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American Bridge Paul Ryan Research Book

American Bridge Paul Ryan Research Book

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Published by: americanbridge21 on Aug 05, 2012
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Ryan Voted to Cut No Child Left Behind by $784 Million. In 2005, Ryan voted in favor of the Labor, HHS & Education
appropriations conference report that cut $1.5 billion from key domestic priorities. The measure cut education programs by
$59 million - including a $784 million cut from No Child Left Behind programs. The bill provided less than a one percent
increase in Title I reading and math assistance for low-income children - the smallest increase in 8 years. In addition, the bill
cut $87 million from programs that helped nearly 14,000 school districts that relied on the funding for school safety, drug
prevention and anti-violence activities. The bill failed 209-224 [Roll Call 598, H 3010, 11/17/2005; House Appropriations
Committee Democratic Staff, “Summary of the Conference Agreement - HR 3010,” 11/16/05]

Ryan Supported Bill that Underfunded NCLB by $8 Billion. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of the appropriations bill for
the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education. The bill underfunded the landmark No Child Left
Behind Act by $8 billion and provided the smallest percentage increase in education funding in eight years. Because of the bill,
54,000 fewer teachers would receive federally supported professional development. Special education programs would receive
a $1 billion funding increase, compared to the $2.2 billion increase promised by Republicans. Pell Grants would finance only

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38 percent of the cost of a public university, compared to 84 percent when the Pell Grant program was established. The bill
passed 215-208 [Roll Call 353, H 2660, 07/10/2003]

Ryan Supported Budget Cutting NCLB by $1 Billion. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of a budget resolution that provided
for $1.3 trillion in tax cuts over ten years, while cutting programs for children and public education by $38 billion over ten
years, below the amount needed to maintain current service levels. It provided virtually no increase for education programs
overall and cut funding for No Child Left Behind programs by $1 billion (from $23.8 billion to $22.8 billion). In addition, the
House Budget eliminated 46 education programs (such as Rural Education, the National Board for Professional Teaching
Standards, and Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology), cut the after school program by 40 percent (or $400
million), and reduced the maximum Pell Grant award (from $4,050 to $4,000). The budget passed 215-212 [Roll Call 82, S 95,
03/21/2003]

Paul Ryan Supported Budget Cutting NCLB by $1 Billion. In 2003, Paul Ryan voted in favor of a budget resolution that
provided for $1.3 trillion in tax cuts over ten years, while cutting programs for children and public education by $38 billion
over ten years, below the amount needed to maintain current service levels. It provided virtually no increase for education
programs overall and cut funding for No Child Left Behind programs by $1 billion (from $23.8 billion to $22.8 billion). In
addition, the House Budget eliminated 46 education programs (such as Rural Education, the National Board for Professional
Teaching Standards, and Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology), cut the after school program by 40 percent (or
$400 million), and reduced the maximum Pell Grant award (from $4,050 to $4,000). The budget passed 215-212. [Roll Call 82,
S 95, 03/21/2003]

Ryan Supported No Child Left Behind Bill. In 2001, Ryan voted in favor of President Bush’s No Child Left Behind Act
(NCLB) to overhaul education proposals to increase school accountability and reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary
Education Act for six years. The final version of the bill required states to annually test students in reading and math in grades
three through eight, provide new accountability measures for schools that fail to make adequate yearly progress, and give
schools greater flexibility to spend federal funds. It included about $26.3 billion for federal elementary and secondary
education programs and $13.5 billion for Title I programs for disadvantaged children in fiscal 2002.The bill passed 381-41.
[Roll Call 497, H 1, 12/13/2001]

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