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The Pafladium

~(

[)TI

Book of

Cumprlcd

hy :\)"Ulww

Halt n t

RCIdlrdledndCompUed

by

Mllnhew Bal,,"! Editor IIhUI Ale~ M4to:IIIIUYII
",,101'$

Au.i)rey

Boen ICII .penl et :Bradford Kevin SI.em'b.le:dD
Slemble:da Oalen!

I\'rl: 01 recll on
Kevln

Keylln'n,
MBrlhe"" Typ .,

Maryann
P!ubllaher

S'lemblcdll
BoOk!,

PalladIum

tABLE OF CONTENTS
IntroduCllon
A~el

"..............
"...............

"
5,

Thrown Clubs MIICt:S " KnlveJ Tiger S".·ords
Lanrern

WClipoltl
" "

" "

"
".. "

"
"

" "

'
"" "......

10 13 14 18 20 26 28
" 31'

Blow·Plpes

"........... " "......

"
,

""

"

"" ••"

CIa

Sbleld

Boarsword ,Inlalo
Slck,1 e Sworda Shnrk

32 " " " ".. " ' "
.....•. " "•. " "

"

"

32
33 34

"..........................................................................................

Tool h Club.siSwordJ

P'0'lo!!8rml StllY'eJ
PlIl'ty.11I8 We'pOlI3 Chglnl IIndl't'hlPl

3'
42
44 46

"
".. "

"

""...••..... "•.••..•..•. ".. .•.••.••.••. .•.••••••.••.•••

tile P.•Illdlum:.BooIr.of EJ:OIICWeA!m ,. publllhed by P,U.d'lum 'BooII'. 5669 CIPler, De noll •. MI. 48210. t0COP)'TIBht 198'1· by Kevin Slembleda. III ~JI r IIlIon lei Copyr Ighl 198'1 by KeY In 51mm bled&. A 1'1 :r.lglIlI r(l$(!.1'\'ed
underlilc In PI" or

foruselnre¥le"

Universal Copyright Conyentlon. woole whhout ""Incn permlulon

NOlblng m8ybc~cproduced from rhe pub.ll.her. excepl

..

INTRODUCfION Almost II'" ryene who pllya ranlNY role-playln 11m or Iller hll tbe de Ire 10 Creal I cbaraaer "00 II unique and "'I 8pI.rl from all Other.. Whel her It be II fie of dreJ'S. IW{Ude;,pauel'n 01 ,peach, or .omel hln .. lse, Ulme 01 Ihe motl chllleng.ln8 lind re ardin, eJperfences 10 I role-play·ln ,Ime " pi, In I 10'IU,. ullfque characler. On IIlIpecl or ch r rer which may be "It red by Ih pia er to promote Ihal char.c:ter', unlqueoeu I. the..., of Unl/IUII weapol'! or comb'" 61yllli. Thl. boo olr., I number of wupon which, elth r by lhelr deat,n Or \1M HI Ihem apart from "'hll mOil people would ",lISldeT IIoIK'm.'or o,r<:lll'!lry. Thl, does 1101 mean thaI Ih~ weapon are bener or more lelbal Ihln "normll" eapons, ~uch U I lord,spen, or mace. b'lI rllther wlliciently rare 10 Ihal on ...ho used Ihem would boo con jd red unlqu : II te 'I u rar IS mosl ranlalY lam orlda ate concerned. It Lr ,u 8<'.$led Ih.1 a plnyer who wlshel hll/her charseter 10 use one of Ihese ex.otlc weaponl ehee llro' wllh th .,m emnuer 10 Inlureno argumentlcome up Iller. It II rhe Dm mlllter who ~u Ibe 11mIII of Ihe arne and lIe/!b "hould be, notified aboul 110 111 CIlT.ete.r p'atU on II 108 the weapon 10 III , an bonu~, dam.,e. or penIII lies c n be, figured eur. The .'u glve" for (rom The Palladium Boot. of W eh 01 ,bern II v:plal ell (ol fowa: N,me: Sel fe.pl~nalo.r)'. ~ Tbe e.ner&lrOllp 10 .."b.ldI Lbll "'elIpon ~Ion .. he ,'OtIPI af H fled (HI, Knlvv: I'), {lscellaneouJ 1M). Pole Arllll (PI. peart (Spl, aocl S "fda IS"". Len b: TIl len th of II! welpon In melers. ~ b rna... or the weapon In llosnm .. Dc.If: " relative IndiUllon of how "quIck- II weapon Is, illed on bel. nee, mIllS. ere, The lower IN. number tb. tH!lIer. Parry: A relallve Indica lIon of how e •• 11 Ihe welpon can parry Ollie•• nlCks. The III,h r the num bet the beller. AnKlt T1:m 01 all ...eapotU were dell ned for rbe leme INflJOl(.. fOtU" basic all I~ ar CUI, ehop, IhrUSl, and Impact. The maln differences betW en II cUt and II chop are I m.",_ and CUTVIIlureof I bl de. Symmetry. Being tb'l any ...a.pon may be Ihro n, Ihll II I relative 100 Ullon of how eflecd"'l1 Ihe arm ,",OIIld be III D ml... tle, The low rlhe number Ibe beller. Olma A ,·elll've IndJe don of how much dim II tills weapon would ceuse 10 on • ver"50" UT el. ~. '0(111 of IRler 1 aboul I e .. upon, usually lbe leo r.pllie I rea 01 orl In. f ') In Ihll column Indlcauu rbe w lpon ill prlm.rlly UJed hb IWO hindi. _ner It Ii up to the arne milt or 10 dlPI Ih Vllu, I the wupons 10 hllllher o..'n Clmp In. for eJ;lmpJe the 1m mUle' may enoose 10 evalusre II "'"apon with • dam. e nun of one by ..aln a four-,Ided eIle, • weapon rllied al ,'1(0 "'lIh a ,la-sided die. • ... ,In of Ih(ee Ilh lin el hl-"ded die, and 10 on; or h ma ehoose 10 use ,he dim number lIS • multiple of four, • x or el hi,11Ied dlcee. A no, aboul the lIIu."IIIO"", on III DdJed ."Ipon, ('''''''" Indlcalel .... ch portiOn of Ihe blade II h :.hup. 'lor

fixes
EPSILONIEYE ....XE
Be.!ldes Ihe mace, Ibe ue was one of the mon ancient hand held weapons (l!,!erved solely for warlere. The ea.l)I clvlllzBtlon of ~uopotamla and ether areas of the Middle East developed B number of copper lind bronze war UI!S ",hlch were very similar In deslgll and use. The epdloll axe Is tbe older of IheJe two forms and WIIS designed to be used agBlnn warriors who wore no armour. II conslsred of a straight or 511ghlly curved handle 10 which 0 nllhe. long, curved blade was 8118Cbed, thl. made It suitable for cunlng 3118e s, The blade Itself ",0,' tnserved Into the ahllft and secured by leal her Ihongs. The eye B-1... developed a. a weapon for U4e against armoured foe,.. The blade of I he 8Jle Is m uch shorter and wider, I hus makl ng II capable of plercl ng merat splint arm,our. These axe heads were secured 10 rne shaft by means of 8 seeker, 0 much more secure and ef'Iecuve means than the epsilon axe, In general. these weapons were used one-handed; the other band held Ihe shield. 1I0ng overh nd .troke. were used with rhe head and upper body being rile main target.

E,..sILON

~

I

I

EpIUon Axe
Eye Axe

H H

.8m .9m

1.7kg I.Skg

2 2

Chop Chop

2
2

3 3

FRANCtsCA
we~ pOn o( Ihe fral'!k'lI w.Q!Ued from the 11~,h 10 ',heelghrh ce nturle$ A.D. It bi bard 'to lay whethe.r the .... apon wu e named after the people Or Ihepeople after the weapOn. Alt.hough the frQ.1>C11C1i ould be used as a bafld.lleld c weapon, It Waf al,mo" e.xch!fI,vely used U II 'mlulle. The

Tllere II 'perbn.p.no more (ImQIllI fls;bllnl Ell ro,pe th n ,t he f fa flClJ.C.B. TIIII charac t erlJt Ic

ueln

fnnktsll ractlc was 1:0 hurl the weapon at an odvernry 0 nd then c hariel n willi ."ord or ~penr. The heov)'ue ellller .Iocop.aclt.at,ed the enem)' or brokeblJ shield. Tnus, depr,lved ofthll Impoo81l1 ~fenllYe Item, Ihe funklsh .. arrter held a dlstlnct advantBge. A$ wllh any weapon theree.xlltl numerous dl'lll'I<:ll)' dlnerent. descriptions andu.lmples of fundlC& wblch hao made an on~encompDI!ln8 pIcture of Ihe arm very dlHlcult. 'ngentlnl, Ille 'franelJca coh5llt'l of an Iron hea.d __ lIh a slightly curved 1111. The halt and I.he b.lt areal an obtuse anIle. rather rhan fhe normal nlne'ty <legrl!es. Tbl. I"se anIle Mables Ihe foroe 01 Imp."'t 10 be more eully Ira~·
FelTed bre!rlt.
10

nandard

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ball

end

therefore

make$

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Itkely

10

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THIN ...~£

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10(£5

Name

Txee
H
H H H

Lenglll
.5m .~m .6m
.6m

!'.!111M
I.~kg

~
0

P.II'!I

"tid T!I!!! Chop
Cltop/T.hl'll!!

