does not include a creative “divergent component. demonstrated no  significant correlations on those variables. Martorano (1977) found 85% of the 20 12th grade females passed the  Combinations task at level III A or better.155). based on “certain criteria” which appear to be “the formulation of  a systematic approach to isolating the proper combination of liquids” (p.  157).  The other task. using five tasks including Chemical Combinations. however.  Performance on  the Chemicals task was significantly correlated to scores representing student’s  cumulative grade point average (r =.  There is  reason to be suspicious of Joyce’s findings.  Kolodiy combined the scores of the two tasks  and found that high school sophomores (35% “passing”) and college freshmen (32%  “passing”) were similar in level of development.  Bart and Mertens (1979).  95.”  (See also.

  Slightly fewer passed the Chemicals task in the  lower age group: 20% females and 34% males versus the higher age group: 34% females  and 36% males passing..  He used five tasks for the combinatorial schema.53. and that tasks that appear similar may actually tap  different schematic requirements. 369) They also  . r =.55  (Tokens task r =.05 years. 9th and 10th  graders.  He used three age groups. the authors conclude that 90% of females  and 70% of males are functioning below formal operations.)   Bady concluded that the nature of the task can indeed influence  the “pass” classification of a subject.  The other three ranged from r =. and Renner (1984) evaluated the influence of age and  gender on development of four formal operational schema including combinatorial  reasoning.  Bending Rods. 11th and 12th graders. Marek.50 to .  Based on evidence including the other tasks (Conservation of Volume. indicates a failure in “providing adequate experiences to help  students develop the use of a systematic general procedure for generating all possible  combinations. especially  in combinatorial reasoning.an essential tool for learning many science concepts” (p. he found that 76% scored formal on the Chemicals task (as well. the Chemicals task was the most correlated. De Hernandez.  Among the early college  students.  They also conclude that lack of improvement in scores with age..  They compared two age groups of 70 subjects each (both 50% female) with  mean ages of 16.72. matching other’s  observations. not significantly  different than a “travel routes” analog.  In comparing each of the five tasks to the total score for the schema across  all age groups. and early college students. r = . 95% passed the  Tokens task).70.  There was no significant difference between age groups for  either gender. nor was there any significant difference between genders within either of  the groups.49 and 17.55 Bady (1978) applied the same approach to combinatorial reasoning as described  above for proportional reasoning.  including the Chemicals and Tokens tasks. Equilibrium in the Balance).

56 suggest. 1978.  A variety of studies have looked at Piagetian cognitive development in light of  lateralization or brain localization.   Communicating Vessels Task   Martorano (1977) found 45% of the 20 12th grade females passed the Vessels task  at level III or better. in an order theoretic re­analysis of Martorano’s  data found that pass scores on the Communicating Vessels task were contingent upon  pass performance of both Correlations and the Combinations tasks.  1976. Wheatley.g. Hart. in light of their own and other studies of gender differences.  Eye dominance was the independent variable.. Samples. Lawson and Wollman (1975) found that  students who demonstrated conservation (number. Gray. Galin.   Brain Localization and Piagetian Studies   Over the last twenty years. . Rennels. except for the Hydraulic Press (also a test for the schema of  equilibrium). 1979.  She determined that the Vessels task was passed by significantly  fewer subjects than any other task (including the Shadows. Frankland.  Bart and Mertens (1979). substance. 1989. that males mature  intellectually earlier than females. 1980. Rekdal. and  Correlations tasks). 1980). most educators interested in brain research have  focused on lateralization as the source of educational implications for curriculum design  (E. 1979. They suggest maturation  moves toward left­hemisphere superiority in task performance and that problem solving  probably requires both hemisphere functions. continuous quantity. and  weight) reflected greater left­hemisphere specialization than non­conserving students. Yeap. Mitchell and Kraft (1978)  provide a review of issues related to mathematics education. They conclude that left­hemisphere verbal  and linear functioning characterized intellectual development in the Piagetian sense. Tomlinson­Keasey and Kelly. 1976. Combinations.

 were not Piagetian. however. frontal lobe development was  . and  Wheatley. Somewhat related.  Wheatley and Mitchell (1976). Mitchell. Buhrke. Molfese. and Wang (1983) used visual­evoked  responses to study “conservation of quantity” in adults. Languis.  What are the influences on a change in left/right EEG alpha amplitude ratios? Is the left  greater. Additional research from this group (Willis. has been covered in the introduction.  Diamond and  Doar (1989) and Diamond (1985) used Piaget’s “Object Permanence task” to study frontal  development in infants. Note. 1980). however. Butters. as well as the study by Dilling.” their own claims notwithstanding. indicated an interaction between habituation and hemisphere  processing. that these authors failed to use a task that would reasonably  meet strict criteria of a “Piagetian task. 1979) indicates that purported visuo­spatial task processing demands were more  readily reflected in alpha power ratios than the perceptually obvious requirements.57 The EEG study by Kraft (1976) (and published in Kraft.  Later judgments elicited only left­ hemisphere responses. the right hemisphere lesser. and  Mitchell. Barton and Brody (1970) found that successful  performance on tasks involving mental rotation (including the Piagetian “Village scene  task”) required intact parietal lobe functioning not only in the left hemisphere. Several studies have noted frontal involvement in a Piagetian developmental  paradigm. Wheatley.  Initial judgments were associated  with frontal activity over both hemispheres. Shute. Molfese. Note that coherence measures avoid these pitfalls. The  tasks.  They concluded that indeed. but also in  the right hemisphere. or do both hemispheres vary in their measurement?  McManus (1983) discusses pitfalls of this research and suggests alternative analytic  methods.  It is important to note that studies of laterality are beset by issues of interpretation.

 Goethe  and Dekker (1986). Rhodes. and appends specific  suggestions for instructional design based on his findings. Spoelstra. Jennen­Steinmetz and Verleger (1987).58 measured in this Piagetian task the same as with the similar but more commonly­used  tool for frontal research: the delayed response task. Storm Van Leeuwen and Versteeg (1980).  Adey (1967.  Studies with  substantive reviews include Gasser. and Malvido (1989) that reports literature indicating that  EEG alpha power measures fail to correlate with measures of EEG alpha coherence.  . Berkhout. Walter. Tucker and Roth (1984).  The following sections  review the literature that reports results of studies into the relationship between  cognitive  skills and EEG alpha coherence measured during the practice of a standard cognitive  state. and Bair (1986). The current study utilizes subjects engaged in maintaining a “standard cognitive  state” while having their EEG alpha coherence measures taken.   EEG Coherence Studies   The reader is directed to these references for a basic introduction to EEG  coherence: tutorials are provided in Shaw (1981 and 1984).  Other psychophysiological  studies using Piagetian theory will be discussed in Chapter Five. and Adey (1967). Walter and Adey (1969).  French and Beaumont (1984) and Beaumont and Rugg (1979). 1969). Ford.  Walter. Kado. in this case. Roth. Rhodes. Herrera. and Adey (1967). Hinrichs and Machleidt (1992).  Normative findings for male  adults are presented in Tucker. Discussion and  Conclusion.  Deinema.  Of particular interest is a  study by Corsi­Cabrera. Case (1981. 1985) outlines a neurophysiological approach to answering many  questions associated with Piaget’s developmental psychology. Wieneke. Transcendental Meditation.

 or it may occur for longer.  Clear experience of imagery  was also significantly correlated with the digit symbol test.  The experience of transcending can be characterized a “going beyond”  thought. the CE group also had significantly  . Jedrczak. R.  The CE group showed significantly  higher measures of alpha coherence and creativity (ideational fluency on the Unusual  Uses subtest from the Verbal form of the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking). r  = .  F. resulting in the experience of awareness without an object of thought. age. Reports  indicate that his may occur very briefly.  The number of months of  practice of the TM­Sidhis program correlated significantly with both digit span scores  and fluency scores when the major confound.  One group consisted of subjects  with self­reported clear experiences (CE) of inner awareness without thoughts (clear  transcending) and the other group without CE. It is also called the experience of “pure consciousness”.  more noticable periods. and be hardly noticed.  They compared  two groups of males.  Similarly.  Beresford.  The frequency of transcending and the clear experience of imagery were  significantly positively correlated with the Torrance tests. EEG alpha coherence.66.59 Standard Cognitive State (Transcendental Meditation) and  EEG Coherence Studies Specific experiences of “transcending” during TM appear related to increased  cognitive skills. 66 of whom  were female. Orme­Johnson and Haynes (1981) studied the combination of subjective  experience. with the mean of these four coherences significantly  correlated with ideational fluency. was partialled out. and a measure of cognitive aptitude. and Clements (1985) measured subjective reports of transcending in TM and  vividness of imagery during practice of the TM­Sidhis (advanced TM practices) in  relation to fluency scores from the unusual uses subtest of the Torrance Tests of Creative  Thinking and scores on the WAIS digit symbol test among 152 subjects.  and Central (C3C4) alpha coherences were significantly greater for the CE group in a  MANCOVA with all four measures. L. both with a mean age of 25+ years.

  In addition. and r  = . whereas when the area is performing  its specialized motor or perceptual function that coherence will be low (Orme­ Johnson et al. r  = .60 greater R alpha coherence and “dominant” alpha coherence (using the largest coherence  measure from the four possible pairs). The  following studies explore this anterior­posterior difference in relation to measures of  cognitive aptitude.  Specifically..  To explain the differential activity of the anterior and posterior cortex.    Posterior Coherence Inversely Related to Intelligence   It is important to examine in some detail the above claim since the functional  significance of coherence has been difficult to identify by many if not all researchers  . they found significant inverse correlations between  alpha O coherence and verbal IQ (WAIS).  Correlations with anterior derivations. where found. Verbal  originality.  Among other findings.. Verbal flexibility. and 4 of 6 scales  from the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking: Verbal fluency. 1982).  As implied above. We propose that when a cortical area is involved in a generalized.64 respectively. the  authors hypothesize an “anterior­posterior axis” in which coherence is higher or lower in  different attentional processes. Orme­Johnson et al. bilateral F alpha  correlated significantly with creativity.65. Studies Related to EEG Alpha Coherence and Intelligence In addition to their findings for FLR­O index of alpha coherence index greater  than ..95. The current research utilizes a “Coherence Index” that reflects an inverse  relationship between anterior coherences and bilateral occipital coherence (FLR­O). integrative  function that coherence is high in that area. r  = .. principled moral reasoning.  Both measures significantly correlated with  ideational fluency. the CE group scored  significantly higher on the creativity test than the unclear experience group. meeting specific brain processing needs.5.  were positive. (1982) also examined effects related to individual  derivations. and Figural fluency.

 Thatcher. F3F4. lower intelligence. Thatcher.  Of the  correlations that were statistically significant. McAlaster.  For example.  rest condition. and beta. although some appeared  anteriorally as well. the  anterior bilateral derivations included C3C4.  Only the posterior T3T4  and anterior C3C4 were not significantly correlated with full scale IQ.  Lester. For alpha. P3P4. all were negatively related to IQ.  Thatcher. speculated that for “local distance” electrodes (7 cm or  less apart). also found that IQ was correlated with increased amplitude  asymmetry for all frequency bands (regardless of which side of the head displayed greater  amplitude).  (In the alpha band.  Some researchers suggest that low coherence fulfills the need for  functional differentiation among cortical locations. theta.  Most of  the correlations were in the posterior regions of the scalp. when the underlying  generators that contribute to the EEG seen at the two sites are coherent with one another. and T5T6. et al. et al.  Frequency bands included delta. alpha. and F7F8.  .  They interpret this to reflect reduced capacity for information coding  capability and therefore. only the posterior P3O1 and P4O2 were significantly correlated  with full scale IQ.  Among the five  homolateral derivations. 143). high coherence represents “neural redundancy. and Cantor (1983) correlated WAIS­R IQ scores with measures of  coherence across many derivations in a study of 191 normal children during eyes closed. the posterior bilateral derivations included O1O2.  “In other words.  Differences in amplitude were interpreted to support the theory that  enhanced differentiation represented increased coding capacity. which essentially reflects the notion  of “concrete.  there is less capacity for coding the information that may become available from the  outside world or from other groups of cells” (p.61 using coherence.” or low functional neural  differentiation. specialized functions” given above. Horst.

 although strongest between 25 and 33 Hertz.  The relationship was present  across the entire frequency range. et al.5 Hz).  All the above research used monopolar  electrodes with linked ear lobes (where reported) in contrast to bipolar electrodes..5  Hz). and Fein. 151). 418). (1983). supporting (but not mentioned by Gasser et al. it held for  both bilateral and homolateral measures in the occipital.  They concluded that short­term digit retention scores may be associated with a general differentiation [i. . 1989).e.  Floyd. and with Luria’s  observations that the evolution of higher cognitive functions parallels histological  differentiation of the cortex (p.  Clusin and Giannitrapani  (1970) presaged Thatcher’s findings and interpretation with their study of 11–13 year­old  right­handed males.) the findings of both Clusin and  Giannitrapani (1970) and Thatcher.  They found an inverse relationship between the Weschsler Digit  Span and resting EEG coherence between 2–34 Hertz. Gasser.) Other coherence researchers relate similar theories.5–12.  The experimental group of mildly mentally  retarded children demonstrated higher coherences during rest than the normal IQ  children. Jennen­Steinmetz and Verleger (1987) independently suggest  that the greater the maturation and intelligence among their child subjects (10­13 years)  the lower the coherences—“assuming that progressing differentiation of brain regions  went along with an EEG at rest” (p.  These findings are compatible with  clinical evidence on the effects of lesions in these areas. lateral­parietal. which  have been shown to reflect different coherence responses to task conditions (Merrin. as well as between O2 Pz (7. less coherence] of on­going  neural activity in certain cortical regions.62 however. Similarly.5–9. only F7F8 demonstrated a significant linear amplitude ratio correlation with  IQ. and prefrontal  areas.  This theory received statistically significant  confirmation in the alpha band for bilateral coherence between occipital O1O2 (7.

  They  conclude that sex indeed impacts the relationship between the EEG measure and  cognitive ability.  They used nine males and nine females with mean ages of  23 and 27 respectively. in addition to individual differences.  spatial.  High intercorrelation (low  hemispheric differentiation) appears related to failure in information processing in men  and vice versa in women. .  For females.   The authors found significant negative correlations (p  < .05) in the alpha band  EEG for males at C3C4. 1980). and O bilateral derivations during eyes  closed rest (referenced to “ipsilateral earlobe”). Herrera.g. at C3C4 and  T3T4 for the verbal subtest. and at C3C4 for the spatial subtest. McGlone. T. and P3P4 on the abstract reasoning subtest.  They point out that their data also show higher intercorrelation  for the four derivation pairs for the female group (less hemispheric differentiation). and Rugg (1978) who  located higher coherences among females while performing cognitive tasks.  The authors point out that the differences in signs for the correlations  mitigated against finding a significant DAT­IQ correlation for the group as a whole.  This is in line with the  above research findings.  Note that EEG interhemispheric  correlation (Pearson product­moment correlation coefficients) is an analog to coherence. however. and O derivations.  They suggest this is consistent with reports in the  literature of lower hemispheric asymmetry in women (e. P.  significant for C. T3T4. the authors report the alpha correlations  were mostly positive.  They point to similar  findings under task conditions reported by Beaumont. during rest. except to point out that hemispheric  differentiation may play a different role for each sex..  but not an identical measure. P. and Mavido (1989) studied the relationship of verbal. with statistical significance only at C3C4 for both the abstract and  spatial subtests. and reasoning subtest scores from the Differential Aptitude Test (DAT) with EEG  alpha interhemispheric correlation at C. Mayes.63 Corsi­Cabrera.  No theory  regarding the cause of the differences was offered.

 there were no statistical differences in the coherence­ IQ correlations for the alpha band.  WAIS­R performance and verbal tests were  administered about four weeks prior to the EEG. (TM.) In conclusion. but without significance.05).  (When pooled. EC. negative.  However. the TM condition  demonstrated statistically greater correlations (p  < .  In comparing pooled anterior bilateral derivations  with pooled posterior derivations. (1983) in a sample of 48  school children ages 10–16 (50% females) who practiced the TM technique while EEG  coherence measures were taken. et al.64 Hernandez (1985) replicated the work of Thatcher.05) and one homolaterally significant  correlation (T3­T5.’s findings.  This indicates the advantage of using TM as a “standard cognitive state” for  such studies. positive. the homolateral alpha coherences­ IQ correlations of left versus right derivations failed to indicate any hemisphere  advantage.  All three conditions revealed significantly greater anterior alpha coherences than  posterior alpha coherences. p  < . and MA)  Hernandez found the patterns of negative coherence­IQ correlations within the posterior  regions to uphold Thatcher et al.  Hernandez indicates the patterns were similar in alpha and  beta bands. and eyes closed mental arithmetic (MA). Despite this overall advantage for the TM condition. tests of the posterior and  anterior derivations in the TM condition revealed only one bilaterally significant alpha  coherence­IQ correlation (C3­C4. p  < .  Hernandez used three conditions for the  coherence measures: TM. when taking all three states into account.05) than the EC or the MA  conditions. eyes closed rest (EC).  This caused her to conclude that “COH is a  .  Looking at the correlation between alpha coherence and IQ  with seven anterior and posterior bilateral coherences pooled. delta and theta bands demonstrated  statistical differences with positive correlations in the anterior and negative correlations  in the posterior measures.

  The TM subjects. support different functions than the occipital. and social responsibility (Luria. and subcortical  connections. although sitting with  .65 relatively stable. Hernandez suggests two implications:  1) the children practicing TM may differ from those in the Thatcher et al.  Anatomically. the frontal cortex has extensive  interhemispheric connections as well as other cortical. abstract conscious processing such  as comprehension. areas. 59).  (A neurophysiological definition of “integration” will be offered in Chapter Vunder  Directions for Future Research. (1982)  and presumably holds for the current research using Piagetian tests of formal reasoning. Following the  second point. This reflects the “integrative functions” suggested by Orme­Johnson et al.  The integrative functions of the frontal lobes include  integration of multimodal sensory information. and 2)  the frontal.  research measured EEG during rest. anterior areas. posterior.  This structure allows for more integrated. eyes closed. judgment. in the context of the functional significance of alpha  coherence.)   TM­Related Anterior Coherence Changes   Following the first point given by Hernandez.   Anterior Coherence Positively Related to Intelligence   Regarding the anterior findings. 66).”  First. 1980). limbic. state­independent characteristic of the subjects under the conditions  measured.  These results are therefore consistent with the neural redundancy  interpretation of local­distance COH” (p. note that the Thatcher et al. however. synthetic functioning (p. Hernandez suggests that the functional significance of coherence may vary  with scalp location. 1980).  “Because of the highly integrative function of these (frontal) areas of the cortex. and selective  attention (Yingling. high  frontal COH may be more reflective of the potential for integrated function.  66). in contrast to  high posterior COH which may be reflective of neural redundancy” (p. the difference in subjects may prove  a key parameter related to “integrative functions. study.

..95 threshold.  The  results of the task have been characterized by Wallace (1970. Evidence that this task alters the subject’s coherence measures occurs in several  studies. see Levine et al. but without  marked decrease at the end of the period.  All studies indicate increases in anterior coherence with TM .)  Furthermore. indicating that alpha coherence is not necessarily correlated  with alpha power. Levine (1976) found that subjects practicing TM tend to increase alpha  coherence in the frontal and central areas at the beginning of the TM period.  or sleep (Also. the subjects engage in a task. 1986) as “restful alertness”  with an EEG “signature” different than either wakefulness.e. half of the subjects performed twice daily relaxation (without TM) and half  followed their normal schedules for 2 weeks.e. the twice­daily 20­minute rest period (i.  (No significant increases in  alpha power were detected. indicating that the regular discipline of eyes­closed  “relaxation” was not the source of change in coherence.  Control subjects practicing “mock” meditation using repetitive  backwards counting in a non­taxing fashion usually demonstrated decreases in any alpha  coherence that may have been present upon closing the eyes. with post­tests taken during TM two weeks after instruction and found significantly  greater alpha frontal coherence above the . First.. coherence for  the same subjects was compared under other experimental conditions. drowsiness. i.  He found that coherence also tends to spread to  other frequencies. additionally  engage in following a set of simple instructions.66 eyes closed and experiencing restful relaxation (Wallace & Benson.  Dillbeck and Bronson  (1981) compared pre­tests during non­TM rest periods for 15 subjects in a longitudinal  study. eyes closed rest. 1976). 1972).  Prior to the TM  instruction.  There were no group differences in alpha  coherence or alpha power.. Second. rest without  TM) was not the cause of the change because prior to the TM instruction. coherence is related to TM and not just rest.

 Orme­Johnson. the authors found that bilateral frontal (F3F4) alpha 1  (8­10 Hz) coherence was negatively correlated with IQ (Otis Lennon Mental Abilities  Test) r  = ­.  And moreover.  The SOF  measure also correlated significantly with GPA.67 A third indication demonstrates that coherence has positive characteristics in TM  subjects.  For example.  in the posttest of all subjects (in which one third (25) of the subjects practiced TM)  . progressive relaxation (PR).  Anterior increases in coherence between eyes­open. 05. Orme­Johnson et al.002). the magnitude of the SOF (with positive anterior  coherence) indicates emergent cognitive skills unrelated to any particular cognitive  training.)  The coherence measures also included F3C3. verbal IQ. using for  analysis the clearest minute of EEG near the end of the TM/PR/rest period. and principled moral  reasoning. show a positive relation with cognitive skills.  This indicates that increases in this coherence index from rest to TM  represent neurophysiological changes almost as great as from eyes­open to eyes­closed  (simple rest).  (Unfortunately. to eyes­closed. or a cognitive program for stress  management. F3C4. occipital measures were lost during the study.  (1982) report evaluation of a “second order coherence factor” (SOF) that consisted of  positive anterior and negative posterior measures of alpha and theta bands.0001). The fourth and perhaps the most compelling evidence supporting the positive over  the negative relationship between anterior coherence and IQ in TM subjects is offered by  Gaylord.  Note that  initially.31.  In this longitudinal study. highly significant increases in the SOF factor  occurred in the transition from eyes­open to eyes­closed (p < . F4C3. p < .  Among their 47 subjects. all subjects were nonmeditators during the pretests. and from eyes closed  to TM (p < .  During the pretests. 83 black adults  (aged 17­44.  After two and a half months. median age 21) were measured prior to random assignment to one of three  treatments: TM. and then to  TM. and Travis (1989). and C3C4. F4C3.

05.68 analysis showed a positive correlation between left hemisphere (F3C3) alpha 1 (8­10 Hz)  coherence and IQ.  The authors note there were insufficient subjects to  study posttest correlation patterns for each group separately. such as reduced orientation. and therefore interpretation  of the finding is difficult. as well  .  Significant increases were found taking all coherence pairs and all frequency bands (4­25  Hz) into account.  That is. and Travis (1989) are  conservative in light of the fact that no overall longitudinal changes were found in any  group. and alpha 2 (10­12 Hz) bands. in defense of the position  that the TM condition was primarily responsible for the switch. Given the reports of Orme­Johnson et  al. p  < . as well.  alpha 1 (8­10 Hz).. Note that these findings by Gaylord.  However.  But they conclude from their own and prior studies (such as  given above) that frontal coherence may be different in meditators and non­meditators. it can be pointed out that  the authors also report that the TM subjects were unique among the three groups in  producing increases in EEG coherence from eyes­open to eyes­closed during the posttest. Orme­Johnson.  But this does not explain the switch in valence between anterior  alpha and IQ. it can be said that the  subjects in the other two techniques may have responded differently during the posttest  eyes­closed rest EEG session. the lack of longitudinal changes indicate that the observed switch in  correlation sign between anterior alpha coherence and IQ is based on minimal  neurophysiological “conditioning” and that the locus of the switch may well be the nature  of the task instructions given for TM practice as much as any longitudinal changes that  occur with the practice. thereby  contributing to the difference across the three groups.  The authors note that subjects reported at posttest a failure to  practice any treatment program with regularity and that this may explain the lack of  longitudinal changes.33. etc. (1982) of longitudinal increases in the SOF factor for eyes­open to eyes­closed.  In speculation for other causes for the switch. and also for right­hemisphere (F4C4) coherences in theta (6­8 Hz). r  = .

  Arendander associates this phenomenon with mechanisms imputed by the  orienting response (OR) of Sokolov (1963). Hernandez’s. One author has suggested the mechanism of  the “transcending reflex” (Arenander.69 as eyes closed to TM. Sheppard and Boyer  (1990) examined the influence of EEG alpha coherence on a decision task among male  and female adults.  The study examines reaction times required for the  subject to determine if a target stimulus is a word or a nonword. 1985 discussion of the  “integrating” influence of anterior coherence above). however. the  . et al. These studies shed light on the significance of alpha coherence relative to  improvements in cognitive skills and intelligence. EEG Alpha Coherence and Frontal Lobe Activation Several studies have evaluated the contribution of EEG alpha coherence to  cognitive success during decision making. In summary.  In each trial. we can reasonably speculate that a similar phenomenon occurs in  the Gaylord.  The research task using the dependent  variable occurs outside of the practice of TM. 1986) that is hypothesized to increase the EEG  coherence in a fashion that enhances the adaptive functions of the brain (also see Wallace.  The study specifically tests whether coherence is related to brain  “semantic activation” as it is understood in the context of “priming” (or alerting) the  subject about a concept prior to exposing the subject to a target stimulus that may or may  not be associated with the concept. Various authors have indicated that voluntary  ORs are associated with frontal lobe activity (Cf.  For example. Brain activation during problem solving can be associated  with the orientation response. What additional support can be  given for this model?  Let us examine evidence regarding orientation and habituation in  relation to cognitive aptitudes. study. an anterior­posterior coherence axis appears related to the cognitive  changes associated with the practice of TM.  1986). subjects are experienced in the  practice of TM.

 and thus slowing RT in the  context of providing adaptive cognitive value.  Instead.  This OR would result from the lack of relationship between the prime and the  target—a mismatch with the neuronal model. or a neutral letter string “xxxxx. (1983) and other  authors mentioned above.  Similarly. the activation associated with  coherence slowed the subject’s reaction time.  However.  The second finding suggests that coherence  can serve to inhibit reactions.70 stimulus is preceded by a “prime” that could take one of three values: a related word. increasing the subjective salience of the mismatch. under conditions of high  coherence the prime “activated” the brain to respond more effectively. a  non­related word.  trials with the greater coherence were associated with faster reaction times when the  target stimulus was related to the prime.”   The authors found evidence that.   Sheppard (1989) concludes in his dissertation version of the above research that  the coherence results refute the “redundancy theory” of Thatcher et al. he suggests his results support a notion of  “information flow” as suggested by Galbraith (1967) and Livanov (1977). I suggest an amended interpretation:  that the delayed reaction time in the non­related prime condition actually results from an  orientation response (OR) that typically gives rise to momentary inhibition of motor  activity.   The authors agree that this does not allow a clear­cut generalization that  coherence speeds information processing.  In other words. as well as facilitate reactions.  Greater coherence may support a stronger  OR.  (Their findings  apply only to right hemisphere coherence (10 pairs summed across both anterior and  posterior regions) and left hemisphere posterior­parietal (5 pairs summed)).  when the target stimulus was not related to the prime.  Redundancy  theory suggests that coherence reflects the amount of coherent (redundant) activity in a  . compared with trials preceded by low coherence.

 as well as anterior functions. I suggest that  higher anterior coherence during the practice of the set of instructions that constitute the   TM technique may reflect greater attentiveness to the task at hand (i.  Based on the above reasoning..  .  For  example. to resist non­adaptive automatization. posterior  functions..   A possible reinterpretation of the redundancy theory arises.. anxiety.  I suggest  that the interactive nature of the experiment could require automatized. given Arenander’s  (1986) transcending reflex model. anticipation) and lower bilateral posterior coherence may reflect greater ability  to habituate to distraction (i. WAIS IQ). and when told to “rest” would  indeed follow the instructions better.  It is  reasonable to assume that the youngsters of lesser IQ were more susceptible to  distraction. then the lower IQ  subjects. engaging in various voluntary and involuntary orienting activities should indeed  display higher anterior as well as posterior coherence values since they would find it more  difficult to maintain attentional contol.  If EEG coherence is in fact related to brain  activation (and much evidence can be given to indicate this is so). stimuli that increased frontal and  posterior (voluntary and involuntary) OR activity. et al. both mentally as well as physically.  study.71 neural system and is inversely related to the system’s capacity to encode and process  information (e. subjects experienced eyes closed rest during their coherence measurements. Berkhout and Walter (1980) report a biofeedback study in which “volitional  control” of interhemispheric coherence changed levels of occipital and parietal coherence. paying  attention. and other. to decentrate). resulting in little  or no frontal or posterior OR activity. higher IQ youngsters  would habituate more rapidly to the setting and events.e.g.  Note that several EEG derivations in the Sheppard and Boyer (1990) study  indicated higher posterior coherences associated with information processing.e.  Conversely. internally generated. volition.  We specifically note that during the Thatcher.

 1685). Orme­Johnson. and less clearly for parietal  areas. . Ascertain the efficacy of the protocols in determining the specific formal  operational structures for which they were designed.  2. Wallace and Dillbeck (1982) suggest that the “shift towards  relatively greater coherence in the frontal regions produced by the TM­Sidhi program is  developmentally beneficial.72 They found that behavior tending to increase arousal (i.  The pilot study utilized 6 individuals associated with programs at  Maharishi International University. enhance focusing) also  decreased coherence at 10 Hz.e.  In an  earlier exposition of the longitudinal study of the effects of the TM and TM­Sidhi  program.  This may explain the efficacy of the FLR minus O coherence index to discriminate  pass and fail scores in the tests indicated above by Orme­Johnson et al (1982).’s (1982) suggestion that FLR­O reflects an index of CNS maturation. 3. 4. clearly for occipital areas. Test the equipment used for the tasks. perhaps reflecting a change in developmental emphasis from  primary perceptual areas to higher association areas involved with planning and  sustaining intentionality” (p.  The pilot study served to: 1. Provide experience with administering the tasks. CHAPTER III METHODS AND PROCEDURES   Pilot Study   A pilot study was accomplished to determine any difficulties which could arise in  the main study. Ascertain the adequacy and validity of the scoring criteria.  The notion  of “paying attention” in this context provides empirical and theoretical support to Orme­ Johnson et al.

  The 7P511H amplifiers were set at 0. 1974.  The output from the J6 of  each of the Grass amplifiers was digitized on­line to 12 bits at 60 samples per second per  channel.  Creutzfeldt. and Wuttke.   Sample Selection   Students from Maharishi International University were participants in a routinely­ scheduled yearly EEG battery.   EEG Measurement   Equipment The electroencephalographic measurements were taken with a 17­channel Grass  model 780 EEG and polygraph with a Megatek Laboratory Interface connected to a Data  General Nova 32K word Nova 3 minicomputer. the protocols were adjusted to permit more clear­ cut evaluation of performance. 0.  Records of four seconds (240 samples per channel) were recorded  on a nine­track.  The coherence spectrum.  Both undergraduate.3  Hz. 1982. and 5 µv/mm for EEG with a 60 Hz notch filter in. and some staff members were included in  the routine evaluations.  After review. 75 inch per second. and the chart  speed was 15 mm/sec. although no strict criteria were levied or met. 1988).  The pen filters were set at 90 Hz with the pen’s 60 Hz filter out. 800 bytes per inch Data General (Model 6030)  magnetic tape subsystem.73 Four interviews were audio taped for subsequent review by the experimenter and  an independent evaluator. Little and Zahn. and Hampson and  Kimura. graduate.1 Hz.  Females were requested to schedule  EEG evaluation outside of three days on either side of their menstrual period (Becker. a measure of the correlation between  .  Recruitment of students tended to be on a class­by­class  basis. Schwibbe.  The subjects were considered a random sample from the MIU  student population of individuals who regularly practice the Transcendental Meditation  technique.

 C3.468 Hz resolution and averaged for the alpha band.  Subjects had no recent history of neurological problems or drug use.  The head was cleaned with alcohol and Grass EEG 10mm gold plated cup electrodes  were attached with electrode cream (Grass type EC­2). and O1. F4C4.  Two to three subjects were evaluated each half day. the subjects were encouraged to walk  around for a few minutes to restore circulation and alertness prior to the EEG session.  Measurements were taken in an electrically shielded. O2.  Mean coherence scores were computed for ten .2 to 11.  The 10 scores were averaged for an overall average  for each pair of derivations. and then they filled out consent forms and background questionnaires.  All recording was monopolar with linked ears for the reference electrode. F3C3.  The test session used instructions played from a tape recorder and received through loud  speakers set at low volume. with epochs of four seconds was used according to the methods  of Levine (1976). F4. and  O1O2.  The  Fast Fourier Transform. Procedures Maharishi International University routinely administers EEG measures as part of  their student evaluation procedures.53 minute periods during which all  subjects practiced the TM technique. was computed for the following pairs of electrodes: F3F4.  Subjects sat for 5 minutes with eyes open then 5 minutes  .  Electrode impedances were below  10K ohms. incremented with 18 samples between frames.95 Hz.  When subjects came in they were shown the laboratory in order to familiarize them with  the environment.  The International 10­20 system  was used to place electrodes at F3. referenced to linked ears.74 two signals. sound attenuated  room.  Coherence  was analyzed to . 8.  Coherence was computed using the average of seven overlapping  frames of 128 samples each.  After application of the electrodes. C4.  All amplifiers were calibrated at the beginning and end of  each session.  No females were  scheduled within three days before or after menstruation.

