EDITORIAL

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A C E R TA I N M A - N E S S
O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A - N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF UNDER PRESSURE U T E M E TA B A U E R I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P… ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS POSING SINGUL ARIT Y JAN VERWOERT ROOM FOR THOUGHT SIMON SHEIKH U N C E R TA I N M A - N E S S MICK WILSON A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL

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JOURNAL OF ARTISTIC RESE ARCH SUMMER 2008

EDI TOR I AL
Too many conferences currently being organized by art academies draw attention to the recent development of
PhD’s in art trajectories. Yet an even more important issue

3 – 4 EDITORIAL

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A C E R TA I N M A - N E S S
5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A - N E S S
WILLEM DE GREEF

today pertains to the specificity of MA Fine Art programs of art academies. After all, it is the master’s program, focused on research, that prepares artists for a possible PhD trajectory; it is the master’s program that offers artists various perspectives on their professional careers; and it is the master’s program and its strong emphasis on the specificities of its curriculum that force the bachelor’s program to reflect on the particular structure of its own curriculum. Moreover, in spite of the obligation to implement the Bologna rules by 2010, many European countries interpret the concrete establishment of the master’s program in various ways. In some countries, a one-year program is offered, while other countries concentrate on a two-year program. Some countries have had master’s programs in Fine Art for many years, whereas others hardly adhere to the deadline for the implementation of a master’s program. These clear-cut urgencies indicate a definite need for an international symposium addressing the issue of the specificity of the MA Fine Art programs. In order to explore these questions further the Utrecht Graduate School of Visual Art and Design ( MaHKU ) started a longterm collaboration project with the Brussels Sint Lukas Academie, an academy which, similar to MaHKU, offers a one-year MA program in Fine Art. A series of meetings last year between lecturers from the Sint Lukas Academy and the MaHKU generated a number of additional questions. It turned out that a variety of issues could be categorized in three sub-categories: the student perspective or the question of competencies; the lecturer’s perspective or the question of specific didactic strategies; and last but not least, the perspective of the institutional environment where the interaction between lecturer and student takes place. Precisely these three perspectives – addressing the same issue from different points of view – are departure points for the symposium A Certain Ma-ness ( Amsterdam, Spring 2008 ) organized by both academies in collaboration with VCH De Brakke Grond, Amsterdam. During the first two presentations ( Jan Verwoert, Clementine Deliss ) the perspective of MA-competencies is the starting point. The issue pertains to whether it is possible to map the various skills required for the MAprogram particularly with regard to a reflective and critical attitude, and a conception of both knowledge production and research. How can we assess these competencies? Could it be that specific, rhetorical qualities are decisive? What will happen to traditional skills such as mastery of technique? Is the artist unskilled despite having followed the graduate program or are traditional skills reformulated during the course of the program and its critical studies? What do critical and contextualizing skills mean for the situation of the academy as such? Is the graduate art academy eventually nothing more than a bastion of the neo-liberal art system as is often the case with prominent American MFA program’s,
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7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E
U T E M E TA B A U E R

14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ?
CLEMENTINE DELLIS

23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y
JAN VERWOERT

28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T
SIMON SHEIKH

3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A - N E S S
MICK WILSON

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or is the academy still clearly defined as an outpost for a culturecritical awareness? During the next two presentations ( Simon Sheikh, Mick Wilson ) the perspective shifts to didactic strategies. Can one determine how a MA curriculum is characterized? What are adequate didactic strategies and educational models, and how do they differ from a BA program? What are the differences and similarities between the various European MA Fine Art programs? How does the Bologna-ruled, curriculum-based program and its seminars, lectures, and various methods and bodies of knowledge relate to the still dominant studiobased paradigm with its rituals of tutorials and studio visits? How do we prevent a more topical discourse based on critical studies and artistic research becoming canonized into a novel form of academia? Finally, how do the current educational strategies and models relate to the research practice of lecturers? In other words, how could the lecturer’s own artistic research be strategically deployed in the curriculum? The question of the position of one’s own artistic research leads us also to the theme of the research environment. Is it the task of the academy to develop a specific artistic research environment? How should such an experimental research environment be facilitated? How does such a research environment relate to the artistic field mostly determined by the free market system? Is it the potential of the experimental environment as one of the last asylums for deviant forms of knowledge production ( or thinking ) that made a great number of curators decide in recent years to proclaim the academy as the starting point for their exhibition projects? Investigating the issue of the academy as field of possibilities from the perspective of the Graduate School appears urgent. In other words, in what way – political, facilitative, infrastructural – could the Graduate School contribute to the development of a research climate in art education? These questions are approached during A Certain Ma-Ness in two ways. First, artists Tiong Ang and Aglaia Konrad developed a presentation in the exhibition space of VCH De Brakke Grond parallel to the themes of the symposium. The exhibition shows the interaction between the research of the lecturer ( Tiong Ang, MaHKU and Aglaia Konrad, Sint Lukas ) and of the student ( Filip Gilissen, Sint Lukas, Joris Lindhout, MaHKU ) as a didactic tool for creating a dynamic research environment within the current educational system ( The visual material printed in MaHKUzine 5 is a series of impressions of this parallel exhibition ) . Secondly, Bart Verschaffel’s talk, Willem de Greef’s introduction, and the presentation of the Utrecht Consortium ( see Research Reports ) all elaborate further on the conditions and possibilities of an artistic research environment. It was Ute Meta Bauer at the Vienna School of Art who was one of the first people in the art academy field to address these questions and issues in the context of institutional preconditions. Therefore, she opens the symposium A Certain Ma-ness with a keynote statement. ( HS )É
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3 – 4 EDITORIAL

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A C E R TA I N M A - N E S S
5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A - N E S S
WILLEM DE GREEF

7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E
U T E M E TA B A U E R

14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ?
CLEMENTINE DELLIS

23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y
JAN VERWOERT

28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T
SIMON SHEIKH

3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A - N E S S
MICK WILSON

41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y
BART VERSCHAFFEL

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are being transformed into “academically oriented” Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees.A C E R TA I N M A . just one decade ago. Especially the academization of higher arts education. are generally transformed into what are called “professionally oriented” Bachelor’s degrees.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . meaning the Flemish and French groups in Belgium. Other programs or courses.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . or at least in Flanders. what could it probably mean? This is what this symposium is about. Fact number one: since 1989.” Another important aspect is that there is only one kind of Master’s degree in Flanders. there are some peculiarities in the way the Flemish government has implemented the Bologna Declaration. if they want to provide Master’s degrees. Contrary to the Netherlands. the 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A .N E S S O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . It has not always been so. those provided by what we call the “hogescholen” ( higher educational institutes ). At present. Which means that only since then were its structure and its qualifications aligned with the rest of the system.N E S S W I L L EM D E G R EEF To make it very clear from the outset. higher arts education has undergone and is still undergoing several reforms. the largest part of the non-university higher education programs and courses. while academic bachelor’s and master’s degrees are provided by universities and by the “hogescholen. By this we mean that higherlevel art institutes. the subject of this symposium is not PhD’s or doctorates in the arts. for instance. Fact number two: arts education is a regular part of the Flemish educational system.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 5 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . the Flemish government started to implement the Bologna declaration some years ago. and believe me even in Dutch it sounds also quite weird: “academizing”. education has not been a national matter. Since then the Ministry of Education for the Flemish Community is responsible for higher education in Flanders. In other words. be they practicebased or not. art education became a full part of the higher educational system. and no exception was made for higher arts education. and probably as a consequence of this. and only in Flanders. will necessarily have to present or develop curricula for students which are clearly “embedded in research”. As adopted by the Flemish Parliament in the 2003 Act on the structure of higher education in Flanders. Instead there has been a complete devolution of competencies for education to the different linguistic communities. professional bachelor’s degrees are only provided by the “hogescholen”. First and foremost. including reform of the Bachelor-Master degree structure. Is there really a need for this? And if so. provided by both universities and “hogescholen”. Like all the other higher education programs and courses. Art students have to become academics or develop some basic competencies in research. or for artists. Nevertheless. Only in 1994. Let me give you some facts on the educational system in Belgium. this symposium tries to deal with what we call in Belgium. universities and non-universities alike.

is associated with the Catholic University of Leuven. scientific domain. between arts education and research? Does it mean. Firstly. Moreover. is the identity as such of higher arts education not at stake here? Thirdly. are looking for the best way to deliver excellent art education within an outstanding academic context. Many arts institutes. the Hogeschool Sint-Lukas Brussel. today nearly all courses in higher arts education in Flanders are supposed to be leading to a Master’s degree. or is there still a need for more professionally oriented programs? Or. if we want to. All this undoubtedly poses many questions. for most of the Flemish politicians it is widely accepted that the “hogescholen” cannot possibly meet this requirement for “academization” without a helping hand from the universities. how can one evaluate the quality of the research done by higher arts institutes or departments? Fourthly. One of the major consequences of this choice is that all Master’s degree programs have to be “embedded in research”.Flemish government has chosen not to introduce a “professionally oriented” degree at the Master’s level.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . Therefore. Even the Flemish minister of education himself stated recently that the helping hand of the universities in the process of academization cannot be more than a small finger. Some have called it the academic drift of the arts institutes or departments. All Master’s degrees in Flanders are supposed to be academic. to put it differently. I believe this symposium offers us a wonderful opportunity for discussing these issuesÉ . does the difference sharply evident in Flanders between professionally oriented and academic course programs make any sense in higher arts education? Secondly. they will necessarily have to reset their targets and to rethink the curriculum.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON Or are their artistic or professional qualities more important? Does it mean that higher arts institutes have to develop their own research programs? If so. How would an academic curriculum look which still made sense for higher arts education and for art students? What are the academic competencies they are supposed to develop? More profoundly. what type of research should they develop? Importantly. if not undeveloped. All these issues are not unique to Flanders. if higher arts institutes want to transform their traditional programs into academic programs. for instance. Let me just point out some of them. each of the “hogescholen” has been affiliated with a university.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 6 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . does all of this not demand a change in the structure of higher arts education itself? For instance. that in the near future all staff members of art schools should hold doctorates or a PhD? 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . My own institute. Is there really a need for this ? Do all students in the arts really need to follow this academic track. how do we make a clear link. all over Europe. should higher arts institutes become fully embedded in the universities and evolve into a full faculty department at the university? Do universities have enough experience with performing arts? At least in Flanders it is no secret that artistic research is an underdeveloped.

and so on? But with the expansion of the market through a new generation of collectors and the globalization of the market itself including the biennial boom.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . The exorbitant tuition fees in the US put a certain pressure to “succeed” on both the institution and the student. On the one hand. 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . But was this what we meant when we asked for more visibility as young art students twenty five years ago? Weirdly enough.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . one wonders where will all these students go when they leave the institution with their degrees in their pockets? If you invest so much into your education. to critical studies. even ten years ago. What might be more specific within the US American setting is the very short path from the art school to the gallery into a collection. the chance of grabbing a seat on the art carousel has sharply increased. I am not sure this is a positive development. it feels as if the art market has replaced the music industry. The art schools and universities – previously more free and open zones for experiments – gradually became incorporated into a suspiciously commodified system. Culture and art are significant economic factors leaving their mark on how art education is shaped. Art academies invent new programs ranging from MAs in public art. more art institutions opening their doors and more museums for contemporary art being established than ever before. Would they instead become more creative web designers. being a critical scholar myself. This might be the case in London as well. In order to serve these expectations. and has become an increasingly. and “creating” successful artists has become a standard promise on the mission statements of and calls for applications to MA programs. Today there are more exhibitions taking place. producers of video clips. Art students have more knowledge of the art market than ever before. This is not only for programs in the United States. and so forth. Although I appreciate that today almost everyone can be a producer of some kind. More private collections. say. with its annual top of the pops and one-hit wonders. The strong market has made art education red hot.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 7 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . attractive field within education. Then the debate centered around what the majority of art students would do who never entered the golden triangle of the academy–gallery–museum. MA courses have expanded both in the field of artistic education and curatorial studies to serve an ever-growing market. you want to know what the pay-off might be. there is a certain pressure on the art schools to connect early with the art market and to generate a smooth entry into the system while the future artist is still in school. are opening their doors to the public.UNDER PRESSURE U T E M E TA B AU ER The art system. especially the art market today has become part of the educational system.” Nevertheless. critical curatorial studies. which is a indeed a welcome specialization disrupting the dominance of hundreds of years of European “master schools” established in order to select and form “the best. This is a major shift as compared to. the desired and demanded accessibility to this “ field of distinction” for a larger number of people has finally become a reality. in more countries.

