P. 1
Affordable Land and Housing in Africa

Affordable Land and Housing in Africa

|Views: 687|Likes:
Housing policy responses to address growing affordability problems and the improvement of substandard housing conditions
Housing policy responses to address growing affordability problems and the improvement of substandard housing conditions

More info:

Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/27/2014

pdf

text

original

Privatisation of government-owned ‘public’
housing has been mainstreamed within the
majority of national housing policies and
strategies alongside wider market liberalisation
processes in many African countries. Privatisation
has mostly been undertaken through transfer to
sitting tenants (free of charge, through vouchers,
or sale at nominal fee). Tese policies have been
implemented at a diferent pace in countries in
Africa and have reduced the size of the public
housing stock signifcantly, however Africa has
always had lower levels of public housing than
other regions, for example Eastern Europe and
Asia.

Privatisation of housing in Zambia began in
1996. Within a very short time all council houses,
most governmental houses, and many houses
belonging to parastatal oganisations and mining
companies, were ofered to the sitting tenants for
purchase.214

While the laws and regulations were
gender-neutral, in practice the man was deemed
to be the main tenant and head of household. In
most cases title deeds were therefore issued in the
man’s name only, even when rental contracts were
in the names of husband and wife. However,

52

PART THREE

the opening up of the housing market enabled
women who could aford to do so to buy a
house.215

Te case of Morestondhof in Nelson Mandela
Municipality in South Africa illustrates what can
happen to afordability and accessibility for low-
and moderate-income families post-transfer in a
housing development situated in an area subject
to real estate boom. Ten years after transfer no
more than one in fve of the original owners still
reside in the complex. Most of those who have
sold have done so in the last few years, tempted by
skyrocketing local housing prices that they could
proft from. Most units have been purchased by
investors who now rent them out at prices well
beyond the afordability of moderate-income
households.216

Overall, privatisation of public housing, together
with various legal reforms abolishing rental
protection, has decreased afordable rental
housing options in many African countries.217
While governments have retreated from
providing low-cost housing, there has been little
private low-cost housing production to fll this
gap. Housing that is afordable to low- and even
middle-income Africans is rarely proftable for
the private sector, and so their output has been
extremely low.

PRIVATISATION OF
PUBLIC HOUSING
TOGETHER
WITH VARIOUS
LEGAL REFORMS
ABOLISHING RENTAL
PROTECTION HAVE
DECREASED AFFORDABLE
RENTAL HOUSING OPTIONS IN
MANY AFRICAN COUNTRIES.218

MANY
GOVERNMENTS,
AT CENTRAL AND
LOCAL LEVELS,
INSIST ON THE USE
OF CONVENTIONAL
BUILDING MATERIALS
TECHNOLOGIES, AND
STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS
THAT PREVENT THE USE OF
MORE APPROPRIATE, READILY
AVAILABLE, COST-EFFECTIVE
AND ENVIRONMENTALLY
FRIENDLY CONSTRUCTION
MATERIALS AND
TECHNOLOGIES.223.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->