75 with eyes closed. immediately before the EEG. Thus..  The tasks were administered by the  male experimenter (the author) immediately after the EEG measurement.3 minutes of EEG was taken towards the end of the 15­minute TM period. or in some  cases.  Subjects took about an hour for the four tasks total. include measures confined to  concrete operations in addition to measures of formal operations in order to achieve a  ..   Task Selection Criteria   Since we seek to verify whether or not a direct relationship exists between a  neurophysiological measure (coherence) and measures of formal operations.  This is a standard approach in correlation studies. Orme­Johnson et al. 15 minutes of the TM technique. Dillbeck and Araas­Vesely. it serves our  purpose to select measures which are most likely to result in a spread of achievement  scores. we could if we wished.  The above procedures and equipment were standard procedure for evaluating students  yearly at MIU. on the one hand. 1986).  Other published research from MIU used essentially the same protocol  (e.  Sufficient test time was allowed to prevent distortion of performance due to real  or imagined pressure for speeded problem solving. and the correlation  schema. 1982. then 5 minutes with eyes closed  resting.  The order of tasks was counterbalanced across subjects. in which there is  greater chance for locating correlations if the spread between high and low scores has  roughly the same distributions as the independent variable. the proportionality schema. the INRC group (as found in  the mechanical equilibrium schema).  The protocols assessed the presence of four formal  operational structures: the combinatorial operations schema.g. for instance.  The 5.   Task Measurement   The protocols for formal operational reasoning were developed from guidelines  set out in Inhelder and Piaget (1958).

This differs from using individual tasks to evaluate the presence of absence of a  particular logic structure. we will be dealing with general structures characterizing the  structured whole of propositional logic and the INRC group. formal operations and operational schemata.  this study focuses only on structures which Piaget has uniquely associated with the  structured whole.  We will be testing for the “structured whole” in its most general form in all the  tasks we select. it is possible to consider two choices: 1. inherent in  propositional logic rather than the propositional operations themselves (Inhelder  and Piaget. 105) It appears useful to select measures from the second set of options.  Rather. failure to pass any of a reasonable sample of tasks  indicates an epistemological condition of the subject. 130) that constitute the stage  of formal reasoning. p.  italics by the original authors).  Fortunately. they require  intellectual capacities greater than those of the concrete level and derive from the  operational transformations entailed by the total structures. we are particularly  interested in the neurophysiological conditions which support the “structured whole”— Piaget’s term for the system which permits operations on operations. 1991. p.  On the other hand.  It reflects the lack of any  reorganization of the “whole of the instruments already used by the subject” (Ibid. thus providing the range of performance needed for a correlational study.e. Given this approach.  Since formal  operations express a qualitatively different mode of cognition than concrete operations.  That is. i. as in the case of the 16 binary  operations.  The study can focus on the resultant “operational schemata” which Piaget  characterizes as operations and concepts which are new to the formal operational stage  yet which: emerge in close linkage with the establishment of propositional logic... the set of  “operational schemata” for the following two reasons: 1. .  The selected tasks  not only represent logical structures of their own. 1958. 136. 2. The study can concentrate on the properties of formal operations per se which  support the formation of propositional operations. but also give evidence of “certain  characteristic logical relations” (Piaget and Garcia.. it turns  out that these tasks can be scored for concrete operational as well as formal operational  performance.76 spread of levels of cognitive development.  Or. p. as opposed to only dealing  with the more specific 16 binary propositional operations themselves.

.e.. Later in his exposition. Thus I will seek evidence of formal operational thought in four tasks. Each task will not only speak for the structured whole.  The first  two tasks will focus on the combinatorial system "presupposes the elaboration of a  'structured whole’ and consequently of a lattice structure with the general laws of  reciprocity which characterize it” (Inhelder and Piaget.  292).  Certain of the operational schemata. study of the structure of propositional logic (as  opposed to study of the propositional operations themselves).  This approach follows the assertion of Garcia: “to say that there are  characteristic structures in action at each stage is very different from saying that the stage  is defined by a logical structure.  Other of the operational schemata seem to emphasize the important  utilitarian or intellectually practical applications of the group INRC or lattice structures..  But this is exactly the same as the lattice structure. p.  Piaget writes: The new system which results from this combinatorial operation.  As soon as the proposition states simple possibilities and its  composition consists of bringing together or separating out these possibilities as  such. in contrast to the structure of  elementary groupings [of concrete operations] (Ibid. 1958.  291)...  require a more explicit application of either or both the component structures which  contribute to the structured whole..   Chemicals Task   The specific task used to evaluate presence of the combinatorial structure will be  the Combination of Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies tasks. 307).  Piaget suggests that  .  namely. based on the  “structured whole” of n­by­n combinations. p. the group INRC and/or the lattice structure of  propositional logic.  Piaget’s formulation of stages involves the first assertion. in essence. is a generalized  classification of a set of all possible classifications compatible with the given base  associations. the lattice structure): The combinatorial composition deals with propositions (in formal operational  thinking). this composition deals no longer with objects but rather with the truth  values of the combinations.77 Thus.  The result is a transition from the logic of classes or  relations [of concrete operations] to propositional logic [of formal operations]  (Inhelder and Piaget.  Study of the  combinatorial system is.. we can test for the failure of subjects to attain the “stage” of formal  reasoning by locating subjects who fail to pass any of the tasks that test for formal logical  structures. as Piaget analyses them. p. but will emphasize  a particular aspect of it. Piaget explicitly links the combinatorial system with the  structured whole of propositional logic (i. proportional and correlation reasoning. viz.  not the second. 130) 2.” (Ibid. p. 1958.

  This  task will test for both of these structures simultaneously.  313).. p. Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies Protocol   Equipment   Four identical eye­dropper bottles containing colorless solutions and identified as  follows: “1” ­ Dilute sulfuric acid “2” ­ Water “3” ­ Hydrogen peroxide solution . Piaget suggests that both of these combinatorial structures arise simultaneously.  This feature should allow us to observe a greater “spread” of formal  operational reasoning skill than if I were to test only for the combinatorial system of  propositional logic alone.  The former is used  spontaneously. protocol and scoring for the Chemicals task  follows.78 this task represents two aspects of combinatorial structure: the mathematical  combinatorial system (which relates to units) and the propositional combinatorial system  (which relates to qualities).  The equipment.  The scoring form appears in the Appendix. the Chemicals task serves to elicit the “deliberate and  reasoned use of combinations” (Ibid.. maturing combinatorial system seems to deal first with qualities and then  numbers. providing evidence of whether  the propositional combinatory structure (lattice) is present as well as providing evidence  whether the mathematical combinatory structure is also present.  Thus. p. without “conscious or explicit decision” and the latter is used  “intentionally when the subject is faced with problems whose solution requires a  systematic table of combinations” (Ibid. while still  requiring the functions of the lattice (the structured whole) in a more general sense. 310) in a mathematical sense.  but the nascent.

 E mixes a solution of one and three in a small plastic cup. “Use this to add a squirt to the cup and you’ll see the color we are looking  for.  I prepared this solution earlier to show  you the color we want. “Go ahead. “Do you need more?”) One paper pad and pencil.  The “g” solution is necessary to test  your combination. Only seven are made available on the work surface.” When S stops.” E hands the bottle of “g” to S.79 “4” ­ Sodium thiosulphate One eye­dropper bottle of distinctly different shape with a colorless  solution and identified as follows: “g” ­ Sodium iodide Fifty small transparent plastic cups to hold combinations of liquids.   Instructions   1.  The remainder are stationed  visibly in reserve until requested. Prior to S’s appearance.) “There are several ways to get the yellow color. E asks: .  Any questions?” E answers any questions.  I want you to work with  these chemicals and make as many different combinations as you can to  get the yellow color.  (E may ask. E says: “This set­up gives you a chance to do an experiment to produce a color  from these colorless chemicals.  Here is paper and pencil.  You may use anything on the table if you think you  need it.  When S is present.” (S responds.

S exhibits in speech and action a methodologically complete approach from the  beginning of the task.80 “How did you decide what to test?” (S responds.) 2. Narrative Scoring Criteria for Colored and Colorless  Chemical Bodies Task Scoring Level  Criteria 5. If S concludes with several ways of making yellow without clearly identifying the  role of each chemical. E says: “With reference to creating the yellow color. 3. mentally or in written  form. what does chemical  one do? What does two do? What do three and four do?” 4. E  asks:  “Can you tell me what each chemical does and how you can prove  it?” (S responds.  S tries all combinations with no unnecessary repetitions.) If S is unclear.   When S is done.  The approach allows for referral to the data. and S has not already volunteered answers to the following.) E permits S to continue or suggests S go on if additional ways are noticed. If S has not stated that all possible ways were tried. at any time.  This level is  scored formal (late). E asks: “Which chemicals are necessary to create the color? How do you  know?” (S responds.) Terminate.  S correctly identifies the roles of each chemical and the  two conditions of the yellow color. . E asks: “Have you tried all of the possible ways of mixing the chemicals?” (S  responds.  1x1 combinations not required if S’s plan excludes them.  This score is  possible even if S makes additional combinations after E asks whether all possible  combinations have been made.  S utilizes propositional logic to make these  identifications.

 the group of inversions and reciprocities (INRC group) comes into  play on two completely different levels at the same time. the group gives  rise to the operational schemata which the subject uses in this and similar  .. corresponds to the internal  equilibrium of his own logical operations without his being aware of it. as  such it constitutes an integrated structure at the interior of his thought.  Piaget  remarks on this dual presence of the group INRC. and no others.  No regard need be taken of S’s logical rigor. in the explanation of a mechanical system in the  equilibrium. it governs the  propositional operations which the subject uses to describe and explain reality. empirical evidence or guesswork in proving the roles of the chemicals.  The level applies regardless of whether the S utilizes  propositions.  This task will evaluate the  INRC group structure in the sense of both a general operational structure and a specific  operational schemata (belonging to the schema of mechanical equilibrium). as a direct phenomenon under  analysis (since.  Likewise. 2. these consist of a physical system whose  equilibrium represents the very problem to be resolved).  This  occurs in such a way that. b) S utilizes evidence.  However. a structure  of which he is naturally not aware.  But second. impression or guesswork in identifying the role(s) of the  chemicals and the conditions of the yellow color. it applies regardless of how well the S identifies the roles of the chemicals and  conditions of the yellow color. S is methodologically incomplete to the extent of only dealing with 1x1 or 2x2  combinations. S may begin with some  initial trial and error and may omit one or more combinations in an otherwise apparently  methodological system. S ultimately performs the same as in level 5.  The method may be replete with repetitions due to  forgetting what had been done.81 4.  1964 for additional description of the INRC group structure).  one or more of the following failures is evident: a) S fails to identify the role of chemical 4. 3.   Communicating Vessels Task   The second task evaluates the presence of the INRC group structure (see Easley. S exhibits a methodologically complete approach as in levels 4 or 5. in the given data. S never exhibits in speech or action complete command of a methodological  approach to the data which permits its recovery and use for analysis. 1.  First.  Thus.  He suggests that the mechanical  equilibrium model.  (Viz. which happens to be that of any equilibrium.  However.  This level is scored formal (early).  S does at least some  2x2 and some 3x3 combinations. S merely relates what has been  empirically demonstrated to prove the roles held by each chemical).

  The scoring form appears in the Appendix. protocol. held in burette clamp and  stand moveable rubber bands (one placed on each tube) piece plastic tubing connecting bottom outlets of the tubes pinch clamp on the plastic tubing stand with 80 x 600 mm cardboard rectangle attached to  permit concealment of the large titration tube pencil meter stick 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 red colored water to fill the connected tubes to the 200 mm level 1 flask shaped titration tube ..82 situations to account for the physical modifications he finds and their  coordination. 40 x 600 mm. held in burette clamp and  stand glass titration tube. 20 x 400 mm.  (Ibid.  321) The task for evaluating the presence of the group INRC structure is the  Communicating Vessels task.  Of the four tasks Piaget uses to evaluate the INRC group  structure (that supports the schema of mechanical equilibrium) this task is easiest to  administer while simultaneously most suitable for avoiding the possibilities of facile and  rote responses by the subject. and scoring for the  Communicating Vessels task follows. p. Communicating Vessels Protocol   Equipment   1 glass titration tube.  The equipment.

) “Why do you think so?” (S responds. E then asks: “Compared to the rubber band mark would anything happen to the water  level in this tube if we raised the tube? Will the water level go up.  E lowers the rubber band on the  movable tube all the way to the bottom.  It shows the tube behind it.  If S has been wrong and wishes to see the result.  The tube is not blocked off.  If S has not predicted the  outcome correctly."  (E indicates tube B).  “Is the line even with the water level?” If the line is not even. down or  stay where it is compared to the rubber band? ” (S responds. E suggests: .  Here is pencil  and paper and a measuring stick if you need them. and sets the clamp.  The  line at M represents a rubber band marking the level of water in this tube.) 3.” (S  responds. E turns the screen around to reveal diagram A. E  shows the result and asks: “Why do you think this outcome occurred? Tell me what happened.”  (E does this. E covers the non­movable tube (B) with the screen (blank side  to the S). raises the movable tube a predetermined distance (previously set so the water  will lower from M to S on diagram A). “Look at the drawing of the narrow tube.83   Instructions   1.) After S responds. E terminates.  Water can  flow between the containers.” E points to the movable tube and says: “We can adjust the height of this tube by loosening the clamp and moving it  up or down.  We can mark the current water level with this rubber band.) 2. E explains the apparatus and indicates by pointing: “Here we have two glass containers connected by a plastic tube.

“You can see the conical tube and the movable tube in this drawing. then continue.) “Is this as close as you can possibly determine? ”(S responds. E continues and points as appropriate to tube A: “Now look at the picture with the V shaped.  Use this  pencil. terminate.  Use your pen to draw in the estimated levels as they are now. conical tube.  Imagine I  block off the connecting tube under the conical tube and that the bubble  tube is empty.  Now we pour this water into the bubble tube and open up  the connection.) Terminate.  S may respond with letter R even though E has set the apparatus for the level to be a letter  S.84 “You can adjust the picture with the clamp to make it even.) If S predicts the water levels are the same.  Can you tell me the letter which indicates  the water level in the conical tube? ” (S responds. here.” (E points. 4.) “Why do you think the water levels are there? ”(S responds.” E continues: “Now we’ll cover the tube with the screen.  Note that due to parallax error.)  “I am  going to lower the movable tube.) “How did you decide that?” (S responds.  The water level  remains the same for this movable tube.) (S responds.  Make a drawing of what you think will happen. E brings out drawing B and hands it to S.) “Why do you think the water level is there?” (S responds.” (E does this.  You can estimate.” (S responds.) “The conical  tube has letters down the center.  Can you tell me the letter which matches  the water level of the hidden tube? ” (E lowers tube A the amount it had  been raised in item 2 above.  Pretend  that it is connected to this movable tube at the bottom.  If S fails to indicate the proper level. .) 5.

S seeks to explain the equality of levels in mechanical terms of action and  reaction. 3.  Usually. S fails to predict the reciprocal equality of level in a hidden tube based on what is  seen in the connected tube.  S cannot use terms of compensatory actions and reactions to give an  explanation for the equilibrium observed.  If S does  correctly predict such an inverse relationship. if such a system is described it consists of compensations  required in the hidden tube to offset changes in the movable tube.  The system is understood in its most general case. due to confusion regarding the role of  volume in maintaining equilibrium. admitted by the S.  This level is scored  formal (late). The third and fourth tasks of this study represent those formal operational  schemata which have greatest utilitarian value in nearly any college science curriculum:  the proportional schema and the correlation schema. 2.  The explanation is incomplete.  Proportions are the foundation of  reasoning with fractions and ratios.  Thus.85 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Communicating Vessels  Task   Scoring Level                                                                Criteria   5.  including containers of unequal volume and shape. S can predict that the levels will be equal based on past experience or current  observations.  S may or may not invoke a rationale based on a system of  action and reaction.  The terms need not be precise. 4. the description  must convey that S appreciates the notion of equilibrium in a system.  This level is scored formal (early). .  Correlations presuppose the presence of the notion of  probability and both the concepts of probability and correlation are the foundation of  statistical reasoning. 1. the reasoning is based on guessing or great  uncertainty.  S may or may not correctly identify conditions  of equal levels when presented with containers of unequal shape and volume.  S completely understands the system of inversions and reciprocities which relates  the water levels of the two containers.  All of these mathematical functions are of obviously crucial  importance to the qualitative and quantitative comprehension of social and physical  science topics. however.  Equality of water levels is described  in terms of mechanical equilibrium based on action and reaction of the quantities of  liquid in each of the containers. S does not expect equality of levels to hold for  unequal forms and volumes. S fails to predict the inverse relation between the lifting of the movable tube and  the lowering of the water level compared to a reference mark on the tube. but which do not result  in equality of the water level. however.

The proportional schema effects the transition between the schemata originating  in the lattice and those which are integral with the group structure.  Piaget links  proportional reasoning to the structured whole by suggesting that “the notion of logical  proportions is inherent in the integrated structure which seems to dominate the  acquisitions specific to the level of formal operations” (Ibid. ratio is a concept that derives more from the INRC group structure than the lattice.  314). Logical proportions apparently precede mathematical proportions. the subject “is unsuccessful at the very  onset of the new construction. whose properties permit testing for geometrical/spatial operations in contrast to the  preceding two tasks which predominantly tested for mathematical skills. or  “speed”) depends on an “intellectual decentration..  This expanded role derives from the fact the task is  more spatially organized than physically organized..  This requires the subject to  simultaneously consider two distinct reference systems and coordinate them utilizing the  principle of inverse and reciprocal relationships between the variables (Ibid. which is a  distinction that the Shadows task can assess.  Also.. or of the distances.”  That is. the schema of proportionality seems  to reflect a more general function of the INRC group structure than is found in the  schema of mechanical equilibrium.86   Projection of Shadows Task   The proportionality schema will be evaluated using the Projection of Shadows  task. Of special interest in a neurological sense is Piaget’s analysis that the concept of  ratio between time and distance (in the case of proportions of distance per time. p. p. because he thinks either of the times. more particularly. when faced with unequal  times and spaces traversed by moving objects. the  group of inversions and reciprocities (INRC) (Ibid. in  a kind of alternating intellectual centration.  in contrast to the combinatorial schema (evaluated by the Chemicals task) which strongly  reflects presence of the lattice structure.  314). p. without being able to unite them in a single  .  208).  Also.

 F. .2 cm above the  working surface.  M.87 ratio” (Piaget.  The support wires fit the holes of the  wooden beam.  The scoring form appears in the  Appendix. 1948. and scoring for the Shadows task follow. Paper pad and pencil. 1 1 1 1 1 Each ring also has a support wire of such length that the center of each ring is 20  cm above the bottom of the support wire. it appears meaningful to seek neurological evidence  to aid our understanding of the process of decentration.  Every 10  cm is marked with a letter beginning with 0 at 10 cm. 5 cm in diameter with white indicator tape.  Thus. Wooden beam.  214). 5 x 5 x 100 cm. p. 15 cm in diameter with green indicator tape. Wire ring. E begins with the light off and with the rings lying on the work surface. then B.  The beam contains holes 1 cm apart along the top. placed lengthwise between the screen and  light source. 1 1   Instructions   1. K. see the  neurological correlates to the span of temporal and spatial attention. Projection of Shadows Protocol   Equipment   1 Slide projector situated with the lens centered at 18. Wire ring. 45 cm square screen constructed of rigid white cardboard located 120 cm  from the light hole. 10 cm in diameter with red indicator tape.  The equipment  protocol. R and N at 90 cm. A. Wire ring.  The lens is covered by posterboard pierced in the center  with a light hole. or in other terms.  E turns  on the light as he speaks: Meter stick. G.

  If S was wrong.  If S’s answer was wrong. will the shadow size  become larger. smaller. E  asks: “What do you think happened?” . 2.” E places the red ring at the G position and removes the card blocking the light. “If I use this ring at the same place on the board as the red ring.) Terminate if S doesn’t see a shadow. moves the ring to the N mark.) “Why do you think so?” (S responds. E blocks the light with a card and picks up the green ring. E covers the light.” E first uncovers the light while the green ring is at G to see the current size.) “Why do you think so?” (S responds.  We also have  pencil and paper and a measuring tape if you need them. some rings and a screen. then recovers  the light. will the  shadow size be larger. removes the red ring and places the green ring at G.) “Let’s check your answer. or remain the same as the one for the red  ring? ” (S responds. “Do you see the shadow? ” (S responds.) “Let’s check your answer. “If I move this green ring closer to the screen. E asks: “What happened?” 3.” E uncovers the light so S can inspect the shadows.  When I place a  ring on this board the shadow appears on the screen.88 “Here is a light source. and uncovers the light again. smaller or remain the same? ” (S responds.

 E allows further trial and  error with the light on by suggesting: “You can move the rings. E covers the light and asks: “Are there any other positions where the two rings will make just  one shadow? ” (S Responds.” (S responds.) “Let’s see what you have. E asks: “Why do you think this will create one shadow?” (S responds.” E uncovers the light. If E finds that S makes some attempt at analyzing the problem in some way other  than pure trial and error.) “How did you determine this?” (S responds. or wishes to check S’s reasoning.) “Is this as accurate as you can get?” (S responds. E says: “Show me.” 4b.  If S is wrong or has indicated uncertainty. E  can introduce the white ring and ask: .) If S says there are none.) 4c. E removes the green ring and holds it with the red ring.  Otherwise.” (S responds. If S attains accurate performance after 3 attempts with two rings.) If S says a single shadow is impossible. After S has placed the rings. terminate. 5.) “Show me. yet E feels  proportional reasoning is not totally comprehended. terminate.89 If S seems not to understand the change in shadow size.  Repeat item 4.  E asks: “Can you make a single shadow with these two rings? ” (S  responds. terminate. E should permit a third attempt with two rings and a single  shadow. 4a. After S has experimented making a single shadow.

 and if E wishes to check S’s  reasoning.” terminate. .) “How did you determine this?” (S responds.) Terminate.90 “Can you make a single shadow using three rings?” (S responds. After S has experimented making a single shadow.  Otherwise ask: “Can you show me?” (S responds.) 5b.) 5a. E covers the light and asks: “Are there any other positions where the three rings will make just  one shadow?” (S responds. If S answers “no.) “How did you determine this?” (S responds.

 however. or may  just place the rings in the correct order. S knows that shadow size depends on the ring size. but fails to understand the  inverse relation between the distance from the light source and shadow size. S never formulates a geometrically inverse proportional relationship. 1.  Therefore. the closer together they should be  arranged to create a single shadow.  Only this level requires that the subject utilize a metric approach. two tasks  emphasize the propositional logic of the lattice structure (Chemicals task and  Correlations task) and two others emphasize the group INRC system of inverse and  reciprocal relationships (the Communicating Vessels and Shadows task).  S can successfully place two or three rings to form a single shadow. S can only base  the response on past experience or intuition and not on analysis of this inverse  relationship.  If S asserts  that the shadow does get smaller as the ring gets farther from the light. it appears before the quantitative sense of  proportions reasoning as discussed in the literature review. S  makes attempts to invoke metrical or perceptual strategies in solving the problem. with the largest nearest the screen.  Thus.   Correlations Task   The last task utilized in the study involves assessment of the degree of correlation  between two variables.  The distances have the same relation to each other as the size of the ring to the smallest  ring. only  this level is scored formal. the proportions schema  serves as the topmost level of achievement in the range of tasks assembled for the study.  A balance of emphasis is obtained by using the correlation structure for evaluation in that  it utilizes the lattice structure (propositional logic) for its solution.91 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Projection of Shadows  Task Scoring Level Criteria 4.  Thus. 2.  Piaget suggests that while the notion of correlations appears later  than the qualitative notion of proportions. After some trial and error. S concludes by stating a non­metrical formulation of  the inverse geometrically proportional relationship between the rings and the light source.  S asserts that the closer to the light the rings are placed. Whether from the beginning or after some trial and error S ultimately succeeds in  stating a metrical formulation of the inverse proportional relationship between the rings  and the light source. 3.  This balance of  .

  Can you sort these cards into groups?” If S sorts them into three or less groups.  Thus.92 structural emphasis should prove useful in post­hoc analysis of the data.   Instructions   1. C  and D and the set of groups is notated (A.  Each card is 11 x 14 cm and each set is colored as listed below.  The groups are referenced as A.) If S says “no” then ask: “Why do you think so?” If S does not understand the question. we will read (4. if group A contains 4 cards. Each set has four groups of color schemes.C. C contains 3 cards and D contains 5 cards.  The scoring form appears in the  Appendix.  Otherwise. Correlations Protocol   Equipment   Two sets of 12 cards each.  protocol.3. B. E says: . S asks: “Do you think there is a relationship between eye color and hair  color in these cards or not?” (S responds.5). zero is used to indicate this in the protocol. all of which carry the same line drawing of a child’s  face.  E says: “Here are some pictures of children with differently colored hair  and eyes. E presents set 1 randomly ordered.  The equipment. B  contains 2 cards. and scoring for the correlations task follow.D). terminate.2.” If S fails to locate four groups.  If one  group is absent in the set. E asks: “Is there any other way to group these cards? Show me.B.

  If S correctly notes the  chances are 100%: “Since you can predict hair color all the time.  I look at it and tell you the color of hair.0.4) and asks: “If I pick one of these cards at random. E removes groups B and C leaving (4. E repeats 2 but utilizes groups C and D: “If I pick one at random.) “How did you determine that?” (S responds.0. and tell you the hair color.) “How did you determine that?”(S responds.2.  What are the chances the card will show  brown eyes with blonde hair?” (S responds.4) and says: “Now judging from all of these cards. right?” 5. E replaces groups C and D of set one and says: “Using any or all of the cards on the table.” 2.) .) “How did you determine that?”(S responds.0.  what are your chances of telling me the correct eye color?” (S responds. leaving (4.93 “Let’s go to the next question to clear it up.2.) E desires S to notice that the set illustrates full relationship. pretend I cover my eyes and  pick one at random.) 3. can you construct a set of  cards in which the hair color has no relationship with the eye color? You  can take away any cards you want. what are the chances the card will show  brown eyes with blonde hair? ” (S responds.) 6.  Pretend I cover my  eyes and pick one at random. E removes groups C and D of set 1 and puts them aside. E rearranges set one in S’s original pattern (4.  What are  your chances of telling me the correct eye color?” ( S responds.2.) 4.” (S responds. we call this a ‘perfect’  relationship.  E says: “Let’s look at just these cards for a moment.0).

94 “How did you determine that?” (S responds.) “Just considering this new set by itself.”  (S responds. S has not utilized some type of probability to accurately relate at least A to  A+B and C to C+D in the full set of cards. saying: “We’ll return to this set in a moment. “Here is another set of cards already sorted. can you find a relationship  between hair color and eye color?” (S responds. 7.) If by this time.) . then terminate. E pushes the set to the side.) “What are your chances of telling me the correct eye color if I pick  a card and tell you the hair color?” (S responds.” E brings out set 2 which has been pre­ordered.  You can set them out.

 less or the same than for the second set?” (S responds. 8.) “How did you determine that?” (S responds. form two sets of your  own.) 9. Description of Color Schemes for Correlation Task _____________________________________________________________________ The four color­schemes Number of cards in each group                                                                              Group                                  Set 1                          Set 2_____   Blue­eyed blondes  (A) 4 3 Brown­eyed blondes  (B) 2 3 Blue­eyed brunettes  (C) 2 1 Brown­eyed brunettes  (D) 4 5 ______________________________________________________________________ “How did you determine that?” (S responds). .) 10. C and D in turn in the second set. Making reference to both sets.  Can you tell me if the relationship in set one  is more. B.) “How did you determine that?” (S responds. E returns attention to set 1. E points to groups A. E asks: “Using any or all of the cards on the table. “Now let’s compare set 1 with set 2.95 Table 1.) Terminate.  Can you make them so one set gives you a greater relationship  between hair color and eye color than the other?” (S responds. asking: “What about this group? How does it influence your judgment?”(S  responds.  Look at the hair color and eye  color relationships in each set.

 S cannot do so. as in  level 5.  . set II.  These subjects were classified as “fail” on the formal stage criterion.  But when called upon to form two sets.   Analysis of Data   The responses to the Piagetian tasks were scored according to Inhelder and Piaget  (1958). or 2) identify a relationship which exhibits a perfect correlation.  Each subject’s name. At one of three points in the protocol. S is able to construct a relationship with zero  correlation and identify a relationship which exhibits a perfect correlation.  Subjects who failed to pass any of the four tasks were considered to lack  evidence of any cognitive “reorganization” that supports formal operational reasoning. 1.  Thus. 5.  Subjects  were additionally classified along a “Formal Stage Criterion” dimension. 4.96 Narrative Scoring Criteria for the Correlations Task Scoring Level Criteria 6. S establishes a relationship between  confirming cases of a relationship and either 1) the whole of cases or 2) the  disconfirming cases. and task scores were recorded.  Thus. Review of Relevant Literature. one set with a greater relationship  between hair and eye color than the other set.  S may or may not be able  to construct a single set with a relationship which demonstrates zero correlation between  hair and eye color.  This is evaluated during questions about the relationship of hair color  to eye color in set I. and during the comparison of set I with set II. S is able to establish ratios between hair and eye color for a given hair color. S invokes a simple ratio of hair/eye color for each color of hair at the points of  evaluation listed for level 6. I do not score it as formal (see discussion in  Chapter II. coherence. S invokes either of the following ratios: 1) (a+b)/(a+b+c+d)  or 2) (a+d)/(b+c). S is unable to correctly identify the probabilistic ratio of hair color to eye color  described in levels four and five. S fails to correctly identify two simple probabilistic relationships in quantitative  terms: b/(a+b) and d/(c+d).) 3. Therefore. This level is  scored formal (late). it only indicates  possession of direct proportions. S performs as in level three but fails to either 1) construct a relationship with zero  correlation.  However.  Subjects who  passed at least one of the four tasks were considered to have “passed” the formal stage  criterion. sex. S makes comparisons in terms of a/(a+b) and d/(c+d). Although Piaget scores this level as early formal.  This level is scored formal (early). 2.

 R.3 minutes of  meditation.  The 4 basic coherence measures (F. . L.  The resulting means for each  subject can also then be assumed to represent a stable measure of coherence.3 minutes is sufficient that we can  invoke the assumption of normality for the initial data.  (See background questionnaire in the Appendix. the  “Coherence Index” (FLR­O).) The EEG alpha coherence scores were combined to create a single number.  The number of samples during the 5. and Art activities. parametric analyses will be  used. Where coherence is used as the dependent variable. Math.  Verbal.97 Scores were recorded that reflect the subject’s preference for Science. non­parametric analysis will be used  when the task score is the dependent variable. O) for each  subject consist of eighty four­second coherence measures taken over 5. Since the task data is ordinal (pass or fail).

M. and students are associated  with M.I.S. Maharishi International University (MIU). since it has an open  admission policy. and the pro­self­development attitudes of the students themselves.  Another 2. located  in Fairfield.  students can be considered “average” in many ways.  They are self­selected to join the  rather unique collection of students. with origins ranging from the U.U. west coast to  the east coast and Europe.  Fairfield is a rural town of about 7.  Therefore. 1992­ 1993) in which stress is minimized and expression of individual potential is maximized.000 persons supported mainly by  agriculture and light industry.  The  students all participate in the school­sponsored “Maharishi Technology of the Unified  Field.U. probably owing to peer pressure.98 CHAPTER IV RESULTS   Results of Subject Selection   The population for this investigation is undergraduate and graduate students  attending a small liberal arts college.I.  Most of the students live on campus. staff.I.  Given  that the students participate in a specific program of self­development.000 faculty. all of the  students were from outside of Fairfield. Iowa.  The avowed goal of TM is to  culture the nervous system to support a state of “restful alertness” (M.  At the time of the research.  Bulletin.  This qualification limits the findings to similar  .U. the sample does  not represent any “average” university population.  The students reputedly do not use alcohol or drugs. family economic wealth is not a particular criterion for admission.  Many of the students receive financial aid and/or scholarships.  school policy.” otherwise known as Transcendental Meditation.

U.  Females were not scheduled for EEG within three days before or after their menstrual  . Although students were contacted class­by­class. M. since the study is correlational.  However. it is not  unreasonable to generalize at least to others with similar age and education who practice  TM.  Students attending more than  one year most likely had received a previous EEG evaluation. plus the fact that students received the  measures during the practice of TM.  Only about 10% of the  sample are international students. As part of an ongoing research program into longitudinal physiological changes in  students.  They are European and sufficiently acclimated to  American culture that no obvious linguistic or cognitive differences seemed to set them  apart from their American peers. suggests that no undue arousal effects would bias the  EEG data. students in any selected class  could accept or reject the opportunity to have their EEG scheduled within a given week. it was not an  entirely new or unusual experience.  This fact.   Sample   The 58 subjects who participated in this study were taken as needed and at  random from the stream of students taking their required annual EEG readings at the  International Center for Scientific Research located at MIU.99 populations of students practicing TM.  The students were quite experienced in the practice of TM and would  therefore habituate rapidly to the situation and not feel “pressured” or otherwise distracted  during the EEG session.  EEG data was freely made available.  required an annual electroencephalographic evaluation of each student.I.  I arranged to “piggyback” additional tests of formal operational reasoning onto the EEG  research program.  Therefore. and the  practice of TM is claimed to result in “naturally” occurring outcomes.