Therefore. F R I E Z E . However. The market is part of the discursive field. art has become a huge globally operating machine in need of skilled labor. it is a system of interconnected relations. a field of constellations and interrelations. The art world is and has always been a complex system. Are they still places to discuss the meaning of artistic production within the larger field of culture? Do they negotiate the role art plays in contemporary society? Previously. as stated above. B A LT I C B A B EL .N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . tomorrow there is an art fair as well. and are we not in need of art schools too at all these newly emerging locations? Again I am of two minds. The critical field defines itself as distinct from the commercial sector. and tomorrow Dubai and the Gulf.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON _ S I N G L E . Art is now a lifestyle. each new spot popping up on the global map. Additionally. A S P ? B AC K = 1& F = 119 8 . however. as this depends on how and by whom a space or institution is run. a black-and-white understanding of this complex system. Where there is a biennial today. Art and its different manifestations have become a powerful economical factor. where each “actor” decides where we position ourselves. young curators. today India. To me there is no outside to the institution. and in which direction we move. as today no one can afford such naiveté. Myriad strategies are incorporated to serve the system. “Off” spaces nowadays are not necessarily more political than a museum. new host sites for biennials. is rife everywhere. C O M / F E AT U R E I S S U E 101 I S S U E 101 . Yesterday it was China. I don’t necessarily agree with that argument as grounds to support an opinion and debate. as Guy Debord presents in his text and film. Solid educational foundations were provided by a ”master” when a school’s focus and reputation rested more upon skills and techniques. galleries and so on. Yet now the art schools seem pretty much part of the canon. 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A .N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 8 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . some more antagonistic.The art market is growing rapidly. the academy provided a somewhat sheltered “biotope” encouraging experience and wild growth. some are amicable. This brings us back to the art schools. no outside to the art market and vice versa. a growing industry producing scores of new job opportunities. The questions we need to address are: What is communicated through this new art. I support the improved access to discourse and modes of production in many places of the world. H T T P :// W W W . some reading of ΩFRIEZE. some knowledge of system theory. a kind of playground and creative laboratory when the academy was more innovative. These are not fixed configurations and an institution today does not represent the same thing it did twenty years ago. There is a huge demand for fresh artists. through current exhibitions and their various formats? What is their content and for whom are they being staged? The society of spectacle. as I still believe in artistic practice as a necessary critical contribution to the formation of societies. art academies and art schools were pre-market. The market embraces all too quickly. But what will be left after the glory days have faded? A recent debate on New Institutionalism in “Bureaux de Change” by Alex FarquharsonΩ referred to a number of us freelance curators joining the “safe haven” of the institutions for higher artistic education. To assume the same clear divisions exist as did maybe twenty-five years ago would be overly simplifying.

N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . we simply created our own formats and spaces and generated our own audiences. film. Rorty and Luhmann never hurts in becoming aware of our very own entanglements. but also the social topography of the art world at large. specifically those who previously held highprofile curatorial positions. extended by post-graduate studies in art theory. one reason is the increasing commodification and instrumentalization of the position of the curator for all sorts of agendas and desires. But what I currently see happening is the `take . The motivation actually causing my shift from working as an artist and organizer to curator and educator seems outdated. Instead of complaining.. but there was no space for us available and what we saw exhibited. was a catalyst for me and some artist friends to generate something else.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 9 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .Bourdieu. and the option of getting away from the sheer pragmatism of running the day-to-day business of a museum. one should not underestimate the potential and pleasure of working with students. To be mainly involved with satisfying trustees and/or local politicians rather than investing time researching fields that might be not that popular – this is not everyone’s cup of tea. from what the art field represents. from mainstream art institutions in those days. more distant locations by the market and its protagonists – and the pressure attached to the market is already felt. and poetry. universities etc. Therefore. did often not address what mattered to us or was not linked to our discussions about art. although a very open and liberal one. called “Stille Helden” – were not completely opposed to art institutions. at least in the Western hemisphere. A second reason is that today’s director of a museum or a “Kunsthalle” is more involved in management and fundraising activities than in working on shows or directly with artists as was the case in the past. I do not want to criticize my colleagues in art institutions and do not want to sound all too negative. affected my desire to understand not only art theory. Furthermore. The exclusion of a younger generation of artists. I have been studying art myself. In my case. To return to Farquharson’s mention of freelance “curators [re-] entering or flirting with educational art institutions”: today’s conference topic does indeed raise the question of why curators in recent times have been accepting leading positions at art schools. music. It was not until later that I understood that art history is not made 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . From my perspective. Art schools seem to offer a kind of temporary refuge for those with a desire to sustain a more critical and discursive practice. I am quite aware of the influence of teachers and the impact of innovative institutional leadership in higher artistic education upon students. a European male-dominated art school setting. The wish to renegotiate the role of art through an expanded notion of artistic education allows a certain degree of distance. the inspiration to be found in other related research fields.over’ of the. performance and theater. specifically women. but I want to express – and this I share with a number of my colleagues – a strong feeling of unease about the economic and political pressures that those who run museums increasingly have to face today. We – as an artists’ group. We were students of the visual arts.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . Today this all seems so far away. at least so far. and some independence.

in the garage. being unpredictable prevented us from being co-opted.. Being part of an artist group allowed us not to get pigeonholed. Inform. both formats produce a communicative space through artistic and intellectual means. those “institutions” are indeed highly interesting. When I studied art in the early 1980s as part of the group of young artists called “Stille Helden”. thus. the infrastructure. The exploration of thoughts and work is a necessary focus in art education. I must have internalized this attitude. We have to demand a review and a correction of public collections and force a change in outdated focus points. And last. One should not forget.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 10 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . For obvious reasons they should take place as well within an apparatus of representation such as an art museum. or within opinion-creating blockbusters such as Documenta. I see teaching in art schools as a practice in line with my curatorial work. to share what I perceive. what the idea behind such participation is. and Entertain” as a healthy mix and a valid model. More and more. It must be made clear. it is not to create a showcase for students entering the market. the authority on the art historical cannon is to a certain extent still in the hands of the major museums and based on their collections.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . Yet teaching is also about the possibility and responsibility of transmitting a specific understanding and notion of a critical artistic and cultural practice to a younger generation of art students. in those days as young artists we were far removed from having a master plan to develop and to manage a career. there is a need for crucial debates within universities and other societal institutions focusing on those issues. the Venice and Whitney biennials. so nothing is wrong with involving students in exhibitions. and an inflation of temporary exhibition formats such as the exploding number of biennials on the other. and the Carnegie International. there is a definite advantage to “duck and cover” within an educational structure for a while. An exhibition is equal to a seminar for me. One should also not forget that a number of conceptual artists. but not least. within art history that mattered to my generation – such as the already mentioned lack of female positions etc. offering them some independence. and to analyze. to discover. I still see certain gaps arising within the dominance of the market. to reflect. they have the budget. So. To come back to teaching. As the 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . I can only hope that at one point the necessity to interfere becomes strong enough to enter the history-producing apparatus. though. the market dictates what art is produced and. I keep in mind the BBC’s founding mandate: “Educate. Even today I seek to find “company” to explore. Facing today’s powerful art market with huge cash flow on one hand. and this made me sensitive towards being identified with an institution rather than with a distinct practice. such as Hans Haacke at Cooper Union and Michael Asher at CalArts could only sustain their practice during previous high art markets due to their teaching positions. But are there any shared intentions to do so at present? In that respect. shown. this was my interest. in order to be able to implement a correction through a multitude of voices whenever necessary.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . I feel the relation between art and exhibitions offers the option to test situations and combinations. though. and also the media power to “correct” and re-write art history.

a public space sphere within an institution for education. One of my teachers in art theory at the Academy in Hamburg.conceptual artist Joseph KosuthΩonce stated so clearly: “. In other words. Therefore. and art schools as fixed entities. its perception. but is more difficult to achieve. I developed a view of the audience as informal participants over time. I recall that in the 1990s it was the curators who were considered the strong players in the field. C A M B R I D G E . As an audience.” I consider myself always to be the primary audience for my projects.. the institutions were the opinion makers. Since raising theoretical questions through both artistic and curatorial practice is one of my driving forces. you have to engage in what you perceive. These notions are in constant flux. For me. as an entity sharing and debating experiences. During the years I directed an artists-run space in StuttgartΩ. my self-understanding of my position as a curator did not differ much from my self-understanding and way of working as a practicing artist right after finishing art academy. E N G L A N D : T H E M I T P R E S S . you have to participate to produce a discourse and to understand an art work. Globalization as such does not stop when it comes to art.e. and communicate that Ω KO S U T H ..N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A .N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . artists. As long as we are able to address that in our educational positions. although the market is strong today. Michael Lingner claimed that only the combination of a work of art. Surely one should not fall into the trap of considering art. – 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . and the communication about it generates what we consider art. possibly caused to a certain degree by curators entering the field. I regret that the awareness of colonial. That keeps one alive and very sensitive to cultural developments. and the speed of the transformational process has been increased alongside the development of high consumption in general. while they should really be “free” thinkers. Today. i. these issues are addressed to pressure artists into being “do-gooders”. to subordinate or to serve a system. I view both art and curating as ephemeral and process-oriented work. museums. art takes part in the economical and political reconfigurations on this planet as much as everything else. gender. but to be a critical and independent voice negotiating civil society. postcolonial. I realize that the art schools are too involved in the markets.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 11 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? Ω K Ü N S T L ER H AU S S T U T TG A R T F R O M 19 9 0 -19 9 4 CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . M A S S AC H U S E T T S / LO N D O N . it remains essential to enter institutional spaces and at the same time not to become too comfortable within them. But free of what? That question reminds me of Antonio Gramsci and his notion of the artist as organic intellectual whose role is not to act. At the same time. Such understanding has been continued by a number of recent political philosophers such as Toni Negri. For example. curators.an audience separate from the participants does not exist. work not so easily absorbed. 19 91 . J O S EP H : A R T A F T ER P H I LO S O P H Y A N D A F T ER C O L L E C T E D W R I T I N G S 19 6 6 -19 9 0 . to be committed for a certain time span and then to move on to new territories. is still crucial and important to me. we should maintain a laboratory-type situation in the academies. Before that. Later. and class debates that once appeared in the curricula of art education disappear almost immediately through the back door now that they have a whiff of “PC ” about them. Today. while working as a curator for large-scale exhibitions such as Documenta11 or the 3rd Berlin Biennial. Power positions are not static or written in stone. This understanding of generating an audience to develop a space of communication. to be challenged..

a place with an everyday experience of this fairly recent academic discourse. it is not a given.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 12 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . and art collectors asked why such an important exhibition as Documenta11 was launched in an art school context and on a topic unrelated to art.0 0 0 48 C O LO FON . Curators are under pressure to Ω P L AT F O R M 5 V I S I TO R S . Lucia. next to each other. too. workshops etc. O F D O C U M E N TA 11 . Let’s return to the topic of curators connected to art schools. Those questions indicated that antagonism was already on the rise. The opening of Documenta11 took place in March 2001 at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna with Platform_1. many for the first time encountering contemporary art. What do we generate as curators when we put art works. rather than educate them from the position of those “in the know. So Documenta11 was criticized mostly for resembling a seminar for higher cultural education. In other words. H A D A R O U N D 650. This meant there were eighteen months before the initial scheduled opening date of Documenta11 in June 2002 ( then called Platform_5 ). Sarat Maharaj. and what do we generate by what is then written about it? When it comes to research I consider curatorial practice well-situated within an art school context. T H E E X H I B I T I O N I N K A S S EL I N 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . Today they are forced to take part in a tourist industry and have started to become fundraising machines in order to survive. For example. One needs a “critical mass” to interact with you if you raise such questions. art dealers. An exhibition of that scale reaches many peopleΩ. and last but not least Susanne Ghez – was the view that Documenta is a knowledge production machine. on “Democracy Unrealized”. In order to focus on the specifics of these discourses. to debate creolité in Kassel does not make much sense. Automatically one is confronted with criticism of people who share the experience and have deep convictions on the topic. Such topics triggered some highly sensitive reactions amongst my colleagues on the faculty at the Vienna academy. we considered Documenta as an educational tool.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . The so-called professionals have to re-encounter art each time they experience new works. Several art critics. a space one has to produce. it feels quite normal. and why not view it as an expanded series of seminars? Platform_1 . also because museums are withdrawing more and more from curatorial obligation. Octavio Zaya. What I shared with Okwui Enwezor and my colleagues from Documenta11 – Carlos Basualdo. I see an exhibition as a zone of activity.constellations are constantly shifting. An exhibition has to clarify the questions raised and share this process with the audience. Once. That is immensely important in order to establish a serious kind of back-and-forth debate and to delve deeper into a topic.” Such a “zone of activity” marks the effort one makes to create discursive art – through a curatorial decision. But since the Documenta11 curatorial team understood this exceptional exhibition format as a form of knowledge production. museums were the places for serious historical research. Mark Nash.4 correlated with the discourses artists invited to Documenta11 were currently exploring.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 20 02 . Platform_1 was focused on a series of talks. we had to go to the places of origin or of relevance for each of the platform topics. Some of them wondered how debates on democracy related to the agenda of an art school. why not launch Documenta11 at an art academy. we are still doing fine. but if you debate it in St. artistic views.

A “good” exhibition leaves one irritated.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 13 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . stimulated. That leaves them with less time for research. An exhibition should be able to create a space for critical reflection. No wonder some curators migrate to educational institutions in order to do research.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON .N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . troubled. Exhibitions are not being created to simply satisfy us. a space for discourse that challenges the way we think and the way we perceive the world. Aren’t those the exhibitions that stick around the longest?É 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A .continuously produce art shows that create media attention and attract large audiences.