&!'!1
'2 '2 2

Cam

fraDcbc. Thrust.l"g A.1e Be.ordeo;l
ThIn Axe War Ale

'2
.2 '2
'2

'2 '2 '2

Ukg
l.5'k8 I.Jkg 1.,.9kg

0
0 0 0

Chop
Chop

MIner'. AI.e

H

Am

'l

ell opm

ru~\

2.

'2

CD

,\
The tribe! of Cent,ral Africa used a number of liKes for ceremonlat purpO$e&. Cenerally, Ihele ...caporu con'IU ed, of a baseball-bat "Ilapedhandle 10 ... hlch lined II rather lorge, hea,ylly curved blade. TIle blade I"elf II driven lruo 'he hM,dle,o Iy.pe of nulng ...!lleh II nOI nearly es seeurelU I he $C)C'k ed lI.Ie hea,ds 0 f many CII'Itures. et Bell Ides rhelr II se Inri t IIUII, 5.oe<l(Ic"" and olh e r cere monlel. Ihese weapons ""ere also carrted as II 'badge of rank.

'$

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V.JEP "' .... AM.SnlJ_

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ANOt:W;AN '>,ATTU

IIKZ

~
s.vQe' Au Elephant Me AD&olaJl a.Ulll Mil

.!U!!
H H H

LeWb
.4m

.M!!!
I.Skg

Om:

~
2 2 2

Atuct
Chop Chop

Type!

m
3

D.m
2 3 2

.7m .6m

Ukg
I.'kg

Chop

CD

aULlOVA

BULLOVA
of Bllllov8 wn ~ lar e (wo-handed flghtln axe of Chol B.gpur In IndJa. The de:slgn of the blad "Dried In Width. Many of thl!l!e Dxel are lilted .. lth spJkesDI I he end of their lIarls I" tbey mlly be Uled 10 Ihrult 05 well. tribes

The

_;2!;.,
,

~
Bullova

~
H

Lea til

M!!!
2.0 II

0eJ:

.f!!!l:
2

An-=k Type!
Chop

m
2

.Q!!!!
J

I.Om

CD

OTHER

AXE- TYPE

W£Il,PONS

Hf/IU. 8ATS:
CU«JPEAJo/ M/mIIJ. AXEJ, OFTlN fJSED AS ""MIte

~J,

BIRP'S HEAD CtuBS:
OF W£llPOAl'.s K£RE M.'IP£ OF HAA'O_D 1l.S£P &Y
NATIIID' GENERALLV TH~£ 7#'.00

o o o o

1WJ"""'1A
SO,IITH

OF N'RIGA. AM> TffE /'M:.IF IC •

o

_Name German War Hammlllr Blrd's Hurlbal Head Clu,b

~
H

Length 1.2m 100m .Sm

M!!!
2.4kS

Dex

~
2

Attack Types
Thrust/Impact Impact Chop

.§I.!!!
3

.Q!!!!
2

H
M

l.2kS 1.2kS
0

2
2

2 J

CD

'Cbroum Weupons
KAPAK
The Kapak Is 1I smoll Ihr'(lwlllg axe which "OJ employed

by the Batak. The auak are 0 group of ulT'cmely warlike people who 1I~'e on Ihe northern portion Or SUmatrll.
rhelr wBr-like rendencles, Ihey are also cannibals. Kapak conslns of a Ihln meul! head .. tllch I! at! ached 10 a Uat, wooden handle; • he whole affair Is abollt ene-rhlrd of a meter In leng.h. It was normally carried Incolllpicuou.ly on .he back JUst below the neck or (1) the ror~l!rrn ",nderneath the sleeves, In these posh Ions It can be gripped hUlaolly and rhrewn, The normal tollge of Ihls weapon W $ about n~e meters and the B lak showed exrreme skill with It. A wurlor could easily pin an enemy's foot to the ground or his hand or arm to a tree. Even Ir a pin was not achteved, a hit In an unprotected ponlon of Ihe body would be an exrrernely crippling blow. As with any I hrowlng axe, Ihls weapon could be used In the hand' In emergency condlllons,buL such usage was not 100 cemmon, Be!ldes

The

8ArAK

kAPAK

Kapak

H

.4m

1.1kg

o

2

ChOp

2

CHAKRAM
Tilt! Chakr m was an Indian weapon whIch w85 similar the now famous Japanese shurlken. The chakram was a II M lIet!1 ring anywhere from .1 10 .3 meters In diameter. The outer edge of IhIs ring wo~ sharp. Seversl chakrllm could be carried on a point ed turban. In comrast 10 I he Japanese shurlken. especl ally I he srar-shaped ones, rhe chakram wa,s used 10 CUI and sever as opposed to punCIlIrlng and peoerrarlcn, If thrown properly the chakram wus said to be able 10 cut through a tWO celllirneter slaik of bamboo al a distance of 30 meters, There aresomeaccounu of Ih ese weapons bel"g Ihrown by (wlrling them on the Inde~ finger before release. This seem to be B rarher clumsy and tnnetteeuve way 10 use Ihls weapon. A more reasoneble meehod Ihrowlng the wellpon would be ...hh an ecross the body. backhand motion.
10

of

_lOllS

V,fR/(P' W.JfZ E .IoNP WII6H r; THE 0II7!R £1>GE OF 1'H£U W~()IoI.J AIU SHARF:

C-'"'4~

Name Chakrnm

.!II!!.
M

Length .3m

Mass .15kg

.Q!!.
0

Ptm'y 0

Anacl< CUI

Types

~

Dam

®

SHAKEN
Sha en were .peeWc form of th 00.... ubiquitous japane.e Shurlken. All oppo,ed 10 ,helmall blade type or 518r shaped did IYpe, the Shaken "'8& 0 more Ihree dimensional form of Ihl weapon. M 8 consequence of t hls form the shaken wcre larger and somewhBI heavier I han Ihe other 1)'peS. The eneral shape of the .halten was somewhal lite I) four-sided die, a rerrnbedron, Each of the Indlvldu I .plkes were bout [lve cenumerers long. These weapons were usually Ihrown wlt h II .harp whip-like mOllon of the

wrbl.

KANG .... oo R

RAT rat, or weet-w 1Il1, of AuslraUa was nick. II w s mode of hard wood wllh each end. It \tiU thro n by swinging several times and then leiling go wllh Effective range 5 aboul fon), meters,

~RAT nI_NO

nC.1(

Th an aroo a polnred throwing conical polnlli on II back ond lonh on underh nd ler.

P·IAU The Piau D Mal y Ian Ihro lnll Iron. similar In [unct icn (0 Ihe J panese shuriken. Unl! e most .huriken, I he piau "'OJ rather ploln-loo IMg weapon, resembltn n small axe he d. All IIh,'mllar weapons, tlte piau could be fairly 8$Uy cone aled underoearh Dllliv 'I. sash. sleeve. or 5 fang.

~
Sh en RBt

Lenglh

Mus .1

De.l 0
0

~
0

.... aclt n
Thru.sl

Ty[)eS

.fu:!!!

.Q!!,!!

M

.ISm
.6m

Kansaroo

.Skg .1 g

Thrun 0
Impact

Piau

1'.1

.Im

0

®

BOOMERANG The Boomerang )1 D somewhat We,sternlzed name gIven to the Ihrowlng sllc1<s used by the aboriglnlea In AU5trDlio. Only Ihose designed as toys will return to lhe rhrower. These weapOns had an eFfective runge of about 20 meters.

IlFR1CNV

.s7IC,I(,s

THROWIJfG

":

'}

\
THROWING Sticks ml5.!lIe STICKS and rocks are certainly the mOSI ancient of weapOns. Nearly every culture had some SOrt of specifically d .Igned .Ilck which could be thrown wllh a cenaln degree of accur cy. These were normally used for hunllng bird" and small game. all

Tbrowlns

StiCk

Name

!.l.I!!!.
M

Lenllb

Perry
I

.6m

Au,act Type!! Impact

§l:!!!

1

O.m

-1-

-ClOJC'VP OF THE DAIrr.1

BRUCH

METSUBISHI
The

- fUKIDAKE
Mellubllhl

weupoM which wB.s Wa3 a J apenese II IlJ populnr among ninja designed 10 blind an enemy. ornelal_ who would wam to as well DI 18 enrorcemenl III e crlm nail ali v I!. In 115 normal term, rne meuublsbl as II small. wood.en bo.l. ellher round or -Square. which was hollowed OUt and could be opened. On either end of Illls fhOl box was fitted II moulhplece alld B ,I>orl IU.be. Because Ibe weapon was 50 small, it could be e illy concealed. There were D number or lubsl81lCes which CQuld be PUI In.lde the meliUbl$bl: dependln on wbal wu des red. Ground pepper and dUll could blind. powdered lal$ or neutes ""auld blind and It.II Die. olurally this weopOn Is very hon range ond ould be relBllvely useless untess lur'prl.e w BI Bchl eved,

AnOlher Blr-powered Japanese weupOn .. e. Ihe Fu Idake 8 blowpipe. Although these were not normally ule4 III weapon, thcy could easily be uled 10 polson IQmeone. They were gener lIy ralrly lon8. boul two mele" n lenglh. The darll were fhled whh paper con~ on Ihe ends 10 ensure n Inlghl fit. The mouthpiece was fitted off to the ,Ide of Ihe main lube. 8 fealure which pre emed me aCCidental 'nh,lIng of rbe d rr. Eflecrlve range .. a, apprQ.1Imulely len melerL which

w...