002. eating or sports? (list).8.3 years.  Prior to removing the electrodes.  Two randomly selected subjects were  videotaped.  The first ten subjects served in the  pilot study. with a S.  This left a total of 58 subjects for the current data analysis.  The presence of the leads was never mentioned as a hindrance to performance nor did  they appear to cause distraction or discomfort.9 and  female mean age was 24. Vessels. Participation in the present study was voluntary and no one refused. eight  were not scored because the subject indicated some degree of left­handedness to the  question: “Do you consider yourself left­handed or ambidextrous in any regular activity  such as writing.  Based on the pilot experience. p  = .6.0502.  The  mean age was 26.  The EEG usually took approximately 60­90 minutes including time to apply the  electrodes.  Of the remaining 68 subjects.  Male mean age was 26.  Males were significantly older.D.” Two other subjects were rejected due to possible  confounding variables: one subject stuttered.  two to four subjects were scheduled for each of the morning and afternoon examination  periods. A total of seventy­eight subjects were tested on each of the four tasks:  Correlations. and another subject’s data set displayed  excessive EEG artifacts. subjects typically went immediately after  their EEG examination into a near­by room where they received the Piagetian protocols.7 years ranging from 17.  Protocol administration required an  average of 60­70 minutes for the set of four tasks.100 period. of 4. t  (56) = 2. the experimenter revised and standardized  both the written protocol and experimenter behavior. Shadows. . and Combinations.  Typically. Thirty­nine subjects were male and 19 were female.  All subjects were advised to eat lightly the meal before their appointment.  The  research was conducted between mid­January and mid­March of 1981.8 to 35.

0276. Verbal: 5.  There was no significant difference in mean years of  college between males and females.  and Math: 4. p  = . p. was 1.5105.437.  . 780).0426. p  = . Science: 4.D.351. 1973.6 years.  In order of preference.0569.  The S.228. marginally significant at p  = .035.8203. NS. 3 df.0 with a minimum of 2 years and a maximum of 8  years. t  (55) = . Art and Verbal were preferred  significantly higher than Math. N = 57.  All tests are two­tailed. Z = ­2.0573.  Checks were made to evaluate both issues. p. EEG data may be subject to  artifacts.772.  Differences in means were tested with a Friedman test for matched  groups (Hays. 785) resulting in a between­measure chi­square approximation of  7.  respectively. Appendix A). Task Scoring Reliability To validate the reliability of the scoring criteria used in each of the four tasks. fourteen  randomly­selected subjects were independently evaluated by a second independent judge.9040. means were Art: 5.  Thereby implying that the subjects were not biased toward those  disciplines.   Measurement Reliability   Measurement reliability involves the possibility of scorer bias in evaluating  subject’s performance on each of the four tasks. an interest inventory was given to detect any bias in favor of science and math  in the subject group. Since the students were contacted on a class­by­class basis for their EEG  evaluation. and Z = ­2.101 The mean year in college was 4.  In a post­hoc comparison using  the Wilcoxon matched­pairs test (Hays. Science.0048. 1973.  Math and Science were not preferred over  the other disciplines. and Mathematics  (see Participant Questionnaire.  Also.  Subjects marked their level of “fulfillment and success” on a scale  of 1 (lowest level)–7 (highest level) for Art.  Science was preferred over Math with marginal significance:  Z  =­1. Verbal disciplines. p  = .

  Table 2 presents the percentage of agreement  between the investigator and the judge on pass/fail evaluations for each task. Passing achievement is defined on the basis of Piaget’s criteria for formal  operational reasoning.  In subsequent  reprocessing of the digitized data.  The number and proportion of subjects passing each task and the  formal stage criteria are given in Table 4.  One record could not be used at all. subjects are scored on a higher level of formal reasoning (late formal) if  .  Early formal. the judge was provided with audio tape recordings of the protocols and  the experimenter’s scoring sheets. as given in the methods chapter.   Summary of Data   Summary of Task Scores The number of subjects scoring at each level of each task and the task index is  given in Table 3.  The judge had prior experience in Piagetian task  scoring. as well as task design and theory. subjects are  considered passing (early formal) if they took a systematic approach to the task and if  they formulated the issues qualitatively correctly without guessing.  Generally. together with the levels of attainment needed to  pass each task.102 For each subject. an artifact rejection program deleted all epochs that  exceeded a criterion voltage. according to Inhelder and Piaget  (1958) requires that a metric approach be taken in addition to application of a qualitative  sense of positioning the rings with respect to their diameter and distance from the light.  For all the tasks. EEG Artifact Analysis Eighteen EEG records were set aside after inspection revealed eye or muscle  tension artifact in more than five of the eighty 4­second sampling epochs.  Seventeen of the records were returned to the subject pool  after removing artifactual epochs.  The one exception to  this generalization is the Shadows task.

 therefore only 13  data points were obtained across the 14 subjects. _______________________________________________________________________ _ *Certain protocols could not be scored due to inability to hear portions of the audio tape. .103 Percentage Agreement on Pass/Fail Ratings By Two Independent Judges  (N=14) _________________________________________________________________________ Task Scored* Agree Percentage Agreement _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Vessels Shadows 13 Combination Correlations  13  11  13  13  12  12  12 85% 92% 92% 92% Table 2.

 acknowledging that the subject may not  have developed more logical structures than indicated by passing the particular given task.  Subjects who fail all four tasks are considered to lack evidence of developing the stage of formal  operational reasoning. Subjects who pass one or more tasks are considered to have developed the  characteristic structures in action at the formal operational stage. Data Summary:  Number of Subjects Scoring Each Level For Each of the  Four Tasks and the Formal Stage Criterion ____________________________________________________________________________________   Scoring Level       Number of Task Subjects 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 ____________________________________________________________________________________ Vessels Male 39 6 7 11 10 14 Female 18 9 2 2 3 2 Total 57 15  7 11 10 14 Shadows Male 37 4 9 13 11 Female 19 10 4 4 1 Total 56 14 13 17 12 Combinations Male 39 4 12 4 13 6 Female 19 5 6 0 7 1 Total 58 9 18  4 20 7 Correlations Male 38 8 5 7 4 9 5 Female 19 5 4 4 1 4 1 Total 57 13  9 11  5 13 6 Formal Stage Criterion* Male 36 8 8 9 7 4 Female 18 7 5 4 2 Total 54** 15  13 13 9 4 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ * The Formal Stage Criterion gives a summary measure of the number of tasks passed by each subject. fail to meet the formal stage criterion.  Therefore. 15  subjects. Here.104 Table 3. none of the other tasks were passed. ** 4 subjects (3 male. the best they could have done would be a scoring  level of “1.”  Using the observed probabilities (15 S’s scored “0” and 13 S’s scored “1”) as a guide to the  expected distribution.  Note that for each of these 4  subjects.” . roughly half would then have scored “1” and the other half “0. 8 males and 7 females. 1 female) are not accounted in the Formal Stage Criterion because one of their 4  tasks lacked clear audio recording and thus prohibited proper scoring.

S.6 1.4 0 1.4 33.3 5.Corr V.1 None 54 15 27.Corr S.Comb V.8 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *Only subjects who were scored on all four tasks were included in this analysis. .4 72.S V.S.8 9.8 0 7.6 5.1 V 54 6 11.8 7.Corr.S.4 1.Corr V. Data Summary: Number and Proportion of Subjects Passing Each Task.Comb 56 54 57 4 57 58 54* 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 1 or greater 4 and 5 12 5 and 6 4 and 5 19 27 4 0 1 5 3 3 1 4 1 0 4 39 24 21.105 Table 4.Comb S. the  Combination of Tasks.2 42.Comb S.Comb Corr.Corr.Comb V.6 7.3 46. and the Formal Stage Criterion _____________________________________________________________________________________ _    Levels          Number of Constituting     Subjects Task         Subjects   Passing           Passing              Proportion (%) _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Formal Stage Criterion Vessels Shadows Correlations Combinations V.1 S 54 0 0 Corr 54 1 1.Comb V.8 Comb 54 6 11.Corr.

 the first level indicates proportional  reasoning.  only two subjects failed both Vessels and Combinations tasks among those who passed  the formal stage criterion. a formal operation ability.  Subjects who fail all four of the tasks are considered to lack evidence of  characteristic structures associated with formal operational reasoning. Conversely. Subjects passing  one or more tasks are scored “pass” on the formal stage criterion acknowledging that the  subject may not have developed more logical structures than indicated by passing the  particular task (39 out of 54). but unrepresentative of the correlational schema. According to Inhelder and Piaget (1958). the INRC group and the combinatorial lattice. respectively. .106 they produced quantitative rationale for their explanations.)  This data suggests that the “Formal Stage Criterion”  is defined primarily by the structures associated with the Vessels and Combinations tasks.  I concur with this reasoning. Therefore.  Wavering excluded this level of performance from receiving a “pass” score with the  justification that correlational reasoning (IIIB and IIIC) must be demonstrated to justify  receiving a “pass” score for a correlational task that is comparable to a “pass” score in the  other formal schemata being tested and compared. a subject can score early formal (IIIA)  on the correlations task without actually demonstrating possession of the schema of  correlations. and  adopt the same convention in this research. Note that 37 of the subjects who passed the formal stage  criterion passed either the Vessels task or the Combinations task or both. (One passed the Correlations task and one passed both the  Correlations and the Shadows task. they receive a pass on the task. these  subjects are scored “fail” on the Formal Stage Criterion (15 out of 54). whether early  formal or late formal.  namely.  As pointed out by Wavering (1979).  In either case.

  The more frequently passed task is assumed to be easier. visual inspection of  the standardized form of the distributions indicates that none of the departures from  normality are extreme. the  distributions are slightly platykurtic. 1973.  . or more flat. all possible pairs were tested using the McNemar chi­square test for the  equality of two correlated proportions (Hays. Although not statistically significant.  See Table 7 for the calculated  chi­square values and the percentage of subjects that received the same score (confirming  cases) in a given pair of tasks.  To evaluate the degree and impact of this apparent non­homogeneity of the formal  reasoning tasks.   Analysis 1 ­ Unitary Composition of Task Index   Although the formal stage criteria suggests that 72 percent of those subject  possess the characteristic structures in action at the formal stage. 740).  Only  21% of the subjects passed the Shadows task compared with 42% passing the Vessels  task. inspection of the rate of  passing the tasks suggested an obvious difference in difficulty between the tasks.107 Summary of EEG Alpha Coherence Measures Descriptive statistics for the EEG alpha coherence measures and Coherence Index  are presented in Table 5  The measures are broken down by gender in Table 6. Subjects gave evidence of  attaining the INRC group schema (Vessels task)and the combinatorial schema  more  easily than the proportions schema (Shadows task).0 corresponding to the normal distribution.  Figure 3 presents the contingency  relationships for  subjects scored pass and fail on the pairs of tasks. The ordered diagram of the statistically significant pairwise tests is presented in  Figure 4.  The skewness values also depart from  the value of 0.  Since the  kurtosis values are less than 3. p.0 corresponding to the normal distribution.  However.  It includes the percentage of subjects who passed one of the tasks more  frequently compared with all subjects who had a pass score on only one of the two tasks.

687 .419 1.000) (.251 .05 .000) (.000 (.463                  ­1.000) (.251 ­.922 ..674 SD .85 .502 .128 2.000) (.111 .001) (.136 ­.000 (.328 .787 1.003) (.082 Kurtosis .307) (.000* (. Data Summary:  EEG Data By Total Subjects _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Alpha Coherence Coherence Index F3F4 F3C3 F4C4 O1O2 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Number of Subjects   58   58   58   58   58 Mean 1.085 .000) (.714 .381 ­.784 ­.181 .108 Table 5.000) F3F4 .785 . Numbers in parentheses give the p value.513 .034 Skewness ­.592              ­.457 ____________________________________________________________________________________ Correlations with.102 .000 (.. Significance cut­off is p ≤  .116) (.000) F4C4 .000) _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *Pearson correlation coefficient.545 1. Coherence Index 1.267 .000) 0102 ­.208 1.077 .000 (.000) F3C3 .012) (.

93540 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ M    Number of Subjects: 39 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Mean 1.24315 .25896 .78912 .08812 Kurtosis ­.09358 .27102 1.69214 .665 .188 _____________________________________________________________________________________ .60749 ­1.52171 .06735 Kurtosis 2.06291 .291 ­.73066 ­.07886 ­.109 Table 6.67726 .436 .35221 ­.619 .65397 SD . Data Summary:  EEG Data By Gender  _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Alpha Coherence Gender                         Coherence Index           F3F4                   F3C3                    F4C4  O1O2 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ FNumber of Subjects: 19 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Mean 1.24502 ­.99174 ­.62486 ­.15003  2.584 ­.39490 2.08270 .06954 1.94447  .70961 .24227  .10071 .27294 Skewness ­.500 ­1.05237  ­.24908 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Test for Differences Between the Means t .72371 .52907 .77955 .14627 ­.68437 SD .12699 Skewness ­.772 .33 df 56 56 56 56 56 p value .10422 .08476 .50651 .562 .

 over­corrected estimate of the probability that the proportions are correlated. we can reasonably expect correlated data.65%) .087 (58.9%) 33 1. in this case. the number of tests.  It gives a sense of the magnitude by which subjects as a group acquire the  underlying schema prior to acquiring the other schema with which it is compared.0% 73.032 3 Combinations 27 30 (75.787 .) . which would raise the  alpha level.5% Correlations 19 38 43 4.6% 60.6% _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *Missing task scores cause the total N to vary from pair to pair.7%) 9. However.3% 82.05 alpha level by six.267 .0083 (This criterion reflects a significance cut­off of p ≤  .110 Table 7.4%) 11 78. ***Significant at p  ≤ .007*** 4 (63.532 13 56. making the outcome a  conservative. Here. we divide the . **This statistic represents the proportion of subjects that pass the particular task but fail the other task  compared with the total number of subjects that pass either task but fail the other task (a disconfirming  relationship between the tasks).071 (72.200 .05 corrected for multiple  tests (6) as recommended by Bonferroni.391 (59.9% 3.6%) 4 16 11 19 14 9 10 80.  Note that this statistic  is inversely related to the p values.002*** 4 (58. Note that the Bonferroni correction assumes independence  among the tests.9%) 34 .571 . Analysis of Relative Difficulty of Task Pairs: McNemar Chi­Square Test for  the Equality of Two Correlated Proportions (with Bonferroni Correction) _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Confirming Cases                                       Disconfirming Cases Pair*  Pass    Fail  (% of Total N) X2 (df=1)                p       N % of Both** _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Shadows12 Vessels Shadows12 Correlations Shadows12 Combinations Vessels Correlations Vessels Combinations 43 24 43 19 44 27 24 37 24 27 35 31 40 36 33 29 32 19 33 30 7.297 .

111 .

112   Shadows             Vessels            Combinations  Pass    Fail            Pass    Fail             Pass     Fail                     Pass           8        11                10        9              16         3    Correlations                Fail            4        32                14       23             11         27                                      Pass           8       19                 14       13  Combinations              Fail            4       25                 10       20                Pass           8       16                                         Vessels              Fail            4       27    Figure 3.  Contingency Relationships for Subjects With Scores on Both Tasks .

6%** 80%**   78.6%       Easiest tasks:               Combinations            Vessels (equilibration schema)      _________________________________________________________________ ______________ *The percentage of subjects who pass the easier task compared with subjects who  pass only one of the two tasks **Significant at p ≤  .0083. reflecting a Bonferroni correction for multiple tests .3%*      Correlations    82.113   Most difficult task:      Shadows (proportions schema)       73.

114 Figure 4. Ordering Diagram for Four Tests of Formal Reasoning:  Arrow Indicates  Direction of Logical Prerequisite .

 and likewise for the one  subject that also passed the Shadows task. given the pre­eminent “status” of the INRC group and lattice structure among  the ten structures Piaget has identified.  There is a modest.  The  test result for the Shadows task was significant at the 0. As mentioned above.  There is no statistically significant relationship in the order of acquisition between  combinations and equilibrations schemata (Vessels task).  if not impossible.  Only two subjects who passed the Formal  Stage Criterion failed to pass either the Vessels or the Combinations tasks. Presumably this is evidence of the notion that  formal reasoning “stage” is not bounded by possession of any particular structure.  The chi square test of independence may not be conservative enough.  Analysis 2 ­ Relationship Between Gender and Task    Performance   A two­tailed Fisher exact test of independence (Hays. p.  However.05 level. the Formal Stage Criterion is passed primarily by subjects  who pass either the Vessels task and/or the Combinations task. but non­significant nd correlrelationship that indicates the  correlations may appear prior to the proportions schema. to explain how both subjects passed the Correlations task without  giving evidence of either the INRC group or the lattice structure. It is difficult. They may or may not have  passed the Shadows or the Correlations tasks. 1973. 736) was performed  to test the null hypothesis that there were no significant differences between male and  female performance in each task. or correlations and equilibration  schemata. two­tailed. It may be that  the contexts of these two tests were sufficiently unfamiliar to these particular subjects that  they could not extrapolate the structures to the situation.3% of  .115 the combinations schema is passed more easily than the proportions aations schemata. the findings remain to be explained.  Only 5.  The Fisher exact test of independence was used  because some of the cells have expected minimum frequencies of less than 10 and the test  uses a df = 1.

 with higher  mean coherence for subjects in the pass group.  Age is not covaried since age can also reasonably be expected to be reflected  in both EEG coherence and task performance.676.  The lower passing rates  of females on the Shadows and Vessels tasks may reflect EEG differences reported by  other EEG coherence researchers in which females scored lower on tasks with spatial  components (Beaumont.  No other tests showed significant  differences.  Therefore. the difference was not significant. t (55) = ­1.  Normally.7% of males. Means associated with the other tasks were in the predicted direction.161.7% of males. the test for the formal stage  .116 females passed compared with 29. and Rugg.465. p  = .  Passing subjects had a mean  Coherence Index score of 1. Interestingly.  The results are summarized in Table 8. the Analysis 2 following. it is expected that the EEG may  reflect gender differences that are task related. two­tailed.8% of females passing versus 48. such gender differences  would dictate that further analyses would be done for each gender separately.  However. 1978). Mayes. Analysis 2 ­ Relationship Between Coherence Index and    Task Performance   Student's t test was used to test the null hypothesis that there was no significant  difference in the mean Coherence Index of subjects who passed a task and those who  failed the test. The results given in Table 9 indicate that subjects who passed the Vessels task  measured significantly higher on the Coherence Index than subjects who failed the  Vessels task.  owing to reported gender differences in the Shadows task. p  = .577 compared with failing subjects who had a mean of 1. will  not covary for gender or age.  However.  Note that females are significantly younger than males in  this study.  The Vessels task appeared to result  in similarly lopsided results with 27.0495 (one­tailed).

8%)**     (61.8%) Shadows37                  19              11        1 .161 (48.117 Table 8.555 (36.043* (29.8%) (26.7%) (27.781 (48. Analysis of Differences in Male and Female Performance on the Four Tasks _____________________________________________________________________________________ _Performance            N     Number of Subjects Passing       Fisher Exact Test Measure  Males  Females               Males                Females      of Independence (df=1) _____________________________________________________________________________________ _  Formal Stage   Criterion 18          36               28                         11 .7%) (5.3%) Combinations 39                  19               19        8 .216 (77.1%) _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *Significant at p ≤ .7%) (42.3%) Correlations 38                  19              14        5 .1) Vessels 39                  18              19        5 .05 (two­tailed) *Percentage of males and females passing .

465 .542 . Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Coherence Index Means between  Pass and Fail Groups _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Group N Mean             S.492 .236 ­1.248 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Shadows Pass 12 1.538 .577 .289 ­.06 .118 Table 9.   t           df   p * _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Formal Stage Criterion Pass  39 1.596 .05 *** Trend at p ≤ .234 1. **Significant at p ≤ .278 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Combinations Pass 27 1.021 56 .156 Fail 31 1.418 .503 .498 55 .549 .196 ­.938 54 .176 Fail 44 1.0495** Fail 33 1.248 ­1.261 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *All significance tests are one­tailed.310 Fail 38 1.0558*** Fail       15 1.618 52 .298 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Vessels Pass 24 1.676 55 .482 .D.242 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Correlations Pass 19 1.

 we must insure there is no significant interaction  between the continuous covariant.  There are no significant interactions between the continuous covariant. to further examine the possible relationships between age. however.  This is a test of the  assumption of homogeneity of slopes. age. the anticipated  influence of gender on both coherence index and task did not appear. Analysis 3 ­ Relationship between Coherence Index and    Task Performance Controlling for Age and Gender   In light of the Beaumont. we should also test to see if any interactions are  present between gender and task and also see if the relationship between task and EEG  alpha coherence strengthens.119 criterion was nearly significant at p = .  The model included task.  In other words. Mayes.  Further analysis evaluated  the interaction between the grouping variables of gender and task performance. and is accomplished by testing for significant  interactions with an ANCOVA (analysis of covariance) using a general linear model that  adjusts for unequal numbers of subjects in the various group cells (Wilkinson.) Therefore. EEG  alpha coherence.   . and task performance. or remains the same when the influence of gender  and age are controlled. 1989). age. gender. and  any of the grouping variables. (See  Table 11). and Rugg’s (1978) findings of task and gender  interaction on coherence measures.0558. (Albeit. gender and task performance. both  Vessels and Shadows used the INRC group schema. weakens. The results given in Table 10 indicate that assumption of homogeneity of slopes  holds. it is surprising that Analysis 2 showed Coherence  Index differences between pass and fail subjects on the Vessels task whereas Analysis 1  indicated gender differences on the Shadows task. This suggests that the alpha coherence index  may indeed reflect a developmental function relative to stages of epistemological growth.  First. and the grouping variables. and taskXgender interaction. age. gender.

5462 Age .5932               Formal StageXGenderXAge 0.1724   47             0.5413                Gender 0.0017 .9149 . Results of Tests of the Assumption of Homogeneity of Slopes for Age as a  Covariant with Task and Gender _____________________________________________________________________________________ _                 (N) Group  Effect                  SS  df  MS          F­Ratio               Probability * _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Formal Stage Criterion (54)               Formal Stage              0.7205 GenderXAge .0089 1 .0017 1 .0060 1             0.5906 Gender .0240 1 .0068 1 .0011 .3786                   0.8744 Gender .0320 .3805 ShadowsXGenderXAge .6339 Error 3.0253 .0002 .3509 .0380 .0244 1 .5537 .1964               Error 3.9892 Gender .3863 Age .4604 Age .0195 1             0.0244 .0011 1 .7585 Error 3.0195              0.0256 1             0.5241               Formal StageXAge                    0.0142              0.0256              0.0956 .1295 .6489               GenderXAge 0.0278 1             0.0008 1 .0528 1 .0665 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Correlation (57) Correlation .03800 1 .0115 .0166 .3583 49 .0662 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Shadows (56) Shadows .7497 VesselsXGenderXAge .4838 .3691 .0000 .0320 1 .0068 .0157 .0060 0.2296 .0194 1 .0889 0.2100 0.120 Table 10.3088 50 .0537 1 .7832 .5563 ShadowsXAge .0008 .7173                   0.0528 .1159                .1029 .0063 1 .0063 .0000 1 .2893                   0.0278              0.0537 .7497 GenderXAge .8980 VesselsXAge .1159 1             0.7669               Age 0.4119 0.0240 .7640 .0675 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Vessels (57) Vessels .0157 1 .0194 .0089 .0142 1             0.2932 .

.2650 51 .0001 .9780 GenderXAge .3487 CombinationXGenderXAge .0008 .4543 50 .0412 1 .2325 Error 3.0691 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Combination (58) Combination .3597 Age .8543 .0077 .6436 .121 CorrelationsXAge .4602 .0412 .0554 .7404 Error 3.0640 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *All significance tests are two­tailed.0077 1 .8180 .0573 1 .0524 1 .8650 .7754 .0547 1 .0547 .3828 CorrelationsXGenderXAge .0554 1 .0536 . .0001 1 .0935 1 .3700 Gender .3567 GenderXAge .8946 .1110 .0524 .0935 1.4261 CombinationsXAge .0573 .0536 1 .

3037 50 0.9939                 Error 3.040** Gender .463 Age .002 .0223       0.005 1 .1849 1 0.0223 1 0.005 .533 52 .776 Error 3.656 Error 3.036 .082 1. Results of Analysis of Covariance in Coherence Index Between Tasks.3374           0.858 Error 3.068 1 .250 .067 .177 .0001           0.005 .006 1 .201 1 .201 3.257 .002 1 .307 Gender .013 .0661 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Vessels (57) Vessels .036 1 .134 Gender .486 54 .1849       2.122 Table 11.002 .082 1 .797 Age .013 1 .5640                 Age 0.  Controlling for Age and Gender _____________________________________________________________________________________ _  (N)  Probability Task  Effect *      SS  df MS  F­Ratio        Two­tailed  One­tailed _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Formal Stage Criterion (54)                 Pass Tasks 0.057 .002 1 .350 53 .0000       0.654 Age .770 Age .013 1 .024 .7980                                .017 1 .549 .876 Error 3.0000 1 0.066 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Correlation (57) Correlation .063 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Shadows (56) Shadows .200 .533 53 .005 1 .013 .068 1.067 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Combination (58) Combination .032 .204 .050**                 Gender 0.065 .006 .086 .082 .154 Gender .017 .

 287.707. Combinations. p  = . Shadows. Correlations. **Significant at p  = or ≤  .123 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *When the GenderXTask interaction is included in the models.05. p  = . p  = .961.828. Vessels. one­tailed test .630. p =. the interaction p values are: Formal Stage  Criterion. p  = .

124 ANCOVA revealed no significant interactions (see footnotes to Table 11). p  = . but without the interaction. the Coherence Index continued to  demonstrate statistically significant differences between the pass and fail groups for the  Vessels task. one­tailed.  In other words. The test for Formal Stage Criterion indicated significant results (p = .  The Coherence Index  was constructed based on empirical relationships among the derivations (frontal + left+  right ­ occipital or “FLR­O”) established in previous research on creativity and mental  health (Orme­Johnson.  That is. 1982). and F4C4 (right or  “R”).  Ratios were tested to explore possibilities for greater  .177. F3F4 (frontal or “F”). et al.  when holding age and gender constant (a Type III test). F = 3.  Do the empirical relations taking each derivation  separately still hold for the formal stage criterion  or any of the four tasks for formal  reasoning? Here. revealed that the Vessels task  demonstrated virtually unchanged results. without regard to differences in age.  A subsequent  ANCOVA on the same model.. follow­up analysis reports additional tests on the derivations and the ratios  between certain of the derivations. F3C3 (left or “L”).  Therefore. Results of these tests on the other three tasks demonstrated similar resemblance to  their equivalent t ­tests. Follow­up Analysis 1 ­ Analysis of Differences in Various    Coherence Measures Between Pass and Fail Subjects   The Coherence Index is constructed as the sum of three “anterior” alpha  coherence derivations . for the given range and distribution of ages.050)  consistent with the hypothesis that the coherence index is a measure of developmental  progress with respect to the stage of formal operational reasoning.040. the  relationship holds across both genders. it is concluded that overall. df = 1.  What holds for males is expected to hold also for  females. minus the “posterior” derivation O1O2 (occipital or “O”). the relationship between  the Coherence Index and tasks are independent of age and gender.

0665.  Apparently. For tests of pass vs. (R­L)/(R+L). fail.043) and the trend for  differences in the Vessels task (p = . males and females are  “neurologically equivalent” for the measures used here. was also studied. Vessels and Shadows. (F­L)/(F+L). interpretation is difficult since  only one female passed the Shadows task.05) were made to  compensate for the multiple tests in this and subsequent follow­up analyses.  Therefore.  However.  For ratios constructed out of measures within the anterior derivations . the  ratio of frontal to left coherence.161). The results are presented in Tables 12 ­ 16. and the analog measures of  anterior/posterior differences.  Although  results indicate that among the tasks there are no significant differences that  .05):  the ratio (L­R)/(L+R)  demonstrated interaction in the Shadows task. posterior derivation : higher for fail). especially in the (L­R)/(L+R) ratio in the  two INRC group tasks. these latter tests used a two­tailed alpha test. apply to both genders.  The lack of other interactions.125 discriminatory power between pass and fail groups within each task. therefore.  The ratios included  typical measures of laterality differences.  not significant).  Preliminary texts for taskXgender interaction  revealed only one statistically significant interaction (p  ≤ .  Because frontal bilateral  activity may signify different mental processes than left or right homolateral activity.  Subsequent analyses and  conclusions will. was surprising in light of the significant  difference between males and females in the Shadows task (p = .  Post hoc Sheffé tests of all  possible pairs  indicated that the ratio was less for the pass female than the fail male group (p  = . no expectations  could be made regarding the relationship between pass and fail groups and the dependent  measures. one­tailed tests were made where the direction of effect  was expected (anterior derivations : higher for pass. no Bonferroni corrections in the alpha level (p ≤ .  Because the tests are  exploratory. (R­O)/(R+O) and (F­O)/(F+O).

 also note that results of the tests indicate no  significant differences  .126 discriminated pass from fail groups.

7433 52 .086 Fail 15 0.0975 1.1372 52                    .0405 0.0701 1.127 Table 12.0447 0.057 .0841 0. **Significant at p ≤  .0825 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *ANCOVAs using a full model of gender.925 Fail 33 .780 0.0526 0.130 Fail 33 .044** Fail 15 ­0.672 .1068 R = F4C4 Pass 39 0. fail.6973 0.074 L­R ratio = (F3C3­F4C4)/(F3C3+F4C4) Pass 39 0.1050 1.341 Fail 15  .0788 1.7236 0.046** Fail 15 0.0212 0.1284 F­O ratio= (F3F4­O1O2)/(F3F4+O1O2)  Pass 39 0.0764 1.021 .6639 52 . task.   t         df            Two­tailed    One­tailed _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ F = F3F4 Pass 39 .0547 1.070 0.282 Fail 33 .051*** Fail 15 0.0187 0.0883 F­L ratio = (F3F4­F3C3)/(F3F4+F3C3) Pass 39 0.0949 52 . Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Formal Stage Criterion Pass and Fail Groups* _____________________________________________________________________________________   Probability Group N Mean            S. male and female subjects were pooled for t­tests of pass vs.3875 52 .051 .D.6868 0.7135 52 .6683 0.092 L =F3C3 Pass 39 0.0469 0.099 O = O1O2 Pass 39 0.789 0.042 R­O ratio= (F4C4­O1O2)/(F4C4+O1O2)  Pass 39 0.  Therefore.0867 52 .05 ***Near significant at p = .413 52 .7099 0. and genderXtask interaction indicated no significant  interaction.

507 55 .   t         df            Two­tailed    One­tailed _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ F = F3F4 Pass 24 .059 .074 L­R ratio = (F3C3­F4C4)/(F3C3+F4C4) Pass 24 .D.959 55 .077 ­1.041 .085 1. Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Vessels Task Pass and Fail Groups* _____________________________________________________________________________________   Probability Group N Mean            S.277 Fail 33  .114 ­1.001 55 .558 55 .794 . fail.781 . and genderXtask interaction indicated no significant  interaction.118 Fail 33 .020 . .063 Fail 33 ­.076 ­1.661 .085 Fail 33 .928 Fail 33 .463 55 .099 O = O1O2 Pass 24 .071 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *ANCOVAs using a full model of gender.069 Fail 33 .057 .595 55 .079 F­L ratio = (F3F4­F3C3)/(F3F4+F3C3) Pass 24 .128 Table 13.  Therefore.672 .071 L =F3C3 Pass 24 .710 .733 .013 .698 .107 ­1.064 .093 . task.075          Fail             33               .021 .687 .198 55 .393 55 .109 F­O ratio = (F3F4­O1O2)/(F3F4+O1O2) Pass 24 .090 R = F4C4 Pass 24 .084 ­.042 R­O ratio = (F4C4­O1O2)/(F4C4+O1O2) Pass 24 . male and female subjects were pooled for t­tests of pass vs.043 .033 .342 Fail 33 .

098 .129 Table 14.083 L = F3C3 Pass 12 .  male and female subjects were pooled for t­tests of pass vs.708 .052 .077 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *ANCOVAs using a full model of gender.330 Fail 44 .065 .017 .164 Fail 44 .261 Fail 44 ­. and genderXtask interaction indicated only one significant  interaction: (F­L)/(F+L) p = . fail.0665. **Near significant at p = .110 Fail 44 .  Post hoc Sheffé tests of all possible pairs revealed that the pass female measure was less than the fail  male measure.126 O = O1O2 Pass 12 .050 . p = .086 ­.623 Fail 44 .087 54 .643 .064 L­R ratio = (F3C3­F4C4)/(F3C3+F4C4) Pass 12 .000 .082 1.104 F­O ratio = (F3F4­O1O2)/(F3F4+O1O2) Pass 12 . Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Shadows Task Pass and Fail Groups* _____________________________________________________________________________________ _  Probability Group N Mean           S.  Interpretation is difficult.044 .052** Fail 27 .465 Fail 44 .   t         df          Two­tailed     One­tailed _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ F = F3F4 Pass 12 .046 R­O ratio = (F4C4­O1O2)/(F4C4+O1O2) Pass 12 .D.793 .  Given the difficulty of interpretation with only one pass female. .645 54 .16 .068 ­1. since only one female passed the  task.146 ­.736 .024 . task.684 .064 ­1.069 .0352.684 .494 54. however.039 .066 Fail 44 .061 ­.082 F­L ratio = (F3F4­F3C3)/(F3F4+F3C3) Pass 12 .988 54 .092 R = F4C4 Pass 12 . not significant.626 54 .442 54 .525 54 .781 .686 .650 54 .

059 1.676 55 .087 ­1. male and female subjects were pooled for t­tests of pass vs.292 Fail 38 .022 55 .069 . fail.077 ­1.165 55 . .056 . task.081 .   t df Two­tailed   One­tailed _____________________________________________________________________________________ F = F3F4 Pass 19 .711 .083 F­L ratio = (F3F4­F3C3)/(F3F4+F3C3) Pass 19 .070 ­.779 .794 .259 Fail 38 . Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Correlations Task Pass and Fail Groups* _____________________________________________________________________________________ _           Probability Group N              Mean         S.094 R = F4C4 Pass 19 .057 Fail 38 .122 F­O ratio = (F3F4­O1O2)/(F3F4+O1O2) Pass 19 .070 .676 .027 .112 O = O1O2 Pass 19 .041 55 .077 ­.942 55 .064 L­R ratio = (F3C3­F4C4)/(F3C3+F4C4) Pass 19 .435 Fail 38 .079 L = F3C3 Pass 19 .717 .680 .673 .549 55 .053 R­O ratio = (F4C4­O1O2)/(F4C4+O1O2) Pass 19 .006 .068 Fail 38 .515 55 .151 Fail 38 ­.338 Fail 38 .130 Table 15.D.038 .419 55 .  Therefore.031 . and genderXtask interaction indicated no significant  interaction.311 Fail 38 .070 .004 .722 .043 1.077 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *ANCOVAs using a full model of gender.