? CL ÉM EN T I N E D EL I S S Is it possible to map the various skills required for the MA . and Australia. with Michelangelo Pistoletto who was setting up the Cittadellarte and University of Ideas. Bordeaux. Currently part of Edinburgh College of Art. students who take on Future Academy either leave quickly because they do not understand its apparent lack of course structure. setting up a situation of parallel research and co-production between the Städelschule in Frankfurt ( where I was a guest professor) and the art academies in Vienna. in fact. C O N T I N U U M .” J AC Q U E S R A N C I ÈR E .Ω In 1999. Edinburgh. Future Academy has effectively spanned five continents in its attempt to discern the context for independent research in art in times to come. In 2001. I transited around Scandinavia for eighteen months. Japan. or became so fully involved in it that their ownership of it is unrelenting. This research deepened until we decided to make voice recordings in a studio in Oslo and develop another Metronome ΩIT Ω“ T H E N OT I O N O F 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . Future Academy characterises my activity as a curator over the last ten years. This has involved generating work with artists and writers through the independent organ Metronome and led to a backstage approach to curating for which the art college has proved to be the most efficient and responsive institutional setting. whilst simultaneously coming to grips with survival. I N T ER V I E W W I T H G A B R I EL R O C K H I L L . P. and community. has no formal legitimacy in terms of official diplomas or exam qualifications. production.program particularly with regard to a reflective and critical attitude. Interestingly. and responses to fieldwork in foreign locations. Future Academy students have acted as the diagnosticians of their own art education. and finally Biella. A N E X P R E S S I O N D O E S N OT FI N D I T S P L AC E I N T H E S Y S T EM O F V I S I B L E C O O R D I N AT E S W H ER E I T A P P E A R S . T H E P O L I T I C S O F A E S T H E T I C S . Supported by host institutions from Europe. Future Academy does not provide an MA or MFA and.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 14 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .. what it has provided for students studying at both large-scale institutions as well as smaller protozoan organisations is a recursive and transitional model for learning how to conduct focused research as artists. Africa. I published Backwards Translation based on the ex-curricula of students. 71 ‘ H E T ER O LO GY ’ R EF ER S TO T H E WAY I N W H I C H T H E M E A N I N G F U L I S D EB ATA B L E W H E T H ER T H E D E V ELO P M E N T O F M E T R O N O M E W O U L D H AV E B EE N AC H I E V E D I N T H E M I D TO L AT E N I N E T I E S I F I H A D W O R K E D W I T H I N M U S EU M S W H ER E T H E EM P H A S I S O N P U B L I C V I S I B I L I T Y A N D AC C E S S M AY H AV E R U N C O N T R A R Y TO T H E F O C U S O N ‘ C O N C EP T UA L I N T I M AC Y ’ T H AT I C H O S E TO WORK WITH. a process.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . economic models.Ω Over the last five years. a curated research initiative set up in 2003 that has been driven primarily by voluntary and non-paying cells of postgraduate students. and a conception of both knowledge production and research? My contribution to this discussion is based on ‘Future Academy’. As a procedure that involves the elaboration of new proposals and their execution. . 20 0 4 .N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON FA B R I C O F T H E S E N S I B L E I S D I S T U R B E D : A S P E C TAC L E D O E S N OT FI T W I T H I N T H E S E N S I B L E F R A M E W O R K D EFI N E D BY A N E T W O R K O F M E A N I N G S . As a self-reflexive investigation that relies on the free will and engagement of students from different institutions and faculties it is necessarily heterological: it appears to disturb the existing coordinates of fine art education by tracing paths across geopolitical locations that throw up earlier colonial cartographies and question current affiliations of power and knowledge that are in the process of being re-negotiated. India. However.. USA .I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P . which can only be successful if they view their current condition as closely aligned to that of a future environment for research. building up an analysis of the use of rhetoric and the voice in art practice with a voluntary posse of postgraduate students who were studying at the various art colleges.

a thought-structure that is naturally interdependent and interactive with other disciplines. C O M 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . co-funded by art academies in Oslo. S U S A N H I L L ER . In particular. T H ER E I S A H O R I ZO N O N T H E K I N D O F AU TO N O M Y P O S S I B L E I N T H I S S I T UAT I O N . W I T H A R T I S T S I N S E V ER A L A F R I C A N C O U N T R I E S . the one convergence I would like to turn to now is the influence of early ethnographic experiments in research.Ω Future Academy and Metronome clearly have many points in common including their unofficial status – you may well ask how Metronome fits into the UK’s Research Assessment Exercise when most productions are without ISBN and Future Academy student cells are not academically accredited? Several convergences exist.). Tate Britain. and later Edinburgh College of Art. I developed Future Academy. the nurturing of self-appointed communities of artists and researchers who engage in a joint investigation and debate modes of survival. first between the London Institute ( now University of the Arts).N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 15 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . and Stockholm.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON T UA ZO N . and Glasgow School of Art. Bateson refers to recursiveness as meaning that repeatedly loops back onto itself in a reflexive dialogue with its representational boundaries. P R OTAG O N I S T S F R O M T H E B L AC K A R T S M O V EM E N T I N LO N D O N . T H I S I S A R E A L O B S TAC L E . S E C O N D . I WA S I M M ER S E D I N A S T R A I N O F “S EM A N T I C A N T H R O P O LO GY ” W H I C H N OT O N LY R EF L E C T E D R EF ER E N C E S I H A D I D E N T I FI E D E A R L I ER A S A N A R T S T U D E N T I N T H E W O R K O F J O S EP H KO S U T H . turning back onto itself the environment in which I had been given so much conceptual freedom and means of production. yet high-security Royal Army Medical College that had just been acquired by Chelsea College of Art and Design. E TC .Ω However. Chelsea College of Art and Design. regulated art publishing and academic norms.11 “I WA N T TO A D D R E S S W H AT I S EE A S A N I N H ER EN T Ω H AV I N G S T U D I E D S O C I A L A N T H R O P O LO GY I N T H E E A R LY 19 8 0 S .Ω I want to revisit the maverick methodologies of twentieth century anthropologists from Margaret Mead through to Michel Leiris and more recently. LOT H A R D I S C I P L I N E ’ S N A R R AT I V E T R O P E S B AU M G A R T E N A N D OT H ER S .N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . and their subsequent interpretation. Copenhagen. Clifford Geertz. nine expostgraduates and I set up base for ten months in the derelict. FI R S T . B U T O F F ER E D A S EL F . “A metalogue is a conversation about some problematic subject. and Japan. I am interested in looking back at the controversial discipline of social anthropology. I’ve come back to Gregory Bateson. M A R C U S A N D C U S H M A N . Bergen. Malmö. A N D F O R A N A R T I S T I C P R AC T I C E W H ER E T H E P R I M A R Y I S S U E I S H O W TO G E T BY.C R I T I C A L A N A LY S I S O F T H E C L I F F O R D G EER T Z . Metronome is neither vanity publishing nor self-publishing. building a form of “ecological epistemology”. but the carrier and medium through which I have transported this research in motion that tends to lie somewhat to the side of recognised curatorial models. This conversation should be such that not only do the participants discuss ΩOSCAR Ω S EE M E T R O N O M EP R E S S . A R T I S T A N D C O L L A B O R ATO R I N F U T U R E AC A D EM Y. Australia. only this time in the US. which I studied alongside contemporary art. Navigating through this vast. In 2002. the polymathic academic and cyberneticist who made seminal advances in the translation of systems of knowing and communicating. EM P H A S I S E S T H E P R O B L EM O F T H E A R B I T R A R Y C O M M U N I T Y S O O F T E N F O U N D I N AC A D EM I C S T R U C T U R E S : L I M I T TO T H E AC A D EM Y A S A PA R A D I G M F O R E X P ER I M E N TA L W O R K . a publication and 12hour event held in the unconverted Millbank building. At that point. Using a relational methodology to understand perception. Bateson’s concept of the “metalogue” is relevant here. for example. and was able to knit together institutional support. R AC E A N D D I F F ER E N C E . M Y S U B S EQ U E N T W O R K W I T H ( S EE J A M E S C L I F F O R D . but then denied an affiliation to throughout the 1990s. sinister site next to Tate Britain with guest artists while imagining its past and future led to The Stunt and The Queel. M I C H A EL B U T H E . Once again I set up informal research units. fieldwork studies. the process of moving and working in different cities and involving local histories and organisations in the project as it evolves. and the primary focus on translation as a key trope in advanced art practice. in 2006 and 2007. PAU L R A B I N O W . Bateson writes. T H E S T R U C T U R E O F A L A R G E I N S T I T U T I O N R EQ U I R E S C O L L A B O R AT I O N W I T H P EO P L E W I T H W H O M YO U M I G H T N OT H AV E A N Y R E A L A F FI N I T Y. P LU S T H E B U R G EO N I N G P O S I T I O N .publication called The Bastard. W I T H I N A N AC A D EM I C S E T T I N G M O S T O F T H E F U N DA M E N TA L Q U E S T I O N S O F S U R V I VA L H AV E B EE N A D D R E S S E D A N D TA K E N C A R E O F BY T H E I N S T I T U T I O N .” M E T R O N O M E N O . Finally. I published the last two editions of Metronome for documenta 12. collating materials from Future Academy fieldwork and developing a further constellation of backing and finance. C O L L A B O R AT I O N S O F C U LT U R A L S T U D I E S R E N D ER E D P R O B L EM AT I C T H E O N G O I N G A R T I C U L AT I O N O F S O C I A L A N T H R O P O LO GY A S A N A P P R O P R I AT E M E T H O D O LO GY F O R A N 8 0 S ’ U N D ER S TA N D I N G O F G LO B A L I S AT I O N .

As well as providing a more or less thorough training ground for artistic positions. So my personal question. at the same time. On an elementary level. each of us has the authority to retain a sense of individual development. deregulated. and whether I survive professionally. “Art academies should be places where research is done that actually cannot be done in universities because universities have other limits that art academies do not need to have.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 16 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . To develop Future Academy as a Batesonian metalogical investigation means pitching it first to students. rather than becoming reduced to mere providers or teachers? This brings me to the blurred definitional framework of what we call the art academy. I would argue that the academy is the site of prelusive knowledge. As Martin Prinzhorn stated in a conversation at the start of Future Academy. One question emerges here: can both art students and faculty recognise the plurality and therefore the instability of methodological procedures as part of their research activities. the art academy necessarily embodies 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL ΩGREGORY A N E C O LO GY O F M I N D ”. “S T EP S TO A C E R TA I N M A . and heterogeneous location for visioning the future and forming agents in this process. 1971 .” One might say the same distinction applies to the art academy in relation to the museum as a site of new production: art academies necessarily should be places where art is engaged with and expanded in a manner that cannot be achieved in museums and galleries. but the structure of the conversation as a whole is also revealed to the same subject. places and people. reactivated again and again over the last ten years. a fuzzy logic that is perhaps this institution’s saving grace and ongoing claim to heterodoxy. and there are no results. and then involving them from day one when nothing is known. just as it evokes the distinctions and concordances between academic discourses of knowledge production and the eccentric vagaries of art practice. where I travel to. However. or is the current conception of competence and accreditation in art education unnecessarily driving both parties towards conformism? Underlying my interests in the art academy environment is the presupposition that it offers an exceptionally individualist. an art academy.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . B AT E S O N . collaborators. has been to ascertain whether the art academy remains a location in which its faculty can experience the flexibility to undertake the prelusive or unknown that defines independent research and the work associated with it. following Jacques Rancière’s notion of the “aesthetic regime of the arts”.the problem. is the organic result of a groups’ desire to work together and formalise certain experiences and resolutions. Its artist-members are able to deploy the transformational moment in their research of aesthetic practices in a way that is not possible in any other institution today. and yet.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . and highlighters together.”Ω This perpetual mirroring exemplifies the liminal dimension located between researching something and producing a representation of this process. The work of the students has a bearing on what I produce. like any institution. For the art academy specialises in and nurtures the lead-up time to production through a particular approach to the relation between ideas and things. encouraging us to determine hypotheses together and form the representation of our findings gradually as they are being pursued. to become interlocutors. Only some of the conversations achieve this double format.

which functions to reinterpret the past and reinscribe as well as redistribute values of competence. run by an elite orthodoxy with a structure which necessitates it to be non-accessible and non-populist. entry is based on convocation rituals. “A ‘common’ world is never simply an ethos. From the 19th century mercantile marriage of Empire Education. because they have the distinct feeling that they need to speak about these in an audible and visible manner.”Ω ΩIBID. “The idea of the documenta magazines project is to come back to a form of mobility that is also a form of academy. formal and informal. on strictly maintained interpersonal networks. 11 . Learning. that results from the sedimentation of a certain number of intertwined acts. Highly ritualised in contrast to more bohemian academies. a shared abode. It is from this perspective that it is possible to raise the question of the relationship between the ‘ordinariness’ of work and artistic ‘exceptionality’. we shift seamlessly into today’s neo-liberal threesome of Globalisation. and more could be developed on this relationship. and Trade. and are permanently revised and reactivated to reflect changing concepts of national and cultural heritage. and the Cultural Industries. here I’d like to focus on the art academy as the tool of cultural expansion.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . heritage art academy and combined it with more self-destruct. It is always a polemical distribution of modes of being and ‘occupations’ in a space of possibilities. vocational training. However one chooses to define the academy per se.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON M E T R O N O M E N O . non EU students. For example. a powerful. these editorial groups and bring them into discussion with one another?”Ω Schöllhammer’s proposition combines the method of an organ such as Metronome with that of a collective research project like Future Academy.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 17 As the name Future Academy indicates. virtual learning environments. The geopolitical incentives of this formulation rise and fall according to demand. a very stable form. He writes. artists’ collectives whose scale is necessarily small and mutable in contrast to the elephantine magnitude of the major art educational establishments that most of us work within. one might focus on the academy as a protection lodge. It begs the question as to whether the European MFA is actually a neocolonial device ultimately being developed to be implemented beyond Ω S EE 44 – 46 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . Life-long learning. It has a long tradition in independent media and involves a group of people working over a long period of time on issues which they find interesting to translate from one place to another or to present. 20 07 . Here the academy is understood as an editorial group. why not use these academies. definitions usually lead at one point to a certain tension between inclusion and exclusion. However. namely the editorial group. I’ve opted for the heavy connotations of the historically bound.an antagonism. and on notions of adherence. A more innovative analogy might be the one raised recently by Georg Schöllhammer at documenta 12. global market in postgraduate education. W H AT I S TO B E D O N E ?. and by extension internationalist policy. Presenting this notion at the Metronome Think Tank in Tokyo. TO K YO . organised and deregulated knowledge. We thought. PAG E 42 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . Schöllhammer states. Today’s corporate rather than imperial model of schooling and human resource development places emphasis on structures we are all too familiar with. and an unhealthy reliance on the fees of foreign. concordant accreditation systems.

