Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

Name: ________________________________

Unbalanced Force Model
Physics Diagrams
Here you can keep track of all of the diagrams that you have learned to draw. You can come back and update it after future models, if you’d like. This list might come in handy when you start tackling complex “goal-less” problems. Name of Diagram Model(s) Example(s) Notes

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from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

Interlude: Vector Practice!
Always use a protractor, ruler, and pencil when working with graphical vector constructions! 1. An object moving in a circular path with a constant speed of 2.0 m/s changes direction by 30º in 3.0 s. a. What is the magnitude of the change in velocity over the 3.0 s interval? Remember that velocity is a vector. Draw a vector diagram and perform the graphical construction to find Δv .

b. What is the magnitude of the average acceleration over the 3.0 s interval?

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

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Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

2.

The free body diagrams below are incomplete. Draw and label one more force appropriate to each situation that will result in the forces being balanced.

Ff

Fn

Fg

Fg

Fn

Ft

Fg

Fg

3.

For each situation, draw a vector addition diagram. Use the vector addition diagram to find the net force on the object (the net force is not a type of force itself; rather, it tells you how unbalanced the forces are).

F1

F2 F1 F2 F4 F3 F3 F1

F3 F2

F4

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from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

Experiment: Pulling Carts with Springs
Sketch and label the experiment setup:

What could we measure? How could we measure it?

Objective of the experiment:

Whiteboarding and Post-Lab Notes

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

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Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

Practice 1: “Goal-less” Problems! (Super cool.)
4. The 80 kg box travels to the bottom of the 2 m long ramp with a constant speed of 1.4 m/s. a. What models apply to this situation and why? (See the italics + bold + underline? That part is way important!)

!

b. Draw at least four diagrams/graphs to illustrate the situation. Choose the diagrams and graphs that you find most useful. Draw these BIG enough to be useful and annotate them like crazy. The diagrams are key.

c.

Using the models you have chosen, solve for any unknown quantities. Use more than one method to find the same answers whenever possible. Show your work and use units. Always start with a variable expression (that is, your first line should always start with symbols only, and you should plug in things that you know in a later step).

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from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

5.

The 80 kg box starts from rest and travels to the bottom of the 2 m long ramp, but its motion is opposed by a 150 N frictional force. Follow the same general procedure as in the previous problem: tell which models apply, draw and annotate diagrams, solve for unknowns.

!

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

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Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

6.

The 80 kg box starts from rest and travels to the bottom of the 2 m long, frictionless ramp. Again, follow the same general procedure.

!

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from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

7.

In the preceding three problems, was the contact normal force that the incline exerted greater than, less than or equal to the weight of the box? Explain.

8.

In problem 6, suppose the incline were tilted at a greater angle. How would your answers change? Use a sideby-side comparison of two vector addition diagrams as part of your explanation.

9.

In problem 4, determine how unbalanced the forces on the cart are (the magnitude of the net force) at the instant its velocity is 1.4 m/s.

In problem 6, determine t how unbalanced the forces on the cart are (the magnitude of the net force) at the instant its velocity is 1.4 m/s.

Are your answers to the above two questions the same or different? If they are the same, explain how this is so even though there is no friction in problem 6. If they are different, explain how this is so even though the cart has the same instantaneous velocity of 1.4 m/s.

10. Suppose the cart in problem 6 were given a shove so that it started sliding up the ramp with a velocity of 3.0 m/s. How far up the ramp would it go?

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

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Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

Practice 2: Multiple Model Problem Solving, cont.
Solve the following problems with the same approach as you did for the “goal-less” problems on Worksheet 1. List the models that apply (and why!), draw and annotate a lot of diagrams (at least four, but probably more), and then use the models to solve for as many unknown quantities as you can. 11. Three blocks are in contact with each other on a frictionless horizontal surface. A person applies a horizontal force of 18 N to the smallest block. Hint: there are multiple ways to define your system here. You could draw several FBDs for the same instant (snapshot).

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from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

12. A 70.0 kg box is pushed by a 400 N force at an angle of 30°  to the horizontal.   Starting from rest, the box travels 15.0 m in 2.78 seconds.

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

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Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

13. A 70 kg box is pulled by a 400 N force at an angle of 30° to the horizontal. Starting from rest, the box travels 15 m in 2.47 s.

!

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from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 04 / UBFPM

UBFPM Model Summary

Concept Map 1.0

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

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