056 R­O ratio = (F4C4­O1O2)/(F4C4+O1O2) Pass 27 .041 1.042 . Results of Unpaired T­Test of Differences in Various Coherence Measures  Between Combination Task Pass and Fail Groups* _____________________________________________________________________________________ _  Probability Group N Mean          S.117 F­O ratio = (F3F4­O1O2)/(F3F4+O1O2) Pass 27 .573 56 . and genderXtask interaction indicated no significant  interaction.072 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *ANCOVAs using a full model of gender.054 .031 .071 L­R ratio = (F3C3­F4C4)/(F3C3+F4C4) Pass 27 .071 .088 ­1.684 .708 .585 56 .927 56 .021 56 .D.670 . .  Therefore.188 56 .031 .117 Fail 31 .084 .094 R = F4C4 Pass 27 .179 Fail 31 .077 ­.670 56 .788 .087 F­L ratio = (F3F4­F3C3)/(F3F4+F3C3) Pass 27 .708 .   t         df          Two­tailed       One­tailed _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ F = F3F4 Pass 27 .280 Fail 31 .077 ­. fail. male and female subjects were pooled for t­tests of pass vs.053 ­1.088 L = F3C3 Pass 27 .014 .011 .411 56 .076 .067 .112 O = O1O2 Pass 27 .253 Fail 31 .101 ­1.125 Fail 31 ­.784 .425 Fail 31 .082 Fail 31 .131 Table 16.721 .664 .312 Fail 31 .594 56 . task.

 not statistically significant.” I suggest that the  increase in anterior alpha coherence may.0745).052). (p = .  This suggests that the right hemisphere may play a role in  discriminating pass from fail subjects. and  Combinations tasks (p = .082).  The Vessels  task also resulted in a low p value (p = .  These trends in general reinforce the  previous empirically supported relationship between adaptive functioning (positive traits)  and the individual measures of alpha coherence reported in the Introduction. More important to our hypothesis.065)  in the O1O2 measure associated with bilateral coherence in the occipital region and in the  ratio comparing bilateral frontal with occipital coherence (p = .  . the tests on formal stage criterion  indicate two significant results and one near­significant result.1) for the right  hemisphere derivation  F4C4 in the Vessels.046).068). Of interest is the general pattern of near­significant p values (p ≤ . and (F­ O)/(F+O) (p = . (R­O)/(R+O) (p  = . These three results are  associated with the O1O2 derivation  and suggest the group of subjects who fail the  formal stage criterion exhibit greater alpha coherence in the bilateral occipital derivation .05) that contradicted the expected directions. Since left.058. however.051). albeit.084) Correlations (p = . Two tests were near­significant at p ≤  .063 and p =  .  The three derivations include O1O2 (p  = . under certain conditions.  The implications of observing negative  relationship between the  bilateral occipital derivation  and cognitive development as given by these results will be  explored in Chapter V under “Recommendations for Future Research.069) in the left hemisphere deriviation and in the  ratios that compare the posterior derivation  with anterior derivations  (p = .  Furthermore.  These trends were  all in the expected directions: anterior derivations  were higher for the pass group and  posterior derivations  were higher for the fail group. Shadows task demonstrated near­significant differences (p  = .044).132 (p  ≤ . give rise to reduced   bilateral occipital coherence as a necessary consequence of the lack of bilateral  commissural connections in the occipital lobes.

 these findings imply that the Coherence Index  maintains a relationship to formal operational reasoning through positive correlations  with anterior homolateral coherence and negative correlations with posterior occipital  bilateral coherence.  Together. and Math preference measures previously indicated that  subjects were not selected with a bias towards mathematics or science. (1982). Science. a follow­up  investigation examines the relationship between preferences and task performance.  The posterior. other research indicates that affective and course performance  measures in science and mathematics correlate well with achievement in tests of formal  . non­ parametric tests were conducted using the Mann­Whitney test for two independent  samples (Hays.  Specifically. 1973. and occipital regions all contribute to the discriminatory trend.  The anterior left  and/or right coherence measures appear to play at least a modest role in all four tasks as  well as in the formal stage criterion. Verbal. Overall. task success is  indicated across a greater variety of tasks in individual measures of right and occipital  coherences (and associated ratios) than by the Coherence Index alone. 778). the alpha criterion was made one­ tailed. Follow­up Analysis 2: Tests for Relationships Between    Preferences and Task Performance   The Art.  Here.  Where a direction of relationship between pass  performance and a preference could be anticipated.  Because the data lack an interval scale and fail the assumptions of normality. in the case of tasks of formal reasoning used here. occipital coherence measures appear  to play an additional role in the Shadows task and significantly so in the case of the  Formal Stage Criterion. p.  This gives support to the original empirical equation (FLR­O) by  Orme­Johnson et al.133 right. it may be suggested  that FLR­O represents a “whole brain” measure.

 and Correlations tasks. based on the p values  demonstrated in this research. also see Rennie and Punch. 1991).134 reasoning (Modgil and Modgil. and may be  unaccounted in areas outside the subject’s domain of familiarity (Piaget.) Confirming.055). and near­significant positive relationships were found between Math  preference and Vessels pass score (p  = . (See Table 17.055). Statistically significant positive relationships (p  ≤ . while Art.  In fact.  Self­selection processes should not be discounted in the search for sophisticated  “diagnostic” procedures of formal reasoning! Note that “formal operations” have a content­specific component.  No predictions  can be made regarding Art or Verbal activity preferences. the preference measures were stronger and more consistent  indicators of formal reasoning across the tasks than any of the alpha coherence measures. an hitherto  uninvestigated variable. as well as Science preference and  Combinations pass scores (p  = . and Combinations tasks. 1976. preference for Art was related to fail performance for Combinations  (p  = . statistically significant relationships  were found between Math preference and pass scores on the Formal Stage Criterion as  well as the Shadows.  . but non­significant (p ≤ . Correlations.05) were found between  preference for Science and pass performance on the Formal Stage Criterion as well as the  Vessels.1) relationships were indicated in the  same direction for Art preference in the Formal Stage Criterion.  Similarly. The overall pattern of test results indicates that self­reported preference for (and  past success in) Science and Math are reasonable positive predictors of performance in  formal stage attainment as well as passing each of the four tasks. Shadows. Conversely. 1972).003). is a negative predictor. and the Correlations and  Shadows tasks.  Confirming.

 separate tests were  conducted on three main effects using the Mann­Whitney test for two independent  samples. and • differences between pass and fail (females examined in tests separately from  males.  The  greater preference for Science and Math among males parallels their tendency for better  performance on the Shadows task.  One­tailed tests were used with Science and Math preference scores. by Gender.135 Therefore.  Near­significant differences (p  ≤ .013) than the female group.   .08)  included higher scores for Science and lower scores for Art preference among males. preference for Art may ultimately be related to formal reasoning if tasks were  invented that used the context of art activities! Follow­up Analysis 3: Tests for Relationships Between    Preferences and Gender   Given the findings of significantly better male performance on the Shadows (p  =  task. • differences between males and females within each task (pass subjects examined  in tests separately from fail subjects).  Tests  evaluated: • differences in preference by gender without regard to task.  Because the data is ordinal and lacks normal distribution. it is not  appropriate to use analysis of variance.  Instead. Differences in Preference. Without Regard to Task Table 18 indicates that the male group has significantly greater preference scores  for math (p  = . and given the success of the preference measure to predict task performance. a procedure that would allow straightforward tests  for interaction between gender and task performance. I  conducted further analyses to see if the preference measures demonstrated similar gender  differences.

006*** Math 4.421 4.5 170.0 .935 308.556 5.0 .0 .093 .875 4.0 .867 206.024** .667 12 4.0 207.025** Vessels             N= Art Verbal Science Math Shadows          N= Art Verbal Science Math Correlations    N= Art Verbal Science Math 24 4.004*** .114 38 5.667 5.614 4.5 .053 467.417 4.839 604.526 4.846 Science 5.741 3.2 218.0 252.000 419.917 5.555 5.275 .974 5.484 319.5 .055 Math 4.737 5.067 430.5 412.455 5.375 4.0 .087 Verbal 4.496 .030 44 5.003*** Verbal 5.0 .641 3.0 299.417 5.167 19 4.236 .071 265.055 356.002*** .263 5.077 4.782 .974 5.600 392.139 4.00 291.039** _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *Mann­Whitney test for two independent samples .094 4. Results of Tests of Differences in Preference Measures Between Task Pass  and Fail Groups _____________________________________________________________________________________ _             Mean Preference Rating Probability   Task Preference Pass Fail U* Two­tailed    One­tailed _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Formal Stage  Criterion  N= 39 15 Art 4.059 .030** Combinations N= 27 31 Art 4.875 Science 5.421 4.455 5.0 .0 290.5 .303 4.892 4.028* 457.074 4.136  Table 17.895 33 5.0 .0 167.

137 **Significant at p  ≤ .05 ***Significant at p  ≤ .01 .

 female N=18 due to missing data ***Significant at p ≤ .9284. appears to be a  female predilection (p = .0 .6673. a presumed “ spatial” mode of expression. the INRC  group schema for “balance” that both tasks require is not an element exercised in artistic  endeavor.  Apparently.279 387.5 . even though visual “balance” can be a significant component in a work of art.066 Math 4.013*** ______________________________________________________________________________________ *Mann­Whitney test for two independent samples **For Verbal.923 5.842 476.368 282.138 Table 18.579 237.  See Tables  19 and 20 for the results. only five statistically significant (p ≤ .0 .073 Verbal 4.  This suggests that the results reflect the separate natures of operational spatial thinking  versus figurative spatial thinking.073).05 It is interesting that Art.0 .05)  . considering that Shadows and the Vessels tasks are  spatially oriented tasks on which females tend to perform poorly. Results of Tests of Differences in Preference Measures Between Male and  Females  _______________________________________________________________________ _ Mean Preference Rating         Probability Preference Male Female U*  Two­tailed One­tailed _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ N= 39 19** Art 4.949 5. Differences Between Males and Females Within Each Task  (Pass Groups Tested Separately From Fail Groups) The next main effect tested was preference differences between males and females  for each task separately looking at pass subjects separately from fail subjects.  Among the 40 tests.776 Science 4.

  Among subjects who passed a task.139 differences discriminated males and females.  preference for Science was greater for males than females in the Shadows  .

250 4.600 11 4.050** .125 53.107 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *Mann­Whitney test for two independent samples .750 60.5 31.136 .800 4.392 .4294.5 58.818 96.727 206.035** .094 Verbal 4.5 5 24.032** Vessels (Pass)             N= Art Verbal Science Math Shadows (Pass)          N= Art Verbal Science Math Correlations (Pass)    N= Art Verbal Science Math 19 4. Results of Tests of Gender Differences in Preference Measures Taken  Separately for Each Task Pass Group _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Mean Preference Rating                           Probability Task Preference Male Female U*          Two­tailed    One­tailed _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Formal Stage  Criterion (Pass)  N=       28 11 Art 4.8574.923 Science 5.000 5.9473.375 85.007*** Combinations (Pass) N= 19 8 Art 4.300 .0 .138 .00 61.2114.000 14 4.145 Verbal 4. .636 116.3643.091 157.0 57.200 5 56.00 43.7475.1807.5 .400 4.0 .000 5.929 5.2635.118 .0 .115 Math 4.2635.5005.208 .400 5.5 10.192 Math 5.0 .536 .0004.113 .0 .607 Science 5.7312.200 5.000 4.5 .140 Table 19.5 11.800 5.5 54.9112.467 .7895.0 1 .8425.400 5.0 .679 5.250 103.0 9.5003.964 3.

 05 ***Significant at p  ≤ .141 **Significant at p  ≤ . 01 .

5 .500 18.0 .486 .5 .000 38.471 4.452 Math 4.294 .280 Verbal 5.923 4.250 18 5.923 5.5 .184 Combinations (Fail) N= 20 11 Art 5.125 3.462 20 5.750 5.0 .350 3.462 4.76 Verbal 4.714 200.857 29.778 5.102 .250 4.402 .231 4.5 120.417 4.150 5.029** _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *Mann­Whitney test for two independent samples .200 108.983 .875 5.0 .142 Table 20.650 4.5 .400 24 5.429 3.273 134.857 30.0 256.600 6.091 81.125 3.5 167.583 4.611 13 5.5 .5 . Results of Tests of Gender Differences in Preference Measures Taken  Separately for Each Task Fail Group _____________________________________________________________________________________ _   Mean Preference Rating                 Probability Task Preference Male Female U*    Two­tailed    One­tailed _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Formal Stage  Criterion (Fail) N= 8 7 Art 5.700 Science 4.058 .335 .462 14 6.500 3.700 4.121 Shadows (Fail) N= Art Verbal Science Math Vessels (Fail) N= Art Verbal Science Math Correlations (Fail) N= Art Verbal Science Math 26 5.064 99.080 131.0 166.0 184.247 .4173 Science 4.241 .000 5.000 5.0 296.5 197.0 106.0 .769 3.692 4.111 Math 4.167 3.5 .5 171.050 4.182 65.

01 .143 **Significant at p  ≤ .05 ***Significant at p  ≤ .

032) and the Correlations task (p  = .05) that discriminate pass from fail groups.  Preference for Math was greater for males in  the Formal Stage Criterion (p  = .  The pass group measured lower in Art  preference and higher in Math preference than the fail group. .  No table is given for the U statistic or  the p  values.  obviating any statistical variance.  Interestingly. discriminations between pass and fail females only occurred  in the Correlations task. Mann­Whitney tests  indicate no significant differences  (p ≤ .05) and Correlations (p  = .086) preferences when comparing pass  and fail females on the Combinations task. Among subjects who failed a task.)  However. Differences Between Pass and Fail Groups (Female Groups  Tested Separately From Male Groups) The question now reduces to whether the pass subjects have greater or lesser  preference strength within a single gender group. implying that its  predictive power was related less to gender and more to pass/fail intermediating variables  on the tasks. non­significant trend differences were  demonstrated in Art (p = .  Note that only one of the five significant tests occurred among the fail group.  (The Shadows task was not examined because only one female passed the task.055) and Math (p = . by preference for Math (in the pass  group) and Art (in the fail group). Overall. Art does not discriminate males and females on any task.  In summary.035) tasks. albeit non­significantly.  Pass means are presented  in Table 19 and fail group means are in Table 20.029) compared with females.  Among females. the evidence suggests that males demonstrate greater preferences for  Math and Science activities than females especially among subjects that pass one or more  tasks.144 (p  = .007). males demonstrated a significant preference  only in the case of Math in the Combinations task (p  = .

020) than fail males in the Combinations task. 1) in the pass group in all four tasks.  The Shadows task demonstrated three  discriminating preferences (p ≤ . given the nature of the findings.1) of which Science and Math were significant at p ≤ .064). 5. perhaps due to an overall  weak preference for Math and Science. with Shadows and Correlations exhibiting  statistically significant differences (p ≤ .  Therefore. pass males exhibited a significantly weaker preference for Art  (p = .001). it appears that males  who pass one or more tasks are more apt than females to express a stronger preference for  science or math than their female counterparts.  Likewise.  The third discriminating preference was Art.   Although the evidence does not support a causal relationship. among males.  It appears that among females.  (For example.  Last. preferences  may be more homogeneous. and  Preference Measures We must remember that the statistical power is much less for these preceding  tests than for the tests including both genders together. and the Shadows task (p = . Science and Math preference still  discriminated males from females. in tests comparing pass and fail males. Math preference was  significantly greater in the Shadows task (p = . with a similar trend demonstrated in  the Shadows task (p = .145 Preferences appear a weak indicator among females.  In summary.  Confirming trends occurred in the Vessels task (p = . Science preference was stronger  (p   ≤ . passing females  numbered 1. and pass from fail within each gender in several  tasks.  Yet. Conclusions Regarding Gender. Task Performance. I suggest that they agree with the  generally acknowledged greater aptitude (and subjective satisfaction) for math among  .061)  and weakly so in the Combinations (p = .  However. and 8 across the four tasks).094) task.  Science was significantly preferred by the pass group in the Correlations task (p = .013) and confirmed with a weak trend in the  Vessels task (p = .096).02.013). 5.01).

 the preference measures had too many ties and thus  lacked rank differences needed by the statistic.  Science and Art  preferences are inversely related. their bunched distribution. As expected. rank correlations indicate a complete lack of monotonic or linear  relationship between the physiological variables and the preference variables. 1976). . but not quite within statistical significance. and given the association of some of the EEG  coherence measures to the tasks as well.  The findings also concur with findings that greater science  achievement is associated with higher performance on tests of formal reasoning (Modgil  and Modgil. Follow­up Analysis 4 ­ Tests for Relationships Between    Preferences and Other Variables   Given the tendency of several preference measures to discriminate pass subjects  from fail subjects on the various tasks. the lack of rank  correlations lacks ready explanation. as expected. 1988).  compared to the coherence measures. and their interaction with the much  wider ranged and more normally distributed EEG coherence measures. it is reasonable to ask if a direct relationship  holds between any of the coherence measures and the task scores.146 males (Benbow.  Table 21 presents the  results of Spearman rank correlations between these variables. it is suggested that the  attenuation of the rank correlations may be a function of the relatively short range of the  preference measures (1­7).002).  Given the  reasonable degree of the previously established relationships between the physiological  measures and the measures of preferences and task performance.  In other words.  Unexpectedly.  Although speculative. the tests indicate a moderate and significant positive monotonic  relationship between Science and Math preference (p  ≤ .

0000 Science ­.0338 R = F4C4 ­.0252 .0561 . **Non­significant but of interest.1817  ­.0945 1.1059 .0163 .1342 .0031 F­0 ratio = (F3F4­O1O2)/(F3F4+O1O2) .2239** .1902 1.0448 .1211 R­O ratio = (F4C4­O1O2)/(F4C4+O1O2) ­.05 is rS = .0721 ­.0210 .0888  ­.1.0872 O = O1O2 ­.0040 .0000* Verbal .0490 ­.0129  ­.0256 F­L ratio = (F3F4­F3C3)/(F3F4+F3C3) .0209 ­.0858  ­.0357 . Results of Tests for Relationships between Preference Measures and Non­task  Variables: EEG Coherence Derivations and Ratios _____________________________________________________________________________________ _   Preference Measures Covariate Art Verbal Science Math  _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ Art 1.0379 F = F3F4 . ***Significant.1265  ­.147 Table 21.0545 .0607 L­R ratio = (F3C3­F4C4)/(F3C3+F4C4) .0161 ­.002 . p >.0000 Coherence Index .0478 .1413 L = F3C3 .1161 .1366 .4450*** 1.05 and  ≤ .0247 .0000 Math .0351 . p  = .0517 .1243 .  Critical value for alpha p ≤ .0870 .0927 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *Spearman rank correlation coefficient.0156 ­.0084  ­.2582 or more.

 relatively little effort has been directed toward integrating  neurological research with the body of Piagetian theory and research.  Early attempts to relate these two fields  using direct EEG measures of brain functioning have been illuminating. The current research attempts to examine the role of left­right hemisphere  involvement in formal operational reasoning.  She posits that this indicates greater left­right hemispheric  information transfer during the task.  The lack of  research has led to speculations by a popular writer that Piagetian reasoning skills are  “left brain” and ignore student aptitudes for “metaphorical” or “right brain” thought  (Samples.  However. although  inconclusive.148 CHAPTER V DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION   Review of Purpose and Procedures   Although much has been said by educators regarding left­right brain approaches  to education in general. This indicates “whole brain” function is associated  with higher levels of reasoning.  Subjects in the second experiment ranged between  six and eight years old and were tested on concrete operational reasoning. Kraft suggests this implies that the left hemisphere verbal activity may have  simultaneously drawn upon right hemisphere thinking activity which reduced the EEG  hemispheric differences. no controls were made to discriminate the presumed right­ hemisphere visual­spatial “thinking” portion of the reasoning task from the left­ hemisphere.  A subsequent study from the same laboratory instituted  such controls and found that high performers differed less between the two conditions  than the low performers (Kraft.  EEG power measures indicated increased left hemisphere activity among  university students during tests of concrete and formal reasoning (Dilling. Wheatley. . 1976). 1975). speaking portion. 1976). &  Mitchell.

  The subjects were students and  staff at a small private university where all the students.  Therefore. however. is free of the variables that confound  power measures.  The limitation lies with an intrinsic  problem of using EEG power ratios. such as variation in skull and scalp thickness among subjects. and Webster and Thurber.  EEG  coherence measures the degree to which two points on the scalp exhibit the same  frequency within a given short period of time.149 The findings have limited scope.05 Hz (Levine.95 indicates that the two EEG signals have a  difference of less than .  The experimenter cannot determine if the  experimental results indicate an increase in the power of one hemisphere. faculty.  Coherence is analogous to the square of  Pearson’s correlation coefficient. 1985. An additional obstacle in much EEG research has been the lack of a standard  cognitive state against which to evaluate the significance of the EEG measures  (Giannitrapani. 1978). however. which represents the percentage of variance in  frequency at one point accounted for by variance in frequency at another point of the  scalp. or a mixture of both.  For this reason. experimenters usually lack knowledge of the subject’s  precise strategy in accomplishing a given task. subjects were chosen who were  experienced in a commonly­available mental technique. A measure of EEG coherence.  For example.  Where tasks have been  administered during the EEG.  Students were accustomed to yearly EEG coherence  . a coherence measure of . Transcendental Meditation (TM)  which is claimed to result in restful alertness of the mind. a decrease of  power in the other hemisphere. 1976).  This makes it difficult to evaluate the  significance of the EEG measures. EEG power ratio measures cannot conclusively fix the locus of hemispheric  change. and staff engaged in the  practice of TM as a regular routine.  A ratio confounds the two.

 INRC group (Communicating Vessels  task).  Both of these qualities have  been applied to right­hemisphere functions. This study seeks to extend the previously mentioned studies of the development of  logical thought by using the Orme­Johnson et al. in part.  Piaget says the structured whole is non­verbal and requires  consideration of all the relevant variables simultaneously. Transcendental Meditation (Wallace.  I suggest that right­hemisphere functions must be represented as well as left­ hemisphere functions in formal reasoning.” a key element of  formal operational reasoning.  The cognitive state is controlled during the measurement period by the  experienced practice of a stress­reduction technique. 1957). and the correlation schema  (Correlations task).  Immediately before or after the EEG session. he suggests that this  tendency to master the structured whole must have its reflection in neurology as well as  behavior.  This combination of L and  R measures reflects a “whole brain” approach to the study of reasoning skills.  In fact.150 measures taken as part of their annual “EEG report card. subjects were tested for formal  operational schemata using clinical versions of tasks patterned after Inhelder and Piaget  (1958): combinatorial reasoning (Chemicals task).” from which data for this  research was taken.  Piaget suggests that cognitive growth moves  in the direction of greater stability or equilibrium.  A composite measure was constructed in which subjects who fail at  . of the “structured whole.  The FLR­O index captures data that reflect L  and R hemisphere operation during a standard cognitive state. (1982) FLR­O index of EEG coherence  as a continuous measure and pass­fail performance on clinical versions of four Piagetian  tasks as the classification variables. The common notion of right brain thought being “wholistic” supports Piaget’s  claim that formal reasoning consists.  1972). proportionality schema (Projection of Shadows task).  Fifty­eight university­level subjects (19 F and 39 M)  were studied.  The structured whole acts like a “field  of force governed by the laws of equilibrium” (Piaget.

2 percent of the subjects passed one or more of four tasks  purported to evaluate the presence of logical structures associated with formal operational  reasoning. however.  In my study.   Discussion of the Data   Proportion Passing the Tasks   Formal Stage Criterion   In this study.  These subjects gave no evidence of the cognitive reorganization characteristic of formal  reasoning. p. has made it clear that although a subject may indeed fail in exhibiting any  particular formal logical structure.3% of females passing versus 29.  however.  Subjects who passed at least one task.7% of males  .4% of the subjects passed the test of proportional  reasoning (Shadows task).   Shadows Task   In the current research. 21. 72. were to pass  a task associated with any of the six remaining structures not tested here.  Piaget. were considered to have  “passed” the Formal Stage Criterion.  With only 5. 1975). 130).  This assumption could be shown wrong if subjects.  The difference arises  out of a possible misunderstanding on the part of many researchers who feel that failure  on any one task indicates lack of development of the stage of formal operations. I assume that each of such reorganizations  is implied by failure to pass any of the four tasks that test for their corresponding logical  structures. 1991.151 all four tasks were considered to have failed attainment of the Formal Stage Criterion. the subject may still have undergone the cognitive  reorganization that gives rise to “characteristic structures in actions at the formal stage  (Piaget and Garcia.  This contrasts with other published reports that only 50 percent or less of  college students exhibit formal operations (Haley and Good. for example.

 found different passing rates. At the UI.152 passing. probably  owing to different test protocols.  Ibe (1985) studied seniors also. outside of the UI program.  Bady  (1978) found 81% of early college students passed the Shadows task. the gender difference was statistically significant. a very good percentage considering she explicitly required use of a metric system  of calculating proportions. gender ratios.  Neither of the last two studies demonstrated any gender  differences in the rate of pass.  These last researchers go on to cite their own work and other’s to suggest that  . Poduska (1983) and Poduska and Phillips (1986) found 12% of 67  university males passed and none of 33 females passed. Perry.  Wavering.  probably due to the interview format.  Farrell and Farmer  (1985) found 12.  although they acknowledge their passing rate are much lower than reported elsewhere.  Martorano (1977) found 55% of her 12th grade girls  passed. among whom only one  (male) of 31 subjects (13 males) passed. similar research at the University of Iowa (UI) suggests the pass rate  is within expectation for the subject age and education. and  Birdd (1986) found only 6% of their subjects (50% female) passed the Shadows task. Kelsey.  Wavering (1979.  Across the groups.  Other UI studies used high school seniors. and scoring criteria. Other research. 1984) reports 15% of  seniors (about 50% females) passed the Shadows task. no pass rates were given.  Piburn (1980) found that 11th grade males scored  significantly better on the Shadows task than females.  However. males scored better than  females by a factor of three or four. they say. 35% of regular 16­17 year­old students.4% of females passed the Shadows  tasks. 57% of gifted 16­17 year­olds. and  no regular 14 year­old students passed.4% of 10­12th grade males and 5.  The ratio of 37 male to 19  female subjects make it difficult to directly compare the overall pass rate with other  research. also a significant gender  difference.  Hensley reports 37% of seniors  (about 50% female) passed.  Dulit found 33% of  adults passed.

 and  10% of average 14 year­old students passed. 98.3% of subjects passed (36.  Wavering notes that Rubley’s subjects were a selected  sample.   Correlations Task   The current study found 33. not counting level IIIA. Rubley (1972) found 57% of 11­12th  grade chemistry students passing (50% of the subject group were females).  This suggests that the gender difference should show up in the  alpha coherence measure.  Neither researcher  found any gender differences.  With level IIIA included.8% of males and 26.  Among University of Iowa studies. from a chemistry class thus accounting for their rather high pass rate.  Wavering  (1979) found that 10% of 12th grade students (50% females) passed. not correlational reasoning. this was not the case. 62% of gifted 16­17 year­olds. Other research elsewhere indicates a range of task and scoring protocols that make  comparisons difficult.  However.  Also.3% of  females passed).  Martorano (1977) found 55% of 12th grade girls passed.  Dulit (1972) found 25% of  adults passed. even though the Shadows task has definite spatial components.153 better male performance may not be accounted for by spatial ability.2% of university  undergraduates passed.  Ross (1973) found 9.  This would appear as a genderXtask statistical interaction. but rather some other  source. 17% of regular 16­17 year­old students. in general.  The significant difference in passing rates between the genders is upheld in  several other studies. the current study appears within the range of results of other  studies. .4% passed.  Wavering elected to classify III­A subjects as non­pass because IIIA only indicates direct  proportional reasoning.  Lovell (1961) found 77% of ablest 15­18 year­old students passed  and only 25% of the least­able students passed.  as we shall see. perhaps as a right­hemisphere “deficit” for the female group  compared to males.  The current research takes the same  position. Thus.

1 percent of subjects in the current study passed (48.  Both studies used the clinical interview method.  Both the Vessels  task and the Shadows task appear to be visuo­spatially oriented.  No University of Iowa research is reported  for this task. the advantage was non­significant (p  = . albeit to different degrees (see discussion below). although questionably.   Communicating Vessels Task   42.  Although males  scored better.  Martorano (1977) found 85 percent of the 12th grade females passed.5 percent of the subjects passing. although  the pass rates in my study appear less than reported in other studies.  The apparent spatial  . Combinations of Colored and Colorless Chemical Bodies      Task 46. Ross (1973) reports 75 percent of his undergraduate subjects  passed. with each drawing upon  the INRC group.  The current results must stand on their own as there’s no  ready explanation for the lower percent age of females passing in my study compared to  Martorano’s study.161). they are probably  acceptable.8%  females passed).  Therefore.  No published gender differences appear for this task. the current study appears to follow in the  conservative trend established by the UI clinical interview method.6 percent of subjects passed the task in the current study (48. Marek.7% males and 27.”  Bady (1978) found 76 percent of college  students passed.7 percent males  passed and 42.  Elsewhere.1 percent of females passed). the current study appears to have obtained reasonable results.  De Hernandez.154 In general. since subjects  may have been allowed to use “trial and error.  No  other results could be found.  Martorano (1977) found 45 percent of 12th grade females passed.  When  compared with studies done at other institutions. as a group.  Joyce  (1977) found 95.  The lack  of gender differences appears to be the norm. and Renner (1984) found 34 percent females and  36 percent males passing (mean age 17 years) with no difference between genders.

 a fourth comparison.  The  Combinations task was passed more frequently than the Correlations task. did not manifest.  Again.  Only one of the significantly related pairs changed status.05) on three tests when  testing pairs of tasks for differences in passing rates within subjects.155 orientation of the Vessels and Shadows task may contribute to the male advantage in pass  rate.  And although the advantage is non­significant for Vessels. Hierarchical Ordering of Task Difficulty The current study found statistical significance (p < .  Also.  Nearly  significant at p  = .07.  Based on the reasonable similarity of  the “standard” all­male profile with the mixed gender profile. the Shadows task was more difficult than any of the other three  tasks. was passed more frequently  than the Shadows task.  with the males­only group passing the Combinations task only slightly more frequently  (p  = .  Subjects passed  both Combinations and Vessels tasks more frequently than the Shadows task. it may tap right­ hemisphere skills in the same manner as hypothesized for the Shadows task.095) than the Correlations task.  however. as we shall see.  This  pattern is borne out in the literature with some qualifications as follows. males passed the Correlations task about the  same frequency as they passed the Shadows task. the expected genderXtask interaction.  To examine these findings in a more standard fashion. Correlations. the same tests  were conducted for males only. Poduska (1983) and Poduska and Phillips (1986) studied university students and  concluded that the proportions schema used in the Shadows task is passed late compared  . In summary.  These results were based on a sample that had roughly 33%  female subjects. with a right hemisphere  “deficit” for alpha coherence among the females group. thereby reflecting trends evidenced by gender  differences.  The Correlations task ranked more difficult than the Combinations task. the following discussion  will use the mixed gender result.

 a sample of 100% females could possibly reverse Martorano’s ordering within  the confidence interval of the current study.  Therefore.   Inhelder and Piaget   Inhelder and Piaget (1958) suggest the following regarding the ordering of the four  tasks: .156 with other schema used in the concept of “speed.  The quantitative form is  tested in the current research.  None of these findings are  supported in the current study. in Piaget’s theory.  This latter sequence.  (Wavering found no  significant difference in pass rates between the two tasks among 8th. but prior to the quantitative notion of proportions. 1984) found his  research with the Correlations and Shadows tasks contradicted what he feels to be  Piaget’s claim that the proportion structure precedes correlation. after the qualitative sense of  proportions. Bart and Mertens also found that pass scores on the Vessels task depended upon  pass performance of both the Correlations and Combinations tasks. the current study found that females passed  significantly less than males on the Shadows task and marginally less on the Vessels task.  The difference in results may exist because Martorano  studied only female students.”  Wavering (1979.  Martorano’s original findings included these results with the addition that passing the  Vessels task also depended on passing the Shadows task. was found in the current research. correlations may be attained. Wavering failed to notice that Inhelder and Piaget (1958) define the  proportions schema with an early qualitative form as well as a later.  For example. 10th. Bart and Mertens (1979) performed an order theoretic analysis of Martorano’s  (1977) data and found that passing the Combinations task was not contingent upon any  other schema. and 12th grade  students.  Therefore.  Furthermore. quantitative form. correlations preceding the later form  of quantitative proportional reasoning.  The current study reflects this finding.)  However.

