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NYPD Annual Firearms Discharge Report

NYPD Annual Firearms Discharge Report

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Published by: Newsday on Aug 02, 2012
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MS MN BX BS BN QS QN SI

CRIMINAL SHOOTING INCIDENTS (1,473)
ID‐AC INCIDENTS (33)

Figure A.5

Figure A.6

2010 ANNUAL FIREARMS DISCHARGE REPORT
INTENTIONAL DISCHARGE–ADVERSARIAL CONFLICT

7

for a variety of reasons. The Annual Firearms
Discharge Report categorizes incidents by
whether the officers involved were engaged
in reactive police work (39 percent) or proac‐
tive police work (61 percent).

Of on‐duty officers discharging their firearms
during these incidents, most were performing
patrol duties (57 percent). This is unsurpris‐
ing, as the Patrol Bureau forms the Depart‐
ment’s core and is staffed accordingly. An ad‐

ditional third of those officers firing were as‐
signed Anti‐Crime units (32 percent), which
actively seek out armed criminals and violent
perpetrators. Although this is disproportional
to these units’ small numbers—officers as‐
signed to Anti‐Crime make up less than 8 per‐
cent of any given precinct’s headcount—it is
predictable given the units’ mandate [see Fig‐
ure A.7].

The majority of officers who ultimately fired
their weapons (53 percent) became involved
in the precipitating situation owing to 911
calls. Such calls—or “radio runs,” in police
parlance—can involve  reports of ongoing or
developing conditions or calls for assistance
from crime victims or witnesses. Fifteen per‐
cent of the incidents involved officers con‐
ducting stops based on reasonable suspicion
[see Figure A.8].

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