MetlUblJhI
FukJdeke

M
M

.Im
2.0m

.1 II
• kg

Speolal

Special

Blowpipe

@

C nbs

NUNCHAKU

" TONF'A

Tonfll were 1'0'0 ,agrlcuhuml "'erl!o'llIO used as weopons. So me sou rees laY rho I , hese ·we epa"s" . or III teest I hel r us<: II! wnpo!l!i" came (lrSI from Oklnaw8, on 1,5o.nd' which I was raken over by Ihe Japallde (olrly ellrly In rhelr feudal perlod; As !'here were ra,h,er ".'Ict IIIW5 concerning the carryIng of s.. ch obvious weapOn, as sword! by the lower c,la.sses, II W'IIS only II mOil er of ,I,me (.and nece&S~ty) before eomrnonplace ,tools would: be used for prorecucn, The nunchaku Is II weopon which Is, oo""perhaps oa fom(>U! 11$ I.he shuTiken (due mainly' 10 the numerous man 1'111 arts movies whl.cll were produced In the I 970't). Orlgl:n811), the nunchalcu wos an agricultural flail, used 'to separare rice from tllechalf. Basically It oonll.sll of two ,hor! wood,en sticks, oboullhlr.tycenlimeterl long, Joined IO,8elheI at one!! nd by a 1110rt Ie "a'l II of rope, leal her ,or c h a I n. Wbenproper,ly u~ Iht! nuncb8ku C'ould be Il devllllI 8tlng weapon a~ It cO\lld be ellllily used to '[r;lke, patrl'. emlillale, drsarrn, (>revlln .ulngleDn opponent. The Tonta ""IIS orlglnaUy used 10 husk and polish rice. I[ ccOntl, rs of lI"'OO<ie nboard or .rob,abou ( 40' til 60 cent Imerers lon8. (0 ,,'hlclla shof'l bundll! b mounted' peI,pendle\l" l~rly near one end. In combat thIs weapen can block Pllack$ ...hen II .""u alona (he forearm, or 1,1 can be used to Illb or club de,pendlng on me clrCllms! snces, Some modern POUce departments lise nlghtsllcks "'h ell ore "ery IIm II af ,10 [he bul.c dieslg n of I he ton" D.

Thl! Nunchol<.u and thl! (0011 used I'n J epan ",hlch

No !lie Nuncholt\l

TYe9
M M

Length
.8m .8m

M~
LOkg 1.0kS

Om.

Parry 'l

AnackTytM}!

~,

.R!!!!
2 2

Impacl Impaee

3

Tonfa

@

MAQUAHlIIl T
",,2 TEe: 1WoR" IIIJ

MAQUAHUU.T
upon warrort'. NOI ani}, were l!>elr wur IIl,e I"ndelleles deJlgned 10 5ublug8le 8m1 enet nlbul!! from I heir ~llhbor!, bUlla provide nenflees 10 I ne gods o:s well. The Aue.: '"'arnor wore a IUIt 01 ormourwhleh as mode of quilt puddm; high ran III "'"riO" Oft!:!11 had I'helr ormou. covered with lIBU.' • 11Il' or ea Ie futher.; elaborate head-drenet were ""orn U ,"",ell, One' cernmen ""elpon of Ihe Alleawu D nal wooden club II u lIded ",I,hpl eces 01 ohs.l dl, II. Obsidian Is ~ 51 one Which can be chlp,ped 10 for,m ellremel,), 4barp edgu,shotp<i!r In f DC 'lban I modern lie .I'pels., Till. we a,pon, c IIII ed II i'I1oquubull'l, wu ad m lI'abl I· su] leo:!, 10 pen"lr~un8 'Ibe ,c,onon pedded armour of I he area.

The

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baud

almost

emlr"l),

KOT/ATE
MAORI
MAf)£

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$'TONE

KOTlATE TII@ Muons of Zealand UI~ 8 number of 11,0n.!! duro 0 f whle II I lie' K01rare, Men I, ami I be ,Po1u are exa m pies. These ""Uponl we re IIIghl I' prj zed posIllS!Ilons of the Moon and were 011en hand d' IIDwn from gelM!taUoll to gene.lIuon. II e 11\.. swords of mOil' cult urel, III $lI weapons of I en lad name:.. like ~fBce- e arer". 0& "'ell.

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or

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M.OPt; WOOl)

POUfUCP _1>101"

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CLUB

.!::l:!!!!!:
Maqulihulll

~
H H H H H

Len tb .8m l.4m Am ,Sm .Sm I.Om

Ml!!
I.Skg

De~

Par;ry
2 2

... TlE!a! uad Imll~CI
ImpBC"[

!l!!!
2 1 2

Dim
J
4

0
2
0

War Club !FIjl.1 Kodllie
Meral Petu Flat Club

4.61<8 1.2kg 1!.Okg I.Okg

Imput! Im,p, ImpK! Impaci
I

2 2 2 2

0
0

H

I.8kg

®

I

MIl O~ I' C,UIIiI;"Tl'~'
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MAO.'!" I ..I'I'ZII\t CllJJ!J (NtW U~lAN')

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'''''''AN OX I'1AC£
£I.IROP/iAN PAt-OEIl MACE

'NPIAIV GVDIT MAC£

Name flot Mace Mace

.!.l'll:!!
H H H H H

length .5m .5m .5m

Mass 1.8kg 1.9kg 2.0kg 1.7 kg 1.8kg

Dex

Parry

Attack Impact Impact Impact

Tll:!!O!

~
2 3
2

Dam 2

Dauer

3 3 3

Ox Mace Sickle Quoit Mace Mace

.om .6m

3 3

Impact Impact

2

2

"

NOaa

MI\'£~

WiTH METAL . SPJ!aS

VARfOUS EUROPEAN

MACES

®

Ifl~ CENrVIUTWL CQN/11fiKTt:P OF M£TAL THo.or.J UNOJ A fd) 5T,rJ(}I!lP WITH 'I. Ml'T.o:, NAt".

WfTH

WOODCN

I/WN SPIIGfS

weDGE

MlUTARY .F1.AJLS
nail In Its ,Implleu form, the n,u I" 1001 fo.rthr'elhl,ng g!!"aln: It gelleroHy ukel Ihe form of a long hendle 10 which Is aUBch· ed Dillon length of board by me~!IIor II IlIort leoglll of chain. The most bll.5lc Improvement upen Ihe basic dellgo, 81 least 10 terml ,of .... l!rf,Pr~ ...MtO.fIr .b.e striking head oft be fl811"llh IIIet ali .pl kea. OllIe r fI eII' de&lgll5 did away "Witb tbe old wooden beod ahole~her and limply f1n,ed t"em Wltb eha:l1ll ,ltlaebedlo (piked ball$. Some flail, b8d '11'0. thr~ ereven more " r Ud", beatU. A""lthaJ flail type weapOfII, thOi! de&1811 ..., for 8110 very powerrulblow, 81 rhe force of the 'T/.ln8 ., concanIreted' Into the, !!cadof the weapon. by vlnueof It I fleuble nature, Thl' lame fle.ubUlI)' 11150.110"" Ibe weapon 10 1'\ ,.Ike eve fa nd a.l'o~nd 811 ene m)'" able tdo

o Wei. It I exIl1nnce

Iv! wltb

m~y

to n ,I:mple P8rlcuIIUrQI,I'0Q1.

medieval

...eapens, the

mUllary

L!!!I!!!
1.6ni

ON -1-

AlrKt.

rrtip~et

TYpe!

!I!!!
3

®

THROWING

KNIVES

III Central Africa the throwing olre was used rather eXlen~lvely. These 5t rangely shaped met al weapons would be of lIu Ie corn bill value Ir used In any ether fashIon. Due to the numerous proJecllon., all of wh ell lire sh rp, lethal blows Can "0511)' be given 10 Ihe Intended 18rgel, especially If h has little or IlO armour on. The throwing knife was thrown horizontal!' from rlaht to terr. The mu!mum r n e W8$ !ald '0 be about 0 mefers: accurat e eoo,ugh throws, 10 severa ,man's leg have been achieved 81 20 to 30 meters, Al closer ranges" 10 10 I S rnerers, rnese weopons con p nerrate wooden boards up to 2 cenum ten thick.

~
Throwing

~
Knife M

Lenllh .7m

Mass
1.2kg

.!2!! f.!!!l
2

Allod Tl2!::!!
Cbop

§:.t!1

Dam

3

@

,.

,,..Kntoes
.,
f •

YAA/DVS

AFRICAN

TflRlJWfNC,

fRONS

TWI.l EAST Nit/CAN Tl'fitOLolQi\(j l~jJJ

SUDAN """'RIlW,IIIa JRDNS

®

The Siun ka more wcopons which are used .In the Malayllan area In conjunction whh 8 nahllng Slyle known as Kuntao. Kunreo Is ChlneJe "Shtlna Ityle which employs b<nh empty-h nded and armed techniqut!$, A large number of weapons ere used In this system. The 'IOIIgkam are 8 pair of hand held weapons abeer hal f a meter long. They resem b.le Ions m'llol IIrrow head. 10 which arealtDched wooden hand Ion. Althou.gh admirably suited {or Ihrultlng, viCiOUS slashes can be mode with Ihe point or III barbs. By employln. tWO al once, courueru cks can e slly be launched wllh one hand while p frying with the ether, TJALUl< There 1.5 a (arm of the morllal Dr! pemjak-IIJst pr acIn EasL J bve known a' 5elill hatl terare, like man marllal an,. Ihls form combines rSlher Intricate mechanics whh 8 number of phllos.ophlcal and r IIglou! beliefs; rhe an is entirely influenced by rh Muslim fallh. The IJaluk il a short nlfe which Is u ed xlenslvely In sella hall cerate, The reverse CUlling edge of the blade mllkes strikes by .he 'lulu Yat)' dlrrlcul, .0 parry Or bloc wit hout !uJutnlng Injury, The weapon Is best D. close quan ers and In surprise 51! usdon!, such El5 oB9Blnolloo. The Ljaluk Is generoU)' corrled In a c:oncealed position. chller In loose filLing germerus or In D wid 5&l1h. In these posilions lien qulc Jy be brought Into DeLlon.

ether

uced

TiTALUK

Name Sl8ngkem TJ.,Iui.