  In the sense of the “structured whole.in spite of appearances and current opinion. verbal  enterprise. as in the Communicating Vessels task. in the strict sense of the term. also is a  prerequisite to formal operational reasoning. but rather more.  First and foremost. The INRC group structure. which is  consistent with Piaget’s theory. 254).  The theorists affirm that  even at this initial level.  The INRC group structure is used both as  an internalized formal structure that integrates the transformations of inversions and  reciprocities and also as a means to understanding the transformations that underlie  equilibrium in a mechanical system. 253). it is a  logic of all possible combinations.  This statement implies.157 The Combinatorial schema is a prerequisite to other elements of formal reasoning:  “The most general property in terms of which we can characterize formal thought is that  it constitutes a combinatorial system.this property implies  all the others and thus is more general than they are” (p. that formal reasoning is not solely a left­brain.  Given a characterization of  right brain processing as “simultaneous.  The  current study found no prerequisite structures to the combinatorial schema. The current study also found that right brain coherence  contributed to the coherence index which was greater for the pass groups in all four tasks.  The authors imply they have been misunderstood on similar  points.” the INRC  group structure complements the combinatorial system.” Piaget and Inhelder’s comment can be  interpreted to suggest that “all possible combinations” is a right brain function... whether these combinations arise in relation to  experimental problems or purely verbal questions” (p. 254). the essential  characteristic of propositional logic is not that it is verbal logic.. in our  current neurophysiological context.. and reiterate: “.  The INRC group structure  provides the set of transformations that permit inferences and implications to be drawn  .  significantly so for the Vessels task. “the main feature of propositional logic is not that it is verbal  logic but that it requires a combinatorial system” (p.

g.  The INRC transformations in many ways suggest the  processes of “mental rotation. as found in the Projection of Shadows task. 1984) interpretation that the proportions  schema should come before the correlation schema. Locker & Youniss.” which has been shown to utilize right brain functions (see  De Lisi. 328).  Inhelder and Piaget actually state that the discovery of proportionality in the Projection of  Shadows task “results from an understanding of multiplicative compensations” (p. but to distinguish the various realized and realizable combinations among  them” (p. 1984). which is consistent with Piaget’s theory. 307).  “The search for correlations does in fact require a  combinatorial system. has been  discussed in the context of Wavering’s (1979. Kerr. Inhelder and Piaget make clear that the  calculations that constitute the schema (e. Dean. 1976. Corbitt. & Jurkovic.  I  suggest that several points indicate that the Shadows task has several prerequisites  including not only the quantitative version of proportional reasoning but also a version of  the INRC group that goes beyond mechanical equilibrium. appears to  require the combinatory schema. 1978. contrary to Inhelder and Piaget’s  suggestion of a qualitative notion and a quantitative notion of proportional reasoning.158 from propositions that arise from the combinatorial system (Inhelder and Piaget. The correlations schema.  In explaining multiplicative compensations. The proportions schema. p. 207).  Regarding the first point. which is  consistent with Piaget’s theory.  The current study found that passing the Correlations task required prior  passage of the Combinations task. since the subject’s problem is not simply to classify the four  possible cases. and  Shepard..  Regarding the second point. 325). according to Inhelder and Piaget (1958). x y = x’ y’) follow the qualitative notion of  proportions in which “the subject has the feeling that a proportionality exists before  calculating it” (p. Piaget suggests that solutions to the  . 1980.  The current study found no prerequisite schema to the INRC group structure.

 in addition to the schema of  Proportions.  Therefore. Ryncarz. that involve the INRC group: the already­mentioned Multiplicative  Compensations.  Orme­ Johnson. and Wallace (1983) also published  measures of coherence in two groups of subjects practicing TM in a separate study at the  same university using the same EEG setup.53 minute periods as in the  current study (see Table 23). the current study demonstrated an ordered hierarchy of task  difficulty that was very similar to the hierarchy implied by Inhelder and Piaget. it would follow attainment on  Combinations.  The current study found that subjects passing the Shadows task generally had also passed  the Combinations and Vessels tasks.159 Shadows task requires two other operational schemata. L.  A non­significant trend indicated that the subjects  also had passed the Correlations task. such as Vessels. . and Dillbeck (1981) published means and standard deviations of F. EEG Coherence Measures Several sources allow comparison of the EEG coherence means on other groups  of students as they were practicing the Transcendental Meditation program in the same  university setting.  Likewise. Wallace. which use a  simpler manifestation of the INRC group.  They used ten . and O alpha coherence measures for two groups of subjects with the following results  (see Table 22). Orme­Johnson. Abrams. which is prerequisite to any manifestation of formal reasoning schema.  this broader range of schematic dependencies would certainly imply that the Shadows  task would follow attainment of other single schema tasks.  The equipment set­up was the same as the current study. Nidich. In summary.  R. as well as the Coordination of Two Systems of Reference.

0785 . sophomores.1549 . Coherence Results for Orme­Johnson. and Dillbeck (1982)  _________________________________________________________________________ Group A: N = 26.6885 . Wallace.6497 . 15 males.1533 O1O2 Occipital Group B: N = 21. 10 females. mean age = 22.0742 . 11 males.6671 .1596 .6975 . 11 females.160 Table 22.1514 .7087 F3C3 Left F4C4 Right .0764 _________________________________________________________________________ .1   Derivation   Alpha Coherence                          SD   F3F4 Frontal .7114 .8   Derivation   Alpha Coherence                          SD   F3F4 Frontal . sophomores.6782 .0694 O1O2 Occipital .7714 F3C3 Left F4C4 Right . mean age = 20.

 and Rugg.7127 .71.78. Coherence Results for Nidich. Occipital  = .  The variability across the  groups encompasses the range of findings and subject ages in the current study indicating  the reliability of the coherence findings of this study relative to other studies involving  similar subjects and the practice of TM.051 .7198 . Left  = .67). mean age = 28.5   Derivation   Alpha Coherence                           SD F3F4 Frontal .7   Derivation   Alpha Coherence                          SD   F3F4 Frontal .   Task and EEG Alpha Coherence Index Relationships   The current study sought evidence of a relationship between a whole­brain index  of EEG alpha coherence measures and task performance. Right  = .8220 F3C3 Left F4C4 Right . 1979) suggests that gender and age contribute to differences in the  . 6 males.071 _________________________________________________________________________ Of these four groups. 8 males.084 Group D: N = 13. 7 females.7343 . mean age = 28. group B is most similar to the profile obtained in the current  study (Frontal  = . Ryncarz.7135 .093 . Abrams.065 F4C4 Right .69.046 . 5 females.161 Table 23.  Prior research (Beaumont.7670 F3C3 Left . and Wallace  (1983) _________________________________________________________________________ Group C: N = 13.  Mayes. Orme­Johnson.

  To validate these results in a way that could  be compared with future research with different ratios of gender and ages.  The  Formal Stage Criterion test indicated near­significant differences between pass and fail  groups (p = . appears to tap visuo­ spatial cognitive skills.  However.  The INRC group structure.040) in the FLR­O index. and therefore.  How do these two tests  relate to the other three tests?  The Vessels task uses the schema of proportionality and  the INRC group structure.  The Formal Stage Criterion also  reflected stronger differences in the expected direction (p = .  The  Combinations task draws on the combinations schema.  The other three tasks demonstrated non­significant differences in the same direction. appear to reflect differences between pass and fail subjects.050).  Essentially the same  results appeared. FLR­O alpha coherence. which is fundamental to formal  reasoning. failure  of the FLR­O index to significantly discriminate pass and fail groups in the Combinations  .  based on a “whole­brain” measure. at face value. subsequent  ANCOVA’s were performed that controlled for gender and age.0495.  Two of the tests.  Student’s t­tests indicate that an index of four EEG alpha coherence measures (Frontal +  Left + Right­ Occipital: FLR­O) was significantly greater for the group of pass subjects  than the group of fail subjects in the Communicating Vessels task (p  = .0558).  Therefore my initial analysis did not control for gender or age because gender and age are  reasonable causal influences on both task performance and coherence measures.162 proportion of subjects performing well on spatially oriented tasks as well as contribute to  differences in their EEG coherence measures when taken under task conditions.  then. it is theoretically required for the Vessels task.  Apparently the metric requirements for passing the Shadows task  pose an extra cognitive burden in addition to the visuo­spatial skills and therefore the  Shadows task is more weakly related to the FLR­O index than the Vessels task. with the Vessels task reflecting slightly stronger differences between  pass and fail subjects (p = . in the expected direction. one­tailed).

These overall findings are quite dissimilar to those of Dennen (1985) who studied  subjects from the same university setting using the same EEG coherence measures  obtained while subjects practiced Transcendental Meditation.  The EEG data was provided from  the school year 1979­1980 with up to four months elapsing before subjects took a pen and  paper test (CAP) designed to measure concrete and formal reasoning.  33% were female.  This suggests that EEG alpha coherence in the FLR­O index may  reflect the emergent properties required to generate the discontinuity associated with a  “new” stage of reasoning. the correlation was negative at ­. Shadows and Combinations.  It is speculated that the Formal Stage Criterion reflects possession of the  INRC group as a “minimum ” logical structure exhibited upon reorganizing the cognitive  assimilative structures. In fact. with p = .19.  Dennen found no  correlation between the FLR­O index and test scores of formal and concrete reasoning.  have some theoretical relationship with each  other. subjects who pass the Vessels task will necessarily pass the Formal Stage  Criterion. the FLR­O index. only the Vessels task clearly demonstrates the INRC group schema.  In summary. with clinical interview tasks administered  .  Therefore. the  significant difference between pass and fail groups with respect to the dependent  measure.163 task suggests that the INRC group visuo­spatial skills used for the Vessels task remain the  “unique” element that is detected by the FLR­O index. while these three  tasks Vessels.  Therefore.  Of the 349 subjects.  The current study  used EEG data from the spring of 1981. may reflect possession or absence of that schema.  The FLR­ O index failed to detect even marginal differences between pass and fail groups in the  Correlations task. the same ratio as the current study.  This may result from the relative absence of the INRC group structure  in the Correlations schema.06. The Formal Stage Criterion is met when at least one of the tasks is passed.

  Perry.  Dennen  concludes that his research fails to support a relation between the FLR­O index and  cognitive ability and leaves open the practical meaning of EEG coherence.  the difference in lapse of time between EEG measure and cognitive testing between the  two studies could be a significant mitigating factor.  and at least in the predicted direction for the Shadows.5 between  written and clinical assessments.048) and a strong trend for the Formal Stage Criterion (p = . but cites a reported correlation of . (1983) administered three well­known written group tests of concrete  and formal reasoning to university students and failed to find strong agreement with  individual clinical Piagetian task interviews. The current study. and Correlations  task.  Removal of the influence of age.  The failure of Dennen’s CAP test to detect differences among his subjects make the  “biological” validity of pen­and­paper tests suspect.164 immediately after the EEG session.  The CAP test was not among the written  tests.0558).7 with  interview investigations of Piagetian stages in defense.  sex. Combinations. Dennen questions the pen and paper test as a source for the  lack of relationship between the two variables. Pratt and Hacker (1984) found failure of a  written test.  Given the superficial similarities of the two studies. Unruh. and Phillips.  For example. marginally supports previously reported  findings of FLR­O as an index of CNS maturation—statistically significant with regard to  the Vessels task (p = . Lawson’s classroom Test of Formal Reasoning. generalization to the CAP appears appropriate as the authors cite findings  from other comparisons of about 50% agreement and correlations of about .  Another factor could be the nature of  the Piagetian scores. on the other hand. and length of time practicing TM did not substantially change his findings.  They hypothesize that the written  test format fails to account for the element of experimentation and subsequent feedback  . Stefanich.  However.  Additionally.  In fact. to demonstrate a unitary  dimension (formal reasoning) among the test items.

  Without such feedback.001). In Dennen’s study. or the otherwise “fail” subjects do  better on the paper test. L (p  = . and psychology.95 threshold (p  = .  presumably using more formal reasoning skills than students in other majors.  For example. interaction with task materials in an interview  setting seems.  While only a modest confirmation.  Further evidence of the possible inappropriateness  of the CAP test lies in the fact that Dennen found that physics and math majors.  It is these skills tapped in the interview setting that may be evidenced with  the FLR­O index in the current study.  The other  majors included art. to demand different cognitive skills than interaction with a  pen­and­paper test.  Frontal brain structures are  particularly affected by demands to organize and plan strategies of problem solving  (Stuss. 1992). at face value. The current research indicates that the FLR­O appears to serve as an index of  central nervous system maturation in the context of formal operational reasoning for at  least one of the four studied tasks as well as marginally for the Formal Stage Criterion.  Also. measured  statistically significantly higher in alpha coherence than other majors together in F (p  =  . all one­tailed tests. and R >. education.046). interdisciplinary studies. the written test  merely examines the student’s current knowledge. a lack of confirmation of the theory could arise because  qualified “pass” subjects do poorly on the paper test. arousal levels  may be generated differentially between the two test settings. influencing the strategies  applied to the problem and the subsequent level of success.  Note that the methodology used by  . philosophy.  literature. business administration.006). they suggest.165 allowed by the clinical task setting. the subject must select a strategy based on interaction  with physical objects rather than interaction with the printed word.  In any event. biology. these results conform to the suggestion of Orme­ Johnson et al. (1982) who found that their version of the index was significantly related to  first­year university GPA and emotional health.

 (R­O)/(R+O). with only one female in the pass  .  My results indicate  that significantly fewer females passed the Shadows task than males. Follow­up Analysis of Relationships Between Tasks and    Other EEG Measures   An investigation was made to determine the underlying relationships between task  performance and each of the four derivations from which the FLR­O index is composed.035. and low coherence levels could result as a confound. p = .   Previous tests of differences in rates of passing tasks between male and female  groups suggested that females may suffer a “visuo­spatial” deficit. however.  Therefore the current research did not compensate for possible drowsiness  during the TM session.  T­tests of the individual derivations F. and O were accomplished along with tests of  four associated ratios (F­L)/(F+L).  may be more sensitive than the methodology used in the current  research.)  The above limitations may have reduced  the ability of the FLR­O measure in the current research to discriminate pass and fail  subjects in more tasks than the Vessels task.  However.3  minutes).  Their index represented the percentage of coherence over . and (F­O)/(F+O). R.   Tests for  genderXtask interaction with each derivation and the four ratios as the dependent  variables indicated no significant interactions except for the Shadows task and the ratio  (F­L)/(F+L). L.95 that occurred in  the 5 minutes of greatest coherence out of 30 minutes recorded.  The choice of the “best 5  minutes” sought to capture the period of greatest wakefulness (drowsiness or sleep  reduces alpha coherence).166 Orme­Johnson et al.  (Note that  one subject who passed on all four tasks had among the lowest FLR­O scores!  Perhaps  he or she slept during the measurement period. (L­R)/(L+R). this result is suspect.  the dependent measure  consisted of average coherence for the total measurement period (which happens to be 5.  In the current research.

 and R. with 13 tests demonstrating p < . the absolute values of R discriminates pass from fail in three  tasks at p < . In the current study. they  .  p  = . all tests upheld any predicted  direction of pass­fail differences.  These findings reinforce the notion of “whole­brain” relationship that  I suggested may exist between the FLR­O index and performance on Piagetian tasks.05. compared to discriminating pass from fail subjects with measure of  FLR­O coherence in only one task with value p < .  Foremost is the finding that the individual anterior derivations.1 and 7 additional tests  demonstrating p < .  Sheffé post hoc tests of all possible pairs indicated that the one pass female  measured less on the (F­L)/(F+L) ratio than the failing male group.  However.  This refutes Samples’ (1975) claim that formal reasoning is solely a  left hemisphere function. beyond this.15  (See Table 24). no Bonferroni correction was  made in the alpha levels for Type I error.   Pooling males and females.052—for the Shadows task. each in the  expected direction. in  logical reasoning.0665.  Tests using the Formal Stage Criterion revealed  three instances of significant differences between pass and fail groups. O.085.  Since this was exploratory. The patterns that emerge from Table 24 provide an insight into contributions made  by various brain regions to the differences between pass and fail subjects in the FLR­O  index.  Although the p values are not significant at less than . only one test among the tasks demonstrated a  statistically significant difference between pass and fail subjects—the (F­O)/(F+O) ratio.167 group.  Therefore anterior R appears to  play some role. p  = .085. are  positively related to successful task performance and that the posterior. L. the lack of significance at the p< .05 level for four out of five tests suggest that  any claims be duly qualified. F. and some degree of  multicollinearity among task performance is expected.  However. all involving the bilateral occipital deviation. in addition to the traditionally accepted role of the left hemisphere. region is  negatively related.

065 .057                .051                   . and F­O are predicted (and found) to be positively related (+) to pass  scores.0558             p  = .18 for All Subjects Together _____________________________________________________________________________________ _  p  Value for T­test Differences Between Pass and Fail Groups EEG Parameter Formal Stage Criterion         Vessels     Shadows     Correlations    Combinations _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ FLR­O Index* (+) p = . O is predicted (and found) to be negatively related (­) to pass scores.179 (F­L)/(R+O) (L­R)/(L+R)                                 .118            .0500              p = .125 (F­O)/(F+O)* (+) .156 FLR­O (Adjusted)** p = . . R.151                  . R­O.082 O* (­)        .168 Table 24.0745            .044                   .069            . **Adjusted for age and gender.046                    .084                                . Results Summary: EEG Component Measures By Task for p Values Less  than .052 _____________________________________________________________________________________ _ *One­tailed tests where F.086                    . L.049         p   = .0625                               .068 .130                    .117                                (greater = pass) (lesser = pass)(lesser  = pass) (R­O)/(R+O)* (+) .040         F* (+) L* (+) .159 R* (+)        .110             .176               p  =  .

051. the data  have suggested that the major EEG alpha indicators of formal reasoning among subjects  practicing TM are positive homolateral frontal and negative bilateral occipital alpha  coherences. as given in Chapter II. Literature Review.  Since both R and L anterior and occipital  coherences appear related to formal reasoning.169 support the finding of O’Boyle and Benbow (1990) that right hemisphere involvement is  associated with intellectual precocity.  This supports other studies of IQ and EEG alpha coherence measures taken while  . the remainder of the discussion will focus  on anterior/posterior functions rather than right­left differences.069).068). The Formal Stage Criterion demonstrates two significant results in tests of a ratio  between anterior and posterior coherences. On the other hand.044 and (F­O)/(F+O) distinguishes pass from fail subjects at p = .  Correlations (p = . and Combinations (p = .  (R­O)/ (R+O) distinguishes pass and fail  subjects at p = . significantly so for the Formal Stage  Criterion (p = . Chapter II. the occipital alpha coherence in the current research is found to be  negatively related to formal reasoning skills.065). the anterior R alpha coherence in the current research is  positively related to formal reasoning skills with most trends for Vessels (p = .085). Summary of Follow­up Analyses in Various Coherence  Measures: The Effect of the TM Instructional Set In summary.082).  Anterior L alpha coherence in the  current research is positively related to formal reasoning skills with trends for Formal  Stage Criterion (p = .  This finding  supports similar negative relationships between cognitive skills and occipital coherence  whether the subject practices TM during the EEG session or merely rests with eyes closed  as given in the Literature Review.  Essentially.  I have previously discussed the significance of each in light of the existing  literature.046) and with strong trend for the Shadows task (p  = .086) and for the Vessels task (p = .

 Interestingly. alpha coherence as measured cannot be “a  necessary but not sufficient” condition.  Cognitive skill and  IQ appear positively correlated to such changes. 37 passed both or one of the Vessels and  .  This means that strictly speaking.    Limitations of the Study   I used the FLR­O index to test for a possible neurological “necessary but not  sufficient” condition for formal reasoning.  In Piagetian terms. the Formal Stage Criterion demonstrated significant results at p =  . as postulated by Piaget. namely that alpha  coherence increases globally and in the anterior regions especially. therefore outlying values did not obscure any implications derived  from the difference in means.0558 unadjusted. yet demonstrated one of the lowest FLR­O indices of all the subjects. in general. one subject passed all four tests of  formal reasoning.170 subjects practice TM. Note that of the 39  subjects who passed the Formal Stage Criterion. the group means for the FLR­O index and other coherence  measures indeed showed differences between pass and fail subjects.  On the other hand.05. some  subjects who failed the test of formal reasoning also had greater coherence than pass  subjects.  I can still conclude that. but contradicts studies in which the subjects merely rest with eyes  closed.  However. subjects with lesser  coherence values tend to fail the task of formal reasoning as administered in this study.  However. and p = .  For example.  The conflict appears to reach some resolution by taking into account the  neurophysiological changes that occur as a result of the TM practice. only one of the four tasks demonstrated results that were statistically significant  at p ≤ .050 when adjusted for age and gender.  The means were  normally distributed. this  implies movement toward higher levels of equilibration.  This implies that the set of instructions  that constitute the TM technique initiates a sequence of neurophysiological changes in the  brain that supports greater adaptability to cognitive demands.

  If the subject pool is mixed gender. irregular frequencies that indicate Stage One sleep. or use several experimenters of the same  gender as the subjects. No selection of EEG epochs was used.  Future research should  eliminate portions of the EEG alpha coherence recordings that reflect any sleep stage.) 3. heavy breathing.  Since the task performance reflects a “best  effort.  (Several experimenters would be required in order to randomly  balance out any difference in style of their clinical interviews. with the following corrective actions. reflecting the relative primacy of the INRC group and the lattice  structures represented by these two tasks.  Also. the EEG record can be evaluated  for low voltage. 2. 1.  Several alternatives exist: use  subjects and experimenter of one gender only. etc.   No controls for experimenterXsubject interaction. then the ratio of male to  female will reflect not only task performance differences but also “distraction” or anxiety  differences which will show up in the task performance.  Sleep during the  EEG measurement could account for the one subject who passed all four tasks.” likewise. or vice versa.  It  is known that during TM. the EEG record can be examined for epochs that reflect a best sustained  . several limitations of the current  research emerge.  This implies that subjects must be visually monitored for signs of  sleep such as head nodding.  Future research  should use portions of the EEG record that reflect “best” performance. Upon review of the measures and their outcomes.  Future research should insure  that experimenter gender does not interact with subject gender. it is  possible that a male experimenter may cause anxiety more for female subjects than for  male subjects. occasionally subjects will sleep.171 the Combinations tasks.  EEG variability  presumably reflects cognitive variability. beyond artifact rejection. yet had  the lowest coherence measures.  For example. with consequent lowering of  the coherence measure. Episodes of sleep during the EEG were not evaluated.

  This could be characterized as increasing the EEG signal­to­noise ratio. lending encouragement to locating a  theoretical link between equilibration and neuropsychological processes even though at  this time the theory must be in the context of subjects who practice TM. 5. and when adjusted for  age and gender.  The current measure (O) only evaluates the degree of coherence between left and right  posterior occipital regions. non­TM  population.050..172 experience.  P3O1 and P4O2) which would be analogous to anterior L and R measures.  . the current index fails to measure posterior EEG within each hemisphere (e. Long­term Effects of the Practice of Transcendental  Meditation on Cognitive Functioning: Toward an Organicist    Reduction Theory of Piaget’s Constructivist Principles   Although the results of the current research were significantly related only to the  Vessels task and can be generalized only to subjects measured while practicing the TM  technique.  Future research should test  enough females to obtain a group passing the Shadows task large enough to provide  reasonable statistical power in tests of the FLR­O coherence index. no  statements can be made regarding the coherence within left or right posterior regions.  For  example.  Full characterization of a variety of brain regions was lacking. it is still instructive to pursue an explanation with the hope that later research  will draw linkages with neuropsychological processes among the larger.  Note also that the test of the Formal Stage Criterion resulted in near­ significant (p  ≤ . Orme­Johnson et al. the test is significant at p = .  Therefore.  For  example.g.0558) differences between pass and fail groups. (1982) used the “best” 5 minutes out of 30 minutes for their  FLR­O index.  The current research  found only one out of 19 females to pass the Shadows task.  Future  research should use more derivations to characterize global brain functioning. 4.  Insufficient number of females were tested.

 it appears reasonable to hope for theory to later  “bridge” the gap between TM and non­TM populations. 1986. Thus. This effort attempts to meet Piaget’s  criteria of an organicist reduction model of genetic epistemology. the OR can also be elicited by internally oriented attentional  processes as well. The following discussion  attempts to build on current neurophysiological knowledge as well as TM research to  show in a heuristic fashion one possible explanation for a putative positive relationship  between the FLR­O index and cognitive skills. Gould.  Several authors have suggested that the mechanics of TM can best be explained by  reference to the known properties and functions of the OR (Arenander.173 This said. Kesterson. 1986). Wallace. Regulation of Selective Attention and the  Mechanics of TM The most immediate point of departure for discussing the effects of the TM  instructions on the brain is a physiological model of selective attention and the  accompanying “orienting response” (OR or “what is it?”) response of Sokolov (1963). The OR often is considered a response to some environmental  stimulus. 1963). For example. & Wolff (1982) and  Maltzman (1979b) show that task instruction creates a mental set that gives rise to  manifestation of an OR beyond the OR normally elicited by novelty or stimulus change.  . Pendery.”  The technique purportedly uses  the “natural tendency of the mind” to attain a quality of restful alertness that over time  brings the mind to its full potential (Maharishi.  This implies that the TM  technique enhances the individual style of cognitive or neurophysiological functioning  that would otherwise be limited by psychological and physiological stresses.  1986. However.  TM is said  to accelerate the normal course of development presumably through alteration of  neurophysiological functioning. Maltzman. the theory in principle has potential for generalization. the  TM technique is claimed to be “natural” and “effortless. For example.

”  The 20  minutes of TM is constituted by repeated encounters with the mantra and other thoughts. In brief.  Meanwhile.  Together. culminating in  a state of awareness without any object of a thought.  it can be inferred that the technique does not require effortful focus on the mantra.174 The central process of TM involves the “transending reflex” which purportedly functions  using brain mechanisms associated with the OR. While transcending may be brief and hardly noticed at first by some individuals. but instructors of the technique  regularly state that the practice uses neither concentration nor contemplation. the model suggests a system that leads to regulation of selective attention  mechanisms through orienting and habituation processes linked to the instructions given  for the practice of TM.  the TM technique apparently provides for an effortless engagement of the mind with the  mantra. and  neither does it require wandering digression from the mantra. . as presented by Arenander (1986) and  discussed by Wallace (1986) and Kesterson (1986).  The physiology attains  successively deeper stages of relaxation while the mind finds it easier to settle down the  conscious attention. the transcendental  state enhances the subjective alertness of the individual. these effects have led  Wallace (1970) to dub the subjective experience of TM as “restful alertness. allowing comfortable assimilation of intrusive thoughts.  The use of the mantra in  meditation leads to a process of “transcending” the thought of the mantra.  Therefore.  Between these two poles.  the nervous system responds with relaxation of the skeleto­muscular system and with  autonomic and EEG changes associated with relaxation.  interspersed with the experience of transcending on the mantra.  The practice utilizes a meaningless sound called a “mantra” that  is repeated according to instructions given to the individual.  The precise instructions for  using the mantra are proprietary to the TM organization.  The cognitive effects of the long­term practice of TM have been  documented in several studies as follows.

 mean of 6.476. Jones.  these studies suggest the efficacy of the TM set of instructions in optimizing brain  function and constitute the rationale for hypothesizing that alpha coherence measured  during TM should demonstrate a relationship with formal operational reasoning.  Abrams.  respectively). (1982) report several significant  longitudinal changes in a one­year study of correlations between frontal. Longitudinal enhancement of frontal alpha coherence over a mere two weeks is  reported by Dillbeck and Bronson (1981). Nidich. however.  Several other longitudinal studies give evidence for cognitive  improvement with the practice of TM outside of the context of alpha coherence.  No relationship was found between time practicing TM and IQ. Nidich. left. and Wallace (1989) found that frontal and left alpha  coherence each significantly correlated with the math GPA of the subsequent  (sophomore) school year among 26 male MIU students (r  = . Orme­Johnson.  For comparison. left.336. Together. Orme­Johnson.  They also found significant inverse relationships between change in  bilateral occipital alpha coherence and the three verbal creativity subtests  indicating that  posterior changes also result in conjunction with anterior changes.   In a study of math achievement prediction among college freshmen.175 Cognitive Effects of the Practice of TM The following is a brief review of studies of longitudinal changes in EEG alpha  coherence during TM that relate to cognitive improvements or the number of months  practicing TM. and summed  FLR EEG alpha coherence were positively correlated with the length of time practicing  TM among 37 Maharishi International University (MIU) students (range of 2 to 13 years  TM. Orme­Johnson et al.  The relationships remained significant even after partialling  out age. the freshman  year’s math and introductory physics GPA  . no cognitive measure was included. As mentioned above.  Nidich. and r  = .77 years). and right  anterior alpha coherence and various subtests of the Torrance Verbal and Figural Tests of  Creative Thinking. and Wallace (1983) found the frontal.

4 when corrected for unreliability.5 and . Dillbeck.  Dillbeck (1982) found subjects instructed in TM  showed an increase in flexibility of perceptual processes over a two week period  compared with control subjects practicing daily relaxation.  The authors note that other researchers find  typical cognitive entry characteristics such as aptitude and science performance correlate  with academic achievement between . Orme­Johnson. & Alexander.  Dillbeck. the  EEG coherence correlations compare well with these other predictors.176 correlated r  = .  (Given the results demonstrated in the above studies.613 with the sophomore year.  Therefore. and Brubaker  (1981) reported significant freshman­senior increases of eight points over four years on  Cattel’s Culture Fair Intelligence Test and on sets of California Personality Inventory  among students practicing TM at MIU. without EEG.)  Shecter  (1978) found a 9 point increase on Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices after 3. Gackenbach. Longitudinal studies of cognitive measures.  Raimondi.7 and affective characteristics correlate with  academic achievement an average of . Assimakis.  Travis (1979) found  significant gains over five months among TM subjects compared to controls on scores  . 1991) conducted a  controlled two­year longitudinal study in which MIU students practiced the TM and TM­ Sidhi programs. Jones. Orme­Johnson. also indicate cognitive  growth. Orme­Johnson.5  months among high school students practicing TM. and Rowe (1986) reported a significant increase of nine points  in scores over a three­to­five year period on the Culture Fair Intelligence Test and the  Group Embedded Figures Test among 50 college students practicing the TM and a related  advanced meditation technique termed the TM­Sidhi program.  He found a significant five­point increase on the Cattell Culture Fair  Intelligence Test and significantly decreased reaction time (typically inversely correlated  with IQ) compared with a control group at a matched university.  Cranson (1989) (see also  Cranson.  Aron. it seems reasonable to  assume similar EEG changes occurred in these meditating subjects as well.

  1979a.  It selectively influences the transmission of information  within the central nervous system” (p. 77­81. pp. determining tendency. the individual attends to the “set” or “dominant  focus” and generates an OR upon thinking the mantra. task  instructions induce a dominant focus which selectively determines which stimuli will  evoke an OR and which will not. and Simonov. 280).  Note that “set” implies a cognitive  direction while “dominant focus” implies a neuro­electrical state.  Evidence for the  concept of “dominant focus” comes from the neurophysiological research of Rusinov  (1973) and others that suggests that the CNS can support a “focus of excitation” that  modifies or directs the neural activity to give responses that otherwise would not arise. 1985. see Pribram.  Maltzman points out that even Sokolov and  .  Similar limitations are found in  Sokolov’s early formulation (1963) of the neuronal model which requires the notion of a  stimulus “mismatch” to create the OR. figural originality.  “According to our view.  Maltzman suggests that the dominant foci are the physiological bases for  attitudes and interests. and.”  This suggests that. or Aufgabe” (Maltzman. through the mediation of instructions.177 from the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking: figural flexibility.  (For additional discussion of the dominant  focus. where novelty or stimulus change  alone may have been the sole originator of the OR.) This view of the human OR  contrasts with Pavlov’s more simple model for dogs. 1971.  In  other words. and  verbal fluency. 280). b) vigorously defends the notion that the “OR is not dependent  on novelty alone but is predetermined by the set or dominant focus present at the  moment. can determine the  acquisition of stimulus significance in experimental studies. during TM. p. Development of ORs to Significant Events and Habituation  to Distraction Maltzman (1979a. these researchers have provided neurophysiological evidence for “the  Wurzburg school’s formulation of set.

 regions depending on the  relative “balance” between anterior and posterior regions. 1977) or  coherence (Busk & Galbraith.  Presumably the long­term cognitive  benefits of TM result from extending this conditioning to daily life in which the subject  follows more attentively the train of thought associated with a task while simultaneously  habituating. an outcome that does not require the mismatch to a stimulus. involuntary ORs are associated with the more  perceptually­oriented posterior regions. Dillbeck & Vesely.  Also.  The negative relation of posterior  .21. 1986)  result from higher demand “task” conditions. 1990.0031. or ignoring thoughts classified as distracting.  The findings of the current  research indicates that higher anterior homolateral alpha coherence correlates negatively  with posterior bilateral coherence (L and O r  = ­.38. based  on other research that suggests increased anterior cross­correlation (Livanov. 330) indicates that while anterior brain regions are  associated with voluntary ORs. since the instructions  guide the subject towards an effortless response to thought. the instructions (and dominant focus) serve to define a class of  mental activity to which the subject habituates: namely thoughts.  This implies that anterior coherence may or may  not exert “control” over the posterior. p  =.1163) . R and O r  = ­. less bilaterally coherent.178 colleagues later accepted the occasion of an OR to a significant stimulus in the absence of  stimulus change. upon becoming aware that  awareness is on a thought other than the mantra. Note that Maltzman (1979b. This subsequent interpretation of the OR (the voluntary OR resulting from  perceiving a stimulus imbued with significance) expands Arenander’s model of the  transcending reflex to include the mantra as a generator of the OR even if it did not  change in any way.  It is reasonable to infer that the L and R anterior derivations are activated.  Sheppard & Boyer. p  =  . p. 1975.  It appears that the instructions given in TM serve to create a  “dominant focus” that “exercises” the brain in generating sustained ORs amidst a state of  physiological rest.