and in Mumbai. thereby questioning today’s renewed forays into educational expansion. In both locations. a weeklong Future Academy seminar generated a proposal by MFA students to set up a bank. for example. I was able to set up experimental student cells and with these. where the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Dakar is actually a post-independence phenomenon initiated by the late president and poet Leopold Sedar Senghor in 1963. I worked first in Senegal. scholars. parallel institutional partnerships. when Future Academy moved to Japan. Likewise Future Academy would negotiate its way forward with its motherships in London and Scotland. Both NGOs could thereby circumvent entrenched bureaucratic problems within the older structures and enable students to develop new methods and productions external of the existing curricula.the territorial parameters of the Bologna agreement? Meanwhile. runs exceptional evening classes on curating and contemporary art. In February 2003. where art colleges were aligned historically with their British colonial counterparts. Future Academy’s resolution to be voluntary and non-paying led to a deep interest on the part of the students in all locations in economic propositions. the student body increasingly mutates flooding the once singular character of a nation’s art academy with an unstoppable flow of new influences. and then in several cities in India. I made the decision to curate this investigation away from a super-structure of European super-schools and to focus instead on the current ramifications of colonial art academies established in the 19th and 20th centuries. what I hope characterises today’s globalised art academy is not just the frenzy of standardisation. J. an NGO co-financed by Norwegian state funding. but the alternative option of travelling intelligently through different institutional structures with their contrasting value systems. this symbiotic relationship was confirmed once more with the participation of small artists’ collectives in Tokyo that focus on educational formats. the Media Centre of Dakar. such as CommandN.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . the urban research group PUKAR (Partners for Urban Knowledge and Research). AIT. was producing documentary films with students of Shri. devised by social anthropologist Arjun Appadurai with US academic funding. or Arts Initiative Tokyo ( AIT ). indicating a true mushrooming of short-term working systems. there were different institutional scales at work. in order to perform a deep transfer of knowledge that can reflect and compliment the newly international character of this student body. latent cultural backgrounds. Within the first six months of Future Academy. AIT has managed to remain financially self-sufficient and autonomous. open to a wide range of office workers and people whose education may not have included formal art studies.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 18 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . and encourage students from the different departments or schools to take ownership of this research. and confused expectations. As a result of pitches I made to artists. School of Art. A college with a large amount of international students is heterogeneous but not necessarily able to make use of this condition. m-lab. J. and students on the hypotheses and modus operandi of this research. For example. With this modest endeavour. Their claim 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . was working with the Ecole Nationale des Arts in Dakar and teaching new media to students.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . Nevertheless. Later.

As research on this financial. the Tontine provided an experiment in alternative funding systems and actually paid for the Senegalese visas to India so that they could to take part in the Synchronisations forum set up by their Indian Future Academy colleagues. In contrast you have the hawker who has no formal education in economics and who has only attended traditional and Coranic schools. from those that are regulated by religious and commercial interests in order to cover financial difficulties or pay for pilgrimages to Mecca. In the future. HE RECENTLY COLLABORATED WITH BENETTON AND ESTABLISHED A LOCAL. Likewise. which. and constitutes part of the informal economic chain. precisely because the nervous accountability of the host institution did not interfere with students’ conception of legitimate research. O R G S C A L E E N T R EP R E N EU R I A L I N I T I AT I V E S . S EE W W W . The fundamental issue with the Tontine is that it remains outside of the law. In the context of Future Academy. the focus on economics did not and it was in Dakar that the most coherent and topical economic model was developed. This hawker enters the economic system too. were still closely tied to French finance. Key to the Tontine in Senegal has been the cultural and social dimension it employs to ensure that a rotating rhythm of contribution and spending is maintained by each of its members. Trust and social sanctions encourage a self-selection process with regard to the group’s membership. What have these people done to become successful in the context of an international system? They receive ΩT H E 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . it was to be the hawker or itinerant salesman who offered the role model. or the acquisition of health and educational infrastructures. The senior management of the UK School in question immediately quashed the proposal and.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON S E N E G A L E S E M U S I C I A N A N D P R O D U C ER YO U S S O U N ’ D O U R TOOK PART IN THE FIRST FUTURE ACADEMY FORUM HELD IN DAKAR IN JANUARY 2003 . the students continued with their individual work and this institution’s involvement in Future Academy pretty much ended there. a micro-credit scheme originally devised by the Neapolitan Lorenzo Tonti in 1653. the role and value of the artist might lead to a type of international intelligence for which both a black market and a barter system might become operational.was straightforward: independent thinking required independent economies.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A .N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 19 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . the organisation of events. the Edinburgh cell also applied the Tontine system to their collective finances. through to smaller cooperatives based on neighbourhood structures. If the example of legally extraneous micro-credit associations had provided the framework. as any further development was voluntary. women’s groups. Tontines can fall within several categories.Ω “ We realise that there are eminent professors of economics in Senegal who often receive travel grants to go to Europe or the States in order to study during the holidays. the one that we call informal. whilst apparently run by the Senegalese. AT THIS MEET ING YOUSSOU N’DOUR RAISED THE ISSUE OF THE GROWTH IN OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG PEO PLE AND THE FAST TRACK THAT THE YOUTH PERCEIVED IN BECOMING A MUSICIAN TODAY . so too did the concept of the individual who might operate it: the student on the one hand. However. In Dakar. both defined as agents in a transactional relationship. is not monitored by the police or the state. communal structure developed. They come back with theories. The model proposed by the Senegalese artists referred back to the Tontine. B I R I M A . and the teacher or professor on the other. O N E O F T H E I C O N S U S E D I N T H E P R . and he or she travels worldwide. and managed to raise a considerable amount for their visit to India. SENEGALESE MICROCREDIT ASSOCIATION CALLED BIRIMA TO SUP P OR T SM A L L C A M PA I G N I S T H E P O R T R A I T O F A S E N E G A L E S E H AW K ER . Tontines can even have clandestine membership arrangements such that although the savings will rotate from person to person these individuals remain unknown within the group. the scheme was activated in the recession of the 1980s as an alternative to the development banks.

I do not think we should look at it in isolation. and illegal taxi drivers with their speed-driven race against death.no support from the government. analyses. and how it is that they still manage to survive (…). But also in terms of media and communications. If we look at the informal sector and how this fluid state of the economy is run. and which they are encouraged to qualify and take ownership of. from prescribed learning structures to voluntary initiatives that do not feature in their academic assessment. 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 20 05 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . their final conclusion was that at a certain point (postgraduate education) student and teacher need to reformulate the hierarchical relationship of knowledge transfer and enter into a flat zone in which each party recognises the value of their respective input and can effectively pitch and barter their way forward. and that. may fast track them into a professional context. expertise would be handed over to informal economists. The formal and the informal do not only exist in economic terms. loans and student debt towards alternative economic Ω U M A N G . Firstly. To resume the argument so far: competence in Future Academy is the ability for students to make a series of shifts. extensive debates took place between the students in Future Academy on the relationship between informal and formal economies. You go out and find your guy and he offers you a mixed bag of things. <<<<<‘ S Y N C H R O N I S AT I O N S ’ 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . Indeed. we could ask them how their system functions without basic formal economic principles. like a market. if anything. describing the mobile architecture of the itinerant salesman as that of a moving directory of comparative studies.”Ω In India. and deducing complex performative and presentational modalities from them. and individual contacts across the world.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R ΩD I S C U S S I O N B E T W EE N N A L L E AU R O . the stock exchange of second-hand clothing. Secondly. and “ traders and crafts people would meet at the shack studio. looking at all these phenomena in terms of aesthetic values and vectors.”Ω Effectively the Senegalese Future Academy team spent lengthy periods in Dakar analysing informal systems such as the network of beggars. peripheral academics. A N D AWA D I O U F AT 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 20 F U T U R E AC A D EM Y ’ S ‘ S Y N C H R O N I S AT I O N S ’ E V E N T I N B A N G A LO R E . Moreover. You don’t enter a pyramid structure.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . the Future Academy team subsequently re-defined this proposal into the ‘Permeable Academy’. should we look at it in isolation or not? Instead of having one-day economies. It is random. from a sole dependency on grants. can we find a way to align the informal to the formal sector? This is the predominant economic paradigm that we are trying to work with or break out of.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON E V E N T I N B A N G A LO R E . emphasising their interconnectedness: “The informal sector is a little like a bazaar. In this Permeable Academy. M A N E . and the shifting of competence from illegal mini-cabbing to the acquisition of what in London taxi driver’s parlance is known as the ‘Knowledge’. But if they could enter the future academy. a tea shop outside the walls of the heritage academies. They exist in the artistic domain too and we should open up this debate in Future Academy. networks. The hawker is at the heart of our intellectual debates right now. then I feel we need to take into account that this actually works and investigate its relationship to the predominant paradigm. 20 05 . If we want to analyse one-day economies or smaller more chaotic models where things are done in more fluid ways. Here we find the transition from informal to formal.

or Pukar in India. situating itself between different public audiences. researched. The Roaming Faculty model offers selected artists and scholars the chance to develop new work through a chain of interconnected situations at four to five different art academies. travel. Huit Facettes in Senegal. contexts. the exercise of a particular sport as a model for analysing thought structures (e.. the polymath.g. Open Circle. they argued. to Superflex.approaches with regard to studying. given the global importance of social interventionism in art practice of the 1990s (from N55. It’s a consortium of sorts. The Tontine system that fuels this moving group of artists and 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 21 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . to the shaping of content and the nurturing of transcultural and transdiciplinary positions. and finally a polymathic understanding of place. and the transnational group of students who work with him or her. the escalation of an armaments race. a polymathic educational model.Ω Ω I ’M THINKING OF JOE S C A N L A N ’ S C O F FI N S . research.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R I would like to end on a related issue that provides the basis for intellectual competence: the figure of the polymath and the concept ‘ of a roaming faculty. Raks. to name just a few). which may be no wonder. and developed. I’d hesitate to call this the seeds of a micro-institutional development but increasingly I feel it may just be heading that way. for a participating institution. a future art academy would engage in a polymathic economy. In 1971 he states that “such matters as the bilateral symmetry of an animal. RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . the Roaming Faculty structure requires part investment of no more than 20 to 25% of a full professorial salary. becomes embedded in a structure dedicated to mobile knowledge transfer and deep exchange. It’s a non-prescriptive condition of empathic learning.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . it was to both latent aesthetic processes. institutional structures and time frames. In this manner. With the introduction of a ‘Roaming Faculty’. Moreover. Heterodox combinations of information and skill would inform art practice: for example.”Ω When we investigated future faculties of knowledge in the art academy. Let’s go back to Gregory Bateson who defines his stance in opposition to what he sees in the 1970s as the increasingly materialist ecology of academic departments. C O M 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . like our hawker earlier on. and practices that might be taught. Senegalese wrestling as mental and physical dialectical engagement). and everyday relational activities that attention was directed. can only be understood in terms of such an ecology of ideas. the patterned arrangement of leaves in a plant.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL ΩI B I D . the nature of play. the grammar of a sentence. and the contemporary crises in man’s relationship to his environment. production. but it is led by the value attributed to an individual’s research. just as they might be interested in hearing from economists or scholars whose research is founded in the cultural idioms and methodologies of non-Western societies. which stand outside of the course curricula. A N D OT H ER P R O P O S A L S F O R O N L I N E S A L E S AT T H I N G S FA L L D O W N . the processes of courtship. a polymathic faculty. daily survival and collective projects. could benefit from a lawyer on immigration and identity issues. peripatetic researcher. that provides for a parallel extension in the work of guest. Art students. something that one could argue is taking place once again. in other words those subjects. It would confirm the value accorded by artists in transactions that introduce service environments into their work from the clinic through to purchases that can be made online. the mystery of biological evolution.

secondly.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . To impart this critical approach to the student seems to be essential today.scholars guarantees the on-going low-level costs. and thereby to dissolve the idea that following a course will make them into an artistÉ 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . and cultural contexts. methodologies. and helps to broker decision-making. Our Roaming Faculty member is the itinerant hawker not only of ideas but also of ways of apprehending. I’d like to propose three areas of articulation for fine art students: first. The value accorded to survival and self-organisation leads naturally to a further set of skills: the rhetorical and analytical wherewithal to stake a position as a student player in the revision of educational structures. and finally a polymathic approach to knowledge production linked to an enhanced disposition towards translation. which are shared. analysing and evaluating their presence within the next generation of artists and practitioners. and by extension the ability to engage with a form of research that is non-prescriptive from the outset. the predisposition to embark on voluntary non-course or examination-led investigations which enhance an understanding of different methodologies of research. understood here as the flexible act of idiomatic transference between disciplines.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . So to conclude. a lucid and production-based interest in economic and symbolic value.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 22 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . rotates ownership between the participating institutions.