1J::R! 1!!!I.!.h
M
K .Sm

MIISI .S 8
.3kg

.Q!!
0

.!:!m.
2

Aneck Typ!!
CutlThrusI CUI

~
2 2

.25m

@

TWO

IfNIVE.s

01'

r_

CONGilQ

FANTAIL

OAGlitll:

Fontall

Da&&1!I'

K

.3m .3m

.2Skg .25 g

o

Forked Tongue 0 gger

o

CUI

KATAR
The Kalar was a rather unulual weapon uled by Ihe Hindus In Indili. Blllically I~e weapon conlill ed of a Ii'll of parellel bars wll h B knl fe blsd IIIIIChed 10 onl! end and 0 palr or erO" bars which sen'ed III 0 hllndle. BecDuse of Itl con$lruCllon, ,he normal 1!llck would be II thrun md as If punching. The DOrmal blad as double-edged bUI curved. double blad d. nd even Irlple bl d d "arleties are ~no ..'n. Somelimes Imllller blade, were concealed within the lar er or rbe blade was dllli ned 10 sprtng OUt 10 form a triple I'll ded nlfe. The longer "enlonl, whle~ were a.cluBlIy swords were caUed pal(j. These weapons had .ather elebor II! hand Dnd fore-orm guard!..
>

_T"'~ PO",LJCANt'1'1
H£O,VT FOR.KEP KAT...""

VARfOIlS

STYLES OF KATAR

~

....

~

..

\

,

,

Nam Kotar

.III!! ~
K
.4m

~
.5 g

De..

Perry

AlI8Ck

TXe!:!

!l!!!
2

l2!.!!!
2

Thrun

@

BRACELET

DAGGER

AI!bough many ilode!IClI dey eloped. WUPO"' .. blcb CQUld'be cotICealed under daCha, the l,ruceh:1 lIasge.r II perbaps one of the ,I mpllm yel eHe,cllve designs. Ge.nerol.ly the cIa,ser hself I,. 11r81,1I1" double-edged ,.,upon wI'!b • ,mall 1>111. The ~8tJb~rd ...... 8uacbed to 8 wrbl bracelel .. blch O(Iuld be fined over the for'earm.The h(lle.frolr .... 81>oUI one tblrdof ..mele:r :In leoglhalld ()onoealed by a loose fl 'It Ing robe or 'h I:1. . An ArTlcan !rlbecalled the HallUll made e~lens!ve

use

peoples af 'fhe Sudan "her,. tbey llved du.e lothair claim aJ 011,hI81'1.)' being a !tllle of Imllhll. 5mb"" .. era .hunned: 01.11 of fear of Ihelr ma.glc 111111 .. hJeII .aye bylbe other

of

lhe

brace:!el

daaser..

The

HIUDllnre

shunned

Ihelr .. orU the power 10 kill.

TRIPLE

O.AGGER

The trlple~dll'8:er "lisa ,"'a8pan used by El!ropean fa ncers, In I.tl closed posl!'lon, IIIJ s wea ponD ppea"ed 10 be II plll.ln dagger, but ...hen 0 release catch ..... pra:ued, 1"'0 side blade. - pushed 01.11 from 'Iha cemral blade 10 form a, 10'1 of 1rldenl. In Ihls form the ...eapon wo. rather lIo.nd)'ln parrying f8.pl,ertond other 11I",lllng type weapons,

KUKRI
Thb le.gendaryknlfe Is Illep.rlncipal ...eapon ·of Ille Gurka. of epa], The .. eaponls u$uaUy carried In g leolher Ih eo t I! 1110 ng wi (h 1 0 much sma II k nl vo.whlch ..... er ij:'e 'h8 pad the $,me. The ceerer of gro ".1 of this weapo" ...as ·....11 r)' . fo,w.prd. lind os Iych, very he.avy andde~Muu InB 1)10"" could b<) IIChleved. It wU laid thaI these 'kn!veJ once IIra",n "'er~nol to be .helllhed unrll Ihey drew blood.
,

"
, ,
... ,SMlI.Q OP:CAArEg

IrVX·R..'·

OF

NIIiTII)N.OiL

QURXM.

KNln

/

"
I
I

'

,

Type
K ~rlp:le

Len!lh .3m .3m

MIISiI .4kll
•. kg J .6kg

o o o
2

TIII'U$!

.Oager

K K

Thtl!51

KIik.rI

.5m

ChopfThruJI

@

KRIS There IS perhaps no more famous a .... epon In Indonesia e I han 'he Kris, In lIS basic form the krts Is II wavy btaded knife/shari s w ord, double edged. designed prlrnartly for rhrusnng, A krts is somewhat more deadly Ihan a sHaigh I bladed hi fe In combat in ,hm IlS wavy blade makes a larger wound and can more readily penetrate between bones. The number of waves In 'he blade IS always odd. ranging Irom ihre [0 t wenty-nlne, The blade usually has some crack. In II and these are said to possess magical powers. The pande or smith who forged the kr is held an honored position In rh Indonesian culture because 'hey were believed to have ae ess to the supernatural, His work was a secrer art veiled In myst ry, The rough appearance of the blade. ahhough desired, was due mainly 10 the crude methods aod mat erlals (usua II y iron meteorites) used by rhe smith. I. was betleved 'hat certain features would determine wberber II krls would bring good or bad luck to irs owner. The number of limes it has shed blood was Important lIS was 1he repu.! a uon of I IS sm it h. t he pan ern of the blade, and 01her [hi ngs as well. II was cerral nly belt er '0 lnherlt a krls man '0 buy one. There were a number Of "rests" which could be performed on me weapon 10 determine its magical character. EJesmples of a rls' powers Include: It could kill a vlci I m when 51 mply polm ed 81 hi rn, It could kill by bel ng Slabbed Into me victim'. shadow Or footprf ru s, It would sometimes leap from Its sheath and fighl lor I,. owner, It COuld r au le In Its sheath 10 warn of approaching danger, or could even rurn wild animals In their ,racks.

THE KRI.s
(JAVANESI?)

;>1'10

ns

l"A/rrS

ULU

SHEATH

PENrJNrJKOH
QAA'tTA

Ji~~~~-'lRING

OTl\NG&Vr

SUlVTV,

N8me Krts

.:!r.P£
Sw

Length .5m

~
.7kg

De.. Parry
0 2

Attack

Types

§:.!!!
3

Dam 2

Chop/Thrusl

@

BAGH

NAKH

VARIOUS

lJAGH

NAKU'S
CLAWS'

~LSOJ<AlOWN~

~TIGCR

Th" Bagh IIkh. or [Ige. claws wUS a small s [ of sreet claws hlch were favored b assus ns In India and the Middle EaSt. Sometlm~ these weapons were further fined wllh dag e. bladl9. 8$ Is th case of the Blcl'l'Hwa Bash Nakh combmallon.

BL~
TO

WEAPONS SMltM 'THE Mil' IM'It BAl'..H
NAJ(H

,

I

,I

\

BICH'HWA BA~H

NAKH
• TiGLR CLAWl'·

wa»

BL~O£S II

Name 6agh Nakh B.loh·~I .. o Bagh Nakh PENDJEPIT

~
M

Length .Im .25m

MIlAS
.OSkg

DtlJ<
0 0

~
0

Attock CUI

T!e!!

.§!!!!
2 2

~

M

.9Skg

CUI{Thrust

The PendJeplt were small, metal-toothed cembm pincera used In inlaysl. In m ny respeers tbe' r esemble our modern Ice Ion $, When used In conjunction with the martial arts 51 Ie of Ih area, I he)' become .lIlh r errecll"e $ weapons. Th ere used to rob. t w15l. nd rear the n esh of n enem lind were particularly devaStating I f holds On the n k, abdomen. 0' groin were achieved.

PENPt7[PIT
M.OL"'Y.JIAN '''''''BAT
PINCEIrS

Name PendJ"1Ilt

~Ilh .Im

Mus .1 g

Allaci: Special

Types

BAGR

-~rR
BAGH ·Tt<;(1(

-uap

NAI(U

"tAW"

NAXIf
(LAW· WITH

III..A{1E (81CH'HWA M5It

A;~ii"!1,4W'1

®

EXECUTIONER'S SWORD

Swords

The e:reCUItoner', or beheading s,",ord was a relatively rare .. upon which wal developed rrom Ihe hand lind a half ... ,ord during Ihe slxleenth cemury In ~urope. M III name Irnpltes, I hls word wa5 used by medle"al execulloners 10 admlnhter juslice to criminals. Often the blode was etched with scenes of execurten or shon cliches dealing wllh law and order. The sword had a nat blade 'If t h parallel cd e:s and blunL Lip. Th handle was Ion enough LO ensur B 0«1 rip S I .. 'as SWUI> like buell.1I bal.