. may be related to adequate frontal lobe development.  This occurs in the context of “central gating mechanisms” that underlie both behavior.  The  authors conclude that “the ability to identify patterns among environmental stimuli and  make accurate inferences from those patterns.  The Shadows task score loaded most strongly on the tests used for  frontal assessment and not on the other measures. distributed  among four factors. Shute and Huertas (1990) administered a clinical version of the  Shadows task to 58 undergraduate students (mean age 22. including those of verbal ability. 9). perhaps due to the selective attention  and preattentive mechanisms enhanced by the anterior activity.. the  occurrence of a frontal negative slow potential shift (CNV).”  They identify the mediothalamic­frontocortical system (MTFCS) as the  mediator of phasic changes in awareness (selective attention) through inhibition of  .It may be that the ability  to anticipate the consequences of one’s own actions is a function of adequate frontal lobe  development” (p.179 coherence suggests reduction in involuntary ORs.”) The notion of frontal executive functioning may underlie the acquisition of  schema. described by Piaget as formal operational  reasoning. plus four additional cognitive measures. and enhancement of certain  evoked response potential (ERP) components in response to “attention­evoking  situations.7 years) together with a battery  of neuropsychological measures commonly used to detect deficits associated with frontal  lobe dysfunction.  (This issue will be  discussed below in the section “Recommendations for Future Research” under “The  Question of Bilateral Occipital Coherence.  Skinner and Yingling (1977) also suggest separate systems for  voluntary versus involuntary ORs looking primarily at the electro­anatomical evidence. Frontal versus posterior functions relate to physiological research on selective  attention and distraction.  For example. as well as another two  measures of verbal ability.  Factor analysis accounted for 70% of the variance.

 “a structure which is a switching  mechanism that gates the ascent of thalamic activity to the cortex” (p. the  selective filtering of sensory experience and the overriding of volitional attention by  reflexive orienting mechanisms” (p.  This control may well be divided into specific functions such as  anticipation. the dual control of the thalamic gates by cortical and brain stem mechanisms  quite obviously parallels two of the most salient subjective characteristics of attention.  This description of attentional gating  mechanisms also supports Arenander’s model of the “transcending reflex. 55). evaluation and monitoring of behavior. goal selection. 63).  Both control  bioelectric EEG activity. plan formulation.180 “ascent to the cortex of information evoked by irrelevant stimuli” (p. evoked potentials (EPs) can reflect differing  contributions from each system.  Therefore. with a balance  between excitation (MRF) and inhibition (MTFCS) determining the subject’s current  conscious state. 12).” Implications of Frontal Functions for the OR and Adaptive  “Stability” Stuss (1992) summarizes the functions of the frontal lobes as executive functions  on the one level and as metacognition and self­reflectiveness at increasingly higher levels. and  other anterior attentional functions such as selectivity and possibly persistence” (p.  The primary goal of the first level is the “conscious direction of the lower­level systems  toward a selected goal. 31).  “For  example.  They both converge on the thalamic reticular nucleus.  In the context of the current research. this analysis appears relevant to the properties of  formal operational reasoning which requires a systematic control of variables as found in  . thus complicating interpretations of EP features.  The  mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF) underlies tonic shifts in vigilance through  excitation of brain activity as in more primitive behaviors such as orienting reactions.  The former controls the more general and reflex oriented attentional  states and the latter controls the selective and voluntary types of attention.

 “reported findings of IQ deterioration after frontal  damage are rare. Impairment in establishing or changing a set 3.  Even studies that do report IQ deterioration admit that other factors may  be important” (p.  Likewise.  Note their similarity to dysfunctions of systematic reasoning in which a schema has not  been strongly developed: 1.  Also see Welsh and  Pennington (1988) for application of frontal functions to Piagetian development theory. then the structure is relegated to “automatic” status. passing judgment and  creating a plan for adaptation to the newly­perceived situation. i. Deficit in the ordering or handling of sequential behaviors 2.e.  Berg and Sternburg (1985) suggest that response to  novelty is a major component of intelligence and that the ability to deal with novel  situations is prominent in Piaget’s theory of development. Stuss and Benson (1984) suggest that “learned” cognitive skills reside in the  posterior regions.  Luria (1973) indicates that patients with frontal lobe lesions fail  to orient to “informative attributes” that would lead to hypotheses concerning a given  . 197). 222) Piaget suggests that once a structure attains sufficient breadth to anticipate all the  combinations given it by actuality. Altered attitude (p. whereas the number of studies reporting negative results is  overwhelming.  For example.  Failure to equilibrate may  well be a failure of frontal functions. Decreased ability to monitor personal behavior 5.  Stuss and Benson (1984) list several dysfunctions associated with prefrontal damage.. Impairment in maintaining a set.181 mental structures that reflect the propositional lattice and the INRC group of  transformations. particularly in the presence of interference 4.  But more to the point is the suggestion that the frontal lobes are  responsible for maintaining assimilative structures that govern accommodation to  observed discrepancies between expectation and actuality. Dissociation of knowledge from the direction of response 6.

 20­21).  The possibles. that do not require any choice from several  equiprobable alternatives. as a rule.e.  be rendered.” the mechanisms for accommodation leading to higher forms of  equilibration..  Anterior functions appear to take on the role of  “possibilities. 1986). but frontal. the atemporal is the outcome of the integration of the transcended in its  transcendence. even though in outcome they lead to systems whose  necessity becomes atemporal.  One of the turning­points marking the beginnings of modern  physics is known to have consisted.” in  which “virtual” operations replace the slow.[Frontal] patients do not subject the conditions of the problem to  preliminary analysis and do not confront their separate parts. which are in fact those of a ceaseless succession of access and  closure... 303). automatic cognitive processes are able to solve  simple problems.  neither do they match the result obtained to the initial conditions” (p. constitute phases in  temporal formation. In Piagetian terms. are due to the general law of equilibration between differentiations and  integrations. .  they single out random fragments of the conditions and begin to perform partial  logical operations. but they are unable to solve a problem that requires  preliminary orientation within its conditions and formation of a hypothesis.  As is known.  Such is the distinctive feature of cognitive equilibration (p. it can be hoped that an analogous service will. which  in normal subjects leads to a proper choice from several equiprobable alternatives  and to the performance of some intermediate operations insuring attainment of the  final goal. with due proportion. without attempting to formulate a general strategy and without  confronting this operation with other elements of the condition of the problem. by contrast. in the belief in time as an  independent variable. even if temporal formation terminates in atemporal structures.182 problem. following Galileo..  Luria’s (1973) comments above illustrate the failure of frontal patients to  consider “all possibilities..[S]uch patients easily cope with simple problems that  have single solutions.  Instead.  These turn­takings.  This means that posterior. posterior functions appear to take on the role of “necessity.  By the introduction of the genetic dimension in  epistemology.  They express one of the aspects of the essentially temporal character  of cognitive constructions. conscious effort required by the transitional  formal reasoner (Piaget. formal logical operations may remain intact enough in patients with  lesions of the frontal lobes.  In this  case.  This  is because all accommodation is accommodation to an assimilation scheme.”  As Piaget suggests: Access to new possibles takes place in a framework of previous necessities. i. controlled cognitive processes fail under more challenging  situation.

 I suggest.  The  individual must. for example.” above).  This source of difficulty suggests that individuals who are formal in one  subject may fail to transfer their skills to another subject because of inadequate or  unprepared frontal functioning.  The finger press or eye blink become  .”  Controlled  processing. is a posterior activity. select the appropriate schema when faced with a cognitive  challenge. using virtual  transformations to reach a logical outcome.  and thus is limited to only one sequence of “memory nodes” at a time (Cf. an automatic  process is difficult to suppress. for example. or in their terminology. Schneider and Shiffrin (1970) outline differences  between “controlled and automatic human information processing.  In the preceding passage regarding “integration of the  transcended into transcendence.  Automatization. I suggest.  Automatic processing. plus an instructed response to the subject to press a button with the  finger or to blink the eye upon getting the air puff. It can handle  several sequences at once because attentional resources are not consumed. Other authors from “early” cognitive psychology such as Kimble and Perlmuter  (1970) suggest methods of deautomatizing. restoring “volitional”  behavior.  The authors  point out that automatic processing can direct controlled attention automatically.” and “once learned. or to ignore” (p. converts the slow.  A research example is the conditioned pairing of a light with an air puff to the  eye (causing a blink). 1986) Frontal functions remain important even after attainment of formal schema. is a frontal activity. 2).183 “Integration of the Transcended in its Transcendence”  (Piaget.  “regardless of concurrent inputs or memory load.  It requires the active attention of the subject. temporal thought process of the individual  into higher­level assimilative schema that operate atemporally. “temporal  formation.” Piaget uses the framework of his genetic epistemology  to describe the process of automatization of accommodative behaviors and operations. In the context of early  cognitive psychology.  This is not a new idea. to modify. I suggest.

”  The classical theory of volition suggests that kinesthetic feedback of  consequences of self­initiated acts (Piaget would probably call this “actions on objects”)  is the primary source of deautomatization.  Based on their research.  .382). be attaching  “significance” to task­oriented cognition. initiation. over time. allows this  “voluntary” control over previously involuntary distractions to become automatic—such  as may be evidenced in the various improvements on IQ tests described in the TM  research findings above. I suggest.  The TM technique.  In other words. or “centrally located feedback loops” also play a role in  restoring volition to involuntary behavior. I suggest that the TM technique trains the individual’s preattentive faculties  (“volition”) to minimize the involuntary lapses of attention when distracted by task­ irrelevant thoughts. in that sense. the authors suggest a  developmental sequence for the development.  In a conscious departure from their  behaviorally­colored ethos. and control of voluntary acts  which is of interest in the context of mental practices such as TM. thereby enhancing voluntary OR responses. the brain must. may  develop frontal structures that support equilibration of more adaptive mental structures.  Kimble and Perlmuter write “[T]he  individual first acquires voluntary control over initially involuntary responses and then  with extended practice allows these responses to retreat from consciousness and attention  and. Kimble and Perlmuter indicate that research shows  deautomatization is never totally prevented by the loss of kinesthetic feedback.  such as support formal operational reasoning. to decentrate.  This means the individual learns to habituate to distracting thoughts.  Development of volition. by implication.  In this sense. they  suggest that volition plays an important role.  This is called “anticipatory  performance. to become involuntary” (p.184 automated (non­volitional) responses to the light. implying  for them that mental images.  or in Piagetian terms.

 as well as  increased cerebral blood flow and other changes in peripheral circulation and metabolism  to support the increased activation. the history of science is movement away  from distracting concepts and towards more inclusive formulations of the laws of nature.. the authors also point  out that the subjective experience of deep restfulness is supported by measures such as  decreased whole body. Let us examine further some ideas that illuminate Piaget’s concept of  “decentering” as an element of cognitive growth. Wallace. and  Beidebach (1992) suggests that many of the measured physiological effects of TM reflect  a state of increased alertness or CNS activation especially at periods of subjectively  deepest transcending.  Together.  In contrast to mental alertness.[Outside of TM.  A recent review by Jevning. otherwise known as “decentration” and restfulness. decentering can be considered  as the ability to ignore distractions.  Habituation to distraction reduces involuntary OR  responses. muscle. these features characterize TM as a  subjective experience of “restful alertness.”  The non­conserving child.  Other indicators of rest include the decrease or  disappearance of EMG (muscle tension).  Increased CNS activation during TM is also indicated by increased coherence. 421)..”  .  “Impulse” as the emotional correlate to cognitive distraction could even be included as  “centering.  In brief. findings indicate]  decreased reaction time and other improvements in sensory and motor performance [that]  can be associated with a more alert state of the central nervous system” (p. can be seen to act “impulsively. for example. plus decreased plasma thyroid  and adrenocortical hormone production.  In a sense. and red cell metabolism.  “Such states are accompanied by high amplitude theta and/or fast  frequency beta bursts consistent with activation.185 otherwise known as “alertness”. and decreased galvanic skin resistance and/or  decreased phasic skin resistance response.   Note that the subjective experience during TM is one of mental alertness co­ incident with physiological restfulness.

  In another example. “temporal” cognition by the frontal structures is itself the process  of accommodation.  The frontal function of “integration” and  .” the child has  to decenter his thinking. shows that it has  taken centuries to liberate us from the systematic errors.  In the  field of thinking.186 failing to take into account the requisite variables for conservation of weight or volume. from the illusions caused  by the immediate point of view as opposed to “decentered” systematic thinking. and to work  out the objective relationships between the points of departure and arrival (p. continually  correcting both the initial systematic errors and those arising along the way. The concept of decentering is central to Piaget’s theory because decentration is  prerequisite to disequilibration. I coined the term “cognitive egocentrism” (no doubt a bad choice) to  express the idea that the progress of knowledge never proceeds by a mere addition  of items or of new levels. that this concept refers to a reciprocal relationship and not to an absolute  “property. the law of  decentering (décentration).  This  assertion of voluntary. thus  separating the (metrical) concept of “long” from the (ordinal) “far. vanity.  And this liberation is far from complete. it would require quite a dose of optimism to believe that our  elementary interpersonal feelings are always well adapted: reactions such as  jealousy. from the false absolutes of Aristotle’s physics to the relativity of  Galileo’s principle of inertia and to Einstein’s theory of relativity. noted favorably by  Vygotsky.”  Similarly. I  speculate that decentration develops when the subject’s frontal (assimilative) structures  assert volitional control over automatized posterior (assimilative) structures. as if richer knowledge were only a complement of the  earlier meager one: it requires also a perceptual reformulation of previous points  of view by a process which moves backwards as well as forward. Vygotsky: On the affective level. which in turn is prerequisite to higher stages of  equilibration. which at first focuses on the end point alone.  But the same kind  of process can be seen in the small child:  my description.  See Pribram (1969) for a discussion of the neurology of  accommodation and assimilation. can certainly be considered  various types of systematic error in the individual’s emotional perspective. of the development of the notion of “brother” shows what an effort is  required of a child who has a brother to understand that his brother also has a  brother. envy. recent experiments (not available to Vygotsky) have shown  that to conceive of a road longer than another which ends at the same point.  For science to shift from a geocentric to a  heliocentric perspective required a gigantic feat of decentering. the whole history of science from geocentrism to the Copernican  revolution. 3).  In our current “translation” of Piaget’s formulation into neurophysiology.  This  corrective process seems to obey a well­defined developmental law. which are doubtless universal. Piaget (1962) writes in response to comments from a fellow  developmental psychologist.

 and p = .  These authors attribute these findings to “differences in relationships between adrenergic  activating and cholinergic inhibitory neural processes.. that is. which. in turn are sensitive to the  ‘sex’ hormones.. Various researchers have studied biological development in relation to cognitive  styles such as impulsivity vs. Kobayashi.  The evidence supported  similar implications for the Formal Stage Criterion (p  = .e.187 “association.0558. the more difficult is it to inhibit and and subordinate the  lower function to a specific higher level function. clear evidence was  found that for the Vessels task at least.. and Vogel. reflection (Nelson and Smith. this is exercise of assimilative structures). studies of sex differences in cognition have  suggested. by suggesting that the relationship of simple perceptual­motor and inhibitory restructuring processes  could be applied to all stages of development. They extend these ideas to Piagetian  developmental issues. are carried out by frontal control over posterior input channels  (i. the more vigorous a given  lower­level function.  Thus. 44). Trait differences may  exert similar influences.050 when  adjusted for age and gender ).  . Klaiber. 23). androgens and estrogens” (p. greater anterior alpha coherence and lesser  posterior coherence during TM were related to formal reasoning.  In the current study.  Amidst the possibility that gender effects would  complicate this simple assertion. I suggest that the concept of formal  reasoning implies neurological conditions that are necessary. that males “excel on more complex tasks requiring an  inhibition of immediate responses to obvious stimulus attributes in favor of responses to  less obvious stimulus attributes” (Broverman. the statistical tests revealed no differences in the  findings for males compared to females. 1989). The varying outcomes of these  contests in different individuals may underlie the consistent bipolar factors of  ability found in the with­individual variance of abilities (p. but not sufficient: namely  frontal homolateral coherence sets the stage for decentration and consequent  accommodation to more complex challenges in the environment. irrespective of sex. among other things..” he suggests. 1968). For example.

 Eylon. approach) together with greater preference for math (and  science). In summary. for example more rapid accumulation of reactive  inhibition in men than women. That is. Another possible variable is a higher anxiety level  in women. and Lawson (1980) suggest that the onset of  formal operations can be equated with development of the ability to avoid premature  closure in a problem­solving situation. Bieri. subjects who fail to decentrate could be said to be “jumping to a  conclusion. the current study also indicates  that subjects who pass the tasks preferred math and science significantly more than those  who failed the tasks (implying a similar relationship between math aptitude and  conceptual.188 Maltzman (1959) found that males performed better in a test of problem solving  (the water jar problem). Similarly.” For example. Furthermore. Wallman. This finding  parallels the findings in the current research in which males performed significantly  better than females on the Shadows task (a test of spatial proportions requiring a  conceptual. 11). He concluded that males were less influenced by “mental set” or  “Einstellung”. Bradburn and Galinsky (1958) concluded from their study of college age  sex differences in spatial relations  (Embedded Figures Test) that superior performance by  males was correlated with superior mathematical aptitude in combination with a  “conceptual approach approach to social and objective stimuli” (p. Bradshaw and Szabadi (1987) found that  females independently classified as “impulsive” demonstrated poorer performance than  non­impulsive females when required to delay pressing a button for a given period after a  loud sound. Van den Broek. irrespective of gender differences. suggesting that more rapid extinction of the dominant long solution responses in men may be due  to a variety of different variables. Although Piagetian tasks were not used in the  . especially as induced by initial failure on the extinction problem (p. non­impulsive approaches to solving the task problems). studies of “impulsive” individuals may characterize the failure to  decentrate.  242). non­impulsive.

 including notions of self­regulation and  EEG coherence. or “limbic outflow”. found that Transcendental Meditation was preferred to biofeedback for “general  relaxation and creating a state incompatible with emergency response” in psychiatric in­  and outpatients (p. (For more details on the significance of frontal coherence. or the growth of “novel” structures not otherwise predicted  from the lower level structures. 1978. It suggests  jumping to conclusions—or impulsive thinking—has control mechanisms that are indeed  developmental in origin. the authors suggest that  teachers “emphasize the tentativeness and probablistic nature of knowledge” (p. as follows. 422).  or “time locking”. However. The TM technique has  been characterized to reduce impulsivity. To overcome impulsive thinking. I suggest that frontal coherence represents just such an assimilative structure and  that this is the assimilative structure that supports accomodation leading. ultimately to  higher forms of equilibration. 114). The authors suggest that developmentally. high level  reasoning results when students “continue their thinking about the questions that had  been unanswered and reason hypothetico­deductively to generate and test their own  hypotheses” (p. They speculate that during TM.  This suggests that growth requires an assimilative structure that controls or overrides  tendancies towards impulsive judgements. Stroebel and Glueck (1978) (also. This appears to meet Piaget’s criteria for “decentration”. under “The Question of Information Transfer”). “the usual affective outflow  . see discussion associated with Damasio (1989) below in Directions for  Future Research.189 cross­sectional study of student in grades 1­6. improvements were  noticed with increasing ages. Glueck and Stroebel. the authors found that training failed to  alter the native strategies for solving complex inferences. 1975).  investigating various meditation­relaxation techniques for treatment of mental illness and  stress. The mechanics of Transcendental Meditation have been discussed in the context  of research into the medical applications of TM. 114).

  They also suggest that the reduction in activation results in increased access to the  non­dominant hemisphere (typically the right hemisphere). a significant stimulus in introduced in the [dominant]  temporal lobe and probably directly into the series of cell clusters and fiber tracts  that have come to be known as the limbic system.. alpha wave production.  Similary. and with the imposition of the  appearance of very dense. but without the accompaniment of any intense emotional affect that may  otherwise accompany such access.  Since there are extensive connections running from the thalamic structures  to the cortex. to dampen the limbic system activity and produce a relative  quiescence in this critical subcortical area.190 from limbic structures is diminished. by the auditory system. Second. regulated by the normally unconscious right temporal  cortex­limbic system.. since the autonomic nervous system is controlled to a  considerable extent by stimuli arising in the midbrain.[This] may act. the mantras may introduce a resonant frequency (6­7 Hz)  “which is in the high theta EEG range and also approximates the optimal processing of  the basic language unit. the phoneme. They report on the  results of their EEG alpha coherence research on patients practicing the various methods. First. as in dreams or creative free  association.  and suggest that differences in coherence patterns result from the specifics of the  techniques. with enhanced transmission of signals between the  hemispheres via the corpus collosum or other commissures” (p. 421).” They theorize that  “when one thinks a mantra. quieting the limbic system activity might allow for the inhibition of  cortical activation. 421). the rapid changes observed  in the peripheral autonomic nervous system—such as the GSR changes and the  change in respiratory rate. . the  manta may be a “boring habituation stimulus leading to habituation of [left hemisphere]  beta activation and augmentation of alpha­theta synchrony” through normalization of  visceroautonomic homeostasis.—could be explained by the quieting of  the limbic system activity” (p. with  considerable rapidity. etc.. high­amplitude. heart rate. with the disappearance of the usual range of frequencies and  amplitudes ordinarily seen coming from the cortex. They speculate on the causal mechanisms for the differing patterns of  increased EEG coherence observed in several of the mantra­derived techniques.

045) and  nearly significant for the Formal Stage Criterion (p = .  Many educators have called for “whole brain” education.  Note that when age and  gender were partialed out of the test for the Formal Stage Criterion. Educational Implications of theTheory Much has been said in the past regarding “right brain” skills versus “left brain”  skills.  Therefore.  This was statistically significant for the Vessels task (p = .  Subjects who passed  the four tasks of formal reasoning demonstrated a higher coherence index than subjects  who failed the tasks. matched control group of children. reflectivity) and three  tasks of Piagetian conservation were taken together and compared with scores from a non­ TM.191 Self­regulation of arousal and activtion can apparently enhance cognitive  development in children.0558). However. taking into  . attention.050). the differences  between pass and fail groups in the coherence index measurement were statistically  significant (p ≤ . cognitive flexibility.  The coherence index consists of bilateral frontal homolateral left and right  anterior coherence as well as an inverse measure of bilateral occipital coherence: FLR­O. it may be termed a “whole brain” measure of CNS  development. three tasks did not show any statistically signficant  relationship. Warner (1986) reports that children who practiced  Transcendental Meditation achieved significantly higher scores when tests of four mental  abilities (information­processing.  This measure represents both anterior and posterior measures as well as left and right  hemisphere measures. Therefore.  The current research contradicts Samples (1975) claim that Piagetian formal  reasoning is solely left brain oriented and ignores right brain skills. the following educational implications are predicated on the  notion that the current research only partially supports an hypothesized relationship  between the coherence index measure and the development of formal operational  reasoning.

 internal  and external. van  den Broek. 14­15). so aptly  described in the above quote. and Singer. Bradshaw.) I suggest that failure to engage students in “whole brain”  learning is functionally equivalent to administration of a “frontal lobotomy” (Cf. 1987. Heath  and Galbraith. does not work to provide a foundation in basic skills and  knowledge (pp. they say What we now appear to need is not individuals trained for the hierarchical and  mechanical workplace but individuals who can govern themselves.  Tomorrow’s  successful employees will have to be problem solvers. leading to holistic development. particularly as practiced  in our schools.. and  resourcefulness. and thinkers who are at home with open­endedness. I suggest that the Caines actually call for “frontal education” in their  apologia for “whole brain” education. Chen.  In a monograph published by the Association for Supervision and  Curriculum Development..  They indicate that routine memorization. adept  negotiators. ” While not made explicit  in their book.The ironic point is that memorization. Caine and Caine (1991) suggest that the real challenge to  education is to create a more complex form of learning that takes into account integration  of “human behavior and perception. & Szabadi. immersing themselves in a “real world” of  interacting parts.  The Caines suggest that we support a richer academic environment in which  students solve problems along thematic lines. remains insufficient for today’s educational challenges. emotions and physiology.  This cannot be done in most “teacher­centered” educational  curricula. flexibility.. Murphey. 1973. 136). and  Lidor.. decisions makers.  They also suggest development of  “relaxed awareness” in which the student learns to override the jarring impulses. that distract the learner from his or her task (p.  (See Tobias. 1966).192 account the predilections and capacities of each hemisphere for gaining command of the  environment.  For  example.  This characterization suggests a neuropsychological basis for the  . a  posterior brain function. 1991. How to achieve this goal?  At least we can exercise the frontal functions. Cavanaugh. in this regard.

 Less teacher direction and evaluation resulted in more predictable and lesson­ related behaviors. that giving direction and other restrictive behaviors force the less­than­conforming  student into a variety of patterns to reduce tension or anxiety. the students exhibited (1) fewer patterns  containing non lesson­related behavior.  The lack of  clustering of patterns and the consequent large numbers of infrequent patterns  may be a function of ambiguous directions or a lack of task orientation to  someone else’s task.  resulting in a more predictable set of behaviors than students in the TSLS science  classroom where directions and evaluation were provided (p.e. consisted of students identifying problems and solving them in their  own way (p. since it was not produced by teacher directions  or shaping.  Thus. 1983 and Farley. suggest. a perception which could arise with a directive teacher.) Some evidence exists that student self­control of arousal (i.  A series of studies has elucidated what I would term “frontal learning” in the  context of “student­structured learning in science” (SSLS) in contrast to “teacher­ structured learning in science” (TSLS). both internal and externally  generated. (Italics are mine.. Shymansky. it may be concluded that SSLS science  students were more involved in on­task behavior with the materials than were  TSLS students. For example. similarly.  Penick et al. For example. in a study of conservation  .  This line of thought has been expressed by Sanders (1983) in terms of “states  of stress” resulting from failure to control levels of arousal and activation..In  addition. in light of the preceding discussion. and (2) greater clustering of patterns. 1981)). 295). An alternative  exists. I suggest that students  actually are a) learning to control their own levels of voluntary ORs. distraction control)  is associated with higher levels of reasoning.  This involvement. 295). it should be noted that SSLS students did not as often exhibit patterns  involving watching the teacher. Penick.193 design of instruction (see Hartlage & Telzrow.. Matthews.  However. These results appear somewhat puzzling in light of traditional educational  approaches. and  Good (1976) found that in the SSLS classroom  where the teacher removed virtually all restrictions on intellectual behavior and  provided no directions or praise. and elaborated  by Rothbart and Posner (1985). b) through  habituation to involuntary ORs arising from distractions.

  Thereby they learn to govern their own arousal  patterns. Good. weight. etc. Similarly. Shymansky.” They  specifically recommend the “discovery method” which reinforces problem solving and  demands creative recombinations of images and verbaliztions to solve problems” (p. Matthews.  The solution  lies in the directions offered by SSLS strategies that place responsibility on the students  for governing their investigative behavior. For example. The advantage of the conservers is their greater ability to monitor and plan their  own behaviors.  for various authors. perimeter. evaluations. 47).. 537­ 538). Maltzman speculates that the transfer of this training to  other situations was actually a result of “the effects of inhibition” that “produce a  decrement in the excitatory potential of other common responses” (p.  It is reasonable to encourage skills self­regulation of arousal and activation in order to  .  Essentially. a TSLS strategy could work to the  disadvantage of the “slower” students in a classroom even though they may have  the most to gain from a science class rich with manipulative materials (p. perimeter­area. 240).  Because of this. area.” They suggest that teachers should “encourage students to generate  images themselves instead of constantly imposing images on their students. Attempts have been made to explicate these approaches. using concepts at hand. perhaps  unwittingly administering a functional “frontal lobotomy” to its students. seem to divert the nonconservers’ attention  away from more productive activities with science materials to a greater degree  than for conservers. and Penick (1976) found that  conservation on tasks of number.194 among students in grades 1­5. displacement.  They found that  teacher’s directions. Maltzman (1960) was able to train college subjects in “originality” of  word associations by encouraging the frequency of uncommon behavior in response to  lists of words used in training. a TSLS strategy works against “frontal” education.  and internal volume influenced how the pupil interacted with the teacher and with sets of  manipulated materials. Greeson and Zigarmi (1985) relate pedagogical  technique to achievement of Piagetian development in the context of “visual imagery” and  “visual literacy.

 Pascual­Leone  . Greeson and  Zigami suggest techniques that exercise the student’s capacity for self­regulation of  arousal and activation levels such as Jacobson’s progressive relaxation. and Tucker (1987) for discussions of hemispheric arousal levels and  anterior controls over lateralized and posterior functions. Hunt. Favian. However. Note that O’Boyle and Bembow (1990) suggest that intellectual precocity may be  related to right hemisphere functions.  Elsewhere.195 avoid premature closure. 62). Pascual­Leone (1989) particularly  investigates a neuropsychological model of field­dependence/independence. He relates the mechanism of mental attention to the  notion of “centration” (p. One author in particular has explored the role of various brain­mediated functions  in the context of neo­Piagetian developmental theory. Problem­solving skills that involve transformations and combinations of  anticipatory images can be developed through curriculum activities ranging from  charades to building mock­ups of complex molecular models (p. and creative visual ideation techniques. he describes excitatory and inhibitory processes that govern attention and are  localized in the prefrontal lobe. They point out that. meditation  strategies. and  Randhawa (1982). as well. See Milner (1971). and Pascual­Leone (1989).) Further explication of Pascual­Leone’s theory can be found in de Ribaupierre  (1989) and in Johnson. suggesting that automatization of schemes is  associated with the reallocation of schemes from the frontal to the posterior areas. or jumping to conclusions (my terms). (I had  not been introduced to his theory until completing this dissertation with the associated  theory. 48). The  congruence of the current theory developed in this dissertation with Pascual­Leone’s  theory is striking. Fischer.. Among other  things. presumably related to visuospatial skills as related  above. in light of the total independence of these two research efforts. impulsivity.. when appropriate. more to the point may be the speculation that enhanced frontal  involvement may lead to the metacognitive controls that permit judicious application of  right hemisphere strategies.

”  Posterior functions appear to support  assimilative structures. perhaps right  hemisphere. culminating in the “structural whole. Summary of the Theory Extrapolating from Piaget’s theory. I  believe.  and growth towards awareness of “all possibilities. linear. This is.e. i.  It is not  . and Wallace. automatic thought processes such as anticipation and the  regulations of “necessity. cognitive processes supported by the posterior regions.196 (1990) cites the coherence research mentioned in this dissertation (e. and  knowledge processing takes place) (p. perhaps left­hemisphere.”  Piaget (1986) himself describes the  steps of development as a process in which linear. wise persons placed under   proper meditation conditions and after some meditation training should exhibit  high­coherence spread over the cortex. 1983) to build the  case that coherence may be a neurophysiological component of “wisdom”.”  Development of formal reasoning requires “whole brain”  interaction of frontal and posterior regions. must be integrated back into the atemporal. automatic. temporal thought becomes  simultaneous.  He suggests that “the atemporal is the outcome of  the integration of the transcended in its transcendence. Orme­Johnson.. decentration.g. it appears that frontal functions support  volitional thought processes through mechanisms such as accommodation. 1981. the new  structure. He suggests  that  Coherence should appear in the EEG under proper meditation conditions  whenever the person has developed numerous manifold structures spanning over  the brain: whenever the cortex is sufficiently integrated as a totality.. but definitely  frontal­oriented. however. a distinct structural mark of wisdom. Abrams. particularly in prefrontal and vertex areas  (areas corresponding to regions where high­level executive. metaexecutive.”  This implies “going beyond” or  transcending the lesser stage with temporal.  Once the lesser structure is transcended. Nidich. Thus. Dillbeck and  Bronson. atemporal competence. possibly constituting the steps of successive  equilibrations through integration and differentiation of successively broader and more  stable schema. 272). cognitive activity. Ryncarz.

 low levels of frontal activation may be one of several reasons for reports of a  low incidence of formal reasoning among high school and college students today.  Therefore.e. Assuming that neurological conditions pose a necessary but not sufficient  condition. However. habitutation of the orienting response). Note that the current research did not uncover any alpha coherence differences  between males and females that interacted with task performance. p =  .. This theory must be taken somewhat tentatively with regard to the current  research. other studies demonstrate that TM increases frontal alpha coherence  over time and they also demonstrate a statistically significant relationship with cognitive  skills. only one out of four tasks displayed a  significant relationship with the coherence index (Vessels.197 unreasonable to suggest that the “transcending reflex” hypothesized to give rise to the  benefits of TM is similar in functional characteristics to Piaget’s description of the  “integration of the transcended in its transcendence” that gives rise to the atemporal  structure. Although a statistically significant relationship exists between the Formal Stage  Criterion and the alpha coherence index (p = ..e.  Alternatively. p = . voluntary orienting) and integrating the new observation so that it  makes sense (i. or “going beyond”  current mentation (i. the collective body of findings can reasonably demand explanation  from a neuropsychological perspective.045. without partialling  out age and gender). with age and gender partialed out. I suggest that both the practice of TM and the  development of cognitive skills engage functions of transcending.0558 without partialling out age and gender).050.  This was an  . we could suggest that individuals failing to attain formal reasoning  structures could be aided by enhancement of a “dominant focus” that supported a habit of  attention to task and habituation to distraction.

In closing. only main effects: males performed  significantly better on the Shadows task and pass subjects demonstrated higher FLR­O  coherence index measures than fail subjects on the Vessels task. the two spatially oriented tasks  demonstrated no taskXgender interaction. I suggest that the current research and the accompanying theory sheds  light on Piaget’s advocacy of “active learning.” i.e. suggesting that the conclusions apply equally to males and  females. The lack of a genderXtask interaction suggests that reasons other than lack of  coherence hold back development of formal reasoning for females in the Shadows task.  Brezin (1980) suggests that instructional design  techniques can benefit from knowledge of “cognitive monitoring. listening to a teacher.”  Physical action on objects necessarily  involves the student in different arousal and activation patterns than they experience  sitting in a chair.198 unanticipated outcome. imposed role expectations.  Such impediments could include any that have been given previously in the literature such  as lack of exposure to manipulative learning opportunities.  On the other hand. the  lack of statistical interaction between gender and task performance simplifies the  implications of the study.  In the current study. 1992). especially surprising in light of known advantages in spatial  Piagetian tasks for males as given in the Chapter II literature review and known  interactions between gender and psychometric spatial skill in measures of coherence  (Petsche & Rappelsberger.  These learning situations culture (and require)  different dominant foci.   . metacognitive  awareness made explicit in the design of instructional materials.  and genetic or gender­related predispositions.  Educators should provide “ecological validity” by giving  students opportunity to learn control of their arousal and activation patterns under  varying problem­solving challenges.