In fact. the academic discourse is about evaluation and legitimation. Today. the logic of institutions and the logic of art education are fundamentally at odds. I would rather suggest working on a clandestine manual or instruction book listing all the tricks and all the ways of seduction required to enable art education within institutions not designed to facilitate anything remotely linked to that form of education. 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . Benjamin Buchloh has argued that the past is the aesthetization of bureaucracy. ideas. though well-meaning and wellintentioned. So I must find other ways of sharing it. that notion is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of what conceptual art practices meant. to discovering whether there are new ways for art practitioners to embody provocative ideas and produce novel forms of communication. i.e. That is not something to be taken for granted. there is fortunately always someone trying to keep doors wide open. because institutions are innately about legitimation and evaluation. Along those lines of thought. Yet it might simply be that we did not understand that conceptual art is about intellectual provocation and the disruption of thoughts. but rather to the creation of new forms of embodiment. The second issue that worries me is the current prominence of the notion of art as a form of knowledge production. since institutions tend to follow strictly the Kafkaesque dynamics of closing in on themselves. I do believe that education based on the notion of art as a form of knowledge production creates artists focused on skills such as self-administration and email production.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . thereby creating hermetic black boxes which destroy information and burn bridges with the outside world. since that fight is a practice filled with clandestine techniques.. After all. Embodiment goes necessarily beyond the academic discourse. We lose the spirit of conceptual art when we actually believe it has produced knowledge. while the intellectual is about the public embodiment of ideas and thoughts. i. If we want to maintain a critical discourse. even if it depends on the academic discourse to realize its practice.POSING SINGUL ARIT Y JA N V ER W O ER T In the continuous rituals of institutional politics and their related internal closed-door logic. I am not in the position to talk about clandestine knowledge in public. perhaps we should understand the intellectual even as something entirely different from the academic. we do take works from the 1970s seriously and believe they have produced knowledge.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . and words. Those different principles imply that people who actually believe in art education will always have to fight the logic of the institution and its continuous institutional ceremonies. In my view. the libidinal and cerebral embodiment of an idea. This in turn brings to another important issue: the issue of the academy as institution. That disruption is not necessarily connected to the production of knowledge. while art education is about inspiration and creation. The question is how to talk about fighting institutional rituals in public.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 23 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . Perhaps we should reconsider the legacy of conceptual art and investment in producing intellectual bodies of art.e. However.

This issue pervades art schools and is almost everywhere in highly individualized societies. One concerns the ethical-political question of the good life connected to the question of subjectivity or singularity.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . Therefore. teaching artistic subjectivities is teaching people how to put themselves at the mercy of the communication industry. 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . the most pressing question is in what name or in whose name we want to talk about institutions. How can we avoid becoming public commodities. We are works in progress. Something pointing to the possibility of a different world. One of the major contradictions in a society dedicated to the production of subjectivities is the issue of singularity. the one hope we all share is that we are the chosen. the question of the good life is actually the most pressing issue they raise. we are producers in the new industry of communication. Many times. There must be a way of speaking about the institution not in its name but in the name of something else. When you read Negri and Hardt’s Empire. As producers of artistic subjectivities. They argue that today’s means of production are the means of communication. We sacrifice our very lives in that new economy. The second is the matter of temporality or the organization of time. That perpetuates the false assumption that we are all just institutional people and that is the only reason we are entitled to speak on its behalf. The issue of the chosen is part of a larger discourse in society. The last question concerns debt or indebtness. Reappropriating today’s means of production no longer implies invading the factories. something implying a utopian principle. the singular ones.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 24 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .we can never speak in the name of the institution even when we are speaking about the institution. Currently. contemporary discussions suddenly create an uncanny moment of closure when we speak of the institution in the name of the institution. as we put our life skills at its disposal. docile bodies and willing contributors to a new form of immaterial labor? Negri and Hardt explore how we may regain control over our intellectual lives. That is what you must do as an artist or an intellectual. I would suggest that it might be necessary to speak about institutions in the name of the good life. What do you do when there is more than one of the chosen on a panel or in a room? That is the first experience you have when entering an art school. I believe one of the most urgent questions facing the art academy is: How do we want to live together? How can we renegotiate the forms of communication that will determine the conditions of our life together? I would like to raise three issues related to that question. officially you are the chosen. but suddenly with horror you realize that you are surrounded by chosen ones. Immediately. but essentially to wrest back the means of social communication. Let me start with the question of subjectivity. that puts us at odds with everybody else. the biggest growth industry is communication. since you have been accepted. the means of social existence. constantly producing subjectivity. At heart this concerns resuming control over our social lives. In the new forms of immaterial labor.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . Perhaps a utopian world is a world without any need for institutions.

There are bad and good ways of posing. One could consider the promise of singularity not to be a problem as it is a deeply existential experience. Often communities are about coexistence. assembling people together to eradicate differences among them. Those bonds. except violence. One of my ideal models of an academy as a provocative community would be The Muppet Show. Bad ways of posing are just imposing. with always staying on the beat. in the loop. are forms of conviviality not pointing to the need for another church or another constitution. So the pressing question is whether we can really propose an alternative model to competition to realize that collective experience of singularity. In a literal sense you provoke. I like to think that the academy is a good place to do just that. you call upon somebody to articulate his or her position. imposing your subjectivity on others. 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . In that sense. though? I think it should be provocative. not convocative. However. The chosen has to fight within a constellation or competition among others to prove that there can only be one. How can we be singular. the first issue deals with the exercise of singularity within the different ethics of a community building. together? In that context. So. The antagonistic community of jealous lovers of solitude might prove provocative. the actual problem is that competition is the sole mode or experience of the promise of singularity society offers today. Usually the chosen becomes approved or legitimized through violence and competition. That is a temporality of absolute presentism.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . but to the need for forms of antagonistic friendship. I would like to make the distinction between a community of provocation and a community of convocation. Good ways of posing are exposing. A strange assembly of creatures finding a way to coexist that is impossible to explain. You learn to present singularity as a form of provocation. Derrida’s Politics of Friendship is fascinating. Temporality is related to the urgency to answer emails immediately. to realize that deeply existential feeling of singularity. I think we have an unique opportunity to do that in the art academy. temporality is the regime determining institutional life and also the market. but it is also what you do as a teacher. I dream of a provocative community that might exist in an art school as an antagonistic community of provocateurs. How do you effect the calling. There is no other alternative. it becomes difficult to imagine disrupting that regime of a particular temporality. The art of posing as a form of provocation is one of the competencies you gain as an art student. allowing the sharing of solitude. That is what you do as a student.Books such as the Harry Potter series or films such as the Matrix or the Lord of the Rings are all about the chosen. Let’s provoke a provocative community of poses.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 25 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . exposing yourself to provoke someone else into reacting to what you are saying. since he writes about the community of jealous lovers of solitude who have nothing to bring to the community save their love of solitude. Today. without constitutions and manifestos. When you always live in the present. union. The second issue I mentioned above pertains to temporality or the organization of time. because the question of singularity is the most pressing issue every student experiences when entering art school.

the art academy is a place where various pasts. I think the more temporalities an academy has. because they have to pay back their student loans. or in a multiple sense of temporalities. since one never knows what the art of the future will be. There are traditional academies. where people embody the present and erase any memory of the past. and with the oblique angles of talking and choosing the subject of teaching. as well as in academies in Britain and the United States. In a Nietzschean sense. since they all speak different languages. though at the same time conflictual. Thus. I think students all become indebted to certain ideas and to certain principles through forms of education. The artist embodies both the experience of the past and performs the experience of the present. embodied by people who might never be able to properly talk to each other. To generate the art of the future. I found that students left school with a debt to the community. with artists and texts brought in.A. and practices embodying different forms of temporality may exist under one roof. However. I realized that different institutional structures produce different forms of debt. That is a big challenge. the potential of the art academy lies in a radical non-contemporary quality. ideas. I found of course that debt is market-related. you could say that we should have many overlapping. This indicates things seriously have gone wrong. Finally. Staying in the Muppet Show model. one can only wish and hope that all people will get enough money to pay their loans back. there is also a spiritual and a symbolic debt. Very often. you need some non-contemporary past potential.Ideally. While teaching in L. beyond material debt. In a welfare 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . On a basic material level. and to produce a different form of co-existence and conviviality. where various generations meet. like Düsseldorf. Yet there should be a way for different temporalities to coexist in one building. students have to pay back what they were given. we need to talk about the third issue mentioned: debt. where the past squashes all presences. While teaching in academies in countries where the social welfare state still exists. the academy is a place of many temporalities. After three years in Sweden. To redeem themselves from that debt they immediately start doing a socially engaged project in order to give back to the community and to do good. debt is at the heart of education. People embodying the past also embody a particular form of potentiality. and talking with students there.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . The goal should be to multiply and diversify the inherent temporalities of the academy.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . I was once in a place that was so presentish that the person running the print workshop was fired because of his links to past knowledge. when one temporality starts dominating others. That has to do with characters and generations. Thus. But there are also high-performance academies. artists must have financially viable products ready and out in a gallery. especially in market-driven societies. where people. Not surprisingly. the better it is.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 26 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .A. and futures exist in one building. presents. while art students embody the promise of the future. People become involved in serious debt problems when financing education. completely antagonistic and incongruent temporalities. L.

Let’s go for another form of art. All we can do is shift the debt into a mode of dedication by asking to what do we spiritually want to be indebted.state. teachers feel enormously indebted to them. When the graduates go out into the world. How could one ever make that guarantee. Especially when teaching traditional skills. That is a promise one can never guarantee. while art could equally be a highway straight to hell? As a teacher. and perhaps we can never redeem or absolve ourselves completely from this debt. where she raises that question of debt and dedication. What other horizon could we open up? What would it mean to be indebted to the good life? There is a beautiful book by Gayatri Spivak called Death of a Discipline. That is a perfect example of shifting debt to dedication. she asks to what spirit do we dedicate our teaching. In the end. I believe we have to communicate that a certain indebtedness will always linger with both students and teachers at the end of the year. I would like to propose dedication as the principle to which we devote our practices of embodimentÉ 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . by saying you should write for the ghost of Shakespeare’s sister. teaching can make a difference in helping students to determine to whom or to what principles they chose to become indebted. to whom do we want to dedicate that practice? Then she refers to Virginia Woolf and that fantastic passage at the conclusion of Room of One’s Own where Woolf speaks to the feminist writers of the future. because they have received affirmation of the validity of producing art. So there is a mutual sense of indebtedness. beyond the material? This leads to considerations of how one might go beyond the institution. Teachers are always tricksters because they bear witness to the fact that art is not just a product. they become indebted to the market. On that symbolic level. they become indebted to the idea of the social or society.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 27 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . in a market-driven environment. for the sake of her return to the future. another form of embodiment. you will remain completely indebted to people whose lives you would have to assure. while you cannot actually do that.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . but will make a difference.

writers and theorists in one master’s program 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . the only way to become an artist is through the art school.and what its object of study entails. One of the goals of art education could be to try and unravel the triad art world. What then would be our object of study today? Is it the art world. Presently. Yet the lack of an overall ideological goal in terms of utopias could also be blamed for that. or is it art? These objects overlap and seem hopelessly entangled. However. Disciplines once involved in utopian and revolutionary goals also find themselves in a crisis. but also in creating a space for thinking. Where knowledge could be inhibiting. We specifically try to mix artists. One might argue that the death of disciplines has been occasioned by interdisciplinarity. not only in terms of their education. curator.ROOM FOR THOUGHT SI M O N S H EIK H How could one use ideas from critical art practices within an educational model also connected with accreditation. evaluation. in trying to let them unlearn what they have learned. all major exhibitions in commercial shows and galleries demonstrate that exhibiting artists are products of art schools. artist. I am teaching in Malmö’s Critical Studies Program with students from all over the world. and course plans? This question relates to didactic strategies and to what the discipline called teaching means today . There is no hierarchical relationship between theory and practice. They all have different preconceptions about art. which is both anti-utopian and antirevolutionary. the artist. So we can at least say with some certainty that art schools produce artists. Spivak talks about “unlearning”. In our view. as a reaction to academicism at art schools today. That is a historical shift compared to fifty years ago. Both theory and practice need a specific mode of address and a specific mode of representation. We focus on available modes and how we can deconstruct and reconstruct. Even though the academy may have lost its aura and its disciplinary modus operandus. In addition. the art academy has never been so successful as it is today.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 28 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . In that sense. But what kind of system are we using? And what is the system we are educating people for? I believe that a MA curriculum should never be entirely predetermined. but also in terms of their socialization and cultural context in general. disciplines are no longer fixed. configure and reconfigure them.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . so we are continuously involved in deskilling. our program is interdisciplinary with a focus on what could be called the role of the cultural producer ( artist. and art. as Spivak states in Death of the Discipline. In spite of the problems with defining the object of study. curators. it should also imply a certain lack of rigidity. thinking could break down pre-determined knowledge. and vice versa. artistic practice is always based on a theory. Currently we have a specific political horizon. writer ) within the art context. The curriculum should not only be involved in the production of knowledge.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . in the postmodern and postcolonial era. We consider artistic production as being outside the contradiction between theory and practice.

unified body. Another question cropping up is what the relationship is between representation and depresentation. In the context of an expanded idea of the notion of representation. so that there is a certain absence both spatial and temporal. i. its constituency could be easily defined based on the interests of the ruling classes. but you do not learn how ( contemporary ) art is produced. By mirroring those two conceptions. In other words. as building blocks that can be used in the articulations of the exhibition. we can create different kinds of understanding and disentanglement. though. we see a move into the educational space of curators. What happens if we try to transform audiences – as many artists currently try to do – into a constituency or a community? What does that mean? With regard to constituencies. In those days. Even in curatorial programs. and communities? Sometimes these notions are considered synonymous. One model 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . The current composition of the museum’s constituency is very difficult to define. In art history courses. and potentially? These discussions must revolve around various truths and methods of representation. but obviously there is a immense difference between production related to art institutions or production related to the audience. In our program.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 29 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . in art we could argue that representation is an act whereby something comes to represent something else.in order for them to develop a single vocabulary of representation. there is rarely a discussion about how art works are produced. we also try to discuss how one as a cultural producer one would define work vis-à-vis the apparatus surrounding production and presentation. new counter-narratives and perhaps even new subjectivities? To and for whom does one speak as a cultural producer? What is the difference in conceptions and locations of various notions among institutions. the education of the populace into a national. audiences. Perhaps that is starting to permeate art education. it usually means that someone stands for someone else. That was the goal of the museum. Today. What does that mean? What is that act of de-presentation? Those questions play an important role in understanding how any representation of the world has certain exclusions rendering things possible or impossible. What is the public role of the artist. how can we. since art institutions ( museums ) have a problem with constituencies. Unlike theory courses at the university.e. construct new narratives. the bourgeoisie. most art institutions are part of the so-called entertainment industry. we offer insight into how art is produced. we could state that in critical theory. An obvious example of de-presentation would be the so-called post-communist condition which is now impossible to discuss or imagine.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . constituencies. it was the nation-state. Artworks still seem to come to us as almost readymade. Fifty years ago. There are certain historical models of the art academy that have been handed down to us that could easily be deconstructed. presently. However. through various modes of address. So there is a profound shift in how to define a constituency. you learn how art is received. I understand de-presentation as the disappearance of ideas and imaginations actively or passively de-presented from the world. historically.

That model would merely substitute the system of discipline for the system of control. we must question the relevance of this model and perhaps look more closely at the university model now replacing the masterclass. That is the very issue of a certain ma-ness. One should then try and maintain the open-space freedom of the laboratory. and its administrative model. one should not uncritically adopt the university structure. However.e. and as discursive spaces. there have also been didactic historical models that could prove inspirational. Rather one should learn from them as spheres of experience. now that artists engage with the world. it is important to shift the notion of knowledge production into what we at the Malmö art school call room for thought. replicators rather than producers of knowledge. students. universities are often teaching machines.e. the new model of examination. The cultural producers we try to create in the Malmö program can also be seen as a counter shift towards these developments within art administration and politics. Therefore. but now moving to a curatorial practice. However. as happens with knowledge in the knowledge industry. while omitting a certain notion of unproductive time and space. Artists are a sort of social avant garde. on the forefront of our current society and its notion of immaterial laborers. potentially hidden in the academy model. teaching. a nondialogical model of address. are being produced. one professor talking to multiple students and deciding just what art education is. Where traditional educational systems were part of a disciplinary society.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A .N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 30 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . “If the art school is a teaching machine. and not just with themselves. i. i. That has very little to do with institutional critique as such. Thought has boundaries different entirely from knowledge. For this reason. As producers of knowledge.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . modules and internalization can only be seen as part of a society of control. Rather. and what kind of knowledge.pertains to the idea of the masterclass. one should examine the implementation of its productive features. Simultaneously. originally an artistic practice. To paraphrase Spivak. as places through which subjectivity has been formed. I believe it would be unrealistic to think that the implementation of the Bologna model or system would solve the problems most of us have – I hope – with the historical master classes.” That is an urgent issue. That very model lies behind the implementation of the Bologna process and its type of top-down political dictating on how all art education should be structured. it is a critique of how institutions work. we must ask what kinds of subjects. I believe. That is an inherently hierarchical and masculine subject position. since the results of institutional critique. This is why. have been much more profound. how they are inadequately historical. and how they fail to be equipped for dealing with the current situation of lifelong education and re-education. Hopefully it is too difficult to transform thinking into a commodity. based on the sovereign reigning over the subject. The critique and the transformation from managerialism. The subjects are all listening to their master’s voice. One model I have been interested in is based 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . a phenomenon. this is of course a pre-democratic model. loose their effectiveness in terms of transforming the art environment. In terms of mode of address.

On the one hand. and the production of knowledge. So. 14-21 ). In Academy. a book published by Stephan Dillemuth was called Academy ( cf. the real socialization. Another inspiration for teaching theory I discovered was on a more pedagogical level in Veyne’s work. and probably several people engaged in teaching have had the experience that even second-year students are already showing in private galleries and selling work. about different parts of the world and different languages. we are studying a genealogy of critique. In principle. Veyne tried to begin from spaces of experience. as something transmitted solely from the authority of the teachers to the students. this was one of the first re-evaluations of the critical artistic potentials of education while considering the educational space as an artistic space. i. He found that teaching adults using children’s books caused them to learn very simple things they could not move past. but that only seems to result in an unprotected title. In that sense. all students will be forced to immediately translate what they view as their knowledge of both themselves and the world. I am also talking about location and culture. In terms of adequate. Already in the mid 1990s. and on the other hand we are studying critically. socialization seems to be the most important way art schools produce their subject of knowledge. However. I always give students the most difficult text first as an introduction to theory. one could argue that teaching Critical Studies has a dual function.on Paul Veyne’s ideas. within that socialization it is hard not to see that students socialized for the art world are influenced by the market – as Ute Meta Bauer argued. In this model. who states that she is not capable of writing a text on teaching. One could say. If one cannot offer that form of socialization. So he would replace the children’s books with complicated books which then immediately initiated a sphere of production. Rather than seeing knowledge as something uncontested. One way to do this is to have a group of participants in a course with very different background. what else is there to offer? Fraser’s interesting statement alludes to a possible scenario one must be aware of in a Master’s program. I am not only talking about disciplines. it is actually a degree worthless in the real world. So why do they still need an art institution? Even though the institution gives a degree similar to the university system. there is an interesting text by Andrea Fraser.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . the artist. what exactly is the MAlevel? There is an idea that one could study anything all over Europe connected to mobility – which is something completely different from fluidity – a notion popping up in the Bologna process. an introduction into the art market. You could have a Bachelor’s in Fine Art and then a Master in Biology.e. Secondly.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . All one can offer are contacts with gallery owners and the art world – perhaps that is the real teaching. the room for thought. MaHKUzine 2.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 31 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . an introduction into basic skills and disciplines. One can talk about the program’s content. didactic strategies and educational models. Currently we are seeing a wild expansion of the market. of course. while giving equal value to the experiences and preconceived notions of the student and the teacher. she claims. Why would you ever need a master’s degree 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . a bachelor course is a foundation.

research and the practice of the lecturers are reflected in the teaching. that would be the only reason to get a master’s degree. If the MA program does not provide socialization. it has to provide some kind of critical understanding of what art means. That is more inspirational and interesting then listening to an analysis of Foucault’s Order of Things one more time. is pedagogy part of the artistic and theoretical practice? Or are these separate things? How could pedagogy influence your work and your thinking? Could one actually analyze artistic or theoretical work in the light of teaching at a specific institution? Does one’s work have an institutional color?É 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . and curating. in fact. art production.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . Of course. of art’s placement in the world in addition to its place in the art world.in art if you are already an artist with your bachelor’s degree? Why should you spend two more years in school? You could want to go for a PhD. That is also how art schools can differ from university humanities departments such as art history or philosophy. I would like to explore the topic of the relationship between educational strategies and the research practices of the lecturers.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 32 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . Finally. and vis-à-vis the marketing of education.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . to present their research rather than work toward fulfillment of a curriculum. I am over dramatizing the situation in order to point out what could become the problem with master’s degrees vis-à-vis the market. This means that we need a certain fluidity and looseness in our course descriptions and certain keywords which can actually change the program’s content. At our school. At the Malmö school we ask seminar leaders. but – the other way around – is the teaching also reflected in the practice of the lecturers? In other words. who come from a variety of backgrounds such as theory.

All the other discourses face its effect and consequence. we are facing problems not significantly different from the ones our colleagues in literary criticism. often within a research context. – can apply their knowledge and understanding. but that include reflecting on social and ethical responsibilities linked to the application of their knowledge and judgements.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . we have to invent new ways to speak the university.U N C E R TA I N M I CK W I L S O N `M A . and formulate judgements with incomplete or limited information. That third question is connected with the conditions of the university at large. For decades.N E S S Is it possible to determine how a MA art curriculum is characterized? What are its appropriate didactic strategies and educational models? I am going to respond to these two questions by working through the general problem of the MA in art education and how the issue occurs within the Bologna process. – have the ability to integrate knowledge and handle complexity. philosophy. to specialist and non-specialist audiences clearly and unambiguously. The related Dublin Descriptors are actually the core statements from the European Union as to what constitutes the specific Bologna outcomes. through various instruments. in fine art and in the contemporary art practice. – have the learning skills to allow them to continue to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous. This is what the Dublin Descriptors state. we are all forced to review. At present. I will turn to the question of how the academy has emerged as a paradigm and a recurrent theme within the field of contemporary art practice. and sociology have. and problem-solving abilities in new or unfamiliar environments within broader ( or multidisciplinary ) contexts related to their field of study. Our common problem is that the demands of a technocratic discourse have become the norm. ‘The Bologna Conference’ is such an attempt to achieve a common. Next. rethink. Master’s degrees are awarded to students who: – have demonstrated knowledge and understanding that is founded upon and extends and/or enhances that which is typically associated with Bachelor’s levels and that provides a basis or opportunity for originality in developing and/or applying ideas. universities defend the rhetorics of the 19th century. since it has failed to withstand a neo-liberal paradigm. Within the Dublin Descriptors is the core of the competencies and outcomes required of an MA graduate. and rediscover what it is that we believe we are doing. and the knowledge and rational underpinning these. – can communicate their conclusions. there have been calls from different positions to try to achieve some equality about what it is exactly what the Master’s entails as distinct from a degree at a doctoral level.N E S S MICK WILSON 33 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . independent definition. So. I just want to begin by noting that the ‘Master’s’ degree – across all subjects – has always been one of the least understood and least defined academic degrees. However. that rhetoric is exhausted. In fact. So. A series of distinctions is 44 – 46 WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .N E S S´ 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . reassess.

The students appear to be constructed as pre-autonomous actors – they are in search of an agency. – between one or two-year Master’s programs. evaluation and synthesis of new and complex ideas. The support for curriculum diversity. The introduction of the Anglo-American system of Bachelor and Master degree programs into the European art school system ( as part of the so-called Bologna 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . Even accepting that ‘Bologna’ does not prescribe curriculum content. Master’s level: [demonstrates] the ability to integrate knowledge and handle complexity. Master and Doctorate. More dangers may be identified. Do we not already address some of the generic MA level descriptors in the first two to three years of undergraduate study? For example. There are other more important risks at stake here. In the competencies. We can make distinctions – between a ‘professional’ and employment – focused Master’s. But wouldn’t we also expect that from a third-year undergraduate student? A primary issue. – between structured or unstructured Master’s. – between specialist or generalist Master’s. – between discipline-specific or multi-disciplinary or even interdisciplinary Master’s. Then one must ask whether it is possible to determine how a Master’s curriculum for contemporary art practice is characterized. Doctorate level: [requires being] capable of critical analysis. Is it possible to determine how a Master’s curriculum is characterized? Within the ‘Bologna process’ the focus has been on outcomes. For example. and formulate judgements with incomplete data.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . then. which on the surface may appear welcome and beneficial. – the Master’s award can be described without reference to one specific discipline. So ’Bologna’ is consistent with making distinctions of ‘kind’ at the same Master’s level. is the question of how the generic descriptors match what we already do within contemporary art education. This is an important component related to our fear of overspecialization in the outcomes or competencies model. The educators within the descriptors appear as secondary ‘resources’ for the realization of the outcomes.N E S S MICK WILSON 34 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . also correlates to marketization.made between Bachelor. There are other risks in the ‘learning outcomes’ model. they do not begin with an agency. there are other risks within the ‘learning outcomes’ ( or competencies ) model. a Master student [demonstrates] the ability to integrate knowledge and handle complexity. however.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . under the heading Making Judgements: Bachelor’s level: [involves] gathering and interpreting relevant data. not on the curriculum. the transformative and critical potential within pedagogy is underrepresented or even absent within the descriptors. and a researchoriented Master’s. This move to establish the market economy everywhere is of course the primary agenda of neo-liberal dispensation. we are required to differentiate our educational products and compete in the new market place of higher education. The advocates of Bologna propose that: – curricula can retain their diversity.

The essential germ of the open academy model is that in an educational setting. program reputations. and so on.process ) seems to point towards the creation of open academies with an unstable sense of identity rather than towards the consolidation of art schools as educational institutions with regimented schedules. So we have two kinds of market threats: i Higher education as such has become a more intensely marketized system in general. the open academy will offer more space for risking new and unwarranted forms of art production and more space for thought. since the annual student presentations and the graduate shows have become hunting grounds for gallerists and curators who are tripping over each other in their insatiable craving for talent.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . ii The art market colonizes the imagination and orientation of the student-artist within the academy. Similar to all other areas of cultural policy. there is even a third type of ‘market’ beginning to emerge: the reputation-based economy of art education. I believe that the open academy rhetoric is somewhat problematic. The question is whether the transformation from a place of creative freedom to marketplace is good for the quality of the art academy. When and why we give awards. A labor market is partly regulated by the guild process of artist-teachers themselves. Now the criteria for recruitment and promotion are no longer primarily based on reputation. of course! But the really important question relates to purpose. Today. What is our purpose? What do we need to disclose? What is it that we do? To what end and with what purpose are we 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . a certain bureaucratic disclosure moves in. artist-teachers as ’chosen ones’ jostling for status. However. it is merely that the student imagines the possibility and already starts playing a different game. Is it then possible to determine how a Master’s curriculum is characterized? Yes. the reputation-based economy of art education has been displaced by the emergence of managerialism. we have the sense that the market is making inroads into education.N E S S MICK WILSON 35 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . Confronting this view. People got together and spoke about art. Until recently. We all participate in the reputation-based economy in the form of e-flux. So. but driven by the discursive community around the extended field of contemporary practice. we had a labor market governed by reputation. we are suddenly required to disclose what it is that we do as art educators. the advertising pages in Art Forum. It is not necessarily the case that the art market appears on the doorstep. where the work of the student-artists is unhooked from the immediate productive demands of the market. the cultural capital and the ascription of reputational standing was something endemic to a community of discourse. Within our working practice. We have institutional reputations. Part of the problem here is that this move is effectively shuttering the openness we have come to understand as being the potential – not always delivered – of the art academy model. and how we do our jobs within the scenario of handing out awards. The reputation-based economy within art education also blurs into its larger counterpart within the contemporary art world.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . constructing one’s curriculum vitae. within the network of fellow competitors for reputational standing.

– that we wish to provide a robust and critical learning environment. The tension that might be painted as a showdown between Ranciere’s ignorant schoolmaster and Bourdieu’s sociologist king.but not so visibly. not to determine. 3 . I would suggest. – that we are trying to bring an offering to the market place. 1 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . ‘Pedagogy’ was one of the three leitmotifs of documenta12. the question of art education is being asked and rehashed again and again. different dispensations of power? How do you work within this and still address questions of emancipation? These are standard.describing and [discursively] constructing the Master’s program or indeed any program? The possibilities are: – that we are doing it simply to mimic an alien system. Manifesta’s Notes for an Art School. What is it that our work does? What is it for? It is as if the curator conversation died. not to control. troubling questions of education in general. ‘We’ art educators. It is also being answered and tested in many different ways . and Frieze Art Fair’s recent round-table discussion on art education ( October 2007 ). but which in some way enable. the fairs. These are three generally recurrent features.N E S S MICK WILSON 36 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON The meditations on and experiments in alternative academies consistently return to the quandary of ‘emancipatory practice’.’ The ‘academy’ projects and debates too often fail to address the general state of higher education in favor of a narrow focus on the specificity of art education. to enable the flow of other discourses. Here the question of art practice and the notion of autonomy come together. The quandary of ‘emancipatory practice’ – how to enable ‘autonomy’ and ‘agency’. to questions of ‘autonomy’ and ‘agency’. and the art education conversation leapfrogged over it. in the academies themselves. – that we are trying to establish credibility with our funders. ‘protoacademy’. The future model of the art school is clearly something engaging the imagination and energies of the international contemporary art scene. I want to expand a bit on what I believe is significant. and autonomous agencies. and practices.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . Possibly the best articulation we have of our aspiration as teachers is not to dictate. the biennials. We want to create structures which do not themselves exhaustively prespecify what will happen.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . but rather to facilitate. 2 The ‘academy’ debates are troubled by the possibility of the educator’s ‘bad faith. not to describe. There are three observations I would like to make in light of these developments in the larger field. Cork Caucus. hierarchies. How do you work within institutional structures. but they really recur strongly throughout all these different experiments. Cyprus and unitednationsplaza theme. Then part of what that structure must be able to do is to entirely dismantle and change. – that we are doing it because there is some impulse to regiment and shutter the openness. ArteContexto’s recent dossier on ‘teaching visual arts’. Frieze’s ‘Art schools then and now’. Everywhere in the journals.

Consider also the desire for ‘pure’ conviviality. and why ( we believe ) we do it. as long as you do it within this framework. and say go on. we’ll just sit back. dialogical exchange. We should perhaps rather seek to cope with -and reflect upon this ‘coping with’ – the impure. Part of that accountability is mutual disclosure: what we ( believe we) do. Authority is not in and of itself ‘bad’. Let us accept our authority and our considerable agency and open it to accountability. the mucky – the muddy wet ground. Of course. Let ‘us’ not disavow authority. The first thing you learn as a student in the academic environment is the flow of influences in the room when teachers and students meet. They say. Accountability to each other – to our peer networks and our colleagues less fully embedded in the art academies – or those who are not there at all.’ This is why we might be a little bit cautious of our claims to realize moments of pure conviviality. The American cultural studies practitioner George Lipsitz says. un-interrogated in the ‘disciplinary’ conversation. to militant posturing and internecine battles with one another that ultimately have more to do with individual subjectivities and self-images than with disciplined collective struggle for resources and power. ‘Living with contradictions is difficult. It is authority not subject to challenge and critique – when it is not answerable to others – which is most troubling. even artist teachers should perhaps not seek purity and an attempted disavowal or refusal of authority.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . but by what goes unspoken. Consider the petty cruelties and rivalries of teachers for the affections of their students.N E S S MICK WILSON 37 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . Think about what the national governments are doing in the domain of higher education. This will bring us not to pure positions but to messy human situations with complex agendas. how we ( believe we ) do it. you know what you’re doing. with 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . The problem with this particular mode of accountability we are being asked to adopt is precisely the technocratic mode which is determined at a central governmental and European level.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A .But we should still be troubled by this. and. Consider Bourdieu’s early lesson on the cultural indoctrination of students not by what is spoken. the brackish ground upon which our agency is based. What we need to do is to revisit the possibility of resisting this. the inability to speak honestly and openly about contradictory consciousness can lead to a destructive desire for “pure” political positions. with conflict and competition for resources. The other part is listening to others when they suggest to us that we might be mistaken –that we mis-recognize ourselves as the ‘subject presumed to know (themselves ). you’re the experts. I am worried when people seek pure positions. someone who says they have shed their authority is not so easily challenged for their exercise of that authority. of another type of accountability. undisclosed. why do we think we can do it with our students? Teachers. The disavowal of authority is a classic strategy of authority. If we cannot do it with our colleagues.’ Part of this is to reflect upon our desire to be loved by our students and to be respected by our peers. especially for intellectuals and artists employed in academic institutions. Consider the classic power struggles of academics for their tiny territories. the pure flow of uninterrupted.

Those who cannot. the inevitable corollary of seeking ‘pure’ positions for ourselves. but it is a promise that we may not fully be able to redeem or honor. do. the magazines. So these institutions were founded on instrumental logics..” ( Calhoun 2006:3 ). – have undergone a series of profound transformations in the last two centuries. It will not work. I would suggest. nationalist.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . cultural. it is unlikely that some of the other changes would have taken place. They will find some other means. teach.. The question of ‘bad faith’ is. ( b ) that more or less full-time scientific and engineering research components of universities got much larger. The ‘university’ and the entire field of ‘higher education’ – post. There are some general points to adduce first. “The [.troubled workplaces where institutionalized behaviors already cause many ‘closures’ of dialogue.’ Consider Luis Camnitzer’s ‘Fraud and Education’ in the recent issue of ArteContexto.” Camnitzer presents an extreme position on this question of ‘bad faith’ – that we already know that what we actually do as artist educators is not what we say we do. ‘we’ have recognized a need for a new way to speak of the university which can challenge the un-challenged authority of the neo-liberal specification of the university as factor of industry and nothing more. Calhoun says about these challenges. secondary. The question of ‘bad faith’ was referenced earlier in the discussion. Jan Verwoert said that ‘we’ promise ‘it makes sense to make art’. write criticism. ‘Without a dramatic change in institutional and sectoral size. In the face of these instrumental and technocratic imperatives.. in a nutshell.N E S S MICK WILSON 38 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 3 The ‘academy’ projects and debates too often fail to address the general condition of higher education in favor of a narrow focus on the specificity of art education. The latest of these transformations is the reconditioning of the university as a fully and explicitly instrumentalized space of economic. Why is it that the art world – the market. The issues. For some time now.] mistake is promising by implication that a degree in art will lead to economic survival after graduation. Remember the general suspicion of art school teachers: Those who can. and social reproduction attuned to the flows of global capital. This is perhaps the trickiest issue to tackle. the relationship of higher education to elite formation changed. Those who cannot teach. on means-ends rationale. They generated spaces of experimentation and openness AFTER the market outside had enabled a non-statemandated private/public-cultural sphere. (c ) that the higher education sector got much larger. and ( d ) that partly as a consequence. Those academies arising outside the university setting came into being because of imperial. the festivals– opened the question of the academy? Were ‘we’ a little reluctant to do so? 2 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A .] Basically. the rhetoric of the university – the ‘idea’ of the university – simply fails to be persuasive. are ( a ) the universities got much larger. 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF The ‘academy’ debates are troubled by the possibility of the educator’s ‘bad faith. It is the market that emerged 48 C O LO FON . tertiary etc. [.. what we have here is a pyramid scheme. The serious elite will no longer look to the university as the primary space to construct and to reproduce their elite status. The independent art academies have a different history. mercantilist and other vested interest arguments.

I would argue. not 2010. focus. I suggest. You can’t include us in your conversation about BA’s and MA’s and PHDS.N E S S MICK WILSON 39 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON came to this.. We’re pure. and areas of action: a standing reserve of metaphors. but what we are already doing. and so on. I think here is a lot more. That is where it originated. MA . What I have presented is precisely the kind of presentation that I would make to MA students in the first few weeks of their studies.. I think this is a very urgent matter for us. we’re different.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A .. let us to see it. We could not possibly be comprehended – even partially – within someone else’s discourse of means-ends or ‘learning outcomes’ or `the sociology of professions or ‘knowledge’. We need some new rhetorics of becoming to negotiate and challenge the dominance of the technocratic way of speaking in the world. All aspects of the life-world are taken as its legitimate concerns. the rhetoric of the ‘open’ – just as the universities’ rhetoric of the ‘idea’ – has now exhausted itself. not within the academies. It would be unfortunate for us under these circumstances to then shout hands off while we take every other discipline. materials.on the fringes of entrepreneurial capitalism that generated the spaces for avant-garde experiments which later became the paradigm for the open academies. is a conditional ‘yes’. But ‘we’ are always negotiating some kind of balance between the requirements of ‘regulatory’ ‘instruments’ and the embedded human situation of our contingent practicesÉ . We seem to have come along way off track on our question of the MA curriculum and appropriate teaching practices. more interesting problem or pre-occupation and tell us about it. So not Bologna. maybe not. post-pop. Where is this rhetoric to be found? Contemporary art practice – as it has emerged in the post-conceptual. How we were not the bearers of that conversation into the public domain..”. I would say “Welcome to ‘our’ uncertain world – the world of art educators.or find a better. How it has been left to the policy-makers and ceded to practitioners on the margins of the academy or outside the academy altogether.. and discourses. The answer.. to actually bring that into the public domain. profession and occupation as grist for our mill.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . show it to us.. If we are really asking today whether we can we make a clear distinction in the education of artists among these levels. though. and still retain some unsquandered potential. My presentation may seem far too generalized to be of any real value in helping to frame a particular MA program or deal with ‘urgencies’. that we were not already in a position to be the bearers of the public disclosure of what art educators do. post-minimalist era – has the characteristic of wishing – or at least appearing to be willing – to thematize everything given in experience. we should not be incensed simply by the fact that there is a bureaucratic imperative to adhere to a framework of BA . For these academies.my [institutional] horizon is not yours. and PHD..maybe change it a little. We should examine how it is that we 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . It’s a little bit yours now if you want to join.

) Cultural Stu di e s / Polit i c al T h e or y.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A .15-20.94 . A r teConte x to16 Mad r id: A r tehoy.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y Glazer. Ga rber.REFERENCES 3 – 4 EDITORIAL Ca m n it zer. 80 . A C E R TA I N M A . N . pp. pp.. Ma r jor ie ( 2001 ) A c a d emi c Ins t in c ts. It hac a: Cor nel l Un iversit y P ress. L ipsit z. Lu is ( 200 7 ) Frau d an d E du c at i on. Ja n ( 200 6 ) L essons in Mod es t y: T h e O pe n A c a d emy as Mod e l. ( 1988 ) T h e Mas t er’s D e g re e. Jud it h S.N E S S MICK WILSON 40 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT Ver woer t . P r inc iples of Refor m i n Deg ree St r uc t u res i n t he Un ited St ates. Stephen H. 94. 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . P r i nceton NJ : P r inceton Un iversit y P ress. in Jod i Dea n ( ed . JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . ER IC D igest Wash in g ton: ER IC C lea r i n g house on Hig her Educ at ion Spu r r. in Met ropol is M: E x pa nd i n g Ac ademy. George( 2000 ) “Ac adem ic Pol it ics a nd Soc ia l C ha n ge”. Berkeley : Ca r neg ie Fou nd at ion for Adva ncement of Teac h i n g. ( 1970 ) A c a d emi c D e g re e Str u c ture s: Inn o vat ive Approa ch e s . pp. 4 .96.