Name Executioner'. Sword

.!l2!
S'"' S..'

Length 1.lm
1.3m

.M!!!
2.2kg '2.•4k8

.Q!!!.

f!!:!l'.
2 '2

AUack

Types

h!!!
J 3

.Q!!!! 3
4

Chop Choprrhru.t

8ehe.adlnJ Sword

@

I

,

,

I

I

r III,,

o
I I

SPt.lT· TIPI'm 7. VL' - r - HHA/t OF INDIA ·SWDItP

J_"

v

INfllA

I

FISH

.JI'1N.£ S IOORD : 5WI7.<ID

A SPtKEY INPIM/ MAO/i' OF MET"",.

SHOTEL The Sho!el Willi the 3word of the Ab ulnl ns, II hod 0 cIouble-edgJ!d blade .... lch h hd diamond ,hoped eress- eerlen, Tho eJ<1 reme curvature of I hie. ...'ords mode them nea.rly UlIeleu except for CUlling allllcksaht>ough IL also enabled attoch to be 'aunched over or around an enemy's shield.

Name S,lIt-Tlpped
ZuJr-'-Khar

.!lI!!!
Sword Sw Sw

Lelllth .8m
.8m

.M!!!
'.7k&
1.8kg

.Qe

txa
2 3 3 2

Attack TIW
Cbop

~
2

Dam

3 3 J 3
2

CUI Chop Chop!Thru51 CUI

3 2 2 3

Fbh Spine Sword N8&ao SIloI.1'J:

S... •8m S... Um Sw .8m

1.4kg
1.7kg 1.4kS

0

2

@

r:

I
~

--

,

==-'
I

I

,

,

-

'mUon Sword (AI Indian

Sw
S...

I.Om
8m

2.lkg 2.Jkg '2

3 '2

Cut!ThrusL Chop

J 3

3 3

Sword 181

kUDI TRANCHANG Tbe kudl Tranchan was a Malaysl,n sword-IYpe weapon. It came In many sizes and IlIa~ and wal, like many other Malaysian ...ea pons, fairly versarlte In lhol II could be used as 0 jungle knife 5 well as weapon. In general these weapons had relatively heavy blade! with rail nJ bamboo. or cord woven handle5; Ihey generally had no hana guards.

V/IRIOC/S 1<(101TRlWCHN/G

I ,.~

'

,

"

,
I

I

\"

~
KudJ Tranchanll

.!li!!!:
H

Len&lh .5-I.Om

M.!!!
.5- LOkS

~

Parry

Anock

Dpes

.§!!!!
I

.!2...!!!
'2

CboplThrun

LANTERN SHiElD The Iamern shield \IIU a rBI her !Innge \IIeO,l>On whlth ...BI developed In halyln Ihe slJ,leemh oentury. It c,on:$ISted of u round buckler.~y,pe shletd, abcut ene-rhlrd of a meier In dlpmeu~r. to whleh 11185 BtlBChed a number of offensive weapons. A handle prejected I',om the bullde of I he lo,.... ard edge of Ihe Shield which wB5g.uped by rhe hand. prou~cted by a plslegBunllelol course. ThIs particular gaunt leI has 1""0 ,plk,uprol rudlng from II. The sel'u(,ed edge5 of these spikes luggeal Ihal Ihey wert also used: 10 try Bnd !rBp an opponent'" blade. Below the gaunllel" II long swol'd·llke blade "'0.$ fhled $0 11'101 II ran 1'000ghly along lhe fore arm. The sherpened blade could be erfe<:llvely used' as a, thrusting weapon; Ihe fearl>Onlon 01 rhls bl,ade nended bock lheshleld 1'1) P'I)HICI Ihe elbow. In additIon" the cenleror Ihe shield WIll filled withe proJeCt· Ing spike which adds furl her 10 :Itslel halc,apablll!l'e.s. f'lnan~ the Ihlcldwas oliO orovlded with II f'!)Un<l flnlllg In r rem 8ndthe ,necessary hardwa re III bad 40 I h III II ,mall lalllern~ouid be Bttsched 10 It. Lanlerns were someurnes used by fenoers In Bttem;pU '10 danle 'their opl>On.enl.s . and ,,",'hole s),$I'e,ms ami Khoo.I' of ualnlngcemered around Ibelr use. While thelanlerndld proba'bl)' shed seme Ught, II II doubtful a' 10 how effective II woulll be In the deTkneu. In Ihl' Insl ance I ccnsluer II to be an unnecessary, albeit Inler~I~lng., oddlcJon to an already overcrowded weapon.

'.om

KNIGHT ~EJfN

wm« ...
.sHIEL"

Name
,--""ern Shiel d
M 1.3m

2.1kg

2

®

BOARSWORD The boal"Sword was 8 European hunlln weapon norm811y by Ihe nobllllY. As 115 name Implies, Ihls Weijpon "'OS used 8aln.1 wild boars. Typically Ihese weaponl consllted of a hand· and-Ihalf hlh I, thaI Is ,10 lOY'" II could be used wllh one or I '010 hands If neteUIrr. The blade luel ( can be dl vld'ed I "10 two secuens, Ihe ,sheft and the head. The shaft normally had 0' diamond or 5qullre cress-seetlen 10 Inlure agaInst heayy 1m pacts. The head "'liS normally leal-,haped and dOUble edged. Some boarsword5 had a removable crOlsbar fhled behind the head to Insure Ihl Ihe weapon did nol penelrale tOO deeply Into the boar and enable him 10 SIBlh rbe ,word "'Ielder ,..lIh his IUS So uted

Name
Boarnoord

Length I.lm

!dau 1.6k

Atlack Thrun

Type:!

NI.oWOo"l

c.'

MDi)/l1Pi GIlANTt.ET J-P

>J Chopffhru51 Chop/Thru"l

I

,

S",
Vi

LOrn
.6m

2, I g
2.1

3
3

3

3

3

NI

JATO

The nlnjalO was Ihe sword of <he J p nese nlnla, Ihe no'" famou. IOClel)' o( Ilssasslns. This Is nOI to uy t hat Ihe nlnjQ alway' carried the "Injaw, but mrher It was one orlhel. many specialized weapons. The nl nJot a ,,'as lome",h(u dl,f(~rem from ether J epanese swords In thDt It '" u so m ewhllt sho rt er a n.d tile h Bndh! "'85 longer than norm 01 ,word.. till, enobled somewhat dlHerenl I YP'9 of 1!llck. 10 be launch d &3 rhe bla~ W8' more flexible. When In lis Kabbard, the nll1Joto could be u.sed as a srep ladder of sor" or a climbing pol due to lis somewhal ovcn;lzed hllnd guard. The Kabbard usel f had II removable cap and could be u.sed as a breathing tube Or 8 blo,.' un.

NlnJoto

Sw

.9m

1.4kll

o

CUt/Thrull

2

3

@

The sickle ... 'ocd was 0 weapon used bYI he ancien! people. of Ihe IIddle Enu. As Its form Implies Ihlt weopon ,"'nS designed (or cUlling aDd choppln and nOI Ihrustlng. It Is essemt lIy an oHshool design from Ihe basic a.xe rorm, alhoug.!> a more ef(lden! one. Ellrly sickle swords were composed ,,/ a long handle and a rather shorl semi-circle blade; Ihls lorrn clearly re~mble.s the axe, Later verslons had " much shorter handl ond II longer blade. arm ally rnese weapons were m de of bronze or Iron. Because I he exaggerated curve of til blade the maJority of rhls weapon's mass was coocenrrmed near Ihe lip.. This nsbled heavy, crushing blo ...s to be broughl down upon Ihe target. The simple hili of thl. weapon ((orded nute proreeuon 10 [he hand Bnd 8. such, parrying blows were usually done whh rhe other hand ...hleh held II 5l1\eld.

or

,

CONGO

Jla(LC

SW!:lIIO

~~ ,=::;;~ , ::;;~;,;:::£
I •

r

'"

~
Sickle Sword

L"nsth

Mass
1.3kg

De. 0

Parry 2

.... ack u
Cut/ChOp

Type!

!l!!!
3

.Q!!!!
3

Sw

.7m

@

TEBUT J E.

MCMO

The lIadvell' of rhe Gllbe.n 1~I.ncbJ In 'he Paelfle deve-loped ,an\!m'ber ofelub-lIke weapons. ",hleh would be mo.t eUe.:[lvl! agaInst highly .Qrmoyred anemles. SI,mllarln buk dellgn 10 the AZlee mllquahullL, the [ebulle and ;pacho ullllzed shark'. leedl Innead of obsIdian, 10 provide II Cl.!lIlng edge. The51! ...eilpon" ca mel nay 0riel y 0 f Iha pe.s and sll e&; I'he 110'0 bulc form' we.,e the 51'lghtly curved and the II r!!.lght • TIle curve<l ones bear .' IIrea! raJem b Ia nee 10lhe
curved, cuul'ng sworc15 found In many more

lures.
of In

Tbes:hDtk.".,

Ieerh whlell were IIluehed

.8,.'.

thl!.!lf! weapoll.! .... ul'd o produce rOI her co m ba r, lIOn of II ke 1.lashl nil someone

ad,yaneed cut'10 Ihe' ·'edg,e'· Wicked wounds whh 0 C'O$$ CIlI

~
TUIHle Peeoo rrBI/T·r1'£

.In!!
H

Length .9rn .6rn

Mass 1.2kg .8.kg

.lle:I !!!!l
0 0

Au lICk
CUI CUL

H:11S:

m
2 2

Dam
2 2

2

H

SHARl(T(JOT:H

M

~RCl.f

UViIL:J

~H

P;JIlCHD

IfIEAIJ&vS

SlJVTH P14CIf'1C I+:>!AAIDR

@

Poleorrns
POLEARMS The most bask definItion of a polearm Is any form of chopping Or thrusting weapon mounted on II long handle. Often these weapons are dlfflcult to classify 'because elt hough Ihere are sorn e ve ry dl st Inc t lve f or m s, they are otren called by dl;fferent names" Addlng ro this confuston are Ihenumerou,$ inrerrnedrete forms which are Inrhemselves dl fflcuh 1,0 c,lasslfy. The European Polearm WaS almost always a weawn of Ihe footsoldler. Indeed" these weapons owe much of their ancestry 10 the mOdified agrlcultUTallools .used by peasant levies of many medieval arm les, As II me passed and newer, more, efflclenl, forms were developed many polearms I:ook on the look of can openers. This 51mll arhy In appearance ,Is lnterest IngDS their prtmary function was to open up I he "CaM" of heavll:y armoured knights. Depend,lng on rne spe<:lflclype of polearm,rbat 1,5 to say whemer It was a chrusdng, choppIng, or a combineIion weapon,llle methods ·of use varied acco.rdlngly. Heavy chopping: typeS SWUM,S overhand could e8~ny crush or CUI .broygh most armcur, ThrUSllng types were good for penetral.lng lolnts In armour as well as breaking up cavalry charges If the soldiers using them held rhetr ground. Large formations of Flemings, Swiss, and' Germans ohen defeated armoured knights In the lalermlddle ages and re-def'ined Ihe art of Warfare. The mos I well-known pol earml. !h e halberd. (n lis basic form a Halberd consisted of 'an axe blade mounted on a pole with polm opposing It. Along thrusllng point w 89 aha part of the head so rha r(h e weapon could be used to chop (wi'l'b tile axe or point) and Ihrust (with the spear palnd. On some weoWI15 the' rhrusnng point W8." elongated a sharpened on nne side so ebar II resembled a Silber. As wflh most polearms, {he shaft behind the head was reinforced wIth metal strtps to prevenr {he weapon f"om bel ng chopped off by an enemy'. weawn., Another feature' of many polearrns was a <:10111 grip which hel'"ed the wIelder mainraln a flrm grasp. The points and hooks on som any pcleerms served 8 very trnpcrcant function. No only did they come Into playas weapons, but Ihey were used '0 ,hook onto and unhorse enemy knights.

Basl<: CI85SJficatlons Thru~t Awl Pike Bohemian Ear-Spoon eba 11ves-Sou rl S Half Moon Korseke Langue de Boeuf Military Fork Partizan Pike Spelum Spcnrocn Runka Chop !cu{t!ng)

of PoleW"ms Combination Beaked Axe Coureau ce Br,eche

Berdlche Bill Falcaslra FalX Fauchard Glalve Jedburg Axe l.ochaber Axe Pole Axe ScYlhe Voulge

Cree
Godendag GUharme Halberd Hippe Lucerne Hammer

Scorpton

8lRPICilE

®

t:HIN£5€ HALF
,</IDCN

VDULDE

HALB£R.P

-:
Length 2.lm 2.5m 2.2m 2.lm 2.3m 2.lm

CHINESE TIGER TRJPCIIIT

~
Berdlche Gulsarme Halberd VouJge

~
p

~
3.11<& 2.61<g 2.8kg 2.4kg 2.ll<g 2.2kg

DeJI

Parry
3 3

Anack

Type!!

~
2
3

Chop/Thrusl ChopfThru5! Chop{Thrus!

3 3 3 3

P P P
M

3
2

3 3 2

Chop/Thrust Thrust CUI

TIger Trident
Chlne!e Half-Moon

P

2

®

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S~

J.Ut~,.

P04£~

M60N Pal,,"

WTT:N

HAJ.B~f) WITH !iP~ P()IVT

Sp

L8m

1.9kg

2

Thrust

J

®

MEYCg,'S SCHOOL OF HALB~R/?

COMIJAT

L

2.

BUK.JClNG TH~ IUSAlLAKT$ wt;AI'(W wrrH DNa OWN HAL6DW.

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PvU!O STIW&>M&> W(APONRr OF THE IlONIAN SOLOIER.

PILUM One of the most interesting weapons used by the Romans was rhe Pllum. Due to rhe fact rhar rhe Romans had tWO types of plta, t here has been some confusion as to the exact descrlpuon of the weopon. From remains found, reasonable reconstruct Ions have been made and each can now be described. The firs. type or the • hi n pllum, has a long, socketed Iron head wlrh a barbed poim. This type was designed to be thrown. Due to the thin Iron head and the barbed point, tr was ohen rendered useless upon Impact with a hard surface. This Was 10 prevent the enemy from pickIng them up and reusing them. The thin pllum was also used to deprive th enemy of hIS shield In t'hat, if It hil the shield and stuck In It, It would be hard to pull Out In the heat of combat, and Its long rnerat shafl prevented it from belng chopped off. A shield with !hls spear sticking In It would then become unbalanced and hard to wield effectively. The second type, or the thick pllurn had a long Iron head wi pyram Idal point. The end of rhe shaft was flat like the tong of 8 sword. The merat head was attached to the wooden shaft and served 10 protect t he hand. It was t'll Is 1 ype of pllu m which was used in hand to hand combat. The met s I neck and hand guard enabled It to be used to parry sword blows, and Its lengrh gave the wfelder a reach advantage over hiS Opponent. The Iron heads of both pllum were about .6 meters In length, the entire weapon WII' about 1.8 rnet ers long.

tn ;;

THIN PlLA

T/lICK

PILA

Name Gladlys Puglo Roman Pllum Dart (Thick) (Thin)

~
Sw

Length .6m .3m 1.2m 1.8m 1.8m

Mass

De"
I 0 0

Parry

Attack

TyPe!

§1..t!l

Dam

K
Sp Sp Sp

.9kg .3kg
.akg 2.lkg l.7kg

3
I

Chop(rhrusl Thrust Thrust Thrust Thrust

2
2

2 3 2

2
2

@

AHLSPIESS The ehlspless Wa,5 a weapon used In europe around the lifl,eenth century. The weapon resembles Ihe old Roman flghllng Spear plillm. ea"kelly Ihe ahlsplea Is II Ion melal spIke with a 5IIuare cross section fined OntO a father short wooden ,shaft. At the point 81 which rne spike fhs Into I he haII 0, round balld guard II lei. Thll guard enables I he weapon to be used to block Dd parry blowl wit houl fear of Injury to Ihe bands. Although Ihls weapon "'8$ around [or 8 ,'elarlvely long perIod of lime, It did nOt enjoy much popularlr)'. The Bohemian Infantry used It Into Ihe sbleen!h century but elsewhere II W81 usually o,nly used by armoured knigh" In lourn.menn. A number of longer polearms,-type weapons with thts same basic design ,,",'ere also used. These Include Ihe A .. IPike whIch had a one meier spIke mounted on a tWO meter shaft and the Plaocon a picot which had a meier spike moumed on a shafl of equal length. Both of these we,apons were desllned 10 be used by IOldleu In formotlon as opposed 10 coe-on-ene close combat.

I,

NIIJIII!

.!II!!
M P
P

1.enltb 1.5m 3.2m
3.0m

M!!!
1.9kg

Dell

~
3 2 2

AI[KIt:

Tll!!!!

§.l!!2

Dam

AIlbpll!S$ Awl Pike

Thrust
ThrulJl

2
3

2.7kg 2.8kg

prancon a Picol

Thrust

3

@

FUSCINA
II could be argued rhar the one thing which Is unlversally associated with the Roman clvlltzar lon is its use of g'ladllarlal conresrs for public eruert aln men t. Of the vartous type.s of gladlat ors the two most "f arnous" were l'he rerart I and the scurcrs, The SCUtOrS were those men armed with 0 sword and a small shield while t he rerartl were those armed with a net and trident. This trident, called 8 fusclna, was rather well suired to close combat. The lines of I he trlcenr's head could not only be used 10 parry sword CUtS and rhrusts, bUI could also be used as a "sword breaker' or to wrench me weapon from a enemy's grasp as well. The rerarlt used a net [0 ensnare their opponent along with the trident. This net could also be used to parry, much like a cloak was much lat er In European (enclng

systems,

Name Fusclna

~
M

Length 1.8m

Mass 2.lkg

~

Parry
2

Attack
Thrust

Tr~ .fu:!!1

Dam

3

®

Sta.-oes

A.' wi~ h moS! societies, SllIrr-type weapons-were use<! ex.ten5lvely fhroushOUI ~he Malay Archlpelnso., These ,,'eapon! M(j[h"l. 'combat 'I<~chnlque.s ale ancienr Indeed. 6,5 the siaff Is one of 'Ihe earUUtlln!l eastest w,ea,pon5 1,0 'make. A losk.al oU1srowlh oflhe basiC ,Uf( Is one In which a m.elol b Ia.de 15 0\ !Itched. A cui'll ns blade 01) I he end of 0 sl·off made Ihe blade much more "ffec,llve I" combat a I> d ens bl'ed II S U3I!r I" com'bm I BIg" srou ps ot all ack,en. The' A. bl " Is II bloded s I ,8If used 01> J DY,Oa nd In many OIlier paris of Malay510 as well. The arblt co.nslsu of a wooden shilt! whlet! Ispolnl ed on one O!!d. On the other end of the sl,afJ II .nlched II r allier Ide. curved blncl e" In Illb 'forman acts con be made by CUlling Or Ihrustlng wllh the blade or by Itrlklng wlthlhepolnled "'oodenelld. The 51aff of an erblr Is grooved 0,ppo5lle me sharp edge of Ihe blade. This fealure enables I he user 10 know exacilly wh Ii! re I he cun In8 ed,g,e Is 0' II Ii! exec: uI es I,nlt I.CDI!! m nnl!!II VI!rlI The La'I'! ans II another blnd.ed Ila(( weupoll used In Malo,)',llo. The l'IIJolongconslllJ of 0 wooden ,harl. 10 whl,ch are ~Iuched 1"'0 la.ge metal Cf'I!KenIS" one on each end. fhe metal crescents are 01.0 flued wll'h 1,",'0 curved ,polnll which project bud war,d from '1:lIe· lips 01 the creseem .• In I his r Orm[ he I a,jal8 118 wou III be 0 1lI,0SI elf CC'I I ve ,.'enpon In combating II la.ge number of foe~PS one could enlly CUI Ihroug.h wav,es Dnel ",o"e, of attackers. As ",II h ·an)' III 0 ff "'eopon tile on e big aelva nt oge I.hey gave In combal was thaI Ihey could keep enemies armed wll II Illorter weapons III bay. due 10 III length, II II ,·err dl'f'ilcull for an uuaexer to ctese In with a defender armed ,,'1[11 a ~,afl w.ll hou I opening himself 10 anode. The lenglh of ~he otafr also enabled effecllye bloch and parru~. 10 be made rOI her easily.

Name
Arbl. LaJot(lll1l

'Type
M
M

Length
1.8m 1.4m

MIUS 2.2k8 2.3 II

~
2

Pllm 2 3

Anlilcl:

T~I!!!!
rUII

~
3

Dam

C 1I0p/Th CUI/Chop

3
4,

@

L.AJ.o.rAIVG

IN ACTION

F&ATNER. ST~1' OP1;N t:'OR CI)NI8;IIT

F'EATHER

ST.... F/B.RANDESTOC F

These European weapons were designed 10 appear Innocuous walking SIBves. Allhou h there were some which had xe heads mounted on (he shoft like batt I aees, the common r"OlUr" of these weopon3 W85 a concealed blade In ehe shaft. The weapon lrself wa about one meter In lengt h Ihemt('ll ves were wILh "he blade retract ed, The blades ehber triangular or dlomond shaped and ranged In len81h menmes t0 from a half to 8 full meter In length. cenrr I bled smaller blod were filled Ion side the Ion. 10 form .. sort of trident. In order for 'he blade 10 be brought inlO play by the wield r, the stuff was '''''un down or au' shorply. Tbl. morton caused Ihe blad to eject and a reI alnlng pin to faU In plne,e. The ..'eapon would .hen be ued 10 parr),. , rhrusr, and In lIeneral be u,sed somewhot II e 0 rupler.

.,.

Name Fealher Stoff

~

Length I.O/I.6m

~
I.Okg

De~

Parry 2 2

AttllClr. Thrust

T~I!!!!!

~
2

Dam 2

0

Srendestoc

1.212.2m

1.9 g

Chop{ThruAI

3

@

PARRYING

WEAPONS

There ,..e.e II number of eunures ...hlCb developed .... II I are CDlied "pll rry I ng wea pons". ~ 1nB,e neeII I t hese consis I ed of SO me IIOrt 0 f sm a II shle Id 0 r hllnd gull rd which '" u .. tlochedl OB sword· ,I)'pc blll,de Or I pear. These '","a,pons were generally designed 10 be used "'1'I,h '1'0'0 h8nds 011llOu8h 50meeOllldbe used one h8nded. The Madu wu an Indian :Pllrryln8 !ihleld which conslated of 8' .meUl'ound Ihl"ldlO which a pair of anlmol horns .... re IlIUched. e Ohen 'Ihe horns were lipped with melal pol ms, The madu Wail II favo.rile among Hindu, rellglou.s The Sa,1 nlie was anol he r I ndie n pa rtyl ng ...ellpon wh I ch consisted of II IIr81,&I>I metal bar ...hh II loop guard arrached; a spear polnl 15 fit led on the end. Somel,lmes a dagger WU conocaled In the olherend' of 'Ihe Shaft. The Adarga was D Moorish weapon which snows Inllu.eN:e from the Indian weapon., partlculerly Ihe I8I,n[le. II consl!!1 e,d of II spear wll.h a cem ral hand, shield: au ached, To, I he Ihlel'd. was fIned II double-edged blade ...'hlell eJI' lendedO~1 perp",ndl.c~lgrly from the spilar. Obvlousl~ ...hh this weapon a $It,alghl p~~h·type ItUSI ~oyld' ee m ad,eln addilionio Jabs h the spear. The Sang Kauw was a Chlne~e weapO,n wllll;h conslsled or ,0 nfo'gliL barLo "'hleb was all ached a do~bl'e-blBded hand guard In addulon, B double-e(l,ged" seml-cfrcutar blace "',OJ rlued '10 one end. This soil of "'e·8pOnwu ,sulied 10 Cult 1"8 Bnd c hoppl ngOIl well UI IIrus II og. . The Sword ,Shiel d' w 11$ a Eu ropea n we.apon wllleh had man)' forms. The Ilm.ple ones "',ere o.nly n Imoll rneral shl.eld protecting the forearm to which was !tiled obl'ade or spike. Thl$ 'bll!deeJ:lended OUI over 1 he bad of rhe har>d:. More elaborllte s:word shields were large': !'.. o-hand'ed 0·1101'5 from one 10 one ond II half meter, In lenSI h. Spike'S euended oul fromeoch end of 1 he>e sllleI ds,

Fuyyqtng

Weupons

beggar ••

''''1

Nome
Adar.,Q Modu Suln\.lc S.. ord SIIleld

T~pe
M
M

LCllIflh I.lm 1.6m .7m 1.5m 1.0m

MIl53
1.9kg 2AkS 1.8 II

.Q!!
'1

Po.r:ry

AlIlICk, Tl~ Thrust Thr~11 Thrust Thousl Cho,plT'hr~tI

.§l!!!
:I

Dam

~'

2

3

3 2
3 3

M
M

:I 2
4

UkS
1.8kg

2 2

Sang

Kau ...

M

~

@

I!HINIJL _~I1IIO~

-"'LL

,

NfDOI(.
I I

--e1) ,~ ,
1,

,'

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CHINESE SAMJ KAIIW
_YIN,.

WLANN

,

'fEjf
'\

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~

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r • ,

1

I

Name Full

~

Lgcb

Mus
1.9kg

Du

.f!!!:r.
3

AHack
CUt

Type!

~
3

Dim 3

Moon

.~m

@

Chatns ond
WhipS

WEIGHTED

CHAm

The RanII' or welghled chain 15 a weapon which h8.• III origins In Chlna, but was allo used III the MeJa)'ao Arch· Ipel_go. In III bulc lorm rhe ranle consiliI or an Iron r I.ng chain llbou ( 1'010 mell! r. Inle.ngt h. T heeodl of I he chel n ere nned will! .mall welghls aboul lin), graml In mus. VarlDlloll!l or the baslc form conalll of II sherte.r le"lt!! of chin, about one meier, to which , aDW toothed disk I. ,"ached or a chain fir ted wllh 8 T shaped &rIp on Olte end and a sharpened merat rod on the olher. The rante Is ~ntlaUy a parrying weapon, destIned to entangle n opponem's weapon Or ensnare his lega or arms, The ones fitted with special ends would be very effective If dlrecled at unarmoured ponlOll1 of en opponenl'. body. When the chain 15 I'ovlrled, centrifugal force keeps It s Iff and 5lralghl. as Ir me. through the air. The recnnlqees used with Ihe chBln lire slmuer to rhose of the &"rr. II 15 prerly obvloUI th81 In order for this wupon lObe succes"lul, Ihe user mu..! be one who has fairly load coor'd'j n all On and' d'u 'Ierh y.1 t aheu Id also be 001 ed t h8'1 I he ranre would be uUlh!:SI In 0 confined space or In 8 grov~ or rrees,

~
RamI! !Type II RamI! Ber G.n.edul Ranle IType UJ

!r.I!!
M

~
2.0m 2.0m I.Om

M!!!
•1kll •7k8 5k8

Q!!
2 2 2

~
2 2 2

And. Impacl

TIl!!!

§t!!! 2 2
2

Oam

M M

Thru.JlII mp cc

2
2

Impact

®

TWO

"'Y~E.S OF M~U'!.A'A:' WHIPS S"INlILA.1I. TD THE PETiT JIlT WHIP

FIGHTING

WHIPS

In Malaysia tbere are a number of dlfferenl flghllng wblps whiCh were, and slllI are employed as weapOns. The Chemell, K81115, and Peljul 8n!! Ihree such types.. All of I nese consilted basically of a wooden handle, somelimes covered wllh lealhflr, 10 which III altached 8 lealher Ihong. Attached 10 the end of Ihe thong I. usua.lly 8 knol of lealher or ",millimes a Im,1I meral Iphere. The entire lenglh" of Ihese weapons ranged from I 10 1.75 meters. A blow with one of these weapoOl I~ relatively harmlea. excepl when equipped wleh Ihe melal bali" .hen the I.rllet 10 usually the face, mere specl(Jcally rhe eyes. To Ihl' day Ihe nallves of ,hi, region often pan Iclpat e In mock combal ....Ih these weapOn&, In general theM! l bouts coni I., of on ahern.11 nl aeries of II rlkes Bnd parrles 8S each c,omb.. ,nl Irles 10 Ill! tbe olhers face. A shield Is used to parry. Allhough this type of .... apon would be usetess against e on armoured opponent, Ihe flexible nature of Ihe leaeber IhonR would enable I( to enlangle weapons or ensnare on enemy 10 possibly PUI him orr balance.

@

VM0uS

WHIPS
MA~ WHIi'J

N'AV<Y5_ WklP.t ~>lR,0N6£" C.LfItI) rs ......avK
CHl.M£TI

-,

PET.nJT

LOMBDK

IISCD IN E#t>E

7l'NIEMO:

SIIICLP V$lP WHIP AI~LS

W RnWIUSTlC.

~
CbemeU

.!!l!!
M
M M

~
1.2m 1.0m
.7m

!!!!!.
1.2kS 1.0kS 1.0 S

Dea

.!!£!z
2 2 2

Ana ImPlicl ImpaCI Impacl

T.ns

m
3 3 J

Dam

K..I... Pel~1

2

@

OPTIONAL WEAPON OAMACE SYSTEM EVllr stnce the rlrst weapons book was published blK:k In 1981, quutlon5 concern In, the damage rallnp of rhe weapon.. have cent Inually been asked. MOil quesllons concern how seem Inlly dtrferent weapons can have Ihe lame dam.oge rallng, why Iin't there a de (lnldye ""pl'anatlon or Ihe 1)'ltem, why don't you publish guideline. or how 10 u.se [he book In conjuncrlen wllh Ihal company In WIIconsln's (anlDsy game, ere, The we.epons IIsllng W8I on all emp. 10 prov'lde all of •he d8la needed by lamers In order 10 be able 10 (II any weapon InlO hl.ther game. Becau.se rhere ere many IYPIII of faol8.yg8mel currently available. II would be foolish 10 Iry 10 Dc~mmod8le Ihem all by living specific damage rallnl' for each. I have developed a combal 'YI,em which U_ Ihe rlltlng$ 11$ they are, bUI for Ihole of YOU who would like some genero.1 guidelines for rtlliog Ihe d8mage rallog5 IRIO your specific lame, I present Ihe follo ...lng: MOSI lame:! give weapon damage In terms of a 1pe<:lflc Iype of die, te., a broadsword does 108, a claymore does 206. ere, Wllh Ihls In mind tbe flrsl 81ep would be to decide which type of die equal. ",hlch type of damage rIll nsror example, a rating of one equals 104, twO equals 106, three 108. and four 1010. You could IIOP at Ihls paint, but the SY!Iem would renlly be tOO sl mpllll lc, The second Ilep Involve.. Ihe cha~raeler'$ 8t811sllc for strength. Mosl g8me.. have Iiallstics generated by roiling 306, whlcb glYes a nice bell-shaped curve distribution of numbers, With this son of system, divide the characler's IIrenglh bt 10 and tben mllltiply the resuiling number ~ the mass of the weapon. If the lame system generates "811.. 11;..1trom 01-100, divide Ihe cbarsct!!" 5trenlth by SO before multiplying by Ihe weapon', mass. The following chart will g.lve the damage bonus: Below 1.5 10 3.1 to 5•.1 10 6.1 10 1.1 10
U

NumbeJ" 3.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0

Damase 0
.1

80nut

.3

.2

....·4

.5

This Chart can be eerulnued by addln, • I for "very full polnl above 8.0 the cheracrer Ioca. The damage bonus can be taken as 8 It r Ighl pJU8 10 thl! ,..eapon'. dam Ige retlng or could be ul\ed 10 Indlclue addItional dice of damage. For example, B chareerer with 8 weapon whose rallng Is a "2" falls within the ·,2" on the cheri. His damage could be 106.2, 106-204, 108 !the .2 belnl equaled to an upward shlfl of one on rne dam Ie rallng). or anything else the gamemasler feels comfortable with. The third srep would be to dlfferentl81e between the varloU8 !!l!!:! of aU8ck as listed unde.r "allack type·. Fer chop or Impaci BII8Ck., no modlflcatloo Is mede to the above system. For Cut alloc.kl, lake only thr~'-<luartets ·0 r the nil' m be. 10 deter mine da mage bonu&. For.:!!!:!!!!. all ack!, Inke only one-hal r or I he number 10 det erm Ine domage bonus. --Lauly. If your ,yatem gives Inenglh bonu.se.. 10 damale. you should not use rhem If 1I,lni this I)'slem Q .trenllh has alretldy been taken Inlo accounl In Ihe fllu.rlnll. With thIs .)'slem II can eM I)' 1M! HeJl tbal rbere can be a great dlrrerenee, 81 least In lerms of dlm .. e, between tWO ~Ingly ,Imllar we8pons. In .ddJUon, dHferem characters will do different things with Ihe same weapon. I hope Ihls syslem h8$ been helpful 10 Ihose of you who have been wondering llbout tbe damage r811n8_ and ho 10 apply them In your lame.

",",

',",

TrI.derlt

Weapon

M

.~m

3

CUt/Tbrull

3

'2

BIBLIOGRAPHY Annual Report Blackmore, Boehelm, Draeger,
Egerton

of the Smithsonian

Institution,

1879.

Howard; Hunrlng Weepoll$, Wendelln; Handbuch Der WaHenkunde. Greece and Rome al War. Aru of the Indonesian Archlpelego. Armour. f.j Weapona and flghllng

Connolly, Peter;
0011

of Talton,

Lord; Indian and OrIental

Hogg, O.F.G.j Clubs to Cannon Manln, Paul: Arms and Armour from the 9th to tbe 17th Century. Armor In Africa.
VII.

Nickel, Helmut; Arml8nd Pant, G.N.; Indian Ratt,

Arms and Armour,

Oscar, and Westbrook, B.E.; Weepoll&.

Adele; secreu

of tbe SamuraJ.

Reid, William; Arms Through the AlIa. Sargeaunt, Stone, George C.; A Glossary of the Construction. Wagner. Edward; European Weapona and Warfare
_____ --" Medleval

Decoration, I 6IIH &4tI.

and Use of Arms and Armour.

Coatume,

Armour and Weapons (1350-1450).
I.n Biblical Lands.

Yudin, Ylgael; The Art of Warfare

ADAPTABLE

TO ALL

GAM

SYST MS'

THE PALLADIUM BOOK Of WEAPO contains 3~ type of armour. each clearh Illustrated with annotations. span the world and mctude European. ASian. Indian, and Japanese. The life pons section depiCts over 600 dlHerent weapons, from kruv 5 and swords IQ pole-arms and axes. Thrs beaunf ullv Illustrated 50 page book 1.5 the Ideal reference tool for am nne. S4.9~ (pO~1 paid). THEPALLADtUM BOOK OF WEAPONS & CASTLES out lrnes t h de"elopmenl of European castles. ach Illusn t d and complete .. llh floor plans. and cr ossbow«, Contain 1'110 weapon sections; the hru detalh a varietv n bo Including the Chines repealing crossbow. Wllh Information nn Silt', pull. r et e quipm -m of fir and other POIRlS of InU"r!!SI. The cond S cuon IS d 1'01 d to and their us. all r a hundred Illustrations. $4.9:' lpos: pardl • ...:':';'hHE-"ro=u-:'-;~:";o::u:":~=-7hD=IS-,:I~:::;'O""~':"v-f~C;:U'-:'C~h K~a~s O=-~h;::-e-WEAP"7.~1 n'::J'-a°=-r:s:":n'-;d--::;~:-;'h-U':":'::~'f'."-"=X:;::~"-~=~OI~:p:~r~~ ~ hO~~S~=~';,o~::t~~~:. and poisons. Why did thes societies come to exrsr? How d adly were th y? Whal 15 myth and reality? What secrets made them th powers they were~ The answers are unlocked In the pages or Weapons lind AssaSSins. Over II hundred Illustrations depicting w eapons, tools, armour. special construction, costumes, and mar fill thl~ SO pag plaYing ald. $4..95 Ip05t paid). Tl"iE PALLADIUM BOOK Of WEAPONS " CASTLES OF TH aRrENT Explore the castle palaces of fu dal Japan with all their rrtek and I; crers revealed. xamine th obi Samurr, hrs merhods, arms and armour. Compare them nh their Chinese COunt r-parrs, Thrs excellent ref rence book contains dozen, of dN all d Ilfust rat ions and casi le floor plans, 0 L Y $4.95 ~POSI paid).

~7

WEA~ONS and CASf

OR'ENT

ES

CO TEMPOR WEAPO

RY
"

TH PALLADIUM BOOK OF CONTEMPORARY WEAPONS contains over 300 hand-held weapons from around th world. Includ d ar revolv rs pls!ol~. sub-machm guns. machine guns, rifles and various attachments. Each weapon IS IlIu$tral d Ith man)' detailed cut -away diagram, perunem Information and notes of Interest. $4. 9~ (JXIst pe Id). PalladJum

Books - Dept. D - 5669 Casper - Delrolt,

Mich.

48210