.  Without active and intentional inquiry. 1974. the student is more likely to fail to  decentrate from automatic responses and thus fail to transcend old schemata.  It appears that teacher­centered  instruction shortsightedly focuses on posterior functions.  The current findings suggest that students  can learn to govern their own level of frontal and posterior arousal and activation by  learning a mental technique such as TM to enhance “restful alertness”.g. p..  I suggest that  educational methods that remain “teacher­centered” unwittingly administer a functional  “frontal lobotomy” to the unsuspecting students. treating the student as a passive  receptacle of information. 1968).  Alternatively. Shymansky & Matthews.  Knowledge gained without active and intentional inquiry—a  frontal activity—fails to become integrated within successively more encompassing  mental structures.  The student gains experience and confidence in letting go of preconceptions and thereby  experiencing a larger sample of “all possibilities.  Without a  dominant focus of intentionality. and Jeffery. in  terms of the goals of science education.  Piaget’s elucidation of the “structured whole” suggests a new outlook on the  neurophysiological prerequisites to education.  Piaget’s recommendation of “active learning” in which students interact with objects to  discover regularities and laws appears to exercise important frontal executive functions.g. 1979. Pribram. The emphasis on development of purposeful (frontal) control of arousal and  activation by the subject also fits the “manifesto” regarding the proper use of visually  .199 All this suggests that a main challenge in education is development of self­ regulation of the orienting reaction (e. 166). the student fails to orient to discrepant occurrences or  fails to habituate to non­task related distractions such as a felt need to “check with the  teacher” or gain “teacher approval”  (e.”  This is an adaptive dominant focus. self­governance of frontal and posterior arousal is  probably best supported in a “student­centered” science curriculum.

 make plans for action. Sorflaten. Similarly.  Second.....adopt a theoretical position than can encompass the purposive or  intentional aspects of the use of visual processes and visualization (p.and not simply a neutral mechanism  for the transmission of information (or instruction).  Additionally.  This involves the developmental  significance of the bilateral occipital coherence measure (O). including bilateral   . during periods characterized subjectively as  “transcendental consciousness” (sustained periods of awareness without thoughts).One axiom of the research approach we advocate is that research must  recognize that humans are purposive and intelligent begins who.. but the recommendation follows from a perspective that both follows and  enriches the current findings.  First. Cochran.200 oriented instructional technology as stated by members of the Visual Scholars Program at  the University of Iowa.. individually or  collectively.The study of visual literacy  as the human ability or set of abilities to use visual processes as mediating  systems must .    Recommendations for Future Research   The Question of Bilateral Occipital Coherence A major topic has to now been postponed. 261)... and Molek (1980) suggested  that  Research in cognitive approaches attempts to provide adequate treatments of  internal order and adaptation to external order. we believe that visual  literacy research should proceed on two fronts: the characterization of the  development of internal structures in cognitively valid ways and the  characterization of the external structures the developing individual finds salient”  (p. 263).. we note an inverse relationship between O alpha  coherence and performance on tasks of formal reasoning (as well as other indicators  reported above... the  EEG record displays sharp and global increases in coherence.Another axiom is that visual processes are  mediating systems of noteworthy complexity. 1992). suggest a  model of brain functioning to support recent inquiries into “induced rhythms” in the brain  (Basar & Bullock. such as GPA and creativity). Younghouse. we note that longitudinal studies of  subjects practicing Transcendental Meditation demonstrate an increase in bilateral  occipital coherence.  I suggest this is an area for  future research.  The topic has two boundaries that together...

 1986.  This implies that the frontal and  association areas support interhemispheric communication. the tips of each prong will vibrate more out of synchrony than the fork  portion.  The fork portion of the  instrument will be the major junction between the otherwise independent frequencies of  each prong (this tuning fork has prongs of variable length!).  Owing to the lack of direct  interconnection.  transcending)?  The direction of research is indicated by the fact that the occipital lobes  do not.201 occipital coherence (Badawi. How is it that O alpha coherence on the one hand correlates negatively with a  psychological trait (e. Farrow &  Hebert. it is reasonable to assume that brain activity is “pulled” into  coordination first on a homolateral basis. as far we know. formal reasoning) and yet on the other hand correlates positively  with a major indicator of the putative mechanism of developmental growth (e. interhemispheric “transfer time much more likely depends on the association  areas where the stimulus is processed. 442). p. and  therefore.. then bilaterally for more anterior regions. Orme­Johnson.  Therefore.  Analogously. & Rouzere.g. Wallace. coordination of activity within a  hemisphere is important and will lead to electrical activity that is homolaterally  . whereas the occipital area  does not. share direct communication via the collosal connections. whereas the fork of the tuning fork represents the more  anterior areas that have bilateral commissural connections. 1984. and in the absence of primarily visual  input (as in eyes­closed TM).  Meanwhile each prong will have its own independent frequency except as  checked by the influence of the fork. across the occipital lobes.  I call this a “tuning fork” model in which the tips of the tuning fork represent the  unconnected occipital lobes.g. and  lastly. upon use of the frontal lobes. and on the part of the corpus collosum that unites  these [association] areas” (Zaidel.  Behavioral correlates included spontaneous respiratory suspension  without being followed by significant compensatory breathing. 1982).

 (p..  Jennen­Steinmetz. Walker. Gasser.  Thatcher (1991a) suggests that “each cognitive stage is  marked by extended periods of equilibrium between competing and cooperative neural  networks punctuated by brief periods of dis­equilibrium. especially when task demands exceed the  capacity of current categories of experience and action. They classify 3 components of  .202 organized..Among the most dominant  cortico­cortico connections are those that develop between different regions of the frontal  cortex and posterior intracortical regions. and coordination within the  motor areas.  They suggest that “spurts” in the rate of increased coherence  “overlap quite well with the timing for the Piaget theory of human cognitive  development..[D]evelopmental growth  spurts result in a relatively sudden increase in the neuronal capacity of a subset of  frontal lobe connections.  They concluded that  coherence between frontal and various homolateral posterior regions increased in a  developmental sequence. and Hudspeth and Pribram (1990)..  several studies support the notion that cognitive development is associated with  homolateral alpha coherence.5 to 22 Hz) in 577 subjects  between the ages of 2 months to early adulthood (26+ years old). Case  (1992)..  All activity presumably falls under the control of prefrontal executive  activity to one degree or another. perhaps developmentally influenced. and Giudice (1987) trace  the developmental sequence of homolateral coherence (. Although not Piagetian oriented.  For example.. Verleger. Thatcher  (1991b) suggests that  the frontal lobe developmental spectrum is consistent with models of the frontal  lobes that postulate an executive type function that is called into operation for  novel and task demanding situations.”  In a further exposition of these developmental processes.  Activities include monitoring and controlling primary sensory areas that  initially process stimuli. processing in the association areas. 415) Further discussions along similar lines are available in Thatcher (1992). Sroka. and Möcks (1988) identify developmental coherence  increases among subjects from 6 to 17 years of age.”  Thatcher.

 and Pribram are currently inferential. and link them with studies of EEG  coherence development. 1987).  However.  The current study has also shown that clinical  Piagetian tests give results not otherwise available from pen and paper tests of Piagetian­ defined reasoning skills. cognitive orienting). links to developmental stages made by Thatcher  et al. TM).. To guide future research..  Recall the findings of Berkhout and Walter (1980) in which  decreased posterior interhemispheric coherence resulted from behaviors that tended to  increase levels of arousal (i. upon cognitive task demands (e.  Obviously. and  anterior­posterior versus left­right coherences. based on ages assumed to  represent pre­operational. it is no longer an issue that homolateral coherence  accompanies human growth. I hypothesize that three stages of coherence reflecting  “whole brain” functioning could be identified.. Tucker. the  first stage will reflect homolateral coherence increases.. it seems reasonable to suggest follow­up studies using  clinical tests of Piagetian­defined reasoning. and formal reasoning.  That is. Given these findings.  First stage activity will therefore be evidenced by  decreased bilateral occipital coherence representing the fact that the free “ends” of the  tuning fork are pulled into synchrony with their respective anterior hemispheric executive  functions (Cf. .203 change: overall level of coherence. concrete. at least in subjects practicing TM. Hudspeth. coherence of occipital with all other regions. Case.  These increases causes the “free”  ends of the tuning fork model (posterior lobes) to assume the frequency characteristics of  the more anterior portion of each hemisphere (this is essentially the definition of  increased homolateral coherence).e. in light of this momentum in tracing neurological  development in a Piagetian context.g.  following the “tuning fork” model.  The current research is the  first study to actually link tests of Piagetian cognitive development with increases in  homolateral L and R anterior coherence.

 Posner. 1984. The global coherence could represent the framework for supporting  coordination required to “bind” functional components of thought (Cf. especially visuospatial (e.  This activity will be evidenced by increased bilateral  frontal coherence as well as possible slight increases or no change in bilateral occipital  coherence.  Component theorists have made significant progress in demonstrating the “distributed”  nature of mental functions.  and Friedrich.. Damasio. which in the case for breathing appears to  be inhibitory. Goldberg and Costa. 1981.   The third stage occurs when frontal bilateral and homolateral coherence is  sufficiently strong as to completely control the primary sensory areas. 1981)  (this is essentially the definition  of frontal bilateral coherence). which  states that two spatially separated points on the scalp share electrical activity at an  identical frequency for a specified period of time.”  The fact that subjects experience spontaneous respiratory suspension  suggests the widespread nature of influences. it is reasonable to ask. thereby causing the  anterior frequency characteristics to be reflected in the “ends” of the tuning fork.”  Apparently the nature of “transfer” is indicated by the definition of coherence.204 The second stage involves anterior bilateral coherence in which each hemisphere  takes on the frequency characteristics of the other. if the  . indicating integration of left and right  representational modes (Cf. 1988).  However.. Mesulan. 1987.g.  This  activity is represented in the sudden and dramatic global increase in coherence across all  frequency bands and brain regions during subjective reports of “transcendental  consciousness.. 1987. The Question of Information Transfer Any discussion of optimizing brain function must cope with issues surrounding  the question of “how does the brain communicate within itself?”  Some researchers such  as Sheppard and Boyer (1990) suggest that EEG coherence reflects “information transfer. 1989). and Farah. Inhoff. Kossyln.

  These authors suggest that the  brain supports a specific network for generating synchronizing signals.” (p.We hypothesize that this coherent sweep  of 40­Hz response could reflect a scanning of the brain with a focus on the activated  sensory area in order to generate a single percept from multiple sensory components. Eckhorn.  researchers point to phenomenon such as 40 Hz “oscillations” that are highly organized in  space and time across the entire scalp.  In general.. Basar­Eroglu.e..205 frequency remains the same. transferred?  Topics covered under the rubric of “induced rhythms” in the brain attempt to address this  issue. variation in a signal.. Although the  convergence zones that realize the more encompassing integration are placed  more anteriorly. it is activity in the more posterior cortical regions tthat is more  directly related to conscious experience. Salen.. 47). Schanze.Processing does not proceed in single direction but rather through  temporally coherent phase­locking amongst multiple regions.. such as the University of Iowa  medical researcher Antonio Damasio (1989).  153). Damasio suggests that consciousness is a function of the entire brain. that  . get support for their theories in findings that  indicate synchronization of stimulus­related brain activities (see also Buzsáki.  For  example..by synchronizing the activities of those neurons  that are activated by a coherent visual stimulus” (p. Posterior cortices require binding mechanisms in anterior structure in order to  guide the pattern of multiregional activations necessary to reconstitute an  event. how is information. and Bauer (1992) indicate that their  research on the cat shows that synchronization “forms the basis of a flexible mechanism  for feature linking in sensory systems.. Brosch. Basar.. and that authors  who speak of a similar need for “binding” brain functions.. i..   Similarly.. Consciousness must necessarily  be based on the  mechanisms that perform the binding. Parnefjord..  both for recognition and recall..  Llinaas and Ribary (1992) suggest that “ultimately  this coherent 40­Hz activity may serve as the basis for the conjunctive property that  characterizes the unity of cognitive experience. It is not enough for the brain to analyze the world into its components (sic)  parts: the brain must bind together those parts that make whole entities and events. The hypothesis suggested here is that the  binding occurs in multiple regions that are linked through activation zones. 1991). and Schurmann (1992). e.g.. Rahn.

 129­130). and Reitbroeck  (1992) and the notion that EPs are a superposition of evoked rhythmicities. Arndt.  At least two hypotheses have been suggested.” as explored in the computer models by Eckhorn.  “[D]uring cognitive tasks. Basar­Eroglu. Parnefjord. such as “linking  networks. and Schurmann (1992) found that human  rhythmic 10 Hz (alpha) activity increases under certain conditions.  However. as found by these researchers  and in the phenomenon of the transcending reflex? . there still  remains a missing link in the question of what is the mechanism that underlies the  adaptive value of global EEG coherence.  While 40 Hz and similar high frequencies have been observe in this role.  Phase shifts in the linkages serve to magnify or reduce  the strength of response to a stimulus. Dick. the subjects probably anticipated with 10­ Hz waves time­locked to the stimulus. Basar­Eroglu. and that the neural correlates of  consciousness should be sought in the phase­locked signals that are used to  communicate between these activation zones (pp.  While paying attention to an omitted stimulus. Dick. Parnefjord. and Schurmann (1992).  Their models  demonstrated that rhythmic activity results even under conditions of irregular stimulation. showing almost reproducible patterns” (p.  All of this work suggests that rhythmic activity plays a role in coordinating other. and is associated with  improved performance. and Reitbroeck (1992) built computer  models of neural network stabilizing mechanisms that enabled simulations of EEG  phenomenon such as “isolated bursts” as well as rhythmic behavior. 172).  This suggests for these authors that rhythmic linkages among regions can actually served  to enhance stimulus registration. it is possible to measure almost  reproducible EEG patterns in subjects expecting defined repetitive sensory stimuli. especially alpha. Arndt. Basar. Rahn.206 these regions communicate through feedback pathways to earlier stages of cortical  processing where the parts are represented. non­ rhythmic activity. Rahn.  Eckhorn. as explored by  Basar. a  companion study of computer models of feature linking mechanisms suggests that alpha  frequencies also play a role.

 the authors point out that  conscious perception was not necessarily involved because Shevrn and Fritzler  (1968) have shown that unconscious percepts can be encoded in the visual evoked  response. John and Schwartz (1981) found that two lights  .  For  example. and when  it occurred at a descending phase. and Sharaev (1991) found that the phase of alpha  sensitivity depends on visual parameters such as the number of degrees the figure appears  in the visual field away from the direct line of vision as well as the visual angle. Kostelianetz. 301). 1967). 1979). it appears that  excitability cycles apply much less to reflex action generated by the subject compared  with reports of positive findings with perception of incoming stimuli (Boxtel.  and it will be seen with greater or lesser probability.  Nunn and Osselton (1974) used GSR measures (a typical OR measure) to  detect responses to a word (“Danger”) that was presented briefly (30 msec) and then  masked with a bright flash. trough. visual stimuli can be presented at different portions of a single alpha wave cycle. Kamenkovich.  Varela. Toro. suggested that the role of the alpha  rhythm may be to serve as an “neuronic shutter.” or a gate that admits or ignores  incoming synaptic impulses. or ascending phase in the frontal­occipital  channels” (p. obscuring conscious perception  of the word.207 Investigators of the alpha wave have.  Of interest in terms of preattentive models of selective attention that I  have proposed. Other studies have suggested further refinements. thus organizing the process of information transfer into  orderly packets of regular transmission exchanges.  Evaluation of the GSR response at each of four phases of the alpha cycle  indicated that perception of the word (increased GSR) occurred statistically significantly  more often “at a descending phase or trough in the parietal­occipital channels.  This hypothesis is also studied in the  context of a “scanning model” or “cortical excitability cycles” (Harter.  For example.  subtended by the figure. depending on the phase of  presentation. or size. while experiments quoted in the introduction indicate that this response  varies according to the alpha phase at which the stimulus is presented (p. thus in most of the 12 trials. at times.  Shevelev. 300).

  They found that auditory detection was significantly better at the negative  peak of the alpha cycle at the temporal derivation T5.  As is known from bio­feedback and TM  research. it seems that they must occur across the  temporal boundary provided by this cortical activity (p. providing an  integrative mechanism over extended regions of the brain. subjects indeed can change EEG frequency and phase relationships at will under  conducive situations. 684). For two visual stimuli  to be perceived as separate in time.  The authors conclude with an outline of the  postulated neurophysiological functions involved and suggest that  the connections of cortical afferent (and efferent) signals might be synchronized  via the temporal course reflected in the local alpha rhythms.  The lights were more likely to be perceived as simultaneous during the  positive phase of the occipital alpha cycle.  Several lines of thought already converge in this  direction.  This research would probably find that self­ regulation in many cases consists of changing frequency and phase relationships between  brain areas.208 flashed with small intervals between them varied in being perceived as simultaneous or  sequential. In summary.  Human factors studies of performance under conditions of stress look towards  .   Future research can delineate the processes of cognitive growth in terms of the  development of EEG self­regulation. Rice and Hagstrom (1989) found an auditory equivalent to the above research in  visual stimuli.  This implies that research can begin to define a consistent system of functions  that support cognition from not only from the level of global coherence. but also from the  level of electrical activity at the cell. which is correlated in phase and frequency with the  alpha rhythm. thus laying to rest the criticism that any findings in the visual modality  could be attributed to eye tremor. I propose that future research investigate cognitive correlates to EEG  coherence taking into account the “excitability cycle” hypothesis and its more general  forms discussed under the rubric of “induced rhythms” that coordinate global brain  functions. thus altering their excitability levels.

 Pribram.  Simonov (1984.  In each case.  Similarly. as well.” again linking his theory to the same neurophysiological  substrata given by Pribram and McGuinness. the substrata links frontal  structures to whole brain function. 1983). . 1985). 1985) suggests mechanisms of self­regulation in terms of a calculus of  motivation in contrast to “drives.  Grones and Thompson  (1970).  Dual process theory holds that orientation (“sensitization”) and  habituation are independent processes for which neurophysiological evidence can be  adduced. see McGuinness. Sanders (1983) links arousal and  activation stress patterns to neurophysiological substrata initially proposed by Pribram  and McGuinness (1975) (also McGuinness and Pribram.   The oft­cited model presented by Pribram and McGuinness has found  considerable following. cite early expressions by Pribram of the same theory in their exposition of  the dual process theory.  Lateralization has been linked to their mechanisms of “self­ regulation” by Tucker and Williamson (1984) as well as by Sanders (1983).209 a taxonomy of stress states (Hockey & Hamilton.  For a clear picture of this approach specifically in the  study of Piagetian formal operational reasoning. and Pirnazar  (1990).

  meanwhile organizing evidence across a range of literature that suggests a strong link  between OR phenomenon and intelligence. The mediating  mechanics of the linkage will be shown to be EEG evoked potentials and their  relationship to coherence.  The  current chapter explores the implications of this claim in greater physiological detail. 1966). This  enhancement of the voluntary OR is hypothesized to occurvia the mechanism by which  EEG coherence reduces variability among averaged evoked potentials associated with a  particular stimulus. . and to increase the signal­to­ noise ratio of the mental processing. This implies that the practice of  TM may strengthen the voluntary OR phenomenon that underlies intelligence. particularly alpha coherence. it can also be elicited by attention to stimuli with subjective  significance or by attention toward a goal (Cf.  While the OR is normally associated with external. and particularly the internally generated OR. as indicated in the general research (Lynn. The primary effect of the OR. or cognitive success in general. Gruzelier & Eves. Arenander (1986) suggests that the process of  transcending can be understood in the framework of the orienting response (OR).210 CHAPTER VI TOWARD A NEUROPSYCHOLOGY OF EQUILIBRATION   (ADDENDUM TO THE ORIGINAL DISSERATION)    Orienting and the “Transcending Reflex”    As discussed in Chapter V. contributes to our understanding of  the “transcending reflex” as outlined in the following summary of Arenander’s  presentation to the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting (1986).  The theory of  the OR.  novel stimulation. 1987). is  to increase the sensitivity and speed of the sensory system.

  Second. while the physiology experiences more and more de­excitation. similar to  results of classical conditioning (habituation) paradigms.  BFS stimulation has also been  shown to induce respiratory arrest in primates and human.  Typically this brings the awareness to the level of  excitation required to repeat the process of transcending. Third. Fourth.211 First.  Note that activation of  the BSF has been shown to induce sleep behavior and EEG synchronization. Arenander suggests that during TM. Badawi et al.  Arenander suggests that the  flow of attention can be quite complex and could result in daydreaming unless the  prefrontal cortex asserts an influence by a) controlling thought­provoking interferences  .  The hippocampal­ based comparator seeks a possible match to the mantra (or other thought) and generates a  match or mismatch outcome.  The oscillatory mode gives rise to the observed increases in slow  EEG waves including alpha coherence. Farrow.  Respiration suspension has  also been found and experimentally measured during TM related to subjective reports of  transcending (Kesterson. 1982. 1984). when a match is determined (usually the mantra leads to a match) then the  comparator signals other brain areas.  This functions to reduce thalamic responsiveness  to incoming sensory information.. when a mismatch is detected the opposite occurs. based partially on the significance of the stimuli. the mantra (or other thought) is the focus of attention and is analyzed in  the appropriate thalamocortical channels related to the various senses. 1986. much as in the case of habituation to a stimulus.  The basal forebrain system (BFS) activates to  accomplish internal inhibition (II) and the mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF) and  associated brain structures are shifted into the oscillatory mode that reduces their internal  excitation (IE) role.  The  de­excitation associated with the match gives rise to transcending.  Various brain systems control the process such that a state of  alertness is maintained.  The II system  deactivates and the IE system activates. the individual alternates experiences of  orienting and habituation. & Hebert.

 37). This causes two independent processes in the nervous system: habituation in the  reflex pathway and a more generalized sensitization of the “state” of the system.  The enhanced distribution and integration are reflected in  the reported increased spread of coherence across the brain in subjects participating in  longitudinal studies.  These  results suggest that sensitization may even serve as a necessary substrate for more  complex forms of associative learning (p. & Berger. 1979) suggest a “dual­process”  trend in which sensitization of the OR can occur independent of habituation to repeated  stimulus.  other investigators (Thompson. Berry. Rinaldi.  the instructions for TM). Note that Arenander suggests that the OR and habituation alternate.  Although low activation of the thalamus (inhibition) normally  would lead to loss of awareness (sleep).e. the increased connectedness of the brain permits  maintenance of awareness with the added benefit of increased allocation of brain  resources for stimulus evaluation.  This model could possibly provide a  . Arenander suggests.  Frontal coherence and increases at other derivation  pairs occur because of changes in thalamocortical “temporal integration” (i. through the repetition  of orienting and habituating during TM so that it supports a more distributed and  integrated mode of processing. EEG  coherence) which in turn depends upon prefontal cognitive functions.  The NRT  exerts inhibitory influences on the thalamocortical sensory circuits by increasing its  oscillatory behavior.  Such NRT­thalamus feedback loops are reinforced by the cortico­ thalamic discharges back upon the NRT and thalamus creating a stable basis for shifts of  attention during the TM process.212 that give rise to distractions and b) providing a cognitive plan to guide the attention (i.  However.  The thalamus contributes to high levels of cortical  coherence through the mechanism of the nucleus reticularis thalami (NRT)...  The  thalamocortical activity may be reorganized.  He points to the research that indicates increased frontal  coherence with the practice of TM.e.

 known to control the ongoing state of the brain and behavior such as  wake and sleep.  In addition to any pre­defined task sequence.  The maintenance of  MRF activity may result from the ORs that continue to be re­evoked as the attention  repeatedly shifts. leading to alert  awareness even while relaxed. leading to inhibition of the  physiology.  Arenander suggests that the LC may facilitate states of less physiological excitation that  appear in transcending. Sixth.  The AC can also control cortical orientation by affective loading of selective  attention on the increased significance of lesser excited states of thought.  “restful alertness. a direction of thought can also be defined  by the affective or motivational valence attributed to a particular stimulus or thought. the individual experiences the alternation of ORs (according to  Arenander) and transcending (habituation) leading to progressively less excited states of  the central nervous system. the MRF activity cannot be reduced completely.  The LC acts to inhibit most neuronal cells in preparation for sleep state. reduction in the spontaneous activity of a cell  receiving an impulse dramatically increases the signal­to­noise ratio. Fifth.  Arenander notes that to maintain conscious awareness (and  not fall asleep). overall. focus of attention may also be aided by the activity of the locus  coeruleus (LC). Seventh.  Thus.  For example. Arenander outlines the mechanisms of selective attention in greater detail.  Cognition and affect are linked by the amygdaloid complex (AC).” according to the authors. acting as part of the  limbic system.” during TM more intuitively than the alternation of orientation and  habituation. the ORs that  .  This dual process model supports the notion of the co­existence of two opposing states.  The AC can associate “reward” stimulus thereby giving it an affective  “match” and transferring it to the hypothalamus and BFS.213 mechanism for Sokolov’s “stimulus­model formation process.

  Perhaps of greater interest is the outcome of recent  studies on the LC that suggest its role in cortical learning and plasticity.  Among other  evidence for a neurobiological basis for intelligence. helps maintain high vigilance during the de­ excited state of the brain and contributes to enhanced reliability and efficiency of feature  extraction during shifts of attention. Kimmel reports that gifted  intelligence children maintain larger and more persistent orienting responses (ORs) in the  form of skin conductance responses to visual stimuli than do average intelligence children  (DeBoskey.   The Adaptive Significance of the Orienting Response    In her presidential address to the Pavlovian Society. then. thereby biasing the thalamo­ cortical structures towards supporting the focus of attention on transcending as well as  ignoring distracting stimuli.  “Long term enhancement of brain function corresponding to least  excited states may support the conscious appreciation of a wider range (vertical) of  cognitive activity outside of meditation” (Arenander. In summary.” and  suggested that such functional stability may be modified by experience. 1986).  Arenander  suggests that the activation of the LC during transcending may modify the  thalamocortical system to allow new modes of neural organization to function during  ordinary activity. Kimmel.  What  additional support can be given for Arenander’s model?  Let us examine other evidence  regarding orientation and habituation in relation to cognitive aptitudes.  The LC.214 do arise would be detected at earlier stages of processing. & Kimmel.  Evidence supporting this  conjecture follows. Kimmel (1985) discussed the  “functional stability of the nervous system: a neurobiological basis of intelligence. who in turn joins Pavlov’s idea of strength of the  . 1979).  Kimmel draws the concept of ”functional  stability” from the work of Nebylitsn. Arenander’s “transcending reflex” is hypothesized to increase the  EEG coherence in a fashion that enhances the adaptive functions of the brain.

 perhaps manifesting a ceiling effect not experienced by the  average children for whom monetary incentive did cause a gradual increase in OR  changes over the 18 trials. in this case. a well­ known researcher of OR and habituation phenomenon.  According to Kimmel. the rewarded children maintained ORs with greater magnitude implying that  motivation enhances attentiveness towards successful performance.. Kimmel.  The gifted children  made lesser increases in OR. changes in ORs) in CNS  . refers to the “ability of the system to continue  responding under repeated stimulation. while the control group received no reward for observing the  stimulus.Where strength is manifested in the ability  to tolerate excitation without reduction in response. or destructive.215 central nervous system (CNS) with Teplov’s concept of CNS “weakness” or high  reactivity to stimuli.  Strength.e. sensitivity is manifested in an  instability and vulnerability to outside influences” (p. and  the continued positive magnitude of the OR.” Weakness refers to “the more sensitive CNS  (that) may be changed from a state of rest to one of catabolic. 59). both shown to be significantly correlated  with intelligence measures.  In DeBoskey.  This evidence of “plasticity” (i.  Half of each group was average intelligence (mean of about 101 IQ) and half  was gifted children (mean of about 145 IQ). activity by  extremely weak stimuli” (p.  Kimmel writes:  “Strength and sensitivity both are  reflections of the same property of the CNS.  Mean age was about 10 years. and Kimmel (1979).. 60). money was paired  with an OR­eliciting stimulus (a geometric form that changed shape or color in each trial)  for the experimental group.  Among both  groups.. ORs Support Cognitive Success  Kimmel (1985) gives examples where intelligence measures have been influenced  by training or motivation. contemporary measures of the  functional stability of the CNS are the resistance to habituation over many repetitions..

  Castelman. and  psychology). in turn. Brennan. but habitually as in the case of gender­related predisposition. The authors also report prior research in which males displayed higher skin  conductance responses to visual stimuli than females presumably for similar reasons. physical education. ORs may reflect when individuals respond to attentional challenges not only  momentarily. the Embedded Figures Test. according to Kimmel.  Zeiner also notes that his high OR subjects  were biased towards science majors (math. which would cause the stimuli to be perceived by them  as irrelevant or inconsequential.  although they indicate that the male physiology may also be responsible.47 between OR magnitude (skin resistance response) and four­year  cumulative college GPA among 19 subjects preselected for high and low ORs. However. to academic performance.  For example.  While  there was no correlation between habituation rate and EFT performance.  and business. and also  slower habituation across trials upon listening to three randomly alternating tones. not mentioned by Kimmel. and Kimmel (1979) studied a visual­spatial task of field  independence. dance. 663).  The low OR subjects selected majors in Spanish. electrical engineering. the authors  ventured to speculate that the females habituated faster to the varying tones owing to  acculturation–socialization history and environmental factors.216 functional stability must be viewed with some caution. given only a  few and inconclusive studies.  They found the predicted higher performance in males on the EFT. Zeiner’s (1979) study reported a significant  correlation of r  = . in relation to gender differences in auditory­ evoked ORs.  Zeiner  suggests the results indicate that the OR is an objective index of attention. which is  related. physics. while appearing to the males as a part of the  problem to be analyzed (p. The emotionally sterile laboratory environment may have been intrinsically less  interesting to the females.   .

 tactual. the GSR occurred simultaneously with the verbal solution. it can be hypothesized that during TM the individual develops  the neurophysiological prerequisites for enhancing resistance to habituation and for  generating continued ORs to stimuli to which significance has been attached.  This suggests that variation  of problem­solving schema may be related to OR phenomenon.217 More specific to the attentional role of ORs. 329).  In seven  cases.  EEG changes were shown to be different.  He discusses at length findings of Russian researchers that  link stages of chess game problem solving with OR­related changes in the GSR.  I suggest that the experience of TM conditions the mind to adopt  a mental set whereby preattentive mechanisms separate “task” stimuli from distracting  thoughts. it  occurred perhaps a minute or so prior to the verbal solution. patients with lesions in the prefrontal  cortex show a deficit in voluntary or goal­directed behavior. loss of which leads to loss of normal ORs and purposive  behavior. as well.  Maltzman (1979b)  relates Luria’s clinical research that the voluntary OR depends on the normal functioning  of the prefrontal cortex. as well as verbal in a  problem­solving situation.  In contrast.  Posterior patients show deficits in the reception and  processing of auditory. which have also been  shown to vary across individuals relative to their cognitive skills. these changes have been reflected physiologically in longitudinal increases  in anterior coherence and psychologically in longitudinal cognitive improvements as  described in Chapter II. but in 31 cases.  Among  TM subjects. for frontal patients compared  with posterior­lesioned patients. or visual information. although their speech and the  reception and processing of sensory information are relatively intact (p. creating for the subject a voluntary OR when exposed to the thought of the  . Maltzman (1979b) finds evidence  indicating that the “signal value” of a stimulus can be non­verbal.  But their goal­directed or  purposive behavior is relatively intact. Relating these ideas of CNS functional stability and training to Arenander’s  transcending reflex model.

 may result from failure of preattentive processes to identify  the INRC group operations as salient to the subject. . suggesting that identification of a  stimulus does not require central processing. thereby giving rise  to the increases in cognitive skills listed above. Öhman (1979) describes the  relation between OR and preattentive mechanisms. or when the “match” identifies the stimulus as significant.   In the current study. 89). See de Pibaupierre (1989) for a discussion of individual differences in acquisition  of Piagetian operations. Vessels and Shadows.g. such as detection of one’s own name or becoming influenced by an unattended  verbal source when interpreting the meaning of the attended phrase (p. there appears to be “at least four different says to enter the formal  operational stage” (p.. and habituation when exposed to  distracting  (unintended) thoughts. the fail groups’ relatively poorer performance on the spatial  tasks.   This preattentive mechanism may carry over into daily activity. Taken together. Another dichotomy appears to be verbal vs.  The results  of preattentive processing can lead to activation of the central attentive processors in two  cases: when the “mismatch” of stimuli and short­term memory representations appear to  have adaptive consequences. typically the right  hemisphere.218 mantra (an intentional thought).  The lack of salience may result from  lower ORs that in turn result from an inability of the brain substrata to support attentive  ORs in the hemisphere devoted to visual­spatial representations. particularly differences that tend to be dichotomized by INRC  group vs. Note that the lack of salience could also be partially an outcome of personal­ historical influences during development (e. parents do not encourage any INRC group  activities). combinatorial lattice operations. 448).  Unattended stimuli can be completely  processed.  For example.  spatial.