During the process of production. i. In this mode. I understand creativity as the pleasure of invention. Conversely. autonomous. thoughts. In fact. reflection is now connected with curiosity and the sense of finding the gesture. Conversely. problems. since isolating works of art is rather unproductive. is very much alive. and description. That form of reflection could be called reflection in the mode of an anthropological laboratory. and the image that captures life. since it is connected with meanings and images as phenomena guiding people to an understanding of what it means to be here and now. implying an overview of a range of positions while identifying conflicts. Artists need to understand the artistic field. Stating criticism is the first move. Art as artistic research seems to be the major cultural value and the major relevance of art today. and also radically new. education and the research environment. feedback. current art is relevant and important only because it is connected to the anthropological laboratory as a space for reflection. independent. However. The critical mode of reflection is different from reflection linked to formulation. Reflection as criticism is a tool for discovering how one can make a move in an artistic or creative project.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L AB O R ATOR Y B A R T V ER S C H A FFEL In thinking about art. Reflection. Rather than being merely critical. reflection is a form of applied thought. Art asks for a certain environment in which to establish an artistic production and to organize that production. over the last fifty years. is crucial so that making art 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . is connected to the phenomenon of art as research and the project of transforming institutions of art education into research institutions. and the desire for the new as inherent components of art and artistic production..N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . the major accent has been on reflective art practice as criticism. the process is very important. the sense of possibility per se. whereupon artists then evaluate what is needed to build on their position. art as reflective criticism or art as an avant-garde logic of negativity has ended in a free-floating game. the statement. i. In this sense. meanings. a critical confrontation with other voices. assess the positions. reflection in the mode of an anthropological laboratory. it is interesting for most artworks to demonstrate the stages. art is working on all aspects of life. then. and questions. the work.e.e. The other form of reflection is connected with art working on meanings and images. critical. art should to be free. I would like to distinguish between two different reflective practices. the two polarities of creativity and reflection need to be involved. Both the social function and the cultural function of art have been identified with being critical where being critical refers both to the institutional and the traditional. the metaphor. One is criticism. and how the final form has been chosen. articulation. the variations. Let me elaborate on the concept of anthropological laboratory.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL 41 RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . Clearly. and then decide what is relevant to make. and images. similar to playing chess. connected with working on meanings and images capturing life. art as a reflective research practice. implying a continuous reservoir of metaphors. From this perspective. In this context.

in a few minutes you can understand what the artist intends from a year of concentration and production. That led to ignorance of film and photography. thus. art is of course a public matter. Yet instead of developing into an institution where art could be deployed as an instrument to reflect upon culture. As a criterium for this. whereas the spectator can experience it in just a few minutes.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .itself becomes part of a complex process. the art world’s favorite discourse is about trends and the art market. during the 20th century. so they do not assume the responsibility of organizing work on the visual culture. The need for reflection. Here art addresses both art production and an audience interested in working on meanings and images a society could adopt. academic research in the universities fails to transform and. What is the danger of introducing a research curriculum into art school environments? That danger is connected to the issue of 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . Thus. be it visual or not.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL 42 RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . Therefore. Thus. Currently. Fortunately. communication is immensely important. seem to be free of its constraints. makes reflection a goal of art education. there are places that do not belong to academia and. but even more so in university education. therefore. When art is research in the sense of working on meanings and images as a form of reflection in an anthropological laboratory. That is the importance of topical art. there is what I would call the degree of condensation in the work of art. the need for a laboratory. belonging to the culture in an anthropological sense. Of course. all the management positions and decisions involve people with an academic background rather than professional managers. the problem is that reflection in the mode of the anthropological laboratory seems to be hidden in the art world. In fact. and ideological realms. universities are at least 90 percent self-governed. In Belgium. there is interest in cultural production in commercial.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . The question arises as to how one could introduce the idea of reflection in the mode of an anthropological laboratory into art education. universities are guilty of neglecting both cultural production at large and focusing on a living culture. In other words. private. the universities are transformed into industries of knowledge. Derrida once claimed during one of the famous Any Conferences on Architecture. the universities worked with a 19th century cultural map. is shunted onto art education. Indeed. The great gift of cultural production is that the entire process of creation is condensed in a transmittable form. I indeed think we need more preparation and more improvisation not just in art education. Therefore. However. It is the responsibility of the academic staff to include more preparation and more improvisation while creating a managed freedom and liberated space for artistic research. The work of art has to be addressed somehow in the community of people working on meanings. since the discourse produced for the outside world and the image the art world creates of itself are not about reflection. that what we need is more preparation and more improvisation. we need an organization and an academic management of freedom. it is disturbing that this type of artistic research fails institutional frameworks. However. The miracle of an art work is precisely that the artist spends a year creating it.

Those problems mainly emerge in the beginning and at the end of an artistic process considered research.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . and content. one should be able to manage a variety of issues.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A .N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL 43 RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 48 C O LO FON . That is the only context. a research program in an art institution – let’s say about Lacan’s gaze – will result in two interventions.unresolved art-related research problems. evaluate. since artistic research fails to connect with institutional frameworks. art as reflection in the mode of the anthropological laboratory clearly necessitates new forms of collaboration with various disciplines and institutions outside the art world and outside art educationÉ 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . In addition. What will be the focus? What will be the subject of reflection? What is relevant? How does one define research programs? How does one formulate decision and evaluation procedures? What will be the goal of the outcome of the research process? In an academic structure. it is clearly understood how to articulate. At the start of research trajectories. In the academic realm. content-wise. research areas are defined. However. the only topic for artistic research to work on is art itself. artistic research could possibly have. Thus. But how many responses will there be? How many people really read that type of research report? I believe that continuity in artistic research is a problem. Then what? The research might be a document to be sent out into the world. a statement and an exhibition called Lacan’s Gaze. document. and discuss the end product and how to connect it to the academic discourse.

is able to contribute to our knowledge about the world..N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . a methodology manifesting itself in artists’ texts and exhibition forms focused on knowledge production. That expectation seems to relate to the most recent debate in the world of visual art. similar to that of scientific research. today’s artistic research attitudes have brought reflection and theory to the center of attention. i. the situation of art institutions is rapidly changing all over the world. the paradigm of art education has been rooted in the artistic situation of the 1980s. one argues.e. Each artistic research project. artists are expected to fulfill the role of art critic and curator themselves.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . That situation made the Utrecht Consortium ( a research collaboration as of January 2008 with MaHKU/Professorship Artistic Research and Utrecht art institutions ) decide to map out the current practical and theoretical issues and developments in further detail. requires its own methodology. In principle. This novel situation has immense consequences for how one approaches competencies in the profession of art. such a model would be impossible to create.e. however. the artistic practice is considered a researching activity whose outcome. Until now. and by Documenta 12’s educational program in 2007. Today.RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM Today. the debate on artistic knowledge production mentioned above. However. one talks in a rather abstract way about art as a form of knowledge production. This was a period where reflection and theory did not play a major role in the world of visual art. These two activities used to be considered part of professional domains such as art criticism and curating. The establishment of the Utrecht Consortium is inspired by the 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A . In these international discussions. artistic knowledge production does not have a ready methodological model. by Manifesta 5’s focus on the academy in 2006. i. the exhibition models are still based on “alternative” ( non-museological) models from the 1980s. Institutions participate in international discussions on the repositioning of academies and cultural institutions as started by the exhibition Academy in the Museum for Contemporary Art ( MuHKA ) in Antwerp and the Van Abbe Museum in Eindhoven. Yet the institutional consequences of this debate have been subject to extensive reflection. In order to deal adequately with this novel situation. What does it mean for an exhibition space in 2008 to develop a policy directed towards knowledge production? After all. in contrast to scientific knowledge production. Conversely.. in light of the emancipation of artistic research.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 44 48 C O LO FON . In this debate. One of the significant problems the Utrecht Consortium has found is that today artists are expected to be able to ( theoretically ) contextualize and present their work in addition to expanding their artistic profession. the Utrecht Consortium as a network of research activities mapping out the outcome of presentations based on the production of artistic knowledge. the Utrecht organizations intend to establish an enduring network comprising the art institutions and the Utrecht School of Art while focusing on dynamic exchanges of views and expertise in the context of knowledge production.

the Utrecht Consortium intends to expand its views on the strategy of artistic presentations and exchange of knowledge as such. In addition to the Consortium partners and professionals in the field. With that.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A . That research will also focus on creating a more natural collaboration of the Utrecht School of Arts and various departments at Utrecht University. and gamma sciences.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . a platform has been created without the need for offices and staff with minimum overhead costs. Those issues could easily be expanded to local.so-called London Consortium. and the TATE – offering joint artistic research programs. and international levels while sharing networks. exploration of methods of presentation specific to today’s visual art as a form of knowledge production. In developing adequate presentation models in the form of both exhibitions and texts. Through this first case study. The Consortium activities will offer them possibilities to develop reflective capacities ( competencies ) crucial for presenting their own practice. The professorship will also hopefully be able to contribute to an international debate about the specificity of artistic knowledge production and its relationship with more traditional forms in the academic distinction of alpha. but still a structural collaboration exploring issues in the context of artistic knowledge production from the exhibition programs and their young artists at the art institutions. i. the Utrecht Consortium intends to be flexible. young artists will be able to enhance their communication with a variety of audiences. The results of this research will be published as a series of “best practices”. regional. (More about that research will be reported in greater depth in MaHKUzine 6 ). An initial example of such collaboration is artist Irene Kopelman’s PhD research study within the context of the Utrecht Consortium. Fine Art graduate students and young artists in the area will also be able to distill tools for critical reflection from the research and its results. Additionally.e. a collaboration among four institutions for education and art – the University of London. Kopelman explores whether the University Museum might be presented as the optimum location for exchange of knowledge between art and science. beta. ICA . models of presentation enabling both artists and exhibition spaces to adequately deal with topical situations regarding the position of visual art while clearly communicating with the audience. The professorship in Artistic Research seeks to employ the Utrecht Consortium project and its outcome to spark an urgently required discussion in the Netherlands on how art academies could prepare students for a knowledge-based practice. the production of artistic knowledge is the theme of various programs and projects to be initiated in 2008 and 2009 through the .N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 45 48 C O LO FON alien to visual art. Another core issue of the Utrecht Consortium implies the issue of the significance and position of an art academy in the context of the topical knowledge debate and its implications for didactic perspectives. At the core of the Utrecht Consortium is practice-based research. Using the historical collection of the Utrecht University Museum. the Science Museum. Unique to the London Consortium is the establishment of a “virtual” organization depending on the knowledge and ( limited ) input of the Consortium partners. Thus. occurring in a location 44 – 46 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A .

These models and their context of artistic knowledge production will be discussed in professional master classes and workshops producing a broad spectrum of knowledge and insight. The survey of “best practices” and its relevant models of presentation will be realized and published. Each invited speaker will also give a master class at the Utrecht School of Arts for MA Fine Art students and/or be involved in an expert meeting with 3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A .N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 46 48 C O LO FON .N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A . Internationally known artists will give lectures in the context of the theme of Artistic Knowledge Production based on their own research-based practice. ( HS )É The Utrecht Consortium is also made possible by the financial support of the Ministry of Education and Culture ( Sia-Raak ) 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH lecturers the day following the public lecture. Topics will deal with reflective methodologies and presentation strategies.unique collaboration of the Consortium partners. The professorship Artistic Research will also organize a yearly cycle of Utrecht Research Lectures.

N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM 47 48 C O LO FON .N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A .3 – 4 EDITORIAL A C E R TA I N M A .

CAMBRIDGE MA WILLEM DE GREEF. UNIVERSITY GHENT JAN VERWOERT.LUKAS ACADEMY. LONDON AND VIENNA SCHOOL OF ART. DUBLIN . MIT. PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPY. LECTURER CRITICAL STUDIES.M A H K U zi n e 5 3 – 4 EDITORIAL JOURNAL OF ARTISTIC RESEARCH SUMMER 2008 A C E R TA I N M A .NL 3 3 – 4 0 U N C E R TA I N M A .4 7 2 8 14 – 22 I S I T P O S S I B L E T O M A P … ? CLEMENTINE DELLIS C O N TA C T MAHKUZINE U T R E C H T G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F V I S U A L A R T A N D D E S I G N INA BOUDIER . DIRECTOR SINT. DIRECTOR VISUAL ARTS PROGRAM. M aHK U /M A EDI TORI A L DESIGN EARN MAHKU IS PART OF THE EUROPEAN ARTISTIC RESEARCH NETWORK . DEAN GRADCAM.N E S S 5 – 6 O P E N I N G : A C E R TA I N M A .BAKKERL A AN 50 23 – 27 P O S I N G S I N G U L A R I T Y JAN VERWOERT 28 – 3 2 R O O M F O R T H O U G H T SIMON SHEIKH 3 5 8 2 VA U T R E C HT THE NETHERL ANDS MAHKUZINE@MAHKU.N E S S MICK WILSON 41 – 4 3 A N T H R O P O L O G I C A L L A B O R AT O R Y BART VERSCHAFFEL WEBSITE W W W. BRUSSELS CLEMENTINE DELISS. ROTTERDAM MICK WILSON. BA LK EM A ARJEN MULDER B I B I S T R A AT M A N FINAL EDITING A N NE T T E W. PA R T I C I PA N T S UTE META BAUER. PROFESSOR PIET ZWART INSTITUTE. DIRECTOR FUTURE ACADEMY. GRADCAM ( DUBLIN ).M A HKU.N L RESEARCH REPORT 44 – 46 UTRECHT CONSORTIUM EDITORIAL BOARD HENK SL AGER (GENER AL EDITOR) 48 C O LO FON 48 A N NE T T E W. BA LK EM A L ANGUAGE EDITING JENNIFER NOL AN T R A N S L AT I O N S GLOBAL VERNUNF T DESIGN CHRIS T I A A N VA N D OK K UM. MALMO SCHOOL OF ART. EDINBURGH SIMON SHEIKH. TOGETHER WITH THE HELSINKI SCHOOL OF ART. MALMO SCHOOL OF ART BART VERSCHAFFEL.N E S S WILLEM DE GREEF M A H K U zi n e JOURNAL OF ARTISTIC RESEARCH H O S T E D B Y T H E U T R E C H T G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F V I S U A L A R T A N D D E S I G N 7 – 13 U N D E R P R E S S U R E U T E M E TA B A U E R ( MaHKU ) I S S N : 18 8 2 . SLADE SCHOOL OF ART.

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