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Uganda Urban Housing Sector Profile

Uganda Urban Housing Sector Profile

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This profile is a comprehensive, in-depth analysis of the structure and functioning of Uganda's urban housing sector.It disclosws its strenghts and weakneses and at the same time makes suggestions on directions for policy intervention.
This profile is a comprehensive, in-depth analysis of the structure and functioning of Uganda's urban housing sector.It disclosws its strenghts and weakneses and at the same time makes suggestions on directions for policy intervention.

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03/27/2014

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cooking, plus indoor and outdoor spaces, and services,
including water, sanitation and power. Tere is limited
indoor space available to households in high density
low-income areas. For example, in Tegwena and Agwe
in Gulu, residents expressed interest in extending the
size of usable dwelling space, but cited prohibitive
material costs as a major barrier to their plans. A similar
proportion of Kampala residents expressed an interest
in expanding dwelling size in order to support naturally
increasing household sizes, for income generation
through rental, yet fewer respondents mentioned the
cost of materials as the most signifcant barrier to these
ambitions. Rather, the relatively high cost of land and
basic services were cited as barriers to improving and
expanding existing dwellings.

Tere is currently no reliable data on several aspects of
the urban housing stock in Uganda. According to the
Ministry of Lands, Housing and Urban Development,
an average of between 2500 and 3000 housing units
are constructed throughout the country every day,
though this includes rural as well as urban areas. Te
ability of public sector agencies to monitor current and
projected needs and the response of the supply system
is restricted by limited fnancial and human resources
at central and local government levels. Te challenges
faced in monitoring and managing the housing sector
are further exacerbated by the high proportion of
private and informal sector provision, much of which
is, by defnition, outside the ofcial records. As various
government and private sector actors deepen available
data on the housing sector, meeting the needs of the
majority of urban residents will become more achievable.

In discussing the national housing stock, it is important
to distinguish between housing typologies within the
informal sector, as this category includes both structures
that are built according to national standards, but have
not obtained formal planning permission, as well as semi-
permanent structures that do not meet ofcial standards
and are most frequently built by the poor themselves, or
by landowners for economic gain through rental. Tis
broad defnition of the informal sector means that the
majority of the national housing stock fts within the
informal category.

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