  However. or using biofeedback to directly influence a visible segment of the AEP. presumably the result of a “functionally unstable” CNS. (i.”  The clarity of the peaks and troughs of a set of averaged AEPs are  a function of the stability or nonvariance in their shape across the numerous trials  required to obtain the AEP. which Kimmel interpreted to indicate greater sensitivity to “weak stimuli” in  Teplov’s sense. in this case. As evidence of “plasticity” of CNS orienting capabilities.e.  The  feedback paradigm. Kimmel also discusses evidence of  “functional stability” from studies that related intelligence and EEG.  This suggests that low intelligence results from the random  transmission errors that hypothetically destabilize the timing of the peaks and troughs of  the AEP.  These random errors  then smooth out the peaks and troughs. perhaps attenuated owing to a  limited range of IQs. thus “shortening” the positive and negative  excursions.219 Stable Evoked Potentials Support ORs  In the same address mentioned above.  She points out that Hendrickson and Hendrickson (1979) demonstrated  correlations of . maintaining  an OR). improved subjects’ ability to detect and locate visual  stimuli.  The several  ..  Kimmel’s address offers much to the current discussion.  However. we must recall that increased sensitivity is a hallmark of the  OR in general. incidentally.773 between intelligence and a measure of auditory­evoked potential  (AEP) complexity—the total length of positive and negative excursions of the AEP. Kimmel reports several  instances where the habituability of evoked potentials was modified either using  instructions to perform a task. evoked  potentials (EPs).  The above correlation may be an overestimate due to the use of groups of  predetermined high and low IQ children.. called  the “string measure. a follow­up study of adults with the  Raven’s Advanced Matrices test found a correlation of . which postponed habituation indefinitely.47.

 Schnobel. these writers found correlations up  to .  (Note: “P200” is the postitive peak that  occurs roughly 200 msec after stimulus onset.80  between the two.5 for the string measure and up to .  1987). 1981. perhaps explaining some of the inconsistencies in previously  reported studies. there still remains compelling evidence regarding neural correlates to IQ that  motivates continued investigation (see Chen & Buckley.   IQ and Evoked Potentials (EPs) in Relation to Orienting   of Attention  While much can be found to criticize in the Hendrickson and Hendrickson work  (Stowell. 1986 for  reviews). 1985) and although some studies have failed to replicate the findings (Shagass. Kruger. 1988. Braden and Williams. (1983) found that  stimulus intensity for visual­evoked potential research was systematically related to the  degree the evoked potential (EP) correlated to intelligence (Raven’s Advanced  Progressive Matrices test). Schalt.)  They also concluded that the string measure was  explained primarily by the N140/P200 excursion with a maximum correlation of .220 topics will be addressed in order.  Under optimum intensity conditions.  Both of them relate to Kimmel’s concept of “functional stability” as reflected in less  variability among EPs. Straumanis.  The authors suggest  these findings are analogous to the EP differences between the IQ groups that is produced  .  First.69 for the peak­ to­peak excursion between N140 and P200. Haier et al. Robinson. “N140” is the negative peak that occurs  roughly 140 msec after stimulus onset.  For example.59 for P200 amplitude.  Roemer. and then taken up from the perspective of the “standard  cognitive state” (TM) used in the current research. & Hassling. D. other studies report that high­IQ subjects demonstrated  more stable waveforms across the EP samples than low IQ subjects. and up to . Haier. Vogel. & Josiassen. (1983) identify several sources of the imputed IQ/EP relationship. and Mackintosh.

”  In other words. higher IQ and increased intensity. diffuse illumination that is sinusoidally modulated at various frequencies..”  They cite support from Robinson  (1982a. 1982b. suggest that the influence of intensity in  discriminating IQ levels “supports the view that higher intelligence is a consequence of  greater activation in general of central processes (mediating N140­P200 amplitude in  particular) in response to normal levels of stimulation.  Robinson suggests that his statistically significant results link the optimum function of the  diffuse thalamocortical system (DST) with optimum balance of excitation and inhibition.  Robinson defined “balance” by measures of cortical responsivity to a  large­field.  Second.  Said  another way.” the CNS neither orients too little nor habituates too much to  stimuli.   Based on these results. both indicators of discrimination  skills. Regarding the first point. the EEG amplitude  (at Pz) is driven neither too much nor too little by variations in the light source.”  .  Each point is developed in the following.  The excursion is greater due to less variation among the  EP samples (i.  Robinson suggests future research into the relationship of WAIS subtests with  “different patterns of DTS mediated background activation of the cerebral cortex. greater “stability”).” as well as stimulus intensity. et al. as defined in  Pavlovian terms.  as represented in Pavlov’s concept of CNS “strength.  Both points suggest that CNS functions  determine how well the subject attends to significant stimuli. other studies indicate that the EPs can be  affected by “state” changes or the deployment of “attention. with “balance. the  N140­P200 excursion is greater. Robinson suggests that CNS “balance” influences  variation in psychological style among his subjects: field independence (Embedded  Figures Test) and intelligence (WAIS performance test).221 by the more intense stimulation: for both cases.e. 1983) who found that WAIS performance scores and Embedded Figures  Test scores were positively related to a measure of “balance” in strength. Haier.

’s second point suggests attentional factors play a role in the strength of  the OR. than the child (Stuss. 1992. or whether  it also requires the ability to habituate to distractions “whereby irrelevant and distracting  stimuli are ‘gated out’ (removed from attention and further processing)” (p. this was the  general intent of the Thatcher (1983) and Hernandez (1985) studies or any study.  Of course. McDonald.  Cooley and Morris.   Gating Out Distractions   Waters. and far greater access to goal­directed attention.  The adult is far more capable of “gating out” such  distractions. Maltzman.”  These terms will be discussed in greater detail below.  To test  .  First. Haier et al. In Piagetian terms. the notion of a  direction of attention becomes important. let us examine the background for this higher­level understanding of  “gating out” of  distractions­­also known as decentering.  Also.  including the current study.  The adult has far greater resistance to  distraction. 229).b). that investigates links between EEG coherence and cognitive  individual differences.  In both cases. selective attention in the service of a goal would be called  “anticipation” whereas the ability to resist distraction (defined as non­goal directed)  would be called “decentration. &  Kortenaar.  Direction.  (Olst. and Koresko (1977) explore the behavioral implications of  gating mechanisms by addressing the question of whether selective attention consists  solely of the ability to maintain strong ORs in the face of repeated stimulation. 1979 a.222 suggesting specifically future research with EEG coherence. or selectivity of attention. 1990). is  controlled by the subject’s level of development.  This implies that “strength” of the CNS (ability to sustain the OR) must take into  account the notion of the “significance” or “voluntary” OR. Heemstra. 1979. “weakness” (susceptibility to stimuli) must  take into account whether the stimulus is indeed salient or whether it is distracting (for  which the ability to habituate the OR would be best).

 the frontal lobes.  The authors conclude that  the process of attention is  at the very least a dual process. arouse the organism for  energy expenditure and action on stimuli.223 this hypothesis. Brunia (1993) extends Skinner and Yingling’s  (1977) model for control of sensory input to include control of motor outputs.  “Selection implies excitation within an environment of inhibition.  1973). the authors compared four groups on their ability to respond with a  correct answer after listening to a taped male voice reading simple mathematical  problems.Interaction between attention facilitation and  attention inhibition processes would enable selective attention (p. an attention inhibition process..  Attention facilitation responses are most probably elicited by stimuli labeled as  salient.  The groups differed in the type of distraction (female voice.  It is this attention facilitation process that has  been the primary focus of psychophysiological research on attention (c. likely involves the  habituation of responses that enhance sensory reception..  The frontal  cortex selects input or outputs by activating inhibitory neurons associated with the  unwanted input or output.  The results indicated that prior habituation to stimuli that  later became distractors resulted in better task performance and resulted in less skin  resistance fluctuations than subjects performing undistracted.  The other process. arouse the organism for energy expenditure and action on  stimuli..  Various measures of autonomic reactivity evaluated the strength of the OR  throughout the experiment. Raskin.f. likely  involves the sensitization of responses (phasic and tonic ORs) that enhance  sensory reception. These “gating” functions represent activity conducted by the anterior portion of  the cortex.  This resultant  access to the cortex from the thalamus is manifested as a local cortical arousal..  For example. 235). and prepare the organism for central  processing of further input.. thus leaving the selected pathway uninhibited.  One.  500 Hz tone. perhaps on the basis that they are part of an active reinforcement  contingency (Mackintosh. 1975). an attention facilitation process. none) during the math problems and in amount of prior opportunity to  habituate to the distraction.. and prepare the organism for central processing of further input.Thus. the investigation  .

 who indicates confirming studies. 1993.. a more “basic” function that the other measures reflect to varying  degrees. looking critically at various psychophysiological measures  that seem to correlate with IQ such as reaction time. “is an  association between IQ and willingness or ability to maintain concentration on a routine  . with r’s  from ­.  Thus.” or inspection  time. 328).45. with  OR and habituation mechanisms supporting it. p. Mackintosh (1986).  This implies that relative to IQ. the  cumulative measure of EPs reflects attentional variance more than the single EP reflects  brain function.  Mackintosh also points out that the standard deviation of reaction time  holds up as the best correlate of g (general intelligence) in relatively homogeneous groups  at a variety of ability levels. the “string measure. Brunia’s model of motor  excitation and inhibition could refer to “restfulness” (a motor feature).  An obvious candidate for this more basic function is selective attention.  The transcending  reflex.224 of motor preparation and attention will reveal signs of both excitation and inhibition”  (Brunia.3 to ­.  The simplest explanation for each  of these findings. according to Mackintosh.72). 1983. suggests that they may reflect differences among subjects in concentration or  sustained attention.72 for the  string measure and r =­. discussed above).” (a cognitive feature). while the previous discussion of cognitive excitation and  inhibition could refer to “alertness.  Makintosh confirmed this inverse relation between variance and IQ by  finding lower correlations between IQ and string length calculated on each individual trial  (r  =. Mackintosh observes that the variance among  the EPs correlates with IQ as highly as the string measure of their average (r =.72 for the variance) implying that the variance indicates variation  of attention. Haier et al. significantly different than r  =.  Regarding the string measure in particular  (Cf. could shift various regulation mechanisms in the direction of co­existing  “restful alertness” with subsequent positive effects.52. then.

. Unsal. perhaps  amplitude jitter is an indication of the subject’s consistency in focusing on the  stimulus. 293. but rather the control over attention that   is necessary for the consistent production of P300 waveform components (p.  Twenty­two adults (mean age  of 32. frontal cortex. is a function of the anterior.What is still developing after 12 years of age is not the ability to  generate a P300 response to a stimulus.42 to ­..  “Our data  represent the first documentation that the prefrontal area shows electrophysiological  . the P300 amplitude  correlated significantly with scores on the vocabulary test from the WAIS­R measured  across both groups of children. and Dywan (1992) who  compared 18 “bright” 12 year­old children with 22 normal peers on skills related to  executive functions associated with the prefrontal area. in this  experiment.225 task” (p.  my italics)..5) provided a second control group on the EP data. in  turn. 14). the  researchers found that among the normal group of children (and the combined groups of  bright and normal children) the P300 “amplitude jitter” was significantly less for those  who show better performance on the frontal measures (r’s  ranging from ­. Also.  They suggest that the amplitude stability is determined.  Congruent with the discussion  above regarding Kimmel’s concept of “functional stability” and EPs. this is a function of maintaining OR to significant stimuli. among other measures.  Again.56). Further evidence comes from Segalowitz. by the cognitive effort or attention allocated to the stimulus. and auditory oddball P300s.  The authors find that the stability of the P300 amplitude is a “strongly developmental  phenomenon.” able to predict a variety of intellectual measures including those associated  with the frontal system.Thus. simple attention and memory  tasks. the authors conclude from their electrophysiological measures that the  functions of the posterior area mature earlier than the prefrontal portion..  Relative to the above discussion of EP variance. which.

 because the frontal area has yet to mature.  These  observations suggest that a person may do well on a standard psychometric test of  intelligence or even traditional academic.  The measured sites were F3.  Federico found that the below­ .  Ignoring irrelevant stimuli is the process of “decentration” according to Piaget.5 seconds to subjects studying a training booklet on pulsed radar. yet do poorly on tests of formal reasoning. The literature suggests that subjects exposed to stimuli perceived  as irrelevant to their current task should have diminished EPs.  The auditory evoked potentials were measured in terms of the mean EP amplitude and  standard deviations over a period of 512 msec after the stimulus (Cf. yet do less well on a  test of formal reasoning. whereas  posterior systems are functionally mature in middle childhood” (p. Federico (1985) administered distracting clicks randomly with an  average interval of 1.   Decentration Consists of Resistance to Involuntary ORs    Kimmel (1985) suggested that “functional stability” is associated with decreased  variability between EPs and with increased amplitude of EPs. (1986)). if they have any EPs at all.  Presumably. P3. 295). and O1 as  well as the homologous sites on the other hemisphere.  This is consistent with the notion  that the prefrontal lobe is not functionally mature until young adulthood. teacher­centered curricula. as  explained in Chapter V. the non­science  curriculum taps less frontal skills than the science curriculum which is typically oriented  towards solving novel problems that demand self­originated solution patterns. we can  adduce implications for EP behavior under conditions of non­significant stimuli.  This may also  suggest a causal mechanism by which some students can do well in a college non­science  curriculum.  While Kimmel discussed  this topic in the context of paying attention to presumably significant stimuli. T3. variance among EPs  constituting the “string measure” of Hendrickson and Hendrickson (1979) discussed by  Kimmel (1985) and Mackintosh.226 activity suggesting very slow maturation in humans.  For example.

  Frederico equates the crystallized abilities with frontal.e. the larger amplitude of the EP (and greater SDs) represent failure to  habituate to the distraction while reading the instructional material.  based on his prior EP research that link these areas with  general aptitude (i.. field  dependence­independence (i. manipulating spatial patterns). Gc. 249).  244). Gf. solving arithmetic problems) and  verbal and reading skill (understanding English words and prose passages). temporal and parietal regions.  ERPs evoked in the occipital areas were generally  associated with spatial ability (i. thus  restoring them to the class of crystallized functions. it appears reasonable to suggest a reinterpretation of the  putative Gf posterior functions as more “automatized” than volitional functions.e. “not  only LH regions as proposed in the popular asymmetric model of the brain” (p.  The putative Gc frontal functions  . comprehending language. perceiving the  environment in a multidimensional manner).  Frederico reviews similar studies  of EPs and cognitive performance and links the findings to proposed anatomical sites for  fluid.  Not consonant with the theory I am developing. acting impulsively). temporal and parietal regions.  The larger amplitude  EPs were recorded in the right hemisphere frontal. as well  as the left parietal area indicating that the poor learners engaged these areas less in the   concept learning task than their counterparts who learned better.  Frederico concludes  that the right hemisphere appears significantly associated with concept learning. abilities. which  are chiefly measures of Gc.  Note that the auditory clicks were a  distraction. processing analytically vs. and crystallized. More investigation is required to reconcile this approach with my own  conclusions. therefore.227 average learners demonstrated higher mean EP amplitudes and greater standard  deviations than the above­average learners.e. reflection­ impulsivity (i. however.  This supports the findings of the current study. globally).e. tolerance of ambiguity (i.  inclining to accept complex issues) and cognitive complexity (i. which are chiefly measures of Gf (p.e.  As a start. deliberating vs. as well.e.

  For example.228 must be examined in the light of the actual tasks. even after covarying for intelligence as measured by Raven’s Matrices  test.  (E.  Even conventional intelligence tests. even though at face value.  Perhaps frontal. adaptive.. Such planning functions would presumably be  mediated through high­level programs which control the operation of lower­level  cognitive programs themselves more posteriorly sited.. . To  overcome automitized responses to stimuli requires that the subject exercise volitional  control. seem to demand the  use of relatively routine even though complicated cognitive operations (Shallice  and Evans. “How many slices in a sliced loaf?”)  The frontal patients responded with significantly more “bizarre” answers than the  posterior patients. where a series of problems of the  same type is presented with gradually increasing difficulty. both Frederico’s work and the work of Shallice and Evans illuminate  Piaget’s concept of “decentering” as an element of cognitive growth. at least until the higher level schema is automatized. the listed tasks appear to represent  automatized knowledge.On this view routine  motor skills and routine cognitive skills such as the performing of mechanical  arithmetic calculations would mainly require the use of only the lower­level  programs. “What is the largest fish in the world?”. Kimble and Perlmuter. 1978. p. 301). This view contradicts the Frederico findings. volitional  processes (as mentioned in Chapter V.g. “How long is an average man’s  spine?”. Shallice and Evans (1978) tested patients with  localized posterior and anterior cerebral lesions using questions that apparently required  general knowledge available to almost all subjects.. thus suggesting the need to  investigate the source of the apparent discrepancy.  The authors concur with Luria (1966)  that the selection and regulation of cognitive planning is one of the main functions  of the human frontal lobes.. but for which estimation was required  and no immediately obvious strategy was available. To decenter requires  the subject to ignore outmoded or inapplicable schema that have been automatized. 1970) were required to  perform them well. However.

  This possibly indicates that automaticity in mathematical calculation is  inversely related to synchrony.  Experienced mathematicians did not need to “pay  attention” with their frontal structures.  Piaget would suggest that the individual must  become aware of some contradiction between the behaviors of the objects themselves and  the concepts used to explain the behavior of objects.  Increase in  synchrony apparently also depends on subject expertise because two experienced  mathematicians demonstrated no increase in cross­correlations during the mental  mathematics. the synchronous  sites were mostly located in the prefrontal lobes and the motor centers. 120).  It appears reasonable to suggest that  this. with  subsequent inhibition of the action. too.229 A Role for Coherence in Accommodation and    Reequilibration     How does the subject make the automatized behavior volitional?  Given the  previous discussion.)  Immediately  after the solution. “Paying attention” may have its neurological representation in increased  synchrony of EEG between various parts of the brain. is a form of “paying attention” and is prerequisite to higher forms of  equilibration.”  Kimble and Perlmuter (1970) point out that  automatized responses become volitional upon “paying attention” to the action.  (Note that cross­correlation is an analog of  coherence that measures the “coherence” across all frequencies at once.  Livanov (1977) reports that his  research on “cross­correlation” of EEG during mental arithmetic (multiplication of two  two­digit numbers) indicates “a sharp increase in the number of cortical areas with high  cross­correlation coefficients” (p.  For the non­mathematicians. the frontal regions appear responsible for supporting the  “assimilation scheme” that governs all accommodation. . with high  correlations between many of the sites.  The frontal regions are  responsible for “paying attention. the cross­correlations drop back close to their initial values.

”  Synchronization of cerebral sites is also reported for physical movements. resulting in greater anterior cross­correlations. therefore.  After “transition to a stable  regime of work.” anterior sites demonstrate greatly reduced amounts of cross­correlation  between hemispheres and between the prefontal and motor areas. manifesting in  increased synchrony. Livanov (1977) cites one study in which 5  subjects received a dosage of chlorpromazine while performing mental arithmetic.  These authors concluded that the coherence  measure they used reflected not only some aspects of anatomical pathways.  Coupling  between visual areas and premotor (OzFz) did not decrease. with greater  anterior synchronization at the beginning of the activity.  The degree of coupling depended on the difficulty of the task. with frontal  premotor (Fz) to motor (C3 and C4) coupling decreasing with practice. but more  importantly. 123). when  unaided by frontal functions.  Adults presumably act with greater intent and more developed  frontal areas than children.  These  outcomes suggest that volitional activity engages the frontal area.  Other evidence  indicates that the number of positive correlations increases with age. reflected dynamic functional brain organization that supported the task.  The  motor centers coordinate with the frontal regions in the form of “ideomotor acts.230 Livanov points out that the frontal lobe activity is “a crucial factor in human  activities which involve initiative. Livanov’s work compares with similar findings for Busk and Galbraith (1975)  who found 4­20 Hz EEG coherence high during the learning phase of a 60 rpm pursuit­ rotor task. but with slower responses. Posterior regions support learned activity.  For example. with adults showing  more correlations than children during performance of voluntary motions.  Chlorpromazine is known to inhibit the “tonic effect of the ascending reticular activating  . suggesting that the visual  input remained stable during the task.  It determines the course of complex behavioral  patterns and seems to be largely responsible for human intellectual activity” (p.

  The association of the RAS with anterior  functions suggests the importance of “alertness” in the process of problem solving and  other frontal activity that may not show up in traditional IQ measures. plus decreased plasma thyroid  and adrenocortical hormone production. muscle. and decreased galvanic skin resistance and/or  .  The cross­correlations decreased markedly in the frontal areas. Note that the subjective experience during TM is one of mental alertness co­ incident with physiological restfulness.  A recent review by Jevning.  Other indicators of rest include the decrease or  disappearance of EMG (muscle tension).  Notably.. 126). findings indicate]  decreased reaction time and other improvements in sensory and motor performance [that]  can be associated with a more alert state of the central nervous system” (p. granting that the frontal lobes  still participate with much reduced activity. the  calculations were made at a slower rate.231 system (RAS). Wallace. while  the infraparietal and other regions maintained their level of synchrony. and  Beidebach (1992) suggests that many of the physiological effects of TM reflect a state of  increased alertness or CNS activation especially at periods of subjectively deepest  transcending.  Increased CNS activation during TM is also indicated by increased coherence. the authors also point  out that the subjective experience of deep restfulness is supported by measures such as  decreased whole body.[Outside of TM.  In contrast to mental alertness.  “Such states are accompanied by high amplitude theta and/or fast  frequency beta bursts consistent with activation.  Livanov concludes that the infraparietal zone  “represents a posterior association zone which seems to be able to ensure all the  necessary forms of integrative cerebral activity” (p.. which is most closely associated with the anterior parts of the cerebral  cortex” (p. and red cell metabolism. as well as  increased cerebral blood flow and other changes in peripheral circulation and metabolism  to support the increased activation. 421). 126).

’ but a predictable  consequence of dynamically organized functional brain states” (p.  For example.  He found that many of the derivation pairs  demonstrated greater EPs when immediately prior to the flash of light the pair had  weighted coherence above the mean. the opposite held. is Galbraith’s observation that “complex patterns of ongoing brain coupling  occurring just prior to. 226).  More important.  I have suggested the improvements result from  enhanced voluntary ORs (anticipation).  Empirically. exerted a marked influence  upon the brain’s response to the stimulus.and the enhanced ability to resist distraction  (decentration) which in turn result from changes in the on­going EEG.  In several derivations. compared with instances when the coherence was  below the mean. both anteriorly  (increased coherence) and posteriorly (decreased coherence). suggesting that certain brain  centers hold responsibility for inhibiting visual signal processing.  Together.” Relationships Between EEG Alpha Coherence and    Increased EPs for Voluntary ORs   The coherence research cited above and in Chapter II suggests that enhanced  rhythmic coordination between spatially distant anterior locations (coherence) somehow  improves cognitive performance. Galbraith (1967) studied a special “weighted coherence” average  to evaluate the effects of increased coherence on the visual­evoked response in the rhesus  monkey with implanted electrodes.  however. these features characterize TM as a  subjective experience of “restful alertness.  These results suggest that trial­to­trial  variability in evoked response amplitude is not a form of CNS ‘noise.232 decreased phasic skin resistance response. and at the moment of. stimulation.  This implicates  the role of coherence in the improvement of cognitive functions. . the  phenomenon of enhanced ORs in relation to ongoing EEG has been studied in several  contexts.

 Basar­Eroglu.  They write:  We have presented evidence that expectancy and selective attention are associated  with regular. When subjects were not informed that target stimuli would be presented regularly  and alternately. which appears to  facilitate an optimal brain response to the sensory input [i.. 1985) has implicated on­going alpha with enhanced auditory and visual EPs  that demonstrate greater amplitude.[the] EEG operators appear to modulate the response  characteristics as a function of learning (p. and that unconscious. The authors indicate that subjects’ EEG was flexible. it can be only stated in general that the preparation rhythms may reflect  several cognitive processes such as expectancy.Accordingly. 4­7 Hz  and 8­13 Hz activities serve as “operators” in the selective filtering of expected  target stimuli. 19).  preattentive mechanisms adjusted the phase of the EEG alpha to meet stimulus demands  for optimum processing. a particular phase of  the alpha cycle is time locked to the stimulus presentation] (p.  “At present.Furthermore. as mentioned above. decreased variability in timing  relative to the stimulus onset.  Recent research on humans (Basar &  Stampfer. their EEG activity appears to have developed an “operator state”  spontaneously.. it is reasonable to link these  phenomenon with learning processes and. enhanced amplitude and  decreased variability of the EPs. frequent target stimuli [and] result in highly synchronized EEG  activity. 175). indicating greater attentiveness. habituation. and more importantly.  This regular “limit cycle” activity occurs in various frequency ranges  between 1 and 40 Hz. and  even short­term memory” (p. at this time.. we tentatively conclude that 1­4 Hz. Rosen and Schutt (1984) suggest that.  However.  ...233 Basar (1980) has spearheaded continued investigation into the brain dynamics that  link the nature of the EP with the on­going EEG.. conditioning. attention...e. experiments in this study have shown that a regular  pattern of stimulation can induce a “preferred” phase angle. In a companion paper.. 175). Basar.

234 Some evidence has accumulated that the practice of TM is related to EP changes.  Goddard (1989) reports that a group of elderly TM practitioners demonstrated  significantly shorter P300 latencies in a visual oddball paradigm compared with matched  controls.  No differences were found however, on an auditory oddball task.  Goddard  suggests that long­term practice of TM may retain a more youthful style of functioning  (i.e., maintain shorter latencies).  Kobal, Wandhofer, and Plattig (1976) found shorter  latencies in a TM group, both in an awake state and in meditation, compared to a control  group in both awake and semi­somnolent states.  The authors suggest the shorter latencies  “may be connected with an improvement or acceleration of the sensory perception.”  But  of greater interest, in relation to findings related by Basar and Stampfer (1985), Kobal et  al. suggest that, “These results seem to be due primarily to the very characteristic change  in the background activity of the EEG in meditators as compared to controls.  During the  period of activity between meditation sections we find an increase of the 8­9 Hz  components of the alpha band” (p. 827).  This indicates that outside of TM, subjects  evidenced greater 8­9 Hz activity, a frequency that Basar and Stampfer suggest serve as  an “operator” for selective attention.  Conclusion–A Neuropsychology of Equilibration Processes    in the Context of TM   In a sense, Kimble and Perlmuter (1970) present their research as a volitional  “stimulus­response” (SR) behavioral model for “transcending” (Piaget’s term) prior  “involuntary” SR conditioning.  This supports the potential for a mental technique such as  TM (Transcendental Meditation) to enhance frontal skills in enhancing significance ORs  and diminishing involuntary ORs using the “transcending reflex” described by  Arenander.  I suggest that the “transcending reflex” is a volitional event that generalizes 

235 to allow acquisition of control over involuntary responses.  For example, in the context of  their own research, Kimble and Perlmuter write: Such studies as there are of these processes suggest that the acquisition of control  over involuntary responses is always accomplished with the aid of supporting  responses already under voluntary control.  The desired response is elicited  initially as a part of a larger pattern of reactions.  With practice the supporting  responses gradually drop out, an accomplishment that required a careful paying of  attention to the desired behavior and a simultaneous ignoring of the others.  With  still further practice the now voluntary reaction becomes capable of being  performed without deliberate intent.  What was once involuntary and later became  voluntary is now involuntary again, in the sense of being out of awareness and  free of previous motivational control” (p. 382). Even given the obvious differences between this paradigm of rather simple SR  conditioning and Piaget’s more complex topic of mental structures, I am still willing to  suggest this is a picture of what Piaget calls the “turntaking” between “new possibles”  and “previous necessities” mentioned in Chapter V.  Kimble and Perlmuter suggest that  volition over voluntary response can be attained by “paying attention.”  For Piaget the  picture would be viewed as the cycle of accommodation to an assimilation scheme, and  the expression of growing equilibration between differentiation and integration.  The  “new possibles,”  “accommodation,” and “differentiation” represent the “temporal,” or  sequentially contemplated form of cognition (i.e., “paying attention”).  Kimble and  Perlmuter appear to identify this as the “voluntary” act.   These authors, as well as Piaget, suggest that one of the outcomes of the voluntary  act, (“cognitive construction” for Piaget) can be a consolidation into a new “automatized”  action (which Piaget terms an “atemporal structure,” or “necessity”).  Piaget suggests that  the individual “transcends” the temporal cognitive construction, thereby “integrating” the  temporal construction into the atemporal schema.  The same concept in neo­behavioral  terms is that the volitional behavior becomes automatized.  

236 I suggest that in each case, the constructive or volitional process is handled by the  anterior, frontal regions of the brain.  The resulting consolidated structure then is handled  by the posterior regions of the brain.  Lack of development of one or more of the frontal  regions could impede successful adaptation or accommodation to new circumstances.   The current study indicates, to varying degrees, that failure on the formal tasks is  associated with diminished anterior L and R coherences.  Also, in Chapter V, Directions  for Future Research, I suggested that bilateral occipital coherence, positively correlated  with fail performance, may be a necessary correlate, within certain boundaries, of  diminished L and R coherence. These points round out my attempt to bring together two  major thrusts of contemporary psychological research: neuropsychology and  constructivist developmental psychology.

APPENDIX Subject Release and Background Letter Approval Letter for Use of Human Subjects Chemicals Scoring Sheet Communicating Vessels Scoring Sheet Projection of Shadows Scoring Sheet Correlations Scoring Sheet

237

238  

 Your least successful areas in the eyes of others (list): 9.): 7. Your least fulfilling areas of activity (list): 8. Major___________________________       2. circle the number  which best reflects your general feeling toward these areas: Lowest                                      Highest 1        2       3         4         5       6        7 Art (kind: ) .  hobbies. Thank you for your cooperation.   Year__________________ 3. Your most fulfilling areas of activity (list types of work or academic subjects or  hobbies): 6. Age_________________      ________        4. John Sorflaten “I agree to participate in the study. Now.   Years of college prior to MIU _______                   years                          months                 Years at MIU________ 5. Your most successful areas of activity in the eyes of others (list work. subjects. etc. Your  participation contributes directly toward structuring instructional methods which are  oriented toward student interests and aptitudes at MIU.”  _________________________________________ name                                       date Background Data 1. The development of successful instructional methods at MIU can be aided by  systematic research into the variety of problem solving methods students use.239 Dear Research Participant. considering number 7 as your highest level of fulfillment and success combined  and number 1 as your lowest level of fulfillment and success combined.  Please sign the agreement below: Sincerely.

240 Science (kind:  ) 1        2       3         4         5       6        7 Verbal disciplines such as literature. eating. Do you consider yourself left­handed or ambidextrous in any regular activity such as  writing. or sports?  (list)  . humanities. Your current course at MIU:  11. foreign language (kind) ) 1        2       3         4         5       6        7 Mathematics  (kind: )   1        2       3         4         5       6        7 10.

241 Chemicals Scoring Sheet Ident________ Date_________ Mark “g” where S starts with “g” Draw line to show where E asks if all possible ways have been tried.p.  (Optional) “Which chemicals are necessary for creating the color?” “How do you know?” .  “Have you made all the possible ways of mixing the solutions?” S says: yes no don't know maybe Actually: yes no S continues: yes no 3.vo) and the cumulative number  of cups visual objects = vo 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 2.  “Can you tell me what each chemical does?” “How can you prove it?” S appears to have been working with eye toward proof: yes no maybe S’s proof relies on deduction from table physical demonstration impression 4. 1.  Does S use systematic scheme to keep track of trials? no yes mental = m Indicate on each trial S’s paper = p system (m.

See drawing: Bubble tube is at _____(S) (approximate per S or estimate on drawing) Conical tube is at _____(S) (if different from E's) Questions to subject: Please describe what you would see when the contents of tube A are poured into tube B: First.) Then draw in the outcome of pouring tube A contents into tube B. 5.  Conical tube: Movable tube is at _____(E).  Introduction 2.  Identical tubes: up down remain the same Movable is at _____(E) Tube B is at _____(S) S measures? yes no 4. draw in the levels of tube A and the conical tube as they exist on the apparatus you  have been working with.) .  Bubble tube: Movable tube is at _____(E).  Single tube prediction: Water level will go: 3.242 Communicating Vessels Scoring Sheet Ident______ Date ______ 1.  (Use pen. Conical is at _____(S).  (Use pencil. Conical tube is at _____(E).

..243 Please describe what you would see when the contents of tube A are poured into  tube B. (Use pencil.)   A B C .) •  Then draw in the outcome of pouring tube A contents into tube B. •  First draw in the levels of tube A and the conical tube C as they exist on the  apparatus you have been working with. (Use pen.

  .  .  .  4.  .  .  .  .  1. 6.  4.  9.  .  7.  . 0.  10 5.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  4.  .  .  .  .  .  .244 Projection of Shadows Scoring Sheet Ident_______ Date________ 1.  .  7.  .  .  .  2. red and green: possible    impossible     will try 5a.  8.  .  3.  .  . 0.  8.  .  .  .  .  .  .  One shadow with red and green: possible impossible will try 4a.  .  .  .  9.  5.  2.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  7.  .  2.  .  .  8.  .  .  .  .  10 .  .  .  . 0.  .  .  10 5b.  .  .  .  . 6.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 6.  .  1.  .  3.  .  .  3.  .  1.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  2.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 6.  .  .  7.  .  .  .  9.  .  . 0.  .  .  3.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  Green ring moved closer to screen prediction: larger    smaller     same 4.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  One shadow with white.  .  .  10 4b.  8.  2.  .  .  .  9.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  8.  .  .  .  .  .  .  9.  5.  .  5.  4.  .  .  .  .  1.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  1.  .  .  3. 6.  .  4.  .  10 4c.  “Do you see the shadow?” no    yes 2.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  5.  5.  . 0.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  7.  .  .  .  .  .  Green ring compared with red ring shadow prediction: larger     smaller      same 3.  .  .  .  .  .  .

  Relationship observed by S?  yes   no 8.0.4)_______ 4.  (4.  Group a:                 b.2.0)_______ 3.0.2.  Set I a______b_______c_______d_______ Set II a______b______c______d______ .0.                  d.                 c.  (4.2.  Relationship of set I is more   same   less   than set II.4)_______ 5.0.245 Correlations Scoring Sheet Ident_________ Date__________ Set I 1.4)  ________ Set II 7.  Relationship observed by S?     yes     no 2. 10.  (0.2.  (4. 9.  yes no   a______b______c______d______ 6.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful