Refinery Process Design

(Lecture Notes)

Dr. Ramgopal Uppaluri
ramgopalu@iitg.ernet.in
Department of Chemical Engineering
Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati
North Guwahati – 781039, Assam, India

March 2010

 

Acknowledgements 
From my mature childhood, I always had a very passionate desire to venture into slightly newer areas 
and explore my professional capabilities in these fields.  This passionate desire fructified after I met Dr. 
T. D. Singh (Founding Director, Bhaktivedanta Institute), a grand visionary for the synthesis of science‐
spirituality. His exemplary life, dedication to the mission day and night always inspired me to set difficult 
to address targets in life and achieve them.  Apart from my fundamental interests in science‐spirituality 
which is my first exploration away from process engineering professional life, Refinery Process Design is 
my second intellectual offshoot. 
The foremost acknowledgement for the Lecture Notes goes to the Almighty God, who provided me the 
desired intelligence and attributes for delivering the Lecture Notes.   
Next  acknowledgement  for  the  Lecture  Notes  goes  to  the  Department  of  Chemical  Engineering,  IIT 
Guwahati which has been my professional father and mother in which I am there for the past six years 
enjoying my every moment in personal as well as professional activity.  IIT Guwahati has truly inspired 
me  to  write  the  Lecture  notes  due  to  variety  of  reasons.  To  name  a  few,  the  early  heat  exchanger 
network  consultancy  projects  conducted  with  IOCL  Guwahati  and  BRPL  Bongaigaon  have  been  pretty 
useful  to  develop  insights  into  the  nature  of  refinery  processes  and  streams.    The  ideal  setting  of  IIT 
Guwahati  in  the  midst  of  petroleum  refineries  really  inspired  me  to  deliver  the  lecture  notes  for 
professional usage too! 
The  third  acknowledgement  goes  to  the  Centre  for  Educational  Technology  (CET),  IIT  Guwahati  for 
providing seed funding towards the preparation of the Lecture notes.  The seed funding enabled me to 
enhance  the quality  of  the book to a  large extent ranging from  calculations to correlation  data tables 
etc. I am highly thankful to Prof. R. Tiwari and Prof. S. Talukdar for providing me this worthy opportunity. 
The  next  acknowledgement  goes  to  my  students  Ms.  Anusha  Chandra  for  assisting  in  the  refinery 
property estimation and Mr. Vijaya Kumar Bulasara for assisting in all CDU calculations! Their patience 
and commitment really inspired me to take up the challenge in difficult circumstances.  Mr. Ranjan Das, 
my  graduating  Ph.D.  student  also  needs  to  be  acknowledged  for  generating  the  data  tables  for  good 
number of correlations which are essential for the calculations. 
Finally, I wish to acknowledge my mother and father, as they have been the fulcrum of my continued 
pursuits  in  chemical  engineering  practice  for  the  past  fifteen  odd  years.    Last  but  not  the  least  I 
acknowledge my wife whose patience and support during long hours I dedicated for the development of 
the lecture notes is very much appreciated. 
 
Date: 16th March 2010   
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 

(Dr. Ramgopal Uppaluri) 
IIT Guwahati 

Preface  To  draft  the  lecture  notes  in  the  specialized  topic  of  Refinery  Process  Design  needs  expertise  in  both  fields of petroleum refining and process design.  for  better  explanations  I  always  felt  that  calculations  should  be  conducted  and  explained as well.  I hope that this lecture notes in Refinery Process Design will be a useful reference for both students as  well as practicing engineers to systematically orient and mature in process refinery specialization.  Thereby. design of light end units and design of refinery process absorbers. a very  introductory  issue  of  relating  the  subject  matter  of  refinery  process  design  to  conventional  chemical  process design is presented from a philosophical perspective.   The primary objective of the lecture notes is to provide a very simple and lucid approach for a graduate  student to learn upon design principles.  In the very first chapter.  The third chapter attempts  to  provide  a  new  approach  for  conducting  refinery  mass  balances  using  the  data  base  provided  by  Maples  (2000). the lecture notes did not present some elementary design related chapters pertaining to the  design of heat exchanger networks.  Consisting of three main chapters.  and  specifically  after  thoroughly  reading Jones and Pujado (2006) book which I feel should be the primary reference for refinery design.  These will be taken up in the subsequent revisions of the Lecture notes.  With this sole objective I drafted the Lecture notes.    Date: 16th March 2010                                                            ii        (Dr.  While Jones and Pujado (2006) summarized many calculations  in  the  form  of  Tables. this lecture notes enables a graduate chemical engineer to learn all  necessary content for maturing in the field of refinery process design.  The basic urge of extending my process design specific  skills  to  the  design  of  petroleum  refineries  started  in  IIT  Guwahati. Ramgopal Uppaluri)  IIT Guwahati  .  All in all.    The  fourth  chapter  deliberates  upon  the  design  of  crude  distillation  unit  with  further  elaborates towards the selection of complex distillation reflux ratio. the second chapter presents a  detailed discussion of the estimation of essential refinery stream properties. pump around unit duty estimation  and diameter calculations.

 2004). T.  1990)  and  Second  International  Congress  on  Life  and  Its  Origin (Rome. T. USA in  1974.  Dedication  To  Dr. Bhaktivedanta Institute    Short biography of Dr. Singh  Founder Director. Bhaktivedanta Swami and was appointed Director of the Bhaktivedanta Institute in  1974. He organized four major International conferences on science and religion ‐ First and Second World Congress  for the Synthesis  of Science and Religion  (Mumbai. First  International  Conference on  the  Study  of  Consciousness  within  Science  (San  Francisco. Collectively thousands of prominent scientists and religious leaders including several Nobel  Laureates participated. He authored  and edited  more than a  dozen  books including What is Matter  and What is  Life?  (1977).  He  was  trained  in  Vaishnava  Vedanta  studies  from  1970 to 1977 under Srila A.  He  was  a  scientist  and  spiritualist  well‐known  for  his  pioneering  efforts  in  the  synthesis  of  science  and  religion  for  a  deeper  understanding  of  life  and  the  universe. C.  Theobiology  (1979).  Synthesis  of  Science  and  Religion:  Critical  Essays  and  Dialogues  (1987)  and  Thoughts on Synthesis of Science and Religion (2001).D. 1986  &  Kolkata. in Physical Organic Chemistry from the University of California at Irvine.            iii    . D.  1997). Singh received his Ph. D. T. Singh:  Dr. He was also the founder Editor‐in‐Chief for two journals of  the Bhaktivedanta Institute. D.

1  Psuedo‐component concept  12  o   2.4  Characterization factor  17    2.4  Refinery Property Estimation  3  2    Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  5    2.12  Flash point estimation and flash point index for blends  61    2.2  Estimation of average  API and % sulfur content  15    2.6  Viscosity  21    2.4  Mass balances across the CDU   79    3.8  Vapor pressure  36    2.1  Introduction  69    3.3.13  Pour point estimation and pour point index for blends  63    2.2  Refinery Block diagram  69    3.3  Estimation of average  API and sulfur content  12    2.15  Summary  68  3    Refinery Mass Balances  69    3.9  Estimation of Product TBP from crude TBP  36    2.1  Introduction  5    2.11  Estimation of blend viscosity  58    2.5  Mass balances across the VDU  81    3.7  Mass balances across HVGO hydrotreater  88    3.1  Introduction  1    1.2  Process Design Vs Process Simulation  1    1.14  Equilibrium flash vaporization curve  66    2.5  Molecular weight  21    2.3  Refinery modeling using conceptual black box approach  78    3.10  Estimation of product specific gravity and sulfur content   44    2.8  Mass balances across LVGO hydrotreater  91  iv    7  .7  Enthalpy  22    2.Contents  1    Introduction  1    1.3  Analogies between Chemical & Refinery Process design  2    1.3.2  Estimation of average temperatures  o   2.6  Mass balances across the Thermal Cracker  84    3.

 Gasoil and fuel oil pools  117    3.4.4.  3.18  Summary  120  4    Design of Crude Distillation Column  121    4.5  Estimation of flash zone temperature  144    4.13  Mass balances across the reformer  103    3.9  Mass balances across the FCC  93    3.17  Mass balances across the LPG.14  Estimation of Top and Bottom Pump Around Duty  173    4.17  Summary  182      References  183      v    .10  Total  Tower  energy  balance  and  total  condenser  duty  estimation  156    4.16  Estimation of column diameters  179    4.9  Estimation of side stripper products temperature  154    4.3  Design aspects of the CDU  126    4.4  Mass balances across the CDU and flash zone  128    4.11  Estimation of condenser duty  157    4.10  Mass balances across the Diesel hydrotreater  97    3.1  Introduction  121    4.16  Mass balances across the gasoline pool  112    3.12  Estimation of Overflow from Top tray  159    4.13  Verification of fractionation criteria  160    4.14  Mass balances across the naphtha hydrotreater  106    3.15  Mass balances across the alkylator and isomerizer  109    3.7  Estimation of tower top temperature  150    4.2  Flash zone mass balance table  143    4.11  Mass balances across the kerosene hydrotreater  99    3.6  Estimation of draw off stream temperatures  147    4.12  Naphtha consolidation  101    3.2  Architecture of Main and Secondary Columns  124    4.8  Estimation of residue product stream temperature  152    4.15  Estimation of flash zone liquid reflux rate  177    4.1  CDU mass balance table  142    4.

  o  API Curve of Saudi heavy crude oil.2  TBP Curve of Saudi heavy crude oil.  Figure 4.  List of Figures  Figure 2.  Figure 2.2    174    around duty  Figure 4.  Figure 4.  Figure 4.5  Probability  chart  developed  by  Thrift  for  estimating  ASTM  5    5    6  12    38    temperatures  from  any  two  known  values  of  ASTM  temperatures.7    122  along with heat exchanger networks (HEN).8  Heat balance envelope for the estimation of flash zone liquid      reflux rate.  159  Figure 4.    vi    177  .4  Heat balance Envelope for condenser duty estimation.  Figure 3.  Figure 4.6  Energy  balance  envelope  for  the  estimation  of  reflux  flow  166  Heat  balance  envelope  for  the  estimation  of  top  pump        rate below the LGO draw off tray.  Figure 3.  Figure 4.  158  Figure 4.3  Sulfur content assay for heavy Saudi crude oil.5  Envelope for the determination of tower top tray overflow.2  Refinery Block Diagram (Dotted lines are for H2 stream).   Figure 2.1  Summary  of  prominent  sub‐process  units  in  a  typical    72    petroleum refinery complex.1  Figure 2.4  Illustration for the concept of pseudo‐component.3      Envelope  for  the  enthalpy  balance  to  yield  residue  product  151    temperature.1  A  Conceptual  diagram  of  the  crude  distillation  unit  (CDU)  75  Design  architecture  of  main  and  secondary  columns  of  the    123  CDU.  Figure 2.

  Table 2.3  Tabulated  Maxwell’s  correlation  data  for  the  estimation  of  10  molal average boiling point (Adapted from Maxwell (1950)).  Table 2.12  Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 500oF and K =  29  11 – 12.  Table 2.7  Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 200oF and K =  24  11 – 12.13  Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 500oF and K =  30  11 – 12.  Table 2.1  Analogies between chemical and refinery process design  2  Table 2.  Table 2.  Table 2.14  Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 600 oF and K =  vii    31  .6  Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 200oF and K =  23  11 – 12.  Table 2.8  Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 300oF and K =  25  11 – 12.  List of Tables  Table 1.10  Table  2.  Table 2.  Table 2.1  Tabulated  Maxwell’s  correlation  data  for  the  estimation  of  8  mean average boiling point (Adapted from Maxwell (1950)).  Table 2.5  Molecular  weight  data  table  (Developed  from  correlation  20  presented in Maxwell (1950)).9  Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 300oF and K =  26  11 – 12.   Table 2.4  Characterization  factor  data  table  (Developed  from  19  correlation presented in Maxwell (1950)).  Table 2.  Table 2.11  Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 400oF and K =  28  11 – 12.2  Tabulated  Maxwell’s  correlation  data  for  the  estimation  of  9  weight average boiling point (Adapted from Maxwell (1950)).10:  Hydrocarbon  vapor  enthalpy  data  for  MEABP  =  27  400oF and K = 11 – 12.

  Fractionation  criteria  correlation  data  for  naphtha‐kerosene  165  products. Connel et.24  EFV‐TBP correlation data presented by Maxwell (1950).  Table 4.  35  Table 2.11 – 12.16  Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 800oF and K =  33  11 – 12.98 at 60  o Table 4.19  End point correlation data presented by Good.15    Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 600oF and K =  32  11 – 12.  62  Table 2. 300 oF (Set B).17  Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 800oF and K =  34          11 – 12.2.72 to 0.1 and 3.3  Variation of specific gravity with temperature (a) Data range:  164  SG = 0.  Table 4.  39  Table 2. 90 % vol TBP cut for    all fractions (Set E).  Table 4.6  Variation  of  Kf  (Flooding  factor)  for  various  tray  and  sieve  specifications.7 at 60 oF (b) Data range: SG = 0.  viii    178  .  58  Table 2.1  Summary of streams and their functional role as presented in  78    147          Figures 3.  Table 2.22  Flash point index and flash point correlation data  60  Table 2.  152  Table 4.5 to 0.23  Pour point and pour point index correlation data. 500 oF (Set    D).  Table 4. 400 oF (Set C).  Table 2.  37      Data sets represent fractions whose cut point starts at 200 oF  TBP or lower (Set A). 90% vol temperature of the cut Vs.  Table 2.   65  Table 3.4  F.5  Fractionation  criteria  correlation  data  for  side  stream‐side  165  stream products.21  Blending Index and Viscosity correlation data.20  ASTM‐TBP correlation data from Edmister ethod.1  Packie’s  correlation  data  to  estimate  the  draw  off  temperature. al.  Table 2.2  Steam table data relevant for CDU design problem.18  Vapor pressure data for hydrocarbons.  Table 2.

  a  design  based  perspective  is  essential to develop a greater insight with respect to the physics of various processes. for the rigorous design of multi‐component distillation systems.  product  distributions  (D.  Temperature  (T).  NS.  xB.   For a binary distillation system.    For  example.  On the  other hand.  Eventually  commercial process simulators such as HYSYS or ASPEN PLUS or CHEMCAD or PRO‐II are used to match  the obtained product distributions with desired product distributions.  NF). a process design problem  is solved as a process simulation problem with an assumed set of process design parameters. Introduction    1. Mc‐Cabe Thiele diagram is adopted for process design calculations and a system of  equations whose total number does not exceed 20 are solved for process simulation. NF) and feed (F.2  Process Design Vs Process Simulation  A  process  design  engineer  is  bound  to  learn  about  the  basic  knowledge  with  respect  to  a  simulation  problem and its contextual variation with a process design problem.  in  a  conventional  binary  distillation  operation. xB).  xF)  to  evaluate  the  number  of  stages  (N).  Typically.      While  technological  perspective  is  essential  for  a  basic  understanding  of  the  complex  refinery  processes. adopting a graphical procedure is  ruled  out for the purpose of  process design calculations.1. adopting a process design procedure or process simulation procedure is  very easy.  rectifying. NS.  B.    However.  A typical process design problem  involves  the  evaluation  of  design  parameters  for  a  given  process  conditions.  petroleum  refinery  engineering  is  taught  in  the  undergraduate  as  well  as  graduate  education  in  a  technological  but  not  process  design  perspective. a refinery engineer is bestowed with greater levels of confidence in his duties  with mastery in the subject of refinery process design.  generating a solution for binary distillation is not difficult. xD. a typical process simulation problem involves the evaluation of output variables as a function of  input variables and design parameters.   Alternatively.  For multi‐component systems involving more than 3 to 4 components. as design based  evaluation procedures enable a successful correlation between fixed and operating costs and associated  profits.   A short  cut method  for the  design  of  multi‐ component  distillation  columns  is  to  adopt  Fenske. xF) to evaluate the product distributions (D.  Underwood  and  Gilliland  (FUG)  method.  on  the  other  hand.  xD)  and  feed  (F.  1.  Based on a trail and error     . condenser and re‐boiler duties (QC and QR) etc.  stripping  and  feed  stages  (NR.  For either case.  In other words.  a  process  design  problem  involves  the  specification  of  Pressure  (P).1 Introduction  Many  a  times. a process simulation problem for a binary distillation column involves the specification of  process design parameters (NR.  rectifying  and  stripping section column diameters (DR and DS). B.

 molecular weight.1 : Analogies between chemical and refinery process design    approach  that  gets  improved  with  the  experience  of  the  process  design  engineer  with  simulation  software.    There  are  few  other  properties  that  are  also  required  to  aid  process  design  calculations  as  these  properties are largely related to the product specifications.  a  refinery  process  design  procedure  shall  mimic  similar  procedures  adopted  for  chemical  process  design.  oAPI and enthalpy have to be evaluated for  various  crude  feeds  and  refinery  intermediate  and  product  streams.1 summarizes these analogies in  the larger context. In  summary.  it is  always a fact  that a multi‐component  process design problem is very often solved as a process simulation problem.Introduction    S. as it necessarily eases  the solution approach. process design parameters are set.   It can be observed in the table that refinery process design calculations can be easily  carried out as conventional chemical process design calculations when various properties such as VABP.   A few illustrative examples are presented  2    .  1.  TBP to ASTM conversion and vice‐versa.3 Analogies between Chemical & Refinery Process design  In  a  larger  sense.    Once  these  properties  are  estimated. Table 1.  a  chemical  engineer  shall  first  become  conversant  with  the  analogies associated with chemical and refinery process design.   1  2  3  4  5  Parameters in  Chemical Process  Design  Molar/Mass  feed  and  product  flow  rates  Feed Mole fraction  Parameters in  Refinery Process  Design  Volumetric  (bbl)  feed  and  product  flow rates   True  Boiling  Point  (TBP)    curve  of  the  feed  Desired  product  Product  TBP  mole fractions  curves/ASTM Gaps  Column  diameter  as  Vapor  &  Liquid  flow  function  of  vapor  &  rates (mol or kg/hr)  Liquid  flow  rates  (mol or kg/hr)  Energy  balance  may  Energy Balance is by  or  may  not  be  far  an  important  critical  in  design  equation to solve  calculations  Desired conversions  ‐ ‐ Barrel to kg (using average oAPI)  Determine average oAPI of the stream  ‐ ‐ Convert  TBP  data  to  Volume  average  boiling  points  for  various  pseudo  components  Convert TBP to ASTM and vice‐versa  ‐ Convert TBP data to Molecular weight  ‐ Evaluate  enthalpy  (Btu/lb)  of  various  streams    Table 1.    However. then knowledge in conventional chemical process design can be used to judiciously conduct  the process design calculations.No.

    Therefore. 14. 9. flash point and pour point need  to be evaluated for a blended stream mixture.e. 16.  3    . 6.Introduction  below  to  convey  that  the  evaluation  of  these  additional  properties  is  mandatory  in  refinery  process  design:  a) Sulfur  content  in  various  intermediate  as  well  as  product  streams  is  always  considered  as  an  important parameter to monitor in the entire refinery.  Therefore. (b)).. True boiling point curve (always given) of crude and intermediate/product streams  Volume (Mean) average boiling point (VABP)  Mean average boiling point (MEABP)  Weight average boiling point (WABP)  Molal average boiling point (MABP)  Characterization factor (K)  Vapor pressure (VP) at any temperature   Viscosity at any temperature  Average sulfur content (wt %)  o API  Enthalpy (Btu/lb)  ASTM conversion to TBP and vice‐versa  Viscosity of a mixture using viscosity index  Flash point of a mixture using flash point index  Pour point of a mixture using pour point index  Equilibrium flash vaporization curve  For  many  of  these  properties.  the  determination  of  EFV  from TBP is necessary. the evaluation of viscosity from blended intermediate stream viscosities is required.  sulfur and  oAPI curve using which properties of various streams are estimated.4  Refinery Property Estimation  The following list summarizes the refinery process and product properties required for process design  calculations:  1.    1. 4. 7. 10. 5. 15.  wherever  necessary viscosity of process and product streams needs to be evaluated at convenience. 11. 2. 13.  the  starting  point  by  large  is  the  crude  assay  which  consists  of  a  TBP.   d) Equilibrium  flash  vaporization  (EFV)  curve  plays  a  critical  role  in  the  design  of  distillation  columns  that  are  charged  with  partially  vaporized  feed.  b) The viscosity of certain heavier products emanating from the fuel oil pool such as heavy fuel oil  and  bunker  oil  is  always  considered  as  a  severe  product  constraint.  For  such cases. evaluation of sulfur content  in various streams in the refinery complex is essential. 3.  c) In similarity to the case evaluated for the above option (i.    Therefore. we  address  the  evaluation  of  these  important  properties  using  several  correlations  available  in  various  literatures. 12. 8.  In the next chapter.

  Amongst several correlations available.    In  summary.3 summarize the TBP.  intermediate  and  product  streams.  A complete TBP assay of the Saudi heavy crude oil  is obtained from elsewhere.   Often.  Crude assay consists of a summary of various refinery properties.  oAPI  curve  and  Sulfur content curve. Often  crude  assay  associated  to  residue  section  of  the  crude  is  not  presented. the most relevant and easy to  use correlations are summarized so as to estimate refinery stream properties with ease.  oAPI and sulfur content curves  with respect to the cumulative volume %.1 Introduction  In this chapter.                5    . These curves are always provided along with a variation in the vol % composition.  This has been carried out to ensure that the  evaluated  values  are  in  comparable  range  with  the  average  oAPI  and  sulfur  content  reported  for  the  crude in the literature.  These values correspond to about 28.  Amongst these.2 oAPI and 2. it is difficult to obtain the trends in the curves for the 100 % volume range of the crude. the  oAPI and % sulfur content graphs have  been extrapolated to project values till a volume % of 100.  a  typical  crude  assay consists of the following information:  a) b) c) d) e) TBP curve  (< 100 % volume range)  o API curve (< 100 % volume range)  Sulfur content (wt %) curve (< 100 % volume range)  Average oAPI of the crude   Average sulfur content of the crude (wt %)  An  illustrative  example  is  presented  below  for  a  typical  crude  assay  for  Saudi  heavy  crude  oil  whose  crude assay is presented by Jones and Pujado (2006).  2.2 and 2. we present various correlations available for the property estimation of refinery crude.  The  determination  of  various  stream  properties  in  a  refinery  process  needs  to  first  obtain  the  crude  assay.      Most  of  these  correlations  are  available  in  Maxwell  (1950).1.  API  Technical Hand book (1997) etc. 2.  the  most  critical  charts  that  are  to  be  known  from  a  given  crude  assay  are  TBP  curve.84 wt % respectively.  Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    2.  Figures 2.  For refinery design purposes.

1: TBP Curve of Saudi heavy crude oil.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    1600 1400 Temperature oF 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 -200 0 20 40 60 80 100 Volume %   Figure 2.  6    .    100 60 o API 80 40 20 0 0 20 40 60 80 Volume % 100   Figure 2.2: o API Curve of Saudi heavy crude oil.

Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    6 Sulfur content (wt %) 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 20 40 60 80 100 Volume %     Figure 2. Where applicable.  molal  average  boiling  point  (MABP)  and  weight  average  boiling point (WABP) is evaluated using the graphical correlations presented in Maxwell (1950).3: Sulfur content assay for heavy Saudi crude oil.  7    .2 Estimation of average temperatures  The  volume  average  boiling  point  (VABP)  of  crude  and  crude  fractions  is  estimated  using  the  expressions:                  (1)              (2)  The  mean  average  boiling  point  (MEABP). extrapolation  of  provided  data  trends  is  adopted  to  obtain  the  temperatures  if  graphical  correlations  are  not  presented  beyond  a  particular  range  in  the  calculations.  These  are summarized in Tables 2.3 for both crudes and crude fractions.  We next  present  an example  to  illustrate  the  estimation of the average temperatures for Saudi heavy crude oil.     2.1 – 2.

184  ‐13.224  ‐41.324  ‐4.2  8.268  ‐27.2  1.390  ‐33.438  ‐27.025  ‐64.337  ‐39.253  ‐46.250  ‐6.8  4  4.958  ‐56.723  ‐37.  8    .8  1  1.306  ‐9.517  ‐29.585  ‐37.390  ‐19.525  ‐15.121  ‐23.037  ‐6.370  ‐8.832  ‐1.8  7  7.529  ‐31.821  ‐6.210  ‐9.6  2.325  ‐41.866  ‐26.882  ‐23.231  ‐36.442  ‐35.043  ‐3.267  ‐4.709  ‐9.497  ‐13.164  ‐23.287  ‐47.125  ‐11.6  6.4  3.605  ‐44.452  ‐31.137  ‐32.027  ‐50.428  ‐21.2  6.476  ‐7.004  ‐45.336  ‐16.564  ‐24.378  ‐25.977  ‐6.4  8.2  7.277  ‐7.674  ‐2.211  ‐0.177  ‐7.956  ‐20.794  ‐11.770  ‐39.665  ‐27.904  ‐21.564  ‐14.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    o STBP  F/vol%  0.4  7.2  5.073    Table 2.538  ‐31.4  1.621  ‐10.513  ‐53.664  ‐13.463  ‐70.644  ‐39.182  ‐8.815  ‐16.490  ‐3.4  4.491  ‐67.623  ‐12.8  10  Differentials to be added to VABP for evaluating MEABP for various  values of VABP  o 200  F  0.015  ‐19.958  ‐15.204  ‐44.157  ‐3.134  ‐36.8  9  9.931  ‐37.988  ‐42.220  ‐25.482  ‐34.6  4.479  ‐23.4  2.345  o o 500  F  600+  F  ‐0.509  ‐32.606  ‐59.8  2  2.763  ‐9.612  ‐53.843  ‐25.741  ‐22.074  ‐12.863  ‐30.2  9.8  8  8.4  6.934  ‐34.558  ‐17.411  ‐4.731  ‐12.946  ‐2.238  ‐10.263  ‐18.627  ‐16.580  ‐39.349  ‐3.447  ‐34.4  5.8  6  6.232  ‐17.4  9.237  ‐1.231  ‐5.766  ‐44.135  ‐21.411  ‐17.083  ‐14.231  o 400  F  ‐0.6  5.6  8.536  ‐47.392  ‐50.260  ‐62.633  ‐2.580  ‐59.637  ‐48.6  9.746  ‐34.6  3.916  ‐51.092  ‐0.635  ‐2.366  ‐2.157  ‐14.8  3  3.153  ‐28.525  ‐9.119  ‐18.8  5  5.853  ‐11.459  ‐56.696  ‐5.713  o 300  F  ‐0.039  ‐13.738  ‐1.1: Tabulated Maxwell’s correlation data for the estimation of mean average boiling point  (Adapted from Maxwell (1950)).059  ‐30.320  ‐29.393  ‐4.174  ‐6.817  ‐42.369  ‐5.2  3.502  ‐18.171  ‐19.171  ‐7.252  ‐39.2  4.2  2.313  ‐8.6  1.6  7.607  ‐3.452  ‐20.714  ‐0.

766  10.103  7.3339  3.8  9  9.481        32.   9    .149  5.705  5.4  8.120  8.598  6.4  9.4  2.718        23.8  2  2.431  11.2685  3.241  1.504  13.498        29.992  4.6  5.6  9.036      13.084  4.770  0.7964  6.822  7.437        25.854  16.8  8  8.8  4  4.3327  2.619  14.5729  7.2  1.356  5.5521  9.4  7.3378  7.4  6.843  9.062      14.8098  3.4  3.8  5  5.406  8.281  3.437        19.1478      2.5961  5.051  5.4252      1.378  4.9128  0.340    12.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties     STBP  o F/vol%  1  1.801  2.2  9.236        28.8  10  Differentials to be added to VABP for evaluating weight  average boiling point  o o o o 200  F  300  F  400  F  500  F  0.6  4.383        18.4  1.623  1.825      15.149  9.063  1.556  2.4331  0.806  12.7724  1.731  0.641      16.603  2.355    13.997  12.850  3.979  2.871        1.7419  12.699    10.485        20.2  7.9349  2.309  9.6  1.690  7.3187  10.874  5.2  4.656    Table 2.364  0.9560  4.3710  10.817        21.3559  1.8  6  6.530  6.869    3.8  7  7.471  4.860  1.450  7.862      17.698  5.707  10.6  6.2  2.8  3  3.4  5.155    13.527  3.385  1.6  7.562  0.0148  11.035        24.2  3.977  9.2  8.651  12.372  1.818  11.6  2.076        17.528  9.8381  8.806        27.525    11.2: Tabulated Maxwell’s correlation data for the estimation of weight average boiling point  (Adapted from Maxwell (1950)).242  5.164  8.2  5.392  6.385        0.373        35.094  7.729        31.1566  5.428    3.096  3.4  4.6859      2.2  6.288  3.6  8.713        34.6  3.

513  ‐14.853  ‐5.4  ‐24.572  ‐22.8  ‐6.289  ‐40.218  7.718  ‐30.198      1.056  2.439  ‐19.4  ‐1.907  ‐16.513  3.524  6.634  ‐52.380  ‐48.853  2.524  ‐65.589  ‐44.4    ‐104.4  ‐12.810  ‐27.190  ‐7.412  ‐80.286  ‐12.103    2  ‐7.367  6.215  ‐25.487  ‐44.548  ‐48.855  2.195  3.2  ‐55.865  2.137  ‐0.367  ‐75.467  ‐25.412  6.893  4.354  ‐19.2  ‐22.941  7.417  ‐56.        10    .6  ‐63.733  ‐73.439  3.6  ‐4.998  ‐33.2  ‐9.654  7    ‐91.736  ‐3.942  ‐5.907  3.243  ‐2.8  ‐16.720  ‐12.582  ‐37.810  4.993  ‐60.893  ‐30.865  ‐3.4  ‐59.582  4.487  5.417  5.218  ‐98.237  6.2  6    ‐70.485  ‐33.225  ‐16.6    ‐80.6  ‐14.528    1.966  ‐40.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    Differentials to be added to VABP for  evaluating weight average boiling point o o o 200  F  300  F  400  F  STBP  o F/vol%  1.998  4.8  ‐47.215  4  ‐33.8    ‐86.548  5.808  1.8  ‐68.412  ‐10.855  ‐7.733  ‐60.603  ‐56.183  ‐14.2  ‐0.8  ‐30.525  5.525  ‐52.286  3  ‐19.2    ‐98.4    ‐75.6  ‐43.912  ‐104.4  ‐40.302  ‐27.6  ‐27.912    Table 2.195  ‐22.808  ‐0.103  ‐2.650  ‐65.941  ‐91.056  ‐10.2  ‐36.237  ‐70.3: Tabulated Maxwell’s correlation data for the estimation of molal average boiling point  (Adapted from Maxwell (1950)).955  ‐37.654  ‐86.966  5  ‐51.

  Solution:  a.215  F (from extrapolation)    0 Weight average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =715 + 37.0895 = 641.67) =  ‐73.67) = ‐116.67) = ‐191.515  F  0 ∆ T (715.91  F    c.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  Q 2.12.1 and graphical correlation data (Table 2.1    0 ∆ T (400.515  F  0 ∆ T (500.0895 F (from extrapolation)    0 Mean average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =715 – 73.12.12.48  F  0 ∆ T (715.3495  F (from extrapolation)    0 Molal average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =715 – 179.62  F  0 ∆ T (715.3). Weight  average boiling point (from extrapolation)    Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 965‐205/60= 12.12.65  F    11    .67    From Table 2. Volume  average boiling point    Tv = t20+t50+t80/3 = (338+703+1104)/3= 715 0F    b.67) = ‐212.12.12.12.215 = 752. Molal  average boiling point (from extrapolation)    Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 965‐205/60= 12.2     0 ∆ T (400.67) =  37.15  F  0 ∆ T (500.67    From Table 2.12.1: Using the TBP presented in Figure 2.67) = 43.96  F  0 ∆ T (600.1 – 2.67) =  ‐179.21  F    d.67) = 41.3495 = 535. Mean average boiling point (from extrapolation)    Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 965‐205/60= 12.1    0 ∆ T (400.12.67    From Table 2.67) = ‐102. estimate  the average temperatures of Saudi heavy crude oil.

Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  2.    Since  oil  processing  is  usually  reported  in  terms  of  barrels  (bbl). a crude oil is characterized to be a constituent of a maximum of 20  – 30 psuedocomponents whose average properties can be used to represent the TBP.  Henceforth.3.3 Estimation of average oAPI and sulfur content  2.    The  estimation  of  oAPI  is  detrimental  to  evaluate  the  mass  balances  from  volume  balances.   12    .  oAPI and % sulfur  content  of  the  streams. the average sulfur content of  both  crude  and  its  CDU  products  needs  to  be  evaluated  so  as  to  aid  further  calculations  in  the  downstream units associated to the crude distillation unit.  Therefore.  it  is  essential  to  characterize  the  TBP  curve  of  the  crude/product  using  the  concept  of  psuedocomponents.    A  pseudo‐component  in  a  typical  TBP  is  defined  as  a  component  that  can  represent the average mid volume boiling point (and its average properties such as oAPI and % sulfur                         Figure 2. to aid refinery calculations.  In  order  to  estimate  the  average  oAPI  and  sulfur  content  of  a  crude/product  stream.  the  psuedocomponent  concept  is  being  used.  as  crude oil constitutes about a million compounds or even more.4: Illustration for the concept of pseudo‐component.  the  average  oAPI of the stream needs to be estimated  to convert the volumetric flow rate to the mass flow  rate.    According  to  the  conception  of  the  psuedocomponent  representation of the crude stream.  sulfur  balances  across  the  refinery  is  very  important  to  design  and  operate  various desulfurization sub‐processes in the refinery complex.    It  is  well  known  that  a  refinery  process  stream  could  not  represented  using  a  set  of  50  –  100  components.1 Psuedo‐component concept  Many a times for refinery products the average  oAPI needs to be estimated from the  oAPI curve of the  crude  and  TBP  of  the  crude/product.    In  a  similar  context.

  These can be then used to estimate the average oAPI and  % sulfur content of the crude/refinery product.1 – 40 0-4 13    .9 4-6 6 – 7.  A similar projection of mid volume with the oAPI and sulfur content curves also provides the mid  volume oAPI and %sulfur content properties.2: Using the TBP.1 and pseudo‐component concept.  typically  a  crude/product  stream  is  represented  with  no  more  than  20  –  30  psuedo‐ components. in summary.   Therefore.5 2 3 3 5 3 5 5.  We next present an illustration with respect to the pseudo‐components chosen to represent the heavy  Saudi crude oil.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  content). oAPI and % sulfur content in terms of the chosen pseudo‐ components.1 35.  summarize a table to represent the TBP. a graphical representation of the TBP is converted to a tabulated data  comprising of psueudo‐component number.   The temperature corresponding to the pseudo‐component to represent a section of the crude volume  on the TBP is termed as mid boiling point (MBP) and the corresponding volume as mid volume (MV).  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Range  Cumulative  volume (%)  -12-80 Differential  volume  (%)  4 80-120 120-160 160-180 180-220 220-260 260-300 300-360 360-400 400-460 460-520 520-580 2 1.  In a truly mathematical sense.  since huge  number  of  straight segments are required to represent a non‐linear curve.1 4. oAPI and % sulfur content presented in Figure 2.  Therefore.  Q 2.  with  the  fact  that  for  a  straight  line  exactly  at  the  mid‐point.5 1.5 – 9 9 – 11 11 – 14 14 – 17 17 – 22 22 – 25 25 – 30 30 – 35.  Solution:  The following temperature and volume bands have been chosen to represent the TBP in terms of the  pseudo‐components.  Psuedo‐ component  No.    Henceforth. this is possible. if the chosen area for the volume cuts corresponds  to  a  straight  line. section volume range. the pseudo‐component shall provide equal areas of area under and above the curves (Figure  2. the calculation procedure is bound to be  tedious.      However.4). MBP and  MV. section temperature range.5 7. a pseudo‐component is chosen such that within a given range of  volume %.  the  area  above  the  straight  line and  below the  straight  line  need  to be  essential  equal. in a typical TBP.

5 40 – 43 43 – 46 46 – 54.25   14    .5 63.5 -100   For these chosen temperature zones.75 58.5 41.5 8.76.5 3 3 2.5 65.5 7.75 8 9.5 75.25 88.5 – 62 62 – 65.75 12.5 32.5 54. the pseudo‐component mid boiling point and mid volume (that  provide equal areas of upper and lower triangles illustrated in Figure 2.25 80.75 69.5 7.5 – 68 68 – 71 71 – 74 74 .5 3.5 – 84 84 – 92.75 45 50.  1 Mid Boiling point  Mid volume  35 2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 100 140 170 200 240 280 330 380 430 490 550 600 640 710 810 880 920 960 1000 1040 1110 1220 1340 5 6.5 23.5 2.25 96.5 92.5 7.5 19.4) evaluated using the TBP curve  are summarized as:  Psuedo‐ component No.75 66.5 72.5 76.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 580-620 620-660 660-760 760-860 860-900 900-940 940-980 980-1020 1020-1060 1060-1160 1160-1280 1280-1400 3 3 8.5 15.5 37.5 27.

663074 0. [Bi] and [Ci] correspond to the pseudo‐component (i) differential volume.75 8 9.3.25 89.742782 0.5 32.5 63.G. %sulfur content       ∑ ∑             (3)                (4)  where [Ai].5 75.847305 0.68523 0.940199 0.96587 0.5 27.2 Estimation of average oAPI and % sulfur content  The average oAPI of a refinery crude/product stream is estimated using the expression:  av.5 59 53 49 45 40.901274 0.5 23.5 72.25 96.5 33 30 25.676386 0. mid volume S.952862 0. S.9 77.959322 0.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  The mid volume (MV) data when projected on the oAPI and % sulfur content curves (Figures 1.8017 0.75 69.5 0.25 88.3)  would provide mid oAPI and mid % sulfur content for corresponding pseudo‐components.921824 0.5 22 19 18 17 16 15 13 10 6.1 81. for  pseudo‐component (i)  and mid sulfur content (wt %) for pseudo‐component (i) respectively.705736 0.75 58.7 75 69 64.822674 0.  15    .5 35.  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Mid volume  Mid oAPI  % sulfur content  2 5 6.5 19.5 41.860182 0. These are  summarized as  Psuedo‐ component No.766938 0.5 15.946488 0.641432 0.979239 1 1.876161 0.2 and 1.721939 0. G.025362   2.75 66.75 12. ∑ ∑ av.25 80.75 45 50.783934 0.5 37.

14402  207.55  36.766938  0.03663  7.05  3.5  18  2.165816 2.9  4.5  Sum  100  Mid volume  o API    89.014579 1.7  2  2.822674  0.676386  0.913681 3.5  23  8.5  22  7.G  B 0.847305  0.5  22  19  18  17  16  15  13  10  6.742782  0.877966 2.21678  8.402975  2.876161  0.5  4  1.834688 2.628483 7.936948  5. factor  A B 2.47036  1.025362  ‐        16    Wt.56573 1.940199  0.946488  0.19564 4.1  81.5  19  3  20  3  21  2.5  24  7.5  17  3.921824  0.351801 4.75  3.641432  0.783934  0.7  1.  Q 2.7  ‐    Sulfur wt.  factor  A B C 0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0.5  35.901274  0.35  1.690217 87.580547 2.9  13  3  14  3  15  8.290698 2.344291 8.  Solution:   Psuedo‐ component  Differential  Number  Volume %  A   1  4  2  2  3  1.55  3.571907  9.151796 2.5 7.979239  1  1.858586 2.411471 2.027845 1.045  .256966  19.959322  0.414676 7.5  16  7.2  0.952862  0.008499 4.01262  10.228346 3.5  5  2  6  3  7  3  8  5  9  3  10  5  11  5.64273  36.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  An  illustrative  example  is  presented  to  evaluate  the  average  oAPI  and  %  sulfur  content  of  a  crude  stream.705736  0.8017  0.35  3.9  77.5  33  30  25.68523  0.576263  10.3: Estimate the average  oAPI and % sulfur content of heavy Saudi Crude oil and compare it with the  value provided in the literature.934301  28.58476   Mid volume  sulfur wt %  C   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0.5  ‐  Mid volume  S.05  0.2  3.663074  0.1  12  4.3  4.5  59  53  49  45  40.860182  0.96587  0.91815  19.660828 6.191734  0.721939  0.35  0.604925  4.366221 2.7  75  69  64.326148 1.38693  5.6  2.7  3.

        17    . API ∑ A ∑ 141. G.2  oAPI  and  2. characterization factor is 11.4: Estimate the characterization factor for Saudi heavy crude oil.5 av.6393        The  literature  values  of  average  oAPI  and  average  sulfur  content  (wt  %)  are  28. %sulfur content 0.  Therefore. .  Solution:   0 Mean average boiling point = 641. S.5 0.4 which can be used to estimate the characterization factor for both  crude and other refinery process streams. graphical correlations to evaluate characterization factor are  mandatory  to  evaluate  the  characterization  factor.    2. ∑ 2.    Q 2.84  wt  %  respectively.    Maxwell  (1950)  presents  a  graphical  correlation  between  crude  characterization  factor  (K).874 B 87. 0API = 30.  oAPI  and  mean  average  boiling  point  (MEABP).4.4 Characterization factor  The refinery stream characterization factor (K) is required for a number of property evaluations such as  molecular weight.0577  ∑ . enthalpy etc.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  av.    The  correlation is presented in Table 2.75. av.9105  F.8758  30.3834770  From Table 2.58476 100 A 131.

582  11.436  11.889  12.355  9.655  10.086  11.040  12.524  10.181  12.897  11.273  11.586  12.862  12.833  9.830  11.331  13.173  12.821  13.353  10.047  9.308  12.087  11.964  13.742  13.301           300     13.360  10.382  13.418  12.386  13.514  12.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  Characterization factor for various values of API  VABP  o o o o  o  o  o  o  o   o  o  o  o  o F  90   85   80 75 70 65 60 55 50   45   40   35   30   100  12.188           280     13.030  11.082  12.298  12.112  11.460  12.249  9.665  11.612  12.577  11.230  10.371  580                    13.687  9.239        360        13.113  10.624  12.255  12.162  11.156  12.184  10.121  10.828  13.273  10.157  11.382  10.903  12.414  11.682  10.788  10.325  10.553  12.983  10.650  13.330  11.724  13.948  10.428  13.280  9.756  12.595  11.431  10.313  10.575  9.717  13.955  11.231  540                 13.072  9.406        400           13.036  9.995  9.410  11.859  11.199              10.996  9.631  9.497  10.003  9.961  12.148  9.348  12.607  12.364  12.663  12.414  10.627  12.295  11.426  12.925  160  13.919  9.899  12.084  12.365     480              13.724  10.749  13.697  11.286  10.541  10.042  12.515              12.444  12.628  13.218  10.912  10.002  10.855  11.117  11.969  10.985  12.854  13.042  9.555  12.904  11.481  11.519  11.855  12.863  13.183  11.755  12.879  9.564  10.809  12.670  11.988  10.081  12.796  11.145  9.735  13.283     460              13.867  9.693  11.158  10.125  11.968  12.752  11.966  9.302  12.118  11.281  12.769  13.470  11.533  13.934  9.645  10.347  12.504  140  13.547  12.806  12.819  12.102  9.946  13.695  10.792  11.498  11.835  10.941  12.666  9.126  9.627  10.712  12.589  10.187  12.754  9.995  12.840  10.018  10.902  12.365  9.521     520                 13.252  11.432  10.587  240  13.937  9.056  12.780  12.183  12.836  9.677  13.998  260  13.854  12.541  11.355  11.212  9.080  9.292  11.927  10.440   o  o 25    o 20       o 15    o 10    o 5   0                  9.762  11.451  12.273  9.256  11.802  9.671  11.527  9.757  10.140  10.186  10.649  9.236  10.460  12.192  12.083  11.879  11.761  10.138  10.585  13.736  9.726  9.079  10.686  12.303  560                 13.014  11.401  13.959  13.703  9.655  12.063  10.988  11.257  9.206  9.399  120  13.573  9.543  12.259  12.977  12.444     500                 13.486           340        13.728  9.564  11.104  10.641  11.826  9.915  9.677  10.727  9.079  10.863  10.324        380           13.798  9.831  11.692  11.230  9.929  11.859  10.205  11.951  9.988  12.221  11.402           320        13.861  13.842  11.137  9.956  13.426                                      18        .490  13.261  12.760  11.810  9.419              11.748  10.489  10.506  10.759  11.571  10.388  11.502  10.504  13.219  11.062  10.069  12.858  10.635  12.452  13.466  10.843  10.133  9.193  9.383  11.130  12.703  13.320  11.982  13.236  10.535  13.489        420           13.447  13.929  13.711  11.725  12.748  200  13.938  10.863  10.758  10.202                 9.614  13.519  11.358  11.191  9.326  11.514  12.202  11.655  10.314  12.334  12.501  11.514  13.992  11.591  9.946  11.288  9.612  9.600  13.436  10.601  11.314                 10.725  12.018  11.608  10.665  9.622  13.883  12.744  12.255  10.396  11.577  13.181  220  13.375  12.924  10.425  10.177  12.789  9.550  12.068  9.319  180  13.391  12.854  13.822  10.048  10.013  11.465  13.317              11.902  11.579  10.392  11.419                 10.474  11.264  10.622  9.183     440              13.

893  10.248 12.611 13.787 12.715  11.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  VABP  o F  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  820  840  860  880  900  920  940  960  980  1000  Characterization factor for various values of API  o o 90      o  85      o  80    o  75    o  70    65    o  60 13.404 12.181 12.984 13.873  12.322 11.391 13.688 13.797 11.685  11.549  10.992  9.728  10.241  11.901  10.573  11.456 13.192 13.205  12.258  12.492  13.557  10.440  11.648 13.063 11.279  10.262  12.208 11.437                                                                                                                                                                        o 30   11.047 12.058 13.618  10.125 13.295  11.224  10.128 11.966  12.728  10.670  10.404  11.763 13.481 13.443  10.839  11.224  10.        19     o 35   11.160 12.494  12.286  10.074     o 25   11.804  10.487  11.625  11.711         o 50   13.289 11.050  10.344  12.792  10.835 13.170  10.858 11.569 11.113  9.774  11.4: Characterization factor data table (Developed from correlation presented in Maxwell (1950)).574 12.841  10.341  11.054  9.442  11.092  11.613  10.196  9.115  10.710 12.224  9.696  10.516  11.444  10.114 12.276 12.415 13.891  11.112  12.611  10.845  10.599  10.552  10.132 11.256 11.937 10.687 11.771 13.907  11.526 13.169  10.328  10.832 13.428 12.384  10.111  10.739  11.256  9.331 12.781  10.640 12.741 11.076 12.548   o 20   10.922 11.080 12.925  10.193  11.570  11.352 12.591 13.362 11.280  9.644 12.744  10.491  10.546  10.708 13.081  12.940  11.876  9.789  12.983 12.980 12.145  12.341  10.442 11.192 11.245 12.865  10.482 12.498  10.388  11.440  12.916 12.145  11.504 11.329 13.990  11.035 12.631 11.935 12.839  10.323  12.786  10.415 13.891                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Table 2.145 12.060 11.995 11.194  12.509  11.989        o 40   12.368  11.908 13.260 13.471 13.417  13.331        o 45   12.505 12.173  9.067  10.850 12.141  o  o  o  o 15   10   5   0   10.294  11.718 12.495  10.208 12.863 12.389  9.558 12.021  12.004 12.898  10.645  10.384  12.674  10.039  11.816 o  55 13.684  10.955  10.384 11.952  12.929  9.781 12.520  .988  10.015  10.306 12.455  11.030  12.742  10.337  9.322  9.642  11.

174 200.645 413.630 157.462 526.127  169.128 182.811 388.824 474.024 394.714 126.871 282.271  366.154  106.796 265.587  307.365  184.030 113.625  412.656 165.406 295.686 182.863  561.110 371.552 98.425 510.386 232.244  95.249 107.746  231.082 493.128 132.788 134.957 573.068 229.631 411.571 206.960  443.886 378.715 199.771 105.893 90.110  176.254 492.936 100.088 308.544  121.478 350.951 443.664  221.105 426.480 148.881  211.298 491.305 120.373 232.053 252.646 191.009  137.167 365.365 101.253 504.710 448.464 459.796 125.216  99.309  122.574 137.794 124.031 208.  20    .855  460.989                                                                                                             86.783 165.911 563.720  526.813 508.708 589.206 244.078 89.069 473.335  510.353  146.562  201.861  350.040 428.206 284.088 274.000 456.873 117.449                                                                                                                                                  80  Molecular weight at various values of API 60 50 40 30 70        85.926 422.197  138.792 378.652 191.444 521.993  579.248 112.654 155.731 302.410 241.070 286.048  113.006  518.640 314.864  103.453  130.402 130.104 336.839 120.900 134.568 110.642 540.112 414.350 269.104 558.209 526.431 83.329 249.854 554.991 103.292 148.140 141.642  336.386 237.032 201.099 133.867 270.981 484.436 542.607 157.598 142.019 216.284  279.783   Table 2.033 226.517 599.885 192.136  397.304 96.605 222.137 339.234 149.480 308.569 142.836  108.072 164.010 356.319 211.021  115.456 187.730 347.835 171.891 172.525 346.991 93.806  94.309  381.892 173.535 279.254 179.115  150.444  192.496  596.332 89.824 511.759  87.472 108.935 396.876  492.285  321.109  117.755 322.031 528.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  MEABP  o ( F)  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  330  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  820  840  860  880  900  920  940  960  980  1000  1020  1030  1040  1060  1080  1100  1120  1140  90  82.680 117.474 362.448 107.663  544.069     0                                                                                              256.115  110.332 127.010 597.244 262.198 156.408 84.293  476.901  243.287 149.470 174.362  266.591 210.029 149.263 467.202 380.016  427.517 404.186 485.260  100.106  129.999 543.558 164.797 81.713 127.131 114.517 120.945 163.830 221.276 444.542 92.139 189.222 580.180 561.147  254.888 181.712 141.5: Molecular weight data table (Developed from correlation presented in Maxwell (1950)).579 299.817 439.244 101.845 87.280 256.094 362.225 431.326 95.761 219.368 460.388 579.371                                                                                                                             20       83.882 140.406 127.166 95.429 156.591  89.437 134.804 477.685 196.992 324.227 10                                                           161.771 113.021 545.034 317.958 174.428 330.445  154.349  92.937 294.231 118.272 144.761 396.114                                                                                                                                         81.470 331.799  293.068 182.

5.084387T 6.6: Estimate the viscosity of heavy Saudi crude oil using viscosity correlations presented in API  Technical data book and compare the obtained viscosity with that available in the literature.01394 10 T   2.6 Viscosity  The  correlations  presented  in  API  Technical  Handbook  (1997)  are  used  to  estimate  the  viscosity  (in  Centistokes) of crude/petroleum fractions.  Q 2.  its  characterization  factor  (K)  and  MEABP  presented  by  Maxwell  (1950)  in  data  format  in  Table  2.pt=641. the estimation of viscosity is presented for the heavy Saudi Crude oil.  Next.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  2.  21    . G.91 oF  From Table 2.92649 6. molecular weight of the Saudi heavy crude oil = 266.09947 10 T 7.5 Molecular weight  The molecular weight of a stream is by far an important property using which mass flow rates can be  conveniently expressed in terms of molar flow rates.  Solution:   0 API = 30.9oF=1101.  A  graphical  correlation  between  molecular  weight  of  a  stream. µ 10 . Mean average b.    2.   µ b) The viscosity of a petroleum fraction at 210 oF is estimated using the viscosity at 100 oF with the  following correlation  .73513 10 T 1.5: Estimate the molecular weight of heavy Saudi crude oil.5.  Typically molar flow rates are required to estimate  vapor  and  liquid  flow  rates  within  distillation  columns.5 R.   µ   In the above expressions.9310 0.  The correlations are presented as follows:  a) The viscosity of a petroleum fraction at 100  oF is evaluated as the sum of two viscosities namely  correlated and reference i.    An  illustrative  example  is  presented  below  to  elaborate  upon  the  procedure  involved for molecular weight estimation.  µ µ µ   where the correlated viscosity is estimated using the expressions  µ A A 10   34.98405 10 T 5.e. the viscosity is estimated using the following expressions:  0 Mean average boiling point (MEABP)T=641.    Solution:     At 100oF. T refers to the mean average boiling point (MEABP) expressed in oR. .49378 10 T   K √T S.05..     Q 2. 10 . .   And the reference viscosity is estimated using the expressions  .

084387T A 2. .7  Enthalpy  The  estimation  of  petroleum  fraction  enthalpy  is  required  for  good  number  of  reasons.   Without knowing the enthalpy of petroleum vapor/liquid fractions. .4193  5.6842  10 T 0.    Next.    Maxwell  (1950)  presents  about  13  graphs  that  can  be  conveniently  used  to  estimate  the  enthalpy  of  vapor/liquid  fractions as functions of refinery stream characterization factor and system temperature (in oF). G.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    S.6  –  2.09947 1. .465   The literature viscosity values are significantly different from those obtained using viscosity correlation.92649 µ 10 µ 10 µ µ µ 10 6. µ 3.269 Cst  .  Solution:   Volume average boiling point = 715 oF  MeABP  600   800  K  11  12  11  12  Enthalpy of liquid  stream (Btu/lb) at 715  o F  400   427   385   406     22    . µ 2.  the  enthalpy  of  refinery  process  streams  is  estimated  using  interpolation  and  extrapolation  procedures.73513 10 T 10 T 5.  an  illustrative  example  is  presented  for  the  estimation  of  enthalpy of Saudi heavy crude oil.9 which is almost twice that obtained from the correlation. of crude = 0.7:  Estimate  the  enthalpy  of  saturated  Saudi  heavy  crude  oil  liquid  at  its  volume  average  boiling  point.  The literature viscosity at 100  oC is 18.6364 Cst  9. √1102 A 34.8758  0 API = 30.49378 5.17. .  2.  Using  these  tables.  The  predicted viscosity matches with that reported in the literature for medium heavy Saudi crude oil.874 0.  Q  2.6325 Cst  . it is not possible to estimate  the  condenser  and  re‐boiler  duties  and  conduct  energy  balances.9310 0.   These  graphical  correlations  are  tabulated  and  presented  in  Tables  2.98405 11.05  K √T S.01394 10 T 10 T 7. G.81  6.

12  17.22 28.33 112.75‐11) x (427‐400) = 420.72 141.69  144.96 86.43  168.02  201.77  92.6: Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 200oF and K = 11 – 12.59 213.34  215.03 131.01  306.60 18.55 116.25 +42/200*(420.81  88.43 182.04  273.47  175.19 225.84 238.46  114.21  138.56 90.42 109.94 49.78  262.06 300.23 143.49 58.95 159.80 313.69 83.75 oF = 400 + (11.4 11.51 101.21 327.73 124.62 308.86  99.75 oF  Crude oil enthalpy at 715 oF whose MEABP = 642 oF = 420.74  156.64 118.16 8.00 98.00 40.59  47.70 129.98  180.92 195.16  48.22 19.43  192.86 268.75 oF = 385 + (11.34  8.98  27.00 18.82 133.75) = 424.47 242.16 29.60  110.24 0.27 39.97 274.60  289.90 166.91 224.13 169.58  234.78 9.13 290.45 253.75 oF  Liquid stream enthalpy at 600 oF and 11.98 283.26 238.39 199.22  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.71 39.54  103.35 153.29  18.18 205.21 253.25‐400.34 209.69 248.25 oF  Liquid stream enthalpy at 800 oF and 11.2  11.59 268.09 191.91 184.75 295.17  247.26 158.75 – 11) x (406 – 385) = 400.27 120.05  133.54 30.15 155.52  78.85 73.45  293.38  57.76  59.40 107.41  0.54  150.68 279.33 0.05  258.37  122.88 80.70 71.75 197.              23    .Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  Saudi Crude MEABP = 642 oF  K value for Saudi Crude = 11.56 8.62 219.39  277.26  188.59 320.67 228.49  8.74  68.17   Table 2.79 72.66  162.13 84.79 60.59 186.60 96.67 257.25  81.83 69.32  28.74 29.38 12 0.38 51.58 38.32 263.93  243.36 172.95 179.42 233.07 9.61  70.75 147.36 136.68 146.      o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  11  0.6 11.91 19.81 61.90  37.37  126.47 105.85  207.51 211.8 0.00  229.395 oF.27 62.91 302.15  38.82 48.75 172.06  220.68 94.33 284.71 50.

90 238.64 526.21  546.48 189.39 479.76  791.65  211.23  302.41 316.69  293.05 650.20  557.12 276.86  507.03 315.21 401.16  267.71  692.19 500.74 449.63 440.33 578.98 407.67 767.39 373.04  481.10 344.42  322.84 337.77  437.97 194.92 357.81 174.55 608.25 275.16 674.50  613.17  804.68  777.03  320.35 513.24 285.61 762.03 653.71  678.70  728.88 622.41  343.30 305.63  714.42 474.64  670.61 295.35 444.97 334.59 383.78 644.42 293.06  329.14 751.34  311.46 631.74 239.13  664.84 538.45  469.81 539.71  520.48  470.92 418.97 227.02 526.29 683.07 393.18   Table 2.21 646.32 497.25 404.76  208.64 782.02 326.09  651.29 746.72  432.56 215.53 458.58 175.03  699.77  226.34 746.29 407.37 805.49 351.14 668.19 360.95 539.70 616.62 258.81  275.77 378.29  187.25 259.16 217.60  370.95 492.38 725.18  375.01 811.36 380.96  251.13  404.83 232.96  571.93 559.00  494.43 660.    24    .44 833.35 235.17 206.88  194.36  507.38 545.88  637.20 369.04 730.41  519.67  532.14  233.06 294.00 367.70  260.59 247.34  447.27 630.80 346.4 11.67  201.34  545.47 294.12 390.21  392.95 552.85 605.43  655.97 703.58 441.25  597.48  720.40  600.88 355.11 248.53 395.7: Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 200oF and K = 11 – 12.80  365.52 231.64  267.82 223.59  481.26 595.13 325.62 566.10 635.77 428.38 506.52 776.15 285.8 179.00 639.24  532.76  219.18 214.16  387.94 384.77 861.29 224.81 844.86 512.83 760.28  758.12 735.08  584.90  424.99 798.66 719.09  748.77  275.34 418.97  641.37  182.78  360.35  229.47  332.93  773.92 610.48 331.80 312.67 714.77 324.97 362.15 625.13 258.05 565.30 704.32  743.57  684.83  353.33 471.14 580.89  586.89 302.48 424.71  349.38 257.97 249.92 199.12  410.85 520.05 220.93 454.42  627.50 486.58 484.02 371.34 182.2  11.06 285.19  414.36 513.96 341.74 588.89  706.46 335.40  763.92 208.87 717.57 304.89  241.13 452.64  734.92 740.81  494.04 199.05 827.65 618.70 594.82 213.13 659.84 574.21 242.36 847.53  819.88 229.09 674.03 314.18 304.02 795.50  789.96  303.72  284.17 689.69  215.36 184.79 187.17  398.57 192.06 428.81 240.60 267.14 679.67 436.03 395.33 802.76 698.27 12 168.07 552.60 206.36 177.98 276.24  236.34 709.46 785.65 689.99 755.83 464.52 566.37 221.54  445.34 462.52  222.11 267.47  204.38 267.41  559.55  573.86 431.76 526.57 817.16 814.85  459.57 779.19  421.87  285.99 415.32 185.57 500.06 284.59  381.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  820  840  860  880  900  920  940  960  980  1000  1020  1040  1060  1080  1100  1120  11  182.66 581.86 180.99 791.97  339.35 476.03  313.52 602.33 532.36  196.65  259.07 171.89 275.45  243.23  189.40 488.6 11.59  457.76 665.67 250.06 412.73  622.33 592.64  294.09 466.62  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.26 202.35 732.02 321.97 831.55  176.78 197.46 770.44 694.79 209.80 552.11  609.84  249.85 192.46 348.51 267.

78 849.57 628.81 443.64 823.17 233.22  537.65 314.93  487.77 409.83  734.28  550.92  537.12 296.68 783.16 626.98  632.76 460.24  312.50 508.66  769.34  373.20 293.88 186.11 360.62 234.37 373.53 404.91  711.32 398.76 760.95 505.52 584.96 518.21 767.05 503.23  748.50  764.98 219.44 820.03  704.80  463.62 202.97 725.52 387.04 745.30 307.29  389.99 358.59  304.92  604.19 197.97  485.71  779.61  498.12 665.52  424.13  564.42  784.04 473.86  276.56  697.90  335.70 720.14 435.66 225.47 380.4 11.86 268.90 318.82 251.94 275.19  416.52  243.39 217.93  295.74 486.04 193.91   Table 2.24 364.82 431.89 369.30  524.50 303.68 673.24 343.61  550.92  669.90 455.71 839.35 468.82  226.11 852.86  182.89 832.99 657.87  428.42  384.73  203.00 410.16  499.71 623.50 714.94  378.18  205.99 383.73 327.76 807.29 531.92  683.18 584.84 612.41 212.48 242.30 517.20  218.06 495.05 694.41  401.36 419.89  618.57  719.97 456.69  451.71 242.6 11.72 386.86 180.11 797.39 528.29 200.86  355.64  512.52 543.51 192.30 207.8: Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 300oF and K = 11 – 12.84  655.48 279.70 242.54  351.98 670.84  213.59  169.96 598.95  689.60 260.00  577.25 637.62  395.2  11.57  810.46 278.04 267.02 710.48 767.86 191.94  199.26 285.07 258.82 333.28 164.34  474.67 609.82 787.11  341.63 564.26 250.93 167.97 392.68 337.77 477.31 557.35 799.82 550.05  591.62  725.62 178.35 591.62  366.19 694.56 184.32  267.32 260.43 708.40 268.09  220.63 353.08 735.76 664.80 655.69 309.51 12 161.85 782.06  284.84  646.25 173.8 172.96 169.47  511.71 836.61 349.58  412.55 722.96 557.90 171.29  406.08 235.68 689.00 319.17 259.70  740.41  235.29 556.20 288.61  615.24 225.73  302.66  589.84  755.89 423.69 613.76 620.    25    .05 578.29 530.25  189.96 469.50 233.32  250.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  820  840  860  880  900  920  940  960  980  1000  1020  1040  1060  1080  1100  1120  1140  11  175.30  266.47 269.22 176.70 704.75 226.09  794.59 347.93 224.65 395.75 420.29 536.06  211.13 522.44 375.94 679.59 642.72 651.04 398.44 634.19  286.26 242.81 606.63  332.42 570.57  345.65 362.17  562.78  275.14 514.86 443.51 201.59  176.96  435.01  439.55 680.73  259.02  315.31  825.90 751.56  628.25  180.46 316.16 775.19  460.41  660.29 771.18  325.57 250.47 431.46 339.20 287.97 416.21 479.75 791.26 756.56 187.66 204.20 298.94 306.03 251.83 649.85 865.49 482.04 210.98 700.91  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.65 407.19  292.83 451.02  227.88  641.12 447.43 685.58  322.43 598.07  258.01 570.82 752.41 640.02 490.78 812.31 297.49  798.96 215.83  576.66 277.27 328.86 178.93  186.29  524.73  362.68  675.07  234.06  472.92  242.01  601.37 341.91 439.86  192.80  196.10 492.47 737.23 729.17 427.93 500.34 324.09 571.57 464.57 216.13 815.15  250.42 195.01 208.77 330.89 740.19 596.80 803.12 544.76  447.98 584.03 351.17 371.06 289.79 542.86 184.

68 161.45 17.72 197.34  17.27 360.29 0.80 87.42 149.77 211.33 149.65 132.36 155.88 321.33 310.46 325.77  189.03 114.75 210.46 79.67  215.28 37.24  0.58 237.58 54.89  299.96  75.04  331.52  135.75 143.65  261.38  271.55 167.05 26.77 137.35  96.83 64.10 293.35  43.66 357.26 161.60 9.85 174.85 310.28 173.52  256.89 115.04 247.48 19.33 0.09  129.61 102.19  152.97  62.96 91.28 266.47 73.01 137.48  124.77 219.12 343.27 98.40  304.05 69.41 315.13  350.71 184.87 223.75 193.29  177.81  364.40 261.66 276.9: Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 300oF and K = 11 – 12.67 47.8 0.69 198.86  85.19 100.67 214.37 8.21 280.82  169.08 337.85  45.67 94.20 367.16 27.08 242.31   Table 2.99  118.91 18.62 29.19 12 0.04 287.84  288.04 386.56 111.70  202.00  335.17  8.93 282.98 224.79 228.94  52.57  72.57  243.13 201.76 46.50 127.58  181.56  220.62 57.80  194.31  36.00 123.94 80.08  315.96 251.03  157.93 372.11  274.19  55.72 206.88 19.24 38.16 266.69  234.50 251.23 126.81 333.73 89.21 83.37 304.68  207.11  246.98  229.88 238.91  140.21 134.06 379.16  285.05  65.28 233.20  7.19  164.6 11.21  81.89  107.48 59.71 77.48 301.4 11.36  27.16 341.43  102.51  347.77 35.57 39.00 68.67 327.03 9.41 9.47 290.59 146.29  319.75  16.55  34.89 354.65 188.                      26    .78 296.18 256.68  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.2  11.49 121.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  11  0.00 180.25 349.42 185.07  146.52 158.43 271.92 171.23 109.40 56.77  25.97 28.92  92.52 67.56  113.11 104.17 48.20 44.

46  705.58 193.10: Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 400oF and K = 11 – 12.50  336.13  176.33 793.77 351.48  261.11  297.66  360.73 188.95 278.17 508.81  298.55 647.40 269.47 808.69 194.69 790.44 210.53  638.50  529.15 437.82  236.52 854.92 617.51 172.15 661.30 639.02 385.62 163.23 339.05 387.32  469.74  367.75 491.72 610.6 11.73 689.92 700.53 521.83 218.91 167.69 677.46 692.43 589.87 632.85 289.62 243.97  583.54 511.39 353.61 654.09 540.21  251.50 756.86 473.51 735.46 589.72 686.22 423.40 179.54  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.25 797.79 751.28 340.96 495.35 300.43 226.34 348.17 662.99 269.07  490.34  771.94  649.  27    .93 426.62 603.07  260.27  710.40  422.65 251.47 461.00 235.8 165.61 220.57 411.55 554.75 397.82  244.84  316.54  308.48  636.85 830.83 804.90 260.84 436.55 444.49  583.35 234.76 242.37 337.06  356.41 375.77  452.62  174.08 719.17 399.4 11.17  306.82 561.32 174.70 216.01 761.93 251.02 171.73 260.65 225.36 513.82 366.34 486.04  786.65 645.32 243.37 261.92  596.26 669.41  349.88 178.79  555.21  213.17  690.35 373.46  802.13  227.30   Table 2.34  725.76  558.81 178.21  465.30  371.10 260.55 202.17 243.15  570.09 392.15 12 155.94  186.18  338.95 309.08 185.73  610.61  288.22 813.14 505.52  543.58 235.50 364.96  169.98  383.67 745.98  503.44 203.34 782.32 819.11  570.46 786.24  378.35  763.39  192.02  179.34  735.90 837.09 468.20 463.24 308.53 632.94 596.72 698.89  219.93 766.37 326.16  481.65 448.07 576.82  778.71  530.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  820  840  860  880  900  920  940  960  980  1000  1020  1040  1060  1080  1100  1120  1140  11  167.42 205.57 319.74 497.61 288.22  162.71 526.57  740.53 209.57 270.76 170.64 707.72  183.95 482.44  624.36 657.93  243.74 630.10 447.09  278.36 320.53 432.00  440.57 646.57 573.93 329.00 771.63  755.74  680.10 297.36 739.78 208.18  492.98 472.05  653.06 181.33  394.35 617.01 252.50  199.30 279.71 307.70  793.15  325.76 318.65 279.92 280.00 576.77 217.97  666.63 518.96 198.91 459.12  347.32  204.82 160.95  228.18  720.52  410.46 380.23 776.44 299.74 486.02 269.88 408.99 825.91  433.56 549.96  279.69 184.75 805.45  445.52  610.53 760.89 536.82 603.84 730.35 377.18 331.22  429.59 403.05 705.13 402.54 548.55  477.01  596.07 299.34  749.01  622.06 546.06  270.20  457.12  189.53  542.27  221.75  677.88 729.74 191.66 212.95 420.42 369.48  206.58 341.73 532.30  662.93 618.90  400.34 310.17  517.49 714.71 228.35 186.32 775.99 288.41  236.33 289.92 587.16 201.69 560.2  11.79  506.96  317.30 535.21  196.42 158.85 567.04 582.24 745.71 251.72  327.65 316.34 455.47 358.36  288.58 362.02 413.85 500.04 236.95 195.69 715.31 683.67  416.14 625.25 413.20  405.86 165.15 330.94  389.64 675.70  817.00 842.96 602.23  252.88 564.89 523.47 451.77 439.35  516.04 476.24  270.35  211.12 352.50 426.97 671.52 389.61  696.74 226.71 724.

03  245.64 364.91 131.50 15.36 84.13 326.65 310.31 73.78 75.81 190.02  70.59 26.60 209.51 162.15  300.81 310.47 282.48 12 0 8.67 72.81 296.8 0  0  0 0 7.35 267.87  90.44  287.56 117.94  238.48 331.13 226.75 347.84 128.59  331.56 148.27 416.78 96.15 281.17  169.79 27.44  181.46 35.23  193.39 45.59  225.05  156.45 203.50 98.57  346.02 32.75  49.44 325.51 109.92 202.96 78.63 253.38 106.50 243.80 190.91 113.53 399.98 305.82 321.38 356.32 381.4 11.62 342.50 34.46  24.86 17.99 174.65 82.6 11.13 419.86 120.51 352.03 216.91 154.2  11.12  259.30 8.86 153.19  378.82 213.99 140.20  277.43 255.91  395.08  362.95  412.30 196.95  118.74 36.86  41.31 69.77  219.29 55.08 171.10 8.39 16.48 257.66   Table 2.42 40.31  305.02 296.78  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.36  140.90  8.97 177.57  51.37 199.23 292.62 65.42  67.32 24.63  349.73 392.45 358.58 164.26 138.58  39.72  365.57 285.60 85.23 263.83 249.24  86.00  264.31 426.22 404.93  16.25 229.95  80.78 159.56 142.81  397.84 64.18 50.89 115.23 150.16  200.68 187.88  25.16  31.58  129.51  315.95 223.09 54.08 44.23  251.90 178.70  15.46 239.32  107.08  334.35 59.60 315.74 124.81 375.17 372.10 336.13 340.                    28    .62 94.37  77.79 301.45  232.96 136.20  320.07 88.54  33.56 184.21  151.31 229.24 166.83 277.99  96.46 104.65  291.52  272.26  175.66  133.97 43.12 409.37  100.95 236.89  145.82 126.36 62.31 27.02 402.11: Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 400oF and K = 11 – 12.41  380.52 216.93  111.89  61.50 387.39  206.46 268.32  163.23 271.75 92.45 368.18  213.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  11  0  7.32  187.96 385.83 53.97 242.66  122.41 102.31  58.32 433.70 17.

95 343.66 696.17 366.88 776.65  510.33 174.90 390.88  490.55 501.66 414.55  229.92  748.02  689.77 549.66  217.55 615.67 272.89 410.49 181.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  820  840  860  880  900  920  940  960  980  1000  1020  1040  1060  1080  1100  1120  1140  1160  11  165.84  192.39 624.05 653.78  233.30  283.85  514.27 653.52 169.69 218.72  448.34  210.12 197.20 155.70 402.02  704.08  222.32  566.74 795.65 313.71 588.88 467.42  273.39 323.09 462.81 344.21  164.47  766.54 674.45 165.92 161.00  775.59  332.93  472.68  690.23 558.69 263.74  735.11 777.16 353.82 380.98 442.60 172.84 745.15 323.45 281.21  178.78 861.61 262.49 303.11 290.28  502.42 531.13  606.97  660.02  214.47  563.49  257.32 333.96 425.21 761.96 312.4 11.94  603.26  675.16  285.77 192.67 481.16  578.09 354.01 194.62 158.75 488.57  460.04 162.68  577.39 210.32 291.52  375.76  352.30 225.96  238.39  313.53 454.90 208.50 282.45 521.75 601.31  377.16  660.95 712.25 495.46 323.50 728.84  225.97 433.69  342.57  185.70 281.94  431.20 333.15  731.77 690.42 416.73 237.80 438.62  171.07  523.95  423.22 544.99  293.23 216.72 667.98 177.97  790.98 801.10  400.26  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.59 457.25  590.6 11.95  553.40 175.11  203.46 253.93 272.03  197.57 224.69 168.8 162.91 639.66 625.08  750.64 381.71  806.65  275.55  206.08 312.89  527.50  177.50 597.71  323.25 621.33 226.47 554.18 504.55 850.56  435.18 421.00 595.01 450.41 768.90  412.13 208.65 300.93 752.91 571.10 399.49  645.49  323.15 833.10  294.04  467.34 698.83  304.30 403.64 333.53 540.38 271.2  11.65 12 148.62 493.14  419.16  241.66  364.11  343.49 417.32  484.73 607.77 713.05 508.75 579.22 584.76 475.57 757.52 365.00 705.65 155.39 220.57 378.10 182.96 256.11  632.45 839.26  720.06  762.02  718.50 356.38  354.76  675.82 376.04 519.81 506.83  539.14 469.81 801.10  477.34 263.24  265.46 343.35  184.34 823.24 527.42  313.17 151.35 612.05 440.14  158.79 652.06 593.22 246.45 514.80 355.17  632.18  536.  29    .26 344.28 785.03 274.76 217.52 630.06  385.99 231.01  190.97 726.99 791.27 682.74   Table 2.89 807.69 772.25  618.91 720.31 188.35 301.98  704.70 185.73  303.34 202.96 427.23  199.77 573.30 323.62 568.82 252.39 254.51  409.17 194.31  255.79 200.12  618.91  497.94 429.04 302.16 660.00  781.98 786.38  171.04 201.97 828.94 681.71  549.10 235.74 609.00  264.19 582.29 248.01  333.52  812.42 168.70 405.83 535.30  388.35 667.58 190.27 844.98 645.99 558.06 243.54 265.33 743.70  397.36  828.99 367.19 284.42 481.24 759.09 811.59 478.50 392.60 532.57 563.35 817.90 293.85 666.32 728.33 393.52 741.27 682.16 292.43  455.63 180.97 817.43  796.74 736.16 636.18  249.62 465.79 187.11 334.30 452.87 545.50  592.20 212.29 445.19 491.09 244.24 518.04 638.32  443.88 712.91 697.51 236.08 387.36  247.77 312.71 239.94 228.45 204.34  366.38  646.12: Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 500oF and K = 11 – 12.23 368.

16 133.6 11.57 61.66  188.18 40.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties      o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  11  0  8.94 231.68 430.41 72.32 184.71 49.95  446.15  98.17 300.19 319.07 185.93  33.65 78.80 100.93 126.22 375.8 0  0  0 0 8.37  249.16 93.86 32.04 408.36  230.04  137.24  79.55  8.01  117.51 355.13: Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 500oF and K = 11 – 12.40 16.21 63.60 16.02 172.55 397.56 51.76 8.59  353.06  461.82 314.31 340.25 129.51 16.33  200.51  40.05 452.70 287.93 424.43  320.79  109.22 80.41 468.08 246.93 205.95 520.63 146.45 345.45 102.80  58.32 420.61 486.34 191.44 52.16  478.34  24.54 280.69 24.87 511.02 259.02  171.40 208.74 82.04 103.70 24.33 59.76 476.38  268.09  291.97  194.75 97.13 202.73 266.18 87.11 471.53  205.42  16.17 160.04  339.96 12 0 9.71  463.33 149.03 193.31  77.09  142.34  16.92  430.22 135.74  41.79 25.17  32.04  127.82  149.10  131.40 335.92 253.34 33.2  11.88 161.75  413.45 91.20 81.14 299.17  182.10  398.23  367.09 240.73 208.20 483.11 295.90 151.56  95.46  310.39  69.83  255.57 273.4 11.54 389.05  350.06  295.59 330.46 68.77 303.38  325.05   Table 2.00 169.59  237.59 43.69 434.66 173.14  411.47 257.45 124.68  50.63 234.06 42.96 361.10  242.57 71.68  67.58 111.57 260.18 16.88 373.75  211.51 24.88 381.19 218.53 221.72  479.25  305.89  364.58 244.35 466.88  383.78 503.              30    .04 309.68  164.62 179.40 42.46  276.17  335.36 144.15 454.33  24.39  283.53  218.51 62.62 284.33 247.03 34.00  445.73 366.53 417.36 113.70  495.28 140.74 157.15 118.56  224.74 288.61 155.85  120.06 493.80 196.41 221.10 107.64 350.56 370.05  262.80  379.89  176.07 272.73 402.71 385.42 358.62 391.72 197.34 167.75 227.10 459.50  106.40 270.35 182.26  86.76 34.14 233.71 448.61  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.46 500.05 137.53 330.46 438.48 70.86  89.45 414.36 405.15 90.61 315.51 487.58 441.65 122.33  159.97 9.81  427.37 53.59 345.41  395.47  153.76 114.48 325.62  60.97 215.09  48.

59 42.96  117.04  97.92  239.23 239.97  466.07 453.53 539.83 436.03 110.96  246.96 324.76 81.13  107.84  65.15 61.58 267.88 505.30 24.56 379.58 109.30 216.52   Table 2.11 204.61 456.44 277.61 17.95  201.07  434.62  298.36 106.89 186.65  548.05 60.59 358.75 230.85 25.20 25.08  481.25 373.87  33.33 80.93  479.85  403.56 151.17  167.94  207.16  183.22  331.04 394.45  317.76 347.93 34.00 335.80 111.20 8.07 179.58  220.70 409.01 539.82  195.75  41.37 503.60  369.27 49.33 518.36 71.40 309.81 557.94 363.65 129.45 86.61 133.27 62.04  388.22  32.88 213.15 255.26 576.14 558.85 294.04 389.20 528.92 100.62 119.92  15.65  290.45 70.37  50.75 288.80 89.42 147.55 268.94  374.29  94.04  384.58  339.42 174.25 67.36 16.13  399.13 236.12  496.80  447.99 192.95  85.40 472.39  56.37 156.71  513.30 291.49  345.96 158.13  68.              31    .95 523.63 131.68 315.55  264.60 440.55  87.94 351.69  271.29 69.15 12 0 8.29 306.58  463.74 420.06 262.62 136.39 32.77 586.90  172.46 521.48 489.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  820  840  860  880  900  11  0  7.31  277.65 383.42 40.94 16.05 90.78 23.66  127.67 343.40 576.36  39.80 319.33 8.93 122.55  138.42  189.28  531.11 53.19 469.42 404.92 321.03 336.28 120.76 153.30 595.68  134.88 483.43 204.30 57.63 493.68  114.79  303.37 192.88  359.97  214.39 33.00 500.06  8.19  414.36 249.91 210.94 125.20  284.85 350.83 424.95 367.91  48.05 333.14 536.31 96.48 98.54  449.48 115.94 177.82 229.60  104.77 548.32 52.02  567.34 242.56 101.04 394.23  354.08  78.69 556.63 510.13 307.56 201.6 11.2  11.30  123.52  15.97 567.31 165.94  59.78 486.91 34.32 265.20 295.97  75.43 43.26 431.65  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.8 0  0  0 0 8.82 281.69 169.80 242.95  430.61 144.30 364.69 198.85 217.16 168.38  178.53  226.46 302.47 181.90 378.21 399.63 189.09  23.76  24.34 51.46 142.17  325.97  515.48 465.55  160.47 15.60  145.20 79.79 476.57 91.81  259.98 409.61 77.57  311.44 256.57  252.84 281.15  156.11 329.36  149.86  497.93 163.28 425.4 11.65  419.07 274.64 223.37 448.76 253.04 415.34 459.94 44.48  548.51 140.14: Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 600 oF and K = 11 – 12.04  530.02  233.69 226.72 442.

38 403.11  228.08 630.40 287.83 497.39 750.14 284.19  358.74  279.02  476.07 602.52 681.96 227.37 229.10  249.09 676.    32    .05 550.09 414.83 156.79 407.43  206.35  436.00 815.75 295.78  172.59 242.93 175.73 526.89  413.14  208.34 646.61 153.71 806.01  423.61 315.20 456.11 305.70 346.87  626.16 285.47 326.19 395.56 408.28 796.56 742.12 296.97 592.29 632.72 479.29 560.45  295.00 156.02 689.62 588.72  178.80 661.85 245.05 462.74 274.83  669.42 578.20  297.29  464.05  529.97  471.95 149.23  741.80 704.07  600.07  597.70  244.29  682.07 607.64 734.74  267.08  213.54 437.69 264.35  535.99 659.45 145.63 186.70 492.74 220.65 305.83 748.75 430.25  269.31 256.52  224.91  192.87 174.40  252.66  370.89 696.21 773.00 394.48 672.47 441.03 782.76 184.04 215.52  696.65 612.19  404.89 657.38 733.36 251.73 169.44  306.42 276.58 484.05  574.76 762.62 718.86  787.12  725.47 194.47  186.03  380.24  696.22 169.17 202.03  739.10  336.43  277.95 163.46 347.96 259.92  233.95  583.23  179.65 765.54  336.45 149.84  194.19 189.35 306.33  221.69  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.41 275.34 196.53 380.18  286.20 651.45 621.73 164.6 11.63 383.43 482.66  326.24 191.05 294.40 369.82  768.93  258.01 597.62  172.96 182.79 511.64 565.78 523.55 211.50  184.90 471.45  152.75 204.50 418.32  613.06 203.10  756.05 508.75 734.39  667.33 163.65 326.44 519.28  326.31 198.44 537.93 218.54  357.06 605.72 248.05 181.80 812.96 674.65 189.25  543.27  587.36 821.44  288.56 219.63  401.49 391.90 780.23 574.95 428.66  459.86  771.07 361.85  711.00 212.67 360.39  160.07  217.51  452.8 156.18  199.16  683.26 474.62 257.00  489.89  241.34 444.39 420.99 425.51  509.68 636.51 178.46  369.49 405.84 336.17  654.40 495.65 703.02  448.91 371.31 799.64  570.41  236.00 565.37 726.09 500.74 266.85 234.15  306.95  166.4 11.74 278.94  726.58  652.06 627.70  201.84 166.54  753.78 305.08 711.39 283.87 238.78 382.58 254.61 466.13 793.13 487.84 569.94 469.35 584.13 159.49  346.77 358.92 450.55 176.38 239.84 554.12 526.34 246.30  497.02 336.14 539.20 641.77  522.36  547.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  820  840  860  880  900  920  940  960  980  1000  1020  1040  1060  1080  1100  1120  1140  11  159.65 336.25  802.93 789.44  783.63 757.47  625.60 326.96 226.07  390.36 704.63 222.65  315.74  439.36  503.30 592.12 315.94 551.16 384.95 206.58  561.14 231.07 171.85  347.43 749.07 616.75 689.11  516.63 315.60 336.69  611.93 359.87 719.93  556.36  711.50  416.74 265.15: Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 600oF and K = 11 – 12.55 831.58 327.28 370.21 687.91 12 142.82 619.32  484.2  11.81 236.49 432.79  640.11 293.14 372.00 417.00 268.93  639.20 506.97 777.15 547.93 196.52  166.19 442.47   Table 2.40 665.46 540.15  426.34 396.07 645.45 315.19 766.88 718.65 457.82  393.48  261.92  381.89 513.35 454.15 347.76 348.77  315.75 533.83 579.37 210.

64  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.00 202.70 283.90 421.18 597.87 532.22  39.56 542.32  230.24 466.04 392.17  247.30  382.05 436.24   Table 2.97  267.95 705.82  360.52 145.51  313.10 190.63 410.83  280.55  557.20  621.94 675.75 662.85 225.70  46.93 337.64  112.89 229.32 12 0 8.51  195.56  623.23 685.87 125.56  715.13 74.63 366.11  427.16 39.05 144.05 132.72  387.13  504.65 31.48 442.53  260.08  540.58  143.83 204.06  604.85  472.23 255.09 262.47 637.93  677.20  63.89 583.50  122.84  442.69 104.72 15.75 483.36 155.14 237.13  431.75  606.87 694.24 189.59 666.11 631.32 91.73 462.42 452.99  553.86 76.72 320.86 352.07  55.37 611.57 406.65 265.8 0  0  0 0 7.03 447.27 289.87 566.21 270.83 208.03  183.52  695.70 220.48 93.32 163.01 147.75  65.76 47.29  74.25 167.28 334.81  38.52 686.    33    .21  461.94 8.76 590.66 505.32 563.20  305.72 530.16: Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy data for MEABP = 800oF and K = 11 – 12.91 401.58 113.53 66.35 296.48  299.03  573.84 48.74 344.40  489.48 725.65 242.41 594.53 49.20 499.69  120.51 580.32  130.6 11.47  457.39  477.61 473.35  524.29 668.23 452.35  368.99 192.38 232.29 572.67 86.09 432.59  222.87 654.46  54.61 323.76  23.92 173.26  509.74  15.08 252.06 23.83 82.66 650.91 58.66 350.25  658.05 306.00 267.87 22.31 67.72 515.25 40.67 618.46 683.34 96.27  639.91  332.31 85.32  536.07 437.38 714.43 559.02 23.25  22.81 549.95 32.70 348.05  133.88 115.42  165.00 494.62 250.74 358.05 546.60 500.86 516.69 422.07 336.53  587.38 105.81  140.57  402.17 724.26 275.53 135.03 526.05  373.19  521.30 84.28 378.88 387.58  677.07 646.66 372.07 16.48 31.99 152.23 745.50  102.06 626.33 309.33 322.54 257.78 111.65  447.35  199.91 426.87 7.40 309.27  89.68 123.58 538.08 73.18  293.81  7.12 316.41  15.59  172.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  820  840  860  880  900  920  940  960  980  1000  1020  1040  1060  1080  1100  11  0  7.14  210.65 216.08 101.97 197.23  286.40 179.13 608.4 11.23 137.2  11.59 103.73 40.46 392.78 95.30 601.27 576.80 170.87 245.51 214.54  273.40  110.40  161.11 416.00 15.95 56.50 239.77 281.78  354.98 75.69 362.47 158.24  396.97 377.54  417.82 32.89  100.98 614.10  151.50 41.49 330.24 407.88  154.28  83.44  81.57 67.77 141.78  340.61 177.82 57.17 201.78  235.09 168.65  570.38  187.64 703.96  218.69 64.81 522.79  493.71  254.76 303.10  695.81 705.59 396.82  346.42 295.84 157.56 15.60 381.47  641.91  318.65  589.98 278.65 364.75 180.52 114.12 227.35 23.99 510.29 134.52  205.97  72.20 185.50 488.98 468.82  175.04 457.90  659.46 121.33 212.83 629.32  412.41 126.22 55.29 644.15  31.31 292.20 483.70  326.46  30.56 555.42  242.30 477.27 49.15  47.19  92.40 735.

49 647.48  401.45 273.73 354.95 355.71 414.74 642.63  437.05 368.76 267.85 208.00 239.59  239.67  334.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  o T ( F)  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  200  220  240  260  280  300  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  460  480  500  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780  800  820  840  860  880  900  920  940  960  980  1000  1020  1040  1060  1080  1100  1120  1140  1160  11  147.66 719.04 682.10 302.31 591.00  294.47 379.00 732.49 268.08  520.05  303.29 714.29 145.60  244.01 578.95  741.02 771.25 532.66  165.55  772.65  513.13  344.77 557.    34    .64  187.95  378.10 331.13 692.61  388.73  223.29  547.98 633.87 230.36 181.45 671.49 529.88  152.57 318.96  534.65  152.89 779.34 478.26 377.87 214.38 812.00 821.49 176.77  231.77 413.45 476.50 12 129.46  712.00 560.28 378.42  377.15 543.65 423.17  165.35 135.53 212.2  11.22  540.83 155.37 213.77  487.07 342.46 497.94 762.59 428.02  600.07 187.38  684.80  594.81 257.81 204.53  495.73 463.72 197.67 795.48  696.64 173.41 205.79 189.47  281.35  194.05 426.93 203.16 604.99 162.46  698.64 168.85 182.30  613.70  727.97 667.35 255.88 283.39 353.30 520.07 675.39  608.71 690.71  272.13 493.67  202.56 704.70  185.79 368.78 636.23 491.95 510.36 415.66  482.51  262.66 441.54 708.21  445.84 368.39 278.16  470.91  500.30 225.38 142.14  367.51 341.87 298.45 439.43 343.50 830.78  323.91 748.55  474.52 651.95 563.28  199.94  461.58 290.08  581.13 259.97  741.68 618.97  458.40  787.97 467.17 450.01 149.93 534.32 159.79 311.63  367.94 620.72 320.51 702.31 287.4 11.93 179.59 729.87  207.22 390.99  140.66  159.61 233.82 261.65 739.57  508.83  254.11  215.77 333.95 402.20 155.37 602.83  412.25 427.45 435.80 330.00  637.72  526.19  356.35  257.76  711.45  332.38  622.76 341.02 550.77 452.39  756.37 459.85  628.93 280.70  321.01 537.89 170.09 590.48 764.67  355.29 138.84  425.36 723.75  171.50 813.8 143.27 220.35  179.92  301.51 465.19  275.29 734.93  756.77 548.50  Hydrocarbon Enthalpy (Btu/lb) for various values of K 11.02  410.96 745.30  401.75 319.35  248.45 631.58 390.70 149.12  787.92 755.63  343.74 142.23 484.78 332.49 612.24 564.42 570.96  681.94  389.81 166.11 795.38 698.98 163.04 438.26 309.56 764.83  178.08 480.42 402.91 627.97 221.75 308.27 277.85  771.08 661.20  192.23 796.08 252.67 779.47 577.94 748.79 518.00  804.80 197.22 515.29  210.10 241.87 246.60 248.25  655.83  574.89 411.44  227.00 489.86 401.20  145.20 354.97 787.49 162.26 502.36 523.61 504.06 717.26 367.6 11.84 299.97  312.48  159.57  449.54 687.08 546.43 605.41 322.54  553.57 229.48  235.92 152.00 184.34 289.24 199.74  587.10 270.94  311.77 169.95 388.74 231.17: Hydrocarbon vapor enthalpy data for MEABP = 800oF and K = 11 – 12.26  642.35  726.95 804.64  434.15 175.29 391.01   Table 2.75 588.59 598.76 677.28 453.13  567.89  422.47  219.17 216.85 243.16 223.32 189.62 378.23 647.88 300.81  291.31  285.57 264.20  652.41 584.30  560.58 149.50 403.29 194.36 155.69 507.67 133.72 574.84 192.74  172.26 779.12 662.01 237.85 292.16 657.33 136.14  666.83  670.59 616.32 250.29 472.86 447.10 310.59  266.

10  45.00  20.48  13.25  0.44  3.16  0. 42  6.01  0.96  6.62  2.48  9.56  6.14  0.02  0.20  20.00  250  0.90  23.03  0.51  0.70  1.07  1.69  5.20  0.29  0.01  0.81  2.90  33.01  0.40  38.20  17.40  14.32  3.09  0.42  9.40  51.80  78.47  0.82  7.01  0.34  5.05  0.10  37.47  0.61  2.02  0.90  0.12  0.06  0.02  1.47  2.47  2.08  0.24  4.13  0.08  2.02  0.20  34.10  83.98  1.01  0.36  0.22  7.60  22.43  4.20  95.20  28.03  0.00  18.04  0.20  30.86  2.40    Table 2.10  18.81  3.01  12.30  22.90  0.51  4.20  12.30  31.20  19.20  70.45  3.01  0.42  0.50  82.66  0.02  0.07  0.36  0.40  15.02  0.00  0.06  0.12  0.90  18.63  5.01  0.23  1.99  1.60  73.30  350  0.42  12.01  0.94  2.20  30.02  1.38  0.90  59.10  50.07  0.02  41.18  0.76  6.30  32.70  100.80  44.10  96.84  2.25  0.30  C5H12  0.10  55.65  1.12  0.30  24.71  1.90  24.01  0.02  4.05  13.30  30.50  96.00  1.04  0.70  300  0.99  1.01  0.41  1.80  39.70  14.04  0.37  0.17  0.32  3.50  44.18: Vapor pressure data for hydrocarbons.58  8.36  7.27  0.39  1.25  9.41  9.70  53.06  0.33  0.05  5.01  .70  25.10  68.32  3.85  13.35  4.17  0.25  0.60  17.90  67.02  15.72  2.11  5.20  50.01  0.50  2.90  42.50  31.01  0.22  8.04  0.10  400  0.50  68.70  13.39  0.66  3.38  0.08  0.80  49.02  14.01  0.02  0.01  0.05  0.22  3.02  0.20  18.60  28.03  0.15  6.01  0.42  3.74  1.10  49.90  100.20  15.10  0.23  0.00  70.15  4.20  37.42  0.05  0.65  1.90  550  600  700  800  900  1000  1100  1200  0.01  0.10  43.02  0.04  7.72  1.90  35.67  1.01  1.90  87.80  19.68  1.01  0.01  0.65  0.80  89.80  60.45  7.35  0.80  41.51  5.30  15.20  52.80  36.64  2.62  1.81  3.48  4.10  26.21  0.00  100  0.20  92.48  3.09  0.24  6.20  90.30  19.70  63.36  0.39  0.01  0.86  0.01  1.10  47.50  72.64  0.23  0.03  0.52  2.21  0.02  1.16  0.29  0.22  0.03  0.01  1.45  1.00  150  0.03  0.02  1.10  80.10  0.53  0.50  56.80  12.02  2.97  8.10  69.44  0.05  4.10  29.48  0.56  0.80  28.14  0.20  0.79  3.20  5.80  14.36  9.61  1.20  34.20  0.76  5.23  11.50  88.14  0.76  8.03  0.25  12.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  o T ( F)  50  75  100  125  150  175  200  225  250  275  300  325  350  375  400  425  450  475  500  525  550  575  600  650  700  750  800  850  900  950  1000  1050  1100  1150  1200  C4H10  1.01  0.46  3.24  5.06  0.50  39.51  0.45  0.01  1.00  500  0.30  32.68  4.56  11.60  14.00  200  0.50  8.05  0.10  17.24  0.15  21.01  1.60  51.20  27.61  1.83  9.01  0.55  10.10  57.10  57.22  0.12  0.95  27.00  1.50  43.04  0.00  86.02  0.08  0.59  2.30  20.70  25.  35    450  0.60  23.07  0.43  2.40  26.36  0.65  11.70  71.70  100.20  79.10  0.53  2.78  9.80  23.40  20.40  0.31  0.20  79.21  4.07  0.43  3.68  7.20  16.35  1.48  2.91  34.11  0.78  10.13  0.10  59.83  4.62  1.10  83.20  60.10  47.02  0.80  5.10  0.52  0.60  62.26  0.06  0.40  77.11  3.52  3.59  2.74  1.20  7.19  0.22  7.33  0.04  0.40  0.11  0.60  42.17  0.51  5.99  1.10  16.20  71.77  7.40  18.20  62.40  0.05  11.74  1.01  1.70  10.15  10.

  Next we present an  illustrative example to estimate the vapor pressure of the crude stream at a chosen temperature.  light  gas oil i.. for column corresponding to 700 oF.  An  important feature of these products is that they are identified to be distinct based on the cut points of  the crude TBP. Therefore.8  Vapor pressure  For  pure  components  and  mixtures  of  known  chemical  speices  and  compositions.    In  this  section.  Q 2.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  2.  the normal boiling point is estimated as the volume average boiling point (VABP).9  Estimation of Product TBP from crude TBP  One  of  the  important  features  of  refinery  process  design  is  to  estimate  the  crude  distillation  product  properties  (TBP)  for  a  given  assay  of  the  crude  oil.    Table  2. the vapor pressure of the crude stream at 800 oF is  2.8: Estimate the vapor pressure of heavy Saudi crude oil at 500 oF.18  presents  the  correlation  presented  by  Maxwell  (1950)  to  relate  vapor  pressure with temperature and normal boiling point of the hydrocarbon..  The normal boiling point is 700 oF  Solution:  From Table 2.    2.5 atm.  For  interpolation purposes.e. The  vapor pressure curves are of prominent usage in the flash zone calculations of the CDU. at 500 oF.  Therefore.52 atm.    For  crude  as  well  as  petroleum  fractions  therefore.  A  CDU  essentially  products  5  products  namely  gas  to  naphtha  (product  1).  kerosene  (product  2). For crude/petroleum fractions. LGO (product 3).e.  correlations  are  necessary  to  evaluate  vapor  pressure.  Solution:  Tv = t20+t50+t80/3 = (338+703+1104)/3= 715 0F  From Table 2. vapor pressure = 0.  we  elaborately  present  the  procedures that need to be followed to evaluate the product TBP properties from feed properties.05 atm.  Q 2. the boiling point of the crude stream is 800 oF at 2.5 atm. it can be assumed that both axes data agree to a linear fit for a log‐log plot. heavy gas oil i. HGO (product 4) and atmospheric residue (product 5).9: Estimate the boiling point of the crude stream at 2.  Antoine  expression  can  be  used  to  conveniently  estimate  the  saturated  and  partial  vapor  pressures  in  gaseous/vapor  mixtures.18. we  present  another  illustrative  example  to  convey  the  efficacy  of  the  vapor  pressure  plots.  Associated cut points for these products are summarized as follows:  a) b) c) d) e) Naptha : Gas to 3750F  Kerosene:  3750F‐ 4800F  LGO: 4800F‐ 6100F  HGO: 6100F‐6800F  Residue: 680oF +    36    .18.

0  599.6  ∆ ( F) ‐13.0  ‐8.4 ‐18.1  369.9 637.0  386.8  481.0  504.1 ‐9.6  519.9 559.0  ‐14.6  ‐5.6  585. 90%  vol temperature of the cut Vs.4 480.4 460.6  222.7  ‐22.5 ‐32.0  ‐8.8 ‐1.1  ‐3.4  ‐15.1 ‐37.1  C ∆ ( F) ‐18.7 ‐35.9  ‐11.6 565. 500  oF (Set D).4 ‐9.2  ‐14.9 ‐19.7 0.5  367.4  316.8  544.3  236.0 ‐6.9 ‐25.6 ‐22.1 ‐3.6 ‐34.2 ‐40.0  ‐38.9 ‐23.8  511.3 ‐19.0  258.7 ‐32.7 622.2  545.3  ‐19.8 ‐13.1  ‐2.6  ‐41.6 1.3 ‐8.5  360.7 ‐43.9  402.2 ‐32.9 ‐9.9 ‐35.1 ‐17. al.0 ‐23.9  455.19: End point correlation data presented by Good.2  421.0 ‐18.8 666.9  409.6 ‐6.9  446.1 ‐33.5 482.7  ‐32.5 494.8  522.5  371.6  437.4  ‐7.8  208.4 531.8 ‐17.1 ‐7.        37    .6  406.3  ‐20.6 572.4 ‐37.6 672.1  640.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties              A  o   T ( F)  126.9 531.9 ‐13.3  474.3 ‐17.2 498.4  648.4  569.9  553.1 628.7 584.0  615.1 ‐7.6  466.9 ‐45.2  444.8  486.4 ‐42.4 589.9  ‐17.3 ‐34.8 ‐15.4 ‐22.5  307.2  404.8  516.3  602.1 o o T ( F)  504.2  628.7 ‐39.3  677.4 ‐45.5  428.3  426.4  620.4 ‐27. 90 % vol TBP cut for all fractions (Set E).0  578.2  380.6  B ∆ ( F) ‐41.1  466.2  280.3  486.8 515.9  652.6 ‐10.2  504.5 ‐11.5 ‐11.4  504.8  ‐43.2  565.4  345.4  324.3 ‐21.5  496.2 ‐20.7  488.3  524.5 513.5  ‐24.5 453.5 612.4  ‐10.5 ‐20.3  464.1  334.0 o o T ( F)  476.8  ‐37.3 ‐16.6  ‐40.6 576.4 ‐4.9  ‐17.9  328.7 ‐30.5 ‐29.9 E ∆ ( F) 2.3 ‐25.2 559.3 543.7  390.7 ‐25.7  690.9  o                                                                       Table 2.7  ‐15.1 521.8 ‐4.3  455.5 ‐16.4 593.3 ‐31.3 ‐21.0  ‐11.2  ‐35.8 ‐41.5  ‐13.5  378.3 471.6  ‐34.6 ‐14.2 D ∆ ( F) ‐7.8  363.9 659.3  ‐6.9  ‐26.8  395.7 ‐15.5 ‐5.2 ‐12.6 601.2 ‐14. 400  oF (Set C).5 646. Connel et.5 ‐16.8 490.2 ‐30.8  417.6  474.4  ‐23.5 o o T ( F)  470.2 ‐21.0  442. Data sets represent fractions  whose cut point starts at 200  oF TBP or lower (Set A).0 ‐12.7 ‐23.1 652.0 639.6  ‐8.2  ‐29.6  560.8  495.4  343.6 ‐20.6  ‐42.8 ‐7.8  355.2 ‐8.1  396.1  385.0 688.0  ‐12.9 ‐20.1  454.3 550.5  ‐30.0 ‐10.1 ‐16.6 ‐27.5  o o T ( F)  413.2 ‐29.0  351.6 682. 300  oF (Set B).6  662.4  587.3 545.7 ‐27.6  ‐28.8 ‐45.7  432.7 ‐21.5  532.

 LGO and HGO).  HGO  and  residue.  However. the residue TBP can be obtained for a given TBP of the crude and accurately obtained  TBP of the other four products (naphtha.          38    .    Often  crude  TBP  is  provided  to  cover  the  cut  points  specifically till HGO and residue is often ignored.  LGO.  kerosene. using a volumetric balance over the crude  and crude assay.   The conceptual procedure to evaluate the product TBPs from crude TBP is summarized as follows:       1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 o Temperature  F  350 300 250 200 150 100 50 IBP    2   3 4 5       10        20       30    40   50   60   70       80             95       97             EP  Volume percent over Figure  2.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  The  first  step  in  the  estimation  of  product  properties  is  to  evaluate  the  TBP  of  the  products  namely  naphtha.   The residue volumetric balance is  often ignored due to the fact that the empirical correlations do not satisfy the volumetric balance law.5:  Probability  chart  developed  by  Thrift  for  estimating  ASTM  temperatures  from  any  two  known values of ASTM temperatures. kerosene.

79 116.71 200.47 78.10  38.85  72.88 82.22 90.62  6.34  98.38  869.30 7.21 52.40  847.01  88.56 142.00 22.26  18.50  ‐8.90  120.74  10.09  101.31 69.08  63.88 83.63 182.87  501.96  166.16 4.38  160.14 83.62  114.61  40.35 59.95  10.93 175.42  103.66 14.23  61.38  39.97 197.47         114.72 167.71  31.63 133.51 69.26 91.52 179.20  148.23  58.15  56.98 159.11  54.08 65.45  179.12 71.24 106.97 12.05 166.91 77.35 129.30 73.32  7.51         160.22 192.65 51.31 36.87  1.97 54.76 171.49 99.57  29.61  141.70 124.47     85.03  13.54 98.58 161.70  ‐9.92 105.43 30.88 64.69 111.29 187.21  123.55 36.44  58.85 153.32  146.35  30.18  4.60 118.82 ASTM  ∆T   o (  F)  0.99  96.35 94.93  141.89 31.30  199.56  71.88 104.22         179.07  44.81 154.42 120.60 104.04  128.84  74.45  127.94  94.26  55.52 73.45 85.21       Table 2.84  85.11 160.36 69.22 42.37  81.94 38.17 125.11  21.84  595.54 122.48 91.09 ASTM  ∆T   o (  F)  0.64  1.90  631.50  66.73 118.05 3.35  63.82  416.79 183.57 131.70 58.66  8.68  91.15  150.27  TBP  ∆T   o (  F)  0.04  ‐0.21 7.27  TBP   ∆T   o (  F)  0.02  125.73  66.92 20.33 191.31 191.13 167.62 182.37  35.10 17.34 163.85  33.82 73.00  39.23  33.87 25.41  128.79  132.82  897.45  203.26  11.50  725.59 90.54 46.60 148.80         124.69 33.78 163.50  31.76 123.23 139.96         106.23  60.81 175.74  101.92  10.58 8.41         133.95 36.68 85.37  7.68  38.44 29.19  42.45 102.27 78.79         129.89 3.33  46.46 145.09  131.49  19.69  75.64  49.23  95.03  187.33 150.39 173.82  119.07 51.29  16.38 150.09 46.68 167.11  22.08  258.96  47.98 41.84 131.10 45.79  54.23  25.12  49.52 78.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties      0 to 10 %  o TBP  ASTM ∆T (  F)   ∆T   o (  F)  0.31 170.41  105.45 18.39  153.83 105.50 17.65         144.10  93.86 79.09  72.37  2.06 198.26  26.21  11.52 23.70 30.13  22.27  0.51  56.76  18.03 48.74  5.59  51.24 135.74  137.58  158.60  44.17  ‐5.68 149.69  81.81 87.93  13.06  108.81     89.13  22.52  169.04 178.41  162.07 140.12  76.40 55.61 177.12 28.47  122.80  81.  39    70 – 90% ASTM 50 % to  TBP 50 %   TBP  ASTM  50 %  50 %  Temp  Temp  o o ( F)  ( F)  .75  3.10 92.12 149.78  13.27 ASTM  ∆T   o (  F)  0.09 178.37  75.34 6.14  20.07  174.27 173.88  818.30 73.30 41.52  30.54 186.30 156.49  92.81 53.40  97.29  69.30 134.03  32.43 196.02 53.36  62.90  68.83  755.67         138.01  8.62 48.74  4.93  4.14 58.44  787.37  117.62  111.12 61.16  87.87         172.20: ASTM‐TBP correlation data from Edmister method.04  88.14  42.10  18.04  27.99 113.08  36.40 137.55  ASTM  ∆T   o (  F)  0.14  167.03  99.32 67.65  75.15  ‐7.34  173.74 32.73         119.11  143.00         150.04 64.47 76.55  TBP   ∆T   o (  F)  1.05  27.31  553.28 TBP  ∆T   o (  F)  0.00 59.11 143.14 42.90 157.25  115.36 110.32  108.33  50.79 87.44 156.99  176.85         110.82  180.67 177.39  27.95  38.75  ‐2.03  46.12  70.84 111.11 98.52 140.27  Segment of Distillation Curve.55 TBP  ∆T   o (  F)  1.13 7.68 97.61  50.92 168.25 96.14  111.59 127.81  117.35 143.12 85.34  114.95 98.45  137.52  75.90  84.25  464.47 172.24  36.96  55.43 162.60  194.90  48.07  60.95 144.19  65.41  310.65  16.43         155.03 187.34  98.31  43. Volume Percent  50 – 70% 10 to 30 %  30 – 50 % 90  ‐ 100%  ASTM  ∆T   o (  F)  0.93 67.89         166.47 102.00 156.09  60.20 110.07 12.67  70.00 153.16  50.19  5.50 43.04  102.05 130.57  80.09 30.87 160.67  13.37  4.17 135.99 39.36 59.29  26.85  125.24  685.77  44.52  80.02 96.39  90.75 23.66  359.08 147.32  14.05  95.94 89.65  75.01 117.90  155.77 125.53 63.74  66.10  2.33  ‐4.41 92.

  c) Thrift developed a probability chart on which all points connecting IBP. al.    The  Edmister  correlation  useful  to  convert  ASTM  to  TBP  and  vice‐versa  is  summarized  in  Table  2.  the  50  %  TBP  can  be  converted  to  obtain  50  %  ASTM  point  for  the  products (other than the residue). Good et al.  Eventually comment upon the efficacy of the calculation procedure.  estimate  the  accurate  end  point  for  the  corresponding  TBP  cut  points  using  interpolation  method.  Solution:  The cut ranges for various products are taken as:  a) b) c) d) Naphtha: Gas to 375 oF  Kerosene: 375 oF to 480 oF  LGO: 480 – 610 oF  HGO: 610 – 680 oF    a) TBP for Naphtha product  Yield vol % = 22.20.   Subsequently.  the  entire  ASTM  data  for  the  product  can  be  estimated.      Figure  2.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    a) For  a  given  crude  TBP  cut  point  for  the  desired  product.  In the calculation procedure.  al.  al  presents  correlations  to  evaluate the ASTM end point. estimate the TBPs of all products other than residue.  knowing  any  two  ASTM  temperatures  at  any  two  volume  %  values.      Eventually.5  illustrates  the  probability  curves  developed  by  Thrift.  The correlations are applicable for both light and middle distillate   products. using end point correlation  provided by Good et. ASTM end point of cut = 375 ‐11 = 364 oF  50 % of the cut (from Crude TBP) = 22.19  illustrates  the  end  point  correlation  developed  by  Good.    Q 2.  Connel  et.8/2 = 11.    These  two  tables  and  figure  are  the  most  important tools for the evaluation of refinery product TBPs from crude TBPs.  d) The ASTM temperatures of the product can be converted to the TBP using Edmister correlation. ASTM 20 %  ……    ASTM  end  point  shall  lie  on  a  straight  line.  Good  et.8  TBP end point of cut = 375 oF  From end point correlation.  In other words. plot the TBPs to obtain the pseudo‐components volume % for all products to verify the  law of volumetric balance.4  40    . ASTM 10 %.    Table  2.10: For the heavy Saudi crude oil whose TBP was provided previously.  b) It can be fairly assumed that the 50 % TBP of the crude matches with the 50 % TBP point of the  products. and assuming the 50 % TBP of product matches with the corresponding 50 %  TBP on the crude. correlations can be used to estimate the ASTM end points  of all products other than the atmospheric residue.    In  other  words.

  the  ASTM  temperatures  of  the  Naptha  cut  are  evaluated.  These are presented as  follows:  Vol %    IBP  10  30  50  70  90  100  ASTM   (0F)  393  408  420  427  434  445  470  41    ∆F  15  12  7  ‐  7  11  25  TBP  ∆F  33  25  13  ‐  12  16  28  (0F)  357  390  415  428  440  456  484  .6 – 22.8 + 8.8 %  TBP end point of cut = 480 oF  ASTM end point of the cut (from End point correlation)  = 480 – 10 = 470 oF  50 % volume of the cut = 22.4 (from crude TBP) = 225 oF  ASTM 50 % of the cut = 231 oF (From Edmister correlation)  Using probability chart and using ASTM 50 % and ASTM end point and drawing a straight line between  these  two  values.    These  are  presented  as  follows:  Vol %    IBP  10  30  50  70  90  100  ASTM   (0F)  150  184  210  233  253  290  364  ∆F  34  36  23  ‐  20  37  74  TBP  ∆F  62  47  38  ‐  31  47  85  (0F)  80  142  189  227  258  305  390     b) Kerosene TBP  Cut range: 375 – 480 oF  Yield = 31.8/2 = 27.2 %  TBP 50 % corresponding to the cut = 428 oF  ASTM 50 % of the cut (From Edmister correlation) = 427 oF   Using probability chart and using ASTM 50 % and ASTM end point and drawing a straight line between  these two values.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  TBP 50 % corresponding to 11.8 = 8. the ASTM temperatures of the Kerosene cut are evaluated.

    These  are  presented as follows:  Vol %    IBP  10  30  50  70  90  100  ASTM   (0F)  493  511  525  537  549  565  592  ∆F  18  14  12  ‐  12  16  27  TBP  ∆F  38  29  22  ‐  20  23  31       d) HGO product  Cut range: 610 ‐ 680 oF  Yield = 48 – 42.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties     c) LGO product  Cut range: 480 ‐ 610 oF  Yield = 42.8/2 = 45.  the  ASTM  temperatures  of  the  LGO  cut  are  evaluated.2 = 5.1 %  TBP 50 % corresponding to the cut =644oF  ASTM 50 % of the cut (From Edmister correlation) = 631 oF   42    (0F)  455  493  522  544  564  587  618  .2 – 31.6 %  TBP end point of cut = 610 oF  ASTM end point of the cut (from End point correlation)  = 610 ‐ 18 = 592 oF  50 % volume of the cut = 31.8 %  TBP end point of cut = 680 oF  ASTM end point of the cut (from End point correlation)  = 680 ‐ 20 = 660 oF  50 % volume of the cut = 42.6/2 = 37.6 = 10.1 %  TBP 50 % corresponding to the cut = 544oF  ASTM 50 % of the cut (From Edmister correlation) = 537 oF   Using  probability  chart  and  using  ASTM  50  %  and  ASTM  end  point  and  drawing  a  straight  line  between  these  two  values.6 + 10.2 +5.

5 23.25 80.3 17.5 22 19 18 17 16 15 13 10 6.75 12.9 4.5  10.952862  0.5 75.75 3.5 0.5 59 53 49 45 40.742782  0.5 32.25 89.25 96.C  Range  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  ‐12‐80  80‐120  120‐160  160‐180  180‐220  220‐260  260‐300  300‐360  360‐400  400‐460  460‐520  520‐580  580‐620  620‐660  660‐760  760‐860  860‐900  900‐940  940‐980  980‐1020  1020‐1060  1060‐1160  1160‐1280  1280‐1400  Total  Vol%(A) Naphth a  0  5.2 100    43    Mid Vol S.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  Using probability chart and using ASTM 50 % and ASTM end point and drawing a straight line between  these  two  values.2 100 Mid  Bpt  API HGO 19.7 .2 0.940199  0.6 2.7  75.8  15.2 3.5 63.641432  0.5  8                            100  LGO 1 27.96587  0.901274  0.35 0.822674  0.5 35.5 15.3 4.979239  1  1.3  8.7 75 69 64.G(B)  Sulfur  Wt%(D)    35 100 140 170 200 240 280 330 380 430 490 550 600 640 710 810 880 920 960 1000 1040 1110 1220 1340 2 5 6.5 63.2  3                                100  Kerosen e                0.35 1.1 81.676386  0.5  9.5  18.9 77.705736  0.55 3.8017  0.5 37.921824  0.860182  0.05 3.7 3.3 15.5 19.    Subsequently.5  24.7 2 2.5 72.959322  0.    These  are  presented  as  follows:  Vol %    IBP  10  30  50  70  90  100  ASTM   (0F)  602  614  623  631  636  644  660  TBP  ∆F  27  20  15  ‐  9  12  19  ∆F  12  9  8  ‐  5  8  16  (0F)  582  609  629  644  653  665  684      The obtained TBPs of the products are plotted against various pseudo‐component temperature ranges  to  obtain  the  pseudo‐component  volume  %  contribution  in  each  cut.  the  ASTM  temperatures  of  the  HGO  cut  are  evaluated.663074  0.7 1.75 58.5 27.  the  pseudo‐ component break‐up in both TBP and evaluated product cuts is presented below along with mid point  o API and midpoint sulfur %:  P.75 66.75 45 50.876161  0.25 88.5  20.35 3.721939  0.5 33 30 25.783934  0.75 69.5 56.5 41.05 0.025362    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.75 8 9.766938  0.847305  0.68523  0.946488  0.

 what to speak of other high boiling products. the pseudo‐components distribution summarized in the table  can  be  used  along  with  the  mid  point  oAPI  and  mid  sulfur  content  of  the  crude  for  each  pseudo‐ component.5 0. G.5 0.  This is because for pseudo‐component 1.  An illustrative example is presented below to evaluate these average properties. Therefore.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  From  the  above  table.10 Estimation of product specific gravity and sulfur content   Using the obtained TBPs of the products. it is herewith  commented that the said procedure is not accurate enough to predict the TBP of the residue product.68523 6.6875 0 0 44    . the product oAPI and average sulfur content can be estimated using the equations:  av.  [Bi]  and  [Ci]  correspond  to  pseudo‐component  volume  %  in  the  product.  it  can  be  observed  that  the  volumetric  balance  law  is  violated  for  Naphtha  product itself.663074 3. S. estimate the average sulfur content and specific gravity of all the  products using the TBPs developed for each cut   Solution:   Naphtha product  P.705736 14.G(B) Wt factor (C=A*B) Sulfur Wt%(D) Sul factor (E=C*D) 1 0 0.46758 0 0 6 24.5 0.  the volume % in naphtha product is zero. %sulfur content       ∑ ∑             (5)                (6)  where  the  columns  [Ai].  However. ∑ ∑ av.102055 0 0 4 9.  pseudo‐component  oAPI  from  the  crude  assay  and  pseudo‐component  sulfur  content  from  the  crude  assay.721939 17.509685 0 0 5 20.676386 7.  Q 2. where as it is about 4 % in the TBP.646907 0 0 3 10.  the  obtained  TBPs  can  be  used  to  obtain  a  fair  estimate  of  the  product  specific  gravity  and  o API.    2.5 0.641432 0 0 0 2 5.5 0.C Range Naphtha Vol%(A) S.11: For the heavy Saudi crude oil.

20331 0.995  Sulfur content of the Naphtha product = 0.5 56.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  7 18.03103/100 = 0.7 1.461551 21.64733 0.05 0.288889 0.03103   Specific gravity of Kerosene product = 80.28412 100 80.2 0.783934 0.8017 0.52833 6.783934 2.766938 6.030678 2.64733 = 0.61355 12.2 0.07477 84.803103  This corresponds to the oAPI of 45.64733/100 = 0.05 0.353414  LGO product  P.35 1.7 0.8017 0.22711 102.766938 0.G(B)  Wt factor  (C=A*B)  Sulfur  Wt%(D)  Sul factor  (E=C*D)  8 9 10 11 Total 0.39945 22.35 0.847305 0.010954    Kerosene product  P.8420331  45    .784805   Specific gravity of Naphtha product = 71.62355 47.35 0.8017 22.5 8 0.606977 28.742782 13.581395 0.47036 Total 100 71.716473  This corresponds to the oAPI of 65.28412/80.18492 4.83648 64.822674 0.2 0.351801 0.3 0.860182 0.280595 15.822674 0.03103 = 0.3 15.70329 13.784805/71.314444 9 3 0.C  Range  Kerosene  Vol%(A)  S.7436   Specific gravity of LGO product = 0.59291 0 0 8 8.C  Range  LGO  Vol%(A)  10 11 12 13 Total 1 27.8 15.2 100 S.7 0.G(B)  Wt  factor  (C=A*B)  Sulfur  Wt%(D)  Sul  factor  (E=C*D)  0.7 75.30776 60.30642  Sulfur content of the Kerosene product = 28.

.18  Average sulfur content of the residue  = .901274 16. .742/87. .876161 0.995  45. . .220185    HGO product  P. .77845  S%  2.716473  0.46099 15.048658 Evaluated properties summary  Properties  Naphtha  Kerosene  LGO  HGO  Cut volume (%)  Whole  crude  100  22.05  65. . .G  0.281  . .2 S.8  8.922 40.73646 1.742 Total   Specific gravity of HGO product = 0. . .P.8773646  This corresponds to the oAPI of 29.   This corresponds to oAPI of 15. .73646 = 2.   46    . .7436/84.5 63.8  10. . .C  Range  HGO  Vol%(A)  13 14 15 19.77356 55.220185  2. .54565  Sulfur content of the LGO product = 102.6  5. Average  specific  gravity  of  the  residue  = 0. .20331 = 1.77845  Sulfur content of the LGO product = 179.010954  0.I  30. .Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  This corresponds to the oAPI of 36.7 2 2.G(B)  Wt  factor  (C=A*B)  Sulfur  Wt%(D)  Sul  factor  (E=C*D)  0.803103  0. .860182 0.36393  0.96467  . .353414  1.8  S. . .3 17.54565  29.6 28.30642  36.048658    .51505 110.8420331  0. .8758  0. . .8773646  A.  = 4. . .30497 179. .50191 87.

66  F    47    .   Next.8420331  0. characterization factor. 1.66 – 5 = 224.933  From Maxwell’s correlation  0 ∆ T (229. molecular weight.  viscosity and vapor pressure  Solution:  Naphtha product  I) Calculations for boiling point    a.P.8  10.048658  4.933) =  ‐5 F   0 Mean average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =229.995  45.  estimate  average  volume. saturated liquid enthalpy. molal boiling points.  mean.010954  0.    Q  2.281    2.716473  0.8  8. the other properties of various products  namely average volume.30642  36.I  30.66. weight.6  5.660F  b.8  50.10 Estimation of other properties of the products  Using the correlations presented previously in other sections.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  All properties summary  Properties  Naphtha  Kerosene  LGO  HGO  Residue  Cut volume (%)  Whole  crude  100  22.8758  0. Mean average boiling point   Slope =  t70‐t10 / 60  = 258‐142/60= 1.96467  A. Volume  average boiling point  Tv = t0+4t50+t100/6 = (80+4*227+390)/6= 229.  Kerosene. viscosity and vapor pressure can be estimated.05  65.36393  0.220185  2.803103  0. mean.16  S.12:  For  Naphtha.353414  1. weight.54565  29.8773646  0.18  S%  2.  LGO  and  HGO  products  of  the  crude  oil. we present an illustrative example to estimate other properties of products.77845  15.G  0. molecular weight.  enthalpy. characterization factor. molal boiling points.

99514  From Maxwell’s correlation = 12.pt=224.3    III)  0 molal  Molecular weight  API = 65.66  F  0 API = 65.66  F    Average temperatures summary  volume  mean  229. mol.660F  224. 1.933) =  ‐6 F   0 Molal average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =229.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  c.66  F    II) Characterization factor  0 Mean average boiling point = 224.933  From Maxwell’s correlation  0 ∆ T (229.pt=224.66  F  Characterization factor.99514  0 Mean average b.wt=107    IV) Enthalpy  0 Volume  average boiling point=229.66  F  From Maxwell’s correlation.66 F  .933  From Maxwell’s correlation  0 ∆ T (229.3    48    0 223. Weight  average boiling point   Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 258‐142/60= 1.66+ 2 = 231.66 – 6= 223.66  F  0 Mean average b.66. 1. Molal  average boiling point   Slope =  t70‐t10 / 60  = 258‐142/60= 1.K= 12.66  F  wt  0 0 231.66  F  d.66.933) =  2 F   0 Weight average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =229.

33 R  S.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  Mean avg B.701423  A2=  ‐0.39383  ν100 = νref+ νcor=0.pt=224.92483  νcor=0.41071x10‐4   B3= 0.P.66  F)  From Maxwell’s correlations and using interpolation.29  LOG νcor = A1+A2K= ‐0. enthalpy= 127.I=(141.16059*10^(‐4)T+8.716473  0 API = A.796 Btu/lb.pt  200  250  K  11  12  11  12  Enthalpy(Btu/lb)  118  128  110  122    L 0 0 H (224.5=65.66  F =684.99514  A1=  2.29506  Watson K factor = T^(1/3)/SG=12.12.512757 centi stokes  Viscosity At 210  B1= ‐1.35579+8.38505* 10^(‐7) T^2= ‐0. 229.92353  B2=2.5/S.5113  LOGν210= B1+B2*T+B3 *LOG( T*(v100)) = ‐0.66 0F  49    .118897  LOG νref = ‐1.    V) Viscosity  At 100oF  0 0 T=mean avg B.40466  νref=0.66  F. of cut= =0.45721  V210=0.348972 centi stokes  VI) Vapor pressure  Assume Temperature= 5000F  Normal boiling point= 229.3. G.G)‐131.

50F      II) Characterization factor   Mean average boiling point = 425.5+0 = 425.P.5.5+0 = 425.8333  From pg.50F   d. Weight  average boiling point   Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 440‐390/60= 0. 0.8333  From Maxwell’s correlation  ∆ T (425.G)‐131.8333) =  00F   Molal average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =425. Molal  average boiling point   Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 440‐390/60= 0.s correlation =  22 Atm    Kerosene product    I) Calculations for boiling point  a. 0.8333) =  00F   Mean average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =425.50F  425.I=(141.5.5.5+0 = 425.5=45.00  50    .Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  Vapor pressure from Maxwell.8333  From Maxwell’s correlation  ∆ T (425. 0.5/S.30642  From Maxwell’s correlation Characterization factor is = 12.8333) =  00F   Weight average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T ==425. No 14 graph in Maxwell’s book  ∆ T (425.50F  425.50F  A. Mean average boiling point   Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 440‐390/60= 0.50F  425. Volume  average boiling point  Tv = t0+4t50+t100/6 = (357+4*428+484)/6= 425.50F  b.50F    Average temperatures summary  volume  mean  wt  molal  425.50F  c.

 425. of cut= 0.5=45.pt=425. G.25544  51    .9973  LOG νcor = A1+A2K= ‐0.50F  Characterization factor. Enthalpy= 232.50F.wt = 172    IV) Enthalpy  Volume  average boiling point=425.30642  A1= 2.22025  Watson K factor = 11.G)‐131. mol.pt=425.00.50F =885.170R  S.pt  400  500  K  11  12  11  12  Enthalpy(Btu/lb)  215  235  210  225    HL(425.00    Mean avg B.50F)  From Maxwell’s correlation and interpolation.12.386988  A2= ‐0.45 Btu/lb    V)  Viscosity  At 100oF  T = mean avg B.pt=425.80031  A.I=(141.50F  From Maxwell’s correlation.50F   Mean average b.K= 12.5/S.P.30642  Mean average b.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    III)  0  Molecular weight  API = 45.

41071*10^‐4   B3= 0.5 +0 = 541. 1.1833  0 ∆ T (541.611072 Cst  Viscosity At 210  B1= ‐1.1833  0 From Maxwell’s correlation.50F  From Maxwell’s correlation.Molal  average boiling point   Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 564‐493/60= 1.1833) =  0 F   52    .50F  b.5 +0 = 541.1833) =  0 F   0 Weight average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =541.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  νcor=0. 1.1833) =  0 F   0 Mean average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =541. 09743  V210= 0.5113  LOGν210= ‐0.92353  B2=2.799044 Cst    VI) Vapor pressure  Assume Temperature= 5000F  Normal boiling point= 425.055726  ν100 = νref+ νcor=1.38 Atm    LGO product  I) Calculations for boiling point  a.  Mean average boiling point   Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 564‐493/60= 1.5  F  d.5. Weight  average boiling point   Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 564‐493/60= 1. ∆ T (541. ∆ T (541. 1.5. Volume  average boiling point  Tv = t0+4t50+t100/6 = (455+4*544+618)/6= 541.555346  νref=1.5. Vapor pressure = 2.5  F  c.1833  0 From Maxwell’s correlation.

886 Btu/lb.5 +0 = 541.50F    II) Characterization factor  0 Mean average boiling point = 541. K= 11.pt=541.50F  541.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    0 Molal average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =541.5  F  Average temperatures summary  volume  mean  wt  molal  541. Characterization factor is = 11. Enthalpy= 297.5 F  From Maxwell’s correlation. mol.5 F  0 API = 36.50F  541.11.          53    .54565  From Maxwell’s correlation.50F  541.wt=214    IV) Enthalpy  0 Volume  average boiling point=541.85    Mean avg B.54565  0 Mean average b.5 F.5 F  Characterization factor.5 F)  From Maxwell’s correlation and interpolation.pt  500  600  K  11  12  11  12  Enthalpy(Btu/lb)  284  305  277  295    L 0 0 H (541.pt=541.5 F  0 Mean average b.85    III)  0 Molecular weight  API = 36. 541.85.

713365  LOG νref = ‐1.16059*10^(‐4)T+8.54565  A1 = 3.391509Cst    VI) Vapor pressure  Assume Temperature= 5000F  0 Normal boiling point= 541.92353  B2=2.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  V) Viscosity  At 100oF  0 0 T = mean avg B.5/S.17 R  S. G.59~= 0.301692  νref=2.I=(141. vapor pressure = 0.5113  LOGν210= B1+B2*T+B3 *LOG( T*(v100)) = 0.716416 Cst  Viscosity At 210  B1= ‐1.842033  A.41071*10^‐4   B3= 0.5 F  From Maxwell’s correlation.5 F =1001.143486  V210=1.P.35579+8.G)‐131.29367  Watson K factor = 11.72279  A2 = ‐0.8806  LOG νcor = A1+A2K=0.5=36.38505* 10^(‐7) T^2= 0.003051  ν100 = νref+ νcor=3.23385  νcor=1.6 Atm            54    .pt=541. of cut =0.

330F  637.330F  640.33+0= 640. 0.33.75    III)  0 Molecular weight  API = 29.33  F   0 API = 29. Mean average boiling point   Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 653‐609/60= 0.330F    II) Characterization factor  0 Mean average boiling point = 639.7333  0 From Maxwell’s correlation.7333) =  0 F   0 Weight average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =640.33  F   d.33  F  c. ∆ T (640. Molal  average boiling point   Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 653‐609/60= 0. 0.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  HGO product    I) Calculations for boiling point  a.77845  From Maxwell’s correlation.330F  639.33 oF    Average temperatures summary  volume  mean  wt  molal  640.33. Volume  average boiling point  Tv = t0+4t50+t100/6 = (582+4*644+684)/6= 640. Weight  average boiling point   Slope=  t70‐t10 / 60  = 653‐609/60= 0.7333) =  ‐1 F   0 Mean average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =640.33– 1 = 639.7333  0 From Maxwell’s correlation.77845  55    .7333) =  ‐3 F   Molal average boiling point =  Tv + ∆ T =640.33‐3= 637.33. ∆ T (640.7333  0 From Maxwell’s correlation. Characterization factor is = 11. 0. ∆ T (640.330F  b.

33  F )  From Maxwell’s correlation and interpolation.33  F   From Maxwell’s correlation. K= 11.35579+8.16059*10^(‐4)T+8.33  F   0 Mean average b.553806  νref=3.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  0 Mean average b.33  F .G)‐131. mol.pt= 639. of cut=0.33  F   Characterization factor. T = mean avg B.5=29.11.77845  A1 =   5.pt= 639. G.877365  API=(141.pt=639.579365  56    .762  LOG νcor = A1+A2K=0.wt=265    IV) Enthalpy   0 Volume  average boiling point=640.41546  Watson K factor = 11.38505* 10^(‐7) T^2= 0.475588  LOG νref = ‐1. 640. enthalpy= 359 Btu/lb.33  F  =1099 R  S.75    Mean avg B.pt  600  800  K  11  12  11  12  Enthalpy(Btu/lb)  345  368  333  350    L 0 0 H = (639.738431  νcor= 5.  V) Viscosity   0 0 At 100oF.75.5/S.625067  A2 = ‐0.

6  425.75  12.799  1.3  Characterization factor(K)  11.5  541.6  223.05  22  2.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  ν100 = νref+ νcor=9.6  425.429  Vapour pressure (atm) at  500 oF  0.3  642  224.41071*10^‐4   B3= 0.465  0.5  640.Pt ( F)  0 Mean avg B.38  0.5  541.85  11.5  541.8  127.611  3.75  Molecular wt  266  107  172  214  265  Saturated Liquid Enthalpy  (Btu/lb)  0 Viscosity  100 F  (Centi‐stokes)  0 210 F  416.2  231.    Properties summary    Properties  Whole  crude  715  Naphtha  Kerosene  LGO  HGO  229.5  541.6  425.Pt ( F)  535.Pt ( F)  0 Wt avg B.5  640.92353  B2=2.054953 centi stokes  Viscosity At 210  B1= ‐1.3  12  11.055  2.392  2.3  752.349  0.513  1.16 atm.5  637.6  425.3  Molal avg B.Pt ( F)  0     57    .5  639.269  0.33  F  Vapor pressure from Maxwell’s correlation = 0. 429535 centi stokes    VI) Vapor pressure  Assume Temperature= 5000F  0 Normal boiling point= 640.6  0.16  0 Vol avg B.385523  V210=2.8  232.716  9.5113  LOGν210= B1+B2*T+B3 *LOG( T*(v100)) = 0.45  298  359  9.

41  7.27  101.51  22.      2.49  204.63  1.55  18.46  401.45  38.37  36.   Therefore.57  2683.16      13.    For  a  chosen  viscosity.23  50.44  4.27  1.15  892.81      15.95  109. one can evaluate the viscosity of the blend i.42    Table 2.03  70.10  20.16  6851.94      12.83  2.08  9.23  52.  Two illustrative examples are presented next to demonstrate the utility of  blending index correlations.59  9.16  10.50  60.86  43.64  27.29  81.34  2.23  29.85  120.75  29.89  2.87  11.76      12.67  76.43  8847.      58    .61  807.83  18.35  94.84      12.11 Estimation of blend viscosity  The  viscosity  of  a  blend  is  correlated  using  the  concept  of  viscosity  index.73  8.05  39.01  31.51  21.21: Blending Index and Viscosity correlation data.54  495.30  35.15  84.75  2.81  27.26  592.76  7.13  37.81  1.e.    Maxwell  (1950)  provided  the  viscosity  blending  index as shown in Table 2.41  79.99  26.67  2.64  35.31  2.87  33.70      13.35  73.58  61.89  19.41  28.00  128.80  691.56  1.96  40.99  38.  knowing  the  viscosity  of  the  various  intermediate  streams  and  their  volumetric  basis  of  mixing.20  1.81  5025.25  37.33  9635.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  Blending  Index  Viscosity (Cst)  Blending  Index  Viscosity (Cst)  139.46  99.10  88.86  8.56      13.18  17.44  5777. the product stream that is prepared by blending  the  said  products  in  the  specified  volumetric  basis.21.40  36.01  25.89  18.22  5..  a  specific viscosity index exists which would contribute on a volumetric basis to the blend’s viscosity index.39  19.57  13.89  7636.36  4014.03      14.

  kerosene.716 Cst = 49.  determine  the  viscosity  of  the  residue  product  using  the  blending  index  correlation  presented  by  Maxwell (1950).5  For Kerosene. .    Solution:  Let vol % gas oil to blend with diesel by x. viscosity and blending index are:    Stream  Viscosity Blending  Vol %  Index  Gas oil  12  37.611 Cst = 61. blending index corresponding to 9.  The refinery fed gas oil  and  diesel  have  been  found  to  have  a  viscosity  of  12  and  3. vol % of diesel (intermediate) is 100 –x.2  For HGO.8 % for Kerosene. .Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  Q  2.  1.5  50  100 – x  59    . blending index for the residue =   = .716  and  9.9  x  Diesel  3. .  LGO  and  HGO  to  be  0. .2  Based on volumetric balance of the blending index.055 Cst = 40. 10. blending index corresponding to 9.6 % for LGO and 5.  Then.    The  automotive  diesel  product viscosity has been specified to have the viscosity in the range of 4. The volume % corresponding to various product fractions can be assumed as 22. blending index corresponding to 1.513 Cst = 89.5  Cst  at  100  oF. . . . the automotive diesel product is produced by blending both  gas oil and diesel products generated as intermediate streams in the refinery. 8. . viscosity of the residue = 6900 Cst. vol %.  = 12.14: In a particular refinery operation. . .8 for  Naphtha.8 % for HGO respectively.  determine  the  maximum  and  minimum  volume  ratio  of  gasoline  to  diesel  (intermediate) to be blended to obtain the desired product.13:  Assuming  the  Saudi  crude  viscosity  to  be  9.055  Cst  at  100  oF  respectively.709  From blending index curve.269  Cst  at  100    oF  and  that  for  products  namely  Naphtha. blending index corresponding to 0.611.    For these two streams. blending index corresponding to 3.8  For LGO. .513.5 – 6 Cst at 100 oF.    Q 2.  Solution:  For Crude oil.269 Cst = 40  For Naphtha.  To obtain  this  viscosity  range.  3.

354  211.22: Flash point index and flash point correlation data  60    .350  1595.67  609.84  640. 100 x 44 = (x)(37.783  79.076  0.5  Blending index of the product = 47  Therefore.10  688.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    a) Minimum volume of gas oil  Viscosity of automotive diesel product = 4. 100 x 47 = (x)(37.38  646.013  0.68  667.40  619.92  679.8 vol %    b) Maximum volume of gas oil  Viscosity of automotive diesel product = 6  Blending index of the product = 44  Therefore.49  687.08  695.515  62.80  Flash point  index  0.82  626.63  678.039  0.55  674.68  657. we get x = 24.06  636.024  0.101  0.985  4.407  0.58  637.138  21.52  618.74  696.012  1.653  1.166  6. we get x = 49.6 vol %    Flash point  o ( F)  697.510  1029.40  630.95  690.23  620.58  630.718  38.902  414.484  104.36  651.31  665.330    Table 2.057  0.94  682.076  143.9)+ (100 – x) (50)  Solving for x.73  637.020  0.203  290.412  675.9)+ (100 – x) (50)  Solving for x.94  675.143  0.201  0.72  657.301  0.

   In similarity to the viscosity blending index.77 (304 – 150) = 118.12 Flash point estimation and flash point index for blends  The flash point of a refinery intermediate/product stream is evaluated using the expression:  Flash point 0.    Q 2. ASTM o5F of these products is evaluated. Using them and using probability chart.  Next. evaluate the flash point by evaluating their ASTM  5 temperatures. 70 % TBP from TBP assay = 945 oF  From probability chart. Table 2. ASTM o5F for Saudi crude oil = 304 oF  Flash point of the crude = 0. using probability chart. we make use of the previously generated ASTM data in  the solved problems. 50 % TBP from TBP assay = 723 oF  For the heavy Saudi crude oil stream.58 oF  For the product streams other than the residue. we choose any two points on the crude TBP and evaluate their  ASTM values using Edmister correlation.  we  present  an  illustrative  example to evaluate the flash point of the residue stream for evaluated crude and product flash points  using the flash point equation. ASTM o5F is evaluated.  Subsequently. flash point index exists as presented by Jones and  Pujado (2006).22 summarizes flash point and flash point  index  correlation  data  as  presented  by  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006).  o Solution:  To evaluate the Saudi crude oil ASTM o5F.  Subsequently.  The flash point index is fortunately a straight line which can be used to evaluate the flash  point of a blend from the known volumetric distributions and flash point indices of various intermediate  streams that contribute towards the blended stream. knowing the ASTM profile of the products could allow one to determine the flash point of the  product.  For the heavy Saudi crude oil stream.77 ASTM 5 F 150   Therefore.  ASTM o5F for Naphtha = 172 oF  ASTM o5F for Kerosene = 404 oF  ASTM o5F for LGO = 505 oF  ASTM o5F for HGO = 609 oF  61    .Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    2. evaluate the flash point of the residue product for known flash point  values of the crude and other products by using the flash point index correlation provided by Jones and  Pujado (2006).15: For the heavy Saudi crude oil and its products.

62  40.27  13.07  ‐30.72  ‐0.95  19.19  7.09  19.77  ‐30.94  oF.56  2.01  42. HGO = 353.98  1.97  11.19  ‐30.99  71.43 oF.73  15.63  2.70  16.97  ‐49.38  26.58  30.92  12.53  2.55  9.70  ‐0.74  ‐43.10  35.93  5.19  40.63  ‐7.84  3.93  30.94 1364 Kerosene 8.00  15.91  7.61  ‐7.09  29.15  14.36  ‐37.64  19.23: Pour point and pour point index correlation data.15  18.66 Residue 52 Not known Say x Crude 100 118.  62    .76  49.69  19.24  8.94  42.80  10.11  31.20  13.05  10.42  3.23  5.43  2.64  40.25  ‐10.35 oF.61  6.13  55.43  13.00  17.86  10.20  3.76  24.97  ‐20.93  ‐18.99  16.50  10.66  49.84  11.74  ‐14.78  49.13  ‐40.90  32.83  77.90  20.47  3.64  40.45  8.02  11.04  ‐0.89  ‐25.79  9.78  25.77  17.05  9.09  2.72  15.08  17.88  42.44  ‐4.58 oF.84  11. the flash point of products are estimated as Naphtha = 16.71  26.87  8.05  3.62  ‐9.68  3.8 16.90  3.20  ‐45.92  8.95  ‐48.65  11.63  ‐20.87  14.47 HGO 5.28  ‐32.62  3.66  ‐19. the flash point and flash point index are summarized as follows:  Stream Volume % Flash Flash point index Naphtha 22.  For both products and crude.30  64.39  3.13  17.51  ‐49.17  31.39  19.74  26.43 0.30  19.99  ‐10.29  26.09  29.69  12.96  29.99  22.80  ‐9.07  ‐25.04  16.08  22.13  10.8 195.00  3.43   o ASTM 50 % = 300  F  Pour point  Pour point  o index  ( F)  o ASTM 50 % = 400  F  Pour point Pour point  o ( F)  index  o ASTM 50 % = 500  F  Pour point Pour point  o ( F)  index  o ASTM 50 % = 600  F  Pour point  Pour point  o ( F)  index  ‐49.6 273.43  ‐19.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  From these ASTM values.32  2.21  5.78  10.79  ‐27.08  33. LGO = 273.33  40. Kerosene =  195.90  19.07  13.01  10.57  3.96  20.27  0.39  9.11  ‐34.75  52.15  14.52  ‐13.39  ‐22.76  40.54  21.23  ‐3.8 353.27  51.03  5.28  ‐30.18  17.23  6.82  56.99  ‐15.43  ‐10.43  ‐39.60  0.63  19.43  13.64  44.35  49.00  30.25  9.26  ‐40.80  2.98  ‐9.60  7.50  ‐20.73  36.99  21.49  16.67  ‐40.84  50.44  30.44  13.24  3.06  11.58 313.34    Table 2.96  39.87  30.03 LGO 10.52  ‐30.16  ‐49.37  7.47  16.31  63.25  4.35 3.58 23.17  ‐40.11  31.03  ‐49.62  ‐0.39  8.45  6.83  ‐4.52  ‐1.29  1.

8758 505. 1. From flash point index correlation.23 10.5 1001.36 44.5 10 MEABP . .4  where MEABP and SG correspond to the mean average boiling point (in oR) and specific gravity (at 60 oF)  for the fraction.   =  0.8774 504. . .842 470.01  . . .7165 310.03 -149. .Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    Upon volumetric balance.  evaluate  the  pour  point  using correlation presented in the API technical data book.3 0.6 0.   In  similarity  to  the  viscosity  and  flash  point. .  Solution:   Using  the  pour  point  formula.5 885.  The correlation is presented as  Pour point 3.16:  For  the  heavy  Saudi  crude  oil  and  its  products  (other  than  residue).5 0.6 684.    Q  2.  the  pour  point  of  the  crude  and  products  other  than  residue  is  first  evaluated:  MEABP (oF) MEABP (oR) SG PP (oR) PP (oF) 642 1102 0.59 Naphtha 224.  the  pour  point  of  a  blend  can  be  conveniently  expressed  using a volumetric balance over the pour point index.  Jones and Pujado (2006) presented a correlation  between pour point of a fraction and its ASTM (50 oF) with the pour point index (data presented in Table  2.8031 419.13 Pour point estimation and pour point index for blends  A  correlation  is  presented  in  API  technical  data  book  (1997)  to  relate  the  pour  point  of  a  petroleum  fraction to its MEABP and specific gravity.  Subsequently.23) using which the pour point of a blend can be evaluated.5 0.59 45.   Next an illustrative example is presented  to  evaluate  the  pour  point  of  crude  and  crude  fractions  using  the  above  equation  and  evaluate  the  residue pour point using the pour point index correlated by Jones and Pujado (2006). . .97 Kerosene 425. 10 .39 LGO 541. residue flash point = 700 oF.  2.36 Stream Crude     63    . flash point of the residue   x = . . . .23 HGO 639.3 1099. evaluate the pour point of the  residue product for known pour point values of the crude and other products by using the pour point  index correlation provided by Jones and Pujado (2006).6 -40.

Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  The  sequential  procedure  for  the  calculation  of  pour  point  index  and  associated  factors  is  presented  below in a column wise approach:    Stream Differential volume (%) ASTM 50 % ASTM factor [B] [A] X [B] Pour point (oF) Pour point index (from correlation) [A] Pour point factor [A] X [C] [C] Naphtha 22.8 233 5312.95 17.8) = 53878  ASTM 50 % of the residue = 53878/52 = 1036 oF  Pour factor off residue = 2570 – (‐19.4 + 3757.6 + 5692.59 25.97 -0.6 537 5692.6 -40.23 9.7 2570   Residue ASTM factor = 72300 – (5312.8 oF  It is interesting to note that from literature.  pour point of the residue = 54 + (1036 – 700) x 5/(700 – 600) = 70.9 oF.16 + 95.16 LGO 10.8 44.85 -19.38 + 17.19 186. pour point = 49 oF  For pour point index = 44 and ASTM 50 % temperature of 700 oF.38 Kerosene 8.          64    .93 +186.05 95.2 10.8 427 3757. residue pour point = 55.93 HGO 5.7 Residue 52 Crude 100 723 72300 45.2 + 3659.8 631 3659.36 32. for residue whose pour point index = 44 and ASTM 50 % temperature is 1036  oF. pour point = 54 oF  Upon extrapolation.39 1.7) = 2288  Pour point index of the residue = 2288/52 = 44  From pour point index correlation (graph).4 -149.  For pour point index = 44 and ASTM 50 % temperature of 600 oF.

71  2.87  38.35  7.19  4.16  9.39  7.97      11.39  1.75  0.50  6.37  27.31  14.87  11.21  0.15  3.45    11.63      10.87  11.39  38.           65    Maxwell’s correlation 3    .31  94.88  6.02  7.95  39.67  17.34  4.34  5.31  14.20  4.97  22.39  18.38  1.98  39.85  31.27  1.47  24.93  0.98  7.34  3.11  4.37  0.67  17.02  3.88  7.23  34.24  39.74  2.34  3.62  7.64  0.17  23.19  0.27  3.25  34.76  8.79  5.43  39.54  0.87  38.49  0.79  36.58  11.50  5.92  6.34  8.14  39.74  39.14  39.03  54.34  3.32  13.34  7.35  2.97  45.23  0.69  36.33  8.34  5.19  37.16  9.50      9.92  0.50      9.60  9.65  14.76  8.34  7.13  0.80  0.24  39.05  98.79  6.63  0.06  2.20  5.35  0.60  6.43  39.04  6.48  7.98  7.95  39.71          7.42  79.34  3.24: EFV‐TBP correlation data presented by Maxwell (1950).19  0.91      11.69  0.17  0.37  27.39  11.11  3.74  0.39  39.91  39.61  39.95  10.18    Table 2.61  28.97  22.68  8.44  39.19  3.30  71.53  10.39  7.33  8.40  39.20  3.34  35.60  10.48  7.68  8.64  9.54  39.15  2.77  87.53  36.95  39.74  39.10  30.34  6.91  19.73  40.88  39.34  2.00  12.84  5.46  3.71  0.19  37.58  11.82  4.69  36.34  7.92  6.97  32.74  91.63  39.68  39.02  1.06  75.40  60.33  0.34  8.78  39.65  1.55  39.33  3.54  39.41  83.89  11.91  39.00  0.20  5.26  40.82  5.00  12.06  3.95  10.02  7.04  6.78  39.36  0.53  11.23  34.21  39.09  8.64  9.50  50.01        10.34  4.96  4.39  39.98  39.88  7.69  2.02  0.78  39.47  0.34  10.08  0.93  66.13  37.57  0.05  39.34  9.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties    Maxwell’s correlation 1    Maxwell’s correlation  2    o T50 (DRL) < 300  F   ∆T50 (DRL  – FRL)  STBP  Maxwell’s  correlation 2    o T50 (DRL) > 300  F  STBP ∆T50  (DRL –  FRL)  Percent  off  ∆ ∆ – – STBP  SFRL  0.49  0.89  11.85  31.66  0.34  6.96  3.94      11.68  39.

  determine  FRL  at  the  volume  %  corresponding  to  the  value of 50 % using the expression  FRL DRL ∆T DRL FRL   j) Using SFRL and FRL50.  Column [C] corresponds to the  factor defined as  ∆ ∆ .24 to evaluate column [C] as ordinate for  various values of abscissa chosen as values taken in column [A].  Usually. evaluate  the corresponding flash reference line (FRL) points using  the expression:  y FRL S x 50   The data points thus evaluated as designated as column [F].Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  2.  i) Using  the  value  of  ∆T DRL FRL . the EFV  curve is determined using Maxwell’s correlations (1950) and a given TBP assay of the stream.14 Equilibrium flash vaporization curve  Equilibrium  flash  vaporization  (EFV)  curve  is  an  important  graph  in  the  design  calculations  of  refinery  distillation  columns.  e) Evaluate column [D] using the expression [D] = [A] – [B]. xFRL other than the 50 % case).  xDRL  other  than  the  10  %  and  70  %)..  We  now  briefly  present  the  procedure  adopted  for  EFV  calculation  following  which  an  illustrative  example is presented  a) For  the  given  TBP  assay. for various volume % values (i.  66    .  Here FRL refers to Flash reference line..   The data set is designated as column [A].24  that  relates  the  ∆T DRL FRL .    The  data  is  especially  required  to  predict  the  over‐flash  temperatures  of  the  distillation which eventually affect the design characteristics of the distillation columns.24 that relates the slope of FRL (SFRL) to  SDRL.  20  %..e.  b) Firstly.e.. evaluate the slope of the flash reference line SFRL..  Column [D] corresponds to ∆T TBP FRL   f) Evaluate column [E] using the expression [E] = [C] x [D].  10 %.  Column [E] corresponds to ∆T Flash FRL   g) Using Maxwell’s correlation data presented in Table 2.  evaluate  the  corresponding distillation reference line points using either of the following expressions:  y TBP S x 10   y TBP S x 70   yDRL values are designated as column [B]  d) Use Maxwell’s correlation data presented in Table 2. evaluate the slope of the distillation reference line (DRL) using the formula  TBP TBP   S 70 10 c) For  various  volume  %  values  (i.100%.  determine ∆T DRL FRL  for the known SDRL.  determine the  volume  %  and  TBP  values  for  0%.  h) Using  Maxwell’s  correlation  presented  in  Table  2.

7 -2.34 0.7 0.7 303.9 40 578 585 0.31 579.24 -90.3 0.7 487.  Slope of the FRL for a corresponding slope of 12.86 671.33 -7 -2.2  ∆T DRL FRL  for SDRL = 12.3 -3.  Solution:  Sample calculations:  Slope of the DRL = (965 – 205)/60 = 12.4 0 0 303. data in column [B] were  evaluated.7 338 331.33 -8. determine the  EFV curve data using Maxwell’s correlation data presented in Table 2.  The evaluation  of  various  columns [A]  to [G] to  yield  the  EFV  curve  data  is  presented  in  the  following  table:  ∆ ∆ [D] [E] FRL EF [A] – [B] [C] X [D] [F] V 0.33 0 0 855.  Q 2.4 50 703 711.7 1149.3 70 965 965 0.13 1039.7 951.7 0.23 487. whose TBP assay has been presented previously.3 10 205 20       67    .Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  k) The EFV data designated as column [G] is evaluated using the expression [G] = [E] + [F].7 0.36 6.33 27.8 60 828 838.33 12.7 oF  The equation to represent FRL is y 9.8 Volume % TBP data DRL [A] [B] 0 -12 78.41 763.7 568.8 100 1400 1345 0.9 30 459 458.17: For the heavy Saudi crude oil.15 1131.67 is 40 oF  FRL50 = 711.3 2.24.7.67x + 78.3 and using this equation.3 -21.67 for DRL is 9.67  Equation to represent DRL is given as y = 12.7 855.7 577.7 1048.7 – 40 = 671.3 0.33 55 18.68 211.3 0.7 90 1246 1218.33 -10.28 395.7 80 1104 1091.7 397.7 760.3 4.2x 211.7 9.7 190 205 0.07 947.7 0.

  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)  and  in  relevant  books  such  as  API  technical  data  book  (1997).  all  calculations  have  been  demonstrated  for  a  single  crude  stream.    Along  with  these. a brief account of various relevant correlations to yield useful refinery properties such as  average  temperatures.  viscosity.  characterization  factor.15 Summary  In this chapter.  flash  and  pour  points  have  been  presented.Estimation of Refinery Stream Properties  2.  flash  point  and  viscosity  blending  indices  in  the  estimation  of  blend  properties has also been presented.   The  significance  of  pour  point. a large number of useful refinery  stream parameters apparent for design calculations can be evaluated using the correlations presented  by  Maxwell  (1950).    In  addition.  68    .  One of the major objectives of this  section is to highlight the issue that with minimum crude assay data.  suitable  procedures  have  been  also  demonstrated  through theory as well example calculations for the estimation of refinery process product properties.  we  attempt  to  orient  the  process  engineer  towards  the  mass  balances  across an appropriate refinery complex and associated elementary calculation principles.  molecular  weight.  for  an  illustrative  example.  as  sample  calculations enable one to develop confidence in the subject matter.  In  the  next  chapter.  Though approximate these correlations are useful to estimate the  properties  for  the  process  engineer  to  orient  towards  the  refinery  properties.  enthalpy.

 the entire flow‐sheet is represented using 22 sub‐process units/splitters.  all  streams  are  numbered  to  summarize  their  significance  in  various  processing  steps  encountered  in  various  units.    A  petroleum  refinery  can  be  conveniently  represented  using  a  block  diagram  that  consists  of  various units and splitters.    In other words.  Further.   In  other  words. Refinery Mass Balances    3. the volumetric split fraction of naphtha stream is  equal to the corresponding volume % of naphtha cut in the crude TBP.    However.    3. the polymerized product leaving the reactor will be also 560 kg/s (This is  due  to  the  fact  that  560  kg  of    the  polymer  corresponding  to  one  mole  of  the  polymerized  product). sum of  the volume and mass based split fractions associated for all product streams for the CDU will be  equal  to  1.2 Refinery Block diagram    A conventional petroleum block diagram presented by Jones and Pujado (2006) for Kuwait crude  is  elaborated  in  this  chapter  with  minor  modifications  to  the  flow‐sheet.  mass  entering  a  unit  shall  be  equal  to  the  mass  leaving  the  unit.  since  mass  can  neither  be  created  nor  destroyed.  it  can  be  easily  visualized  that  physical/chemical  processes  produce  streams  whose  composition  is  different from that of the feed and splitters produce streams whose composition is equal to the  composition  of  the  feed  stream.  in  a  polymerization  reaction  of  ethylene to  yield say (C2H4)20.   For  instance. for the CDU process. For instance.    In  representing  a  process  flow‐sheet.  split  fractions  are  conveniently  used  to  identify  the  distribution of mass (and volumes) in the system.  While units involve physical/chemical processing.  Split fraction associated to a product stream  from a unit is defined as the mass flow rate of the product stream divided with the mass flow  rate  of  the  feed  stream  entering  the  unit.  These are:  a) To understand the primary processing operations in various sub‐processes and units.  in  a  chemical  process.  the  associated volumetric split fractions are not bound to be summed up to 1. the splitters only  enable  splitting  of  a  stream  into  various  streams  of  similar  composition.  c) To serve as the initial data for the elementary process design of sub‐processes and units.  the  product  stream  flow  rates  can  be  easily  evaluated  with  the  knowledge  of  the  associated  split  fractions.  3.  For  the  matter  of  convenience.    Figure  3. as mass can neither be created nor destroyed.    In  a  physical  process.  the  petroleum  refinery  can  be  regarded  to  be  a  combination  of  physical  and  chemical  processes. where as the mass  based split fractions shall sum up to 1.  Whatever  may  be  the  case.  as  no  chemical  transformations  took  place.  b) To estimate the flow‐rates of various intermediate streams using which final product  flow rates can be estimated.1  Introduction  A petroleum refinery mass balance is required for number of purposes.    Fundamentally.  as  far  as  mass  balances  are  concerned.    Therefore.    A  brief  account of these units and their functional role is presented as follows:  69  .  ethylene  entering  the  reactor  is  about  20  x  28  =  560  kg/s  and  if  100  %  conversion is assumed. 20 moles of ethylene react to produce one mole of the polymerized product.1a‐u  summarizes  these  22  sub‐processes.

Refinery Mass Balances                   C  D  U   1     1                       2 3 4 5   (a) Crude distillation Unit                  V D U 5 8 (b) Vacuum distillation unit  12 9 8       TC 2 10 N-HDS 4 3 11 14 3 L-HDS 15 4 5 16 10 12                 SEP-C4 7 17 6 H-HDS 18 7 6 19 12   (f) HGO Hydrotreater    20 13 13       14 38 17     (d) Naphtha HDS  9 (e) LGO Hydrotreater                7 2   (c)Thermal Cracker                    6 21           15 K-SP 22 8 23     (h) Kerosene Splitter    (g) C4 Separator  70  .

Refinery Mass Balances      24     25   26 19  FCC 27   9 28     29       (i) FCC Unit          32   SEP-C2 30 33   11           (k) C2 Separator Unit                        20 NS 37 13     (n) Naphtha Splitter              31 B-SP 41 15 42   10     39        (j) C3 Separator  30 31       24     34 GT 32   35 12           (m) Gas treating Unit    38      39   CR 37 40 14          (o) Catalytic Reformer      ISO 44 43   16       (q) Isomerization Unit  36 21 SEP-C3 43 (p) n‐Butane Splitter    71  .

  light  gas  oil. kerosene have higher values  than gas oil and residue.  kerosene  and  gas oil.  side  strippers.   Therefore.    a) Crude distillation unit (CDU): The unit comprising of an atmospheric distillation column.1:  Summary  of  prominent  sub‐process  units  in  a  typical  petroleum  refinery  complex.1a).  On the other hand.Refinery Mass Balances                45 25 ALK 44 17 46 18 47 (r)Alkylation Unit                  33 45 LPGP 50 41 46 19 51   (t) LPG Pool Unit                  16 GOP 54 23 28 21 55 48 (v) Gasoil Pool        LVGO-SP   18       (s) LVGO Splitter    26   27   GP 38   20 40       42 47     (u) Gasoline Pool      11   FOP 29   22 49         (w) Fuel Oil Pool  48 49 52 53 56 57 58   Figure  3.  Usually.  In  some  refinery  configurations.  heavy  gas  oil  and  atmospheric  residue  (Figure  3.  terminologies  such  as  gasoline.  reactive transformations (chemical  processes)  are  inevitable  to  convert  the  heavy  intermediate  refinery  streams  into  lighter streams. naphtha.  kerosene.  Amongst the crude distillation products.  heat  exchanger  network. modern refineries tend to produce lighter  components from the heavy products.  feed  de‐salter  and  furnace  as  main  process  technologies enables the separation of the crude into its various products.  jet  fuel  and  diesel  are  used  to  represent  the  CDU  products  which  are  usually  fractions  emanating  as  portions  of  naphtha. five  products  are  generated  from  the  CDU  namely  gas  +  naphtha.  b) Vacuum  distillation  unit  (VDU):  The  atmospheric  residue  when  processed  at  lower  pressures does not allow decomposition of the atmospheric residue and therefore yields  72  .

   Hydrotreaters:  For  many  refinery  crudes  such  as  Arabic  and  Kuwait  crudes.  naphtha  and  gas  to  C5  fraction  are  obtained  as  other  products (Figure 3.  various  hydrotreaters  are  used.  to  accomplish  sulfur  removal  from  various  CDU  and  VDU  products.  along  with  diesel  main  product.  Fluidized catalytic cracker: The unit is one of the most important units of the modern  refinery.    Conceptually.    The  LVGO  and  HVGO  are  eventually  subjected to cracking to yield even lighter products.  cycle  oil  and  slurry  (Figure  3.  gasoil  and  thermal  cracked  residue  (Figure  3.  It  is  further  interesting  to  note  that  naphtha  hydrotreater is fed with both light and heavy naphtha as feed which is desulfurized with  the reformer off gas.  Conceptually.2b).1i). C4 separator separates  the  desulfurized naphtha from  all  saturated  light ends  greater  than  or  equal  to  C4s  in  composition (Figure 3.    Thereby.1d).  desulfurization  of  LVGO  &  HVGO  (diesel)  occurs  in  two  blocked  operations  and  desulfurized  naphtha  fraction  is  produced  along  with  the  desulfurized  gas  oil  main  product  (Figure  3.    In  some  petroleum  refinery  configurations. light ends from the reformer gas are stripped to  enhance  the  purity  of  hydrogen  to  about  92  %  (Figure  3. light cracked naphtha. sulfur removal is accomplished to remove sulfur as H2S  using  Hydrogen. LPG and gasoline product generation.  Only for kerosene hydrotreater.  HVGO  and  vacuum  residue  (Figure  3.  In this process.  in  industry.1k) and generates the fuel gas + H2S product as well. C3 separator separates butanes (both iso  and  nbutanes)  from  the  gas  fraction  (Figure  3.    The  butanes  thus  produced  are  of  necessity in isomerization reactions.  hydrotreating is regarded as a combination of chemical and physical processes.  Naphtha splitter: The naphtha splitter unit consisting of a series of distillation columns  enables  the  successful  separation  of  light  naphtha  and  heavy  naphtha  from  the  73  .  On the other hand.1j). for the  purpose  of  modeling. The unit enables the successful transformation of desulfurized HVGO to lighter  products such as unsaturated light ends.  for  different  products  generated from CDU and VDU.   Therefore.  Therefore.  Similarly.  All these units  are regarded as physical processes for modeling purposes.  Thermal  cracking  yields  naphtha  +  gas.  the  unit  is  useful  to  generate  more  lighter  products from a heavier lower value intermediate product stream.  Thermal Cracker: Thermal cracker involves a chemical cracking process followed by the  separation  using  physical  principles  (boiling  point  differences)  to  yield  the  desired  products.  the  unit  can  be  regarded  as  a  combination  of  chemical  and  physical processes.1e). VDU is also a physical process to obtain the desired products.   The H2  required for the hydrotreaters is obtained from  the reformer  unit  where  heavy  naphtha  is  subjected  to  reforming  to  yield  high  octane  number  reforme  product  and  reformer  H2  gas.  Separators:  The  gas  fractions  from  various  units  need  consolidated  separation  and  require stage wise separation of the gas fraction.2c).1f).  in  the  LVGO/HVGO  hydrotreater.    In  due  course  of  hydrotreating  in  some  hydrotreaters  products  lighter  than  the  feed  are  produced.  sulfur  content in the crude is significantly high.  H2S  is  produced.    For  instance.Refinery Mass Balances  c) d) e) f) g) LVGO. the  C2  separator  separates  the  saturated  C3  fraction  that  is  required  for  LPG  product  generation (Figure 3.  thermal  cracking  process  is  replaced  with  delayed  coking  process  to  yield  coke  as  one  of  the  petroleum  refinery  products.    Henceforth. For instance.  for  LGO  hydrotreating  case.    In  due  course  of  process.    Similarly.   Therefore. the products produced from CDU  and  VDU  consist  of  significant  amount  of  sulfur. heavy cracked naphtha.1g). no lighter product is produced  in  the  hydrotreating  operation.  The VDU consists of a main vacuum  distillation  column  supported  with  side  strippers  to  produce  the  desired  products.

1t).  To achieve  desired products with minimum specifications of these important parameters.    A  kerosene  splitter  is  used  to  split  kerosene  between  the  kerosene product and the stream that is sent to the gas oil pool (Figure 3. gasoline pool  and  isomerization  unit  (Figure  3. the refinery block diagram with the  complicated  interaction  of  streams  is  presented  in  Figure  3.    The  most  important  blending  pool  in  the  refinery  complex  is  the  gasoline  pool  where  in  both  premium and regular gasoline products are prepared by blending appropriate amounts  of n‐butane.  A  reformer  is  regarded  as  a  combination  of  chemical  and  physical processes.  k) Blending  pools:  All  refineries  need  to  meet  tight  product  specifications  in  the  form  of  ASTM temperatures.  butane splitter splits the n‐butane stream into butanes entering LPG pool.   These two products are by far the most profit making products of the modern refinery  and  henceforth  emphasis  is  there  to  maximize  their  total  products  while  meeting  the  product  specifications. LGO.1.1w).  The  naphtha  splitter  is  regarded  as  a  physical  process  for  modeling  purposes. viscosities. which do not  allow  much  blending  of  the  feed  streams  with  one  another  (Figure  3. As isobutane generated from the separator is enough to meet the demand  in  the  alkylation  unit.    The  gasoil  pool  (Figure  3. slurry and  cracked residue. in many refineries.  isomerization  reaction  is  carried  out  in  the  isomerization  unit  (Figure 3.Refinery Mass Balances  consolidated  naphtha  stream  obtained  from  several  sub‐units  of  the  refinery  complex  (Figure  3. alkylate and light cracked naphtha (Figure 3.1n). octane numbers.  H2S  is  successfully transformed into sulfur along with the generation of fuel gas (Figure 3.  With these conceptual diagrams to represent the refinery.   Eventually.  In the fuel oil pool (Figure  3.1p). some fuel gas is used for furnace applications within the  refinery along with fuel oil (another refinery product generated from the fuel oil pool) in  the furnace associated to the CDU.1r).    Thereby.    The  process yields alkylate product which has higher octane number than the feed streams  (Figure 3. haring diesel.    Unlike  naphtha  splitter.  While the LPG pool  allows blending of saturated C3s and C4s to generate C3 LPG and C4 LPG.  these  two  splitters  facilitate  stream  distribution  and  do  not  have  any  separation  processes  built  within  them.1u).1h). blending  is carried out.  Similarly. flash point and pour point.  i) Alkylation & Isomerization: The unsaturated light ends generated from the FCC process  are  stabilized  by  alkylation  process  using  iC4  generated  from  the  C4  separator.  the  unit  produces  high  octane  number  product  that  is  essential  to  produce  premium  grade  gasoline  as  one  of  the  major  refinery  products.2.  light  ends  and  reformer  gas  (hydrogen). reformate.    A  concise  summary  of  stream  description is presented in Table 3. light naphtha.  74  .1v)  produces  automotive  diesel  and  heating oil from kerosene (from CDU).  j) Gas treating: The otherwise not useful fuel gas and H2S stream generated from the C2  separator  has  significant  amount  of  sulfur.   l) Stream  splitters:  To  facilitate  stream  splitting.  There are four blending pools in a typical refinery.  h) Reformer:  Heavy  naphtha  which  does  not  have  high  octane  number  is  subjected  to  reforming in the reformer unit to obtain reformate product (with high octane number). LVGO and slurry. heavy fuel oil and bunker oil are produced from LVGO.1m).1q) to yield the desired make up iC4.    In  the  gas  treating  process.  various stream  splitters  are  used  in  the  refinery  configuration.

2: Refinery Block Diagram (Dotted lines are for H2 stream).Refinery Mass Balances  1               20 12     SEP-C4 2 13 N-HDS   7 4   14     K-SP 22 15   C 3 L-HDS 8 23 D   5 16 4 U   1   17   V 18   5 H-HDS 6 D 6 19   7 U   2   10 9     8 TC   3           11       Figure 3.  38 24 34 GT 32 12 35 SEP-C2 30 SEP-C3 33 11 LPGP B-SP 31 15 10 50 19 41 42 51 36 NS 21 43 37 13 39 CR 40 14 52 GP ISO 20 16 24 LV-SP 53 48 18 44 45 FCC 9 25 ALK 46 17 47 26 54 27 GOP 28 49 29 FOP 22 21 55 56 57 58 75  .

Refinery Mass Balances  Stream  Stream Make  Source   1 Crude oil Market   2 Gas + Naphtha  CDU    3 Kerosene   4   Destination Functional Role  CDU  1 Separation  1 N‐HDS 4 Sulfur removal  CDU 1 L‐HDS 5 Sulfur removal  Light Gas oil  CDU 1 L‐HDS 5 Sulfur removal  5 Atmospheric residue  CDU 1 VDU 2 Separation    6 Light Vacuum Gas oil  (LVGO)  VDU 2 H‐HDS 6 Sulfur removal    7 Heavy Vacuum Gas oil  (HVGO)  VDU 2 H‐HDS 6 Sulfur removal    8 Vacuum residue   VDU 2 TC 3 Cracking    9 Gas + Naphtha  TC  3 N‐HDS 4 Sulfur removal    10 Cracked Gas oil  TC  3 L‐HDS 5 Sulfur removal    11 Cracked residue  TC  3 FOP 22 Product Blending    12 Hydrogen   N‐HDS 4 L‐HDS H‐HDS  5 6 Hydrodesulfurization of  intermediate products    13 Desulfurized Gas +  Naphtha  N‐HDS 4 SEP‐C4   7 Separation of gas (< C4) and  Naphtha (LN + HN)    14 Desulfurized Gas +  Naphtha  L‐HDS 5 N‐HDS 4 Naphtha stabilization (to saturate  unsaturates)    15 Desulfurized Kerosene  L‐HDS 5 K‐SP   8 Splitting Kerosene for blending  pool and product     16 Desulfurized LGO  L‐HDS 5 GOP   21 Togenerate Auto diesel and  heating oil products     17 Desulfurized Gas +  Naphtha  H‐HDS 6 N‐HDS 4 Naphtha stabilization (to saturate  unsaturates)    18 Desulfurized LVGO  H‐HDS 6 LV‐SP 18 To by‐pass the stream    19 Desulfurized HVGO  H‐HDS 6 FCC   9 To catalytically crack and produce  lighter products     20 Saturated light ends  SEP‐C4 7 SEP‐C3   10 To separate C3s from C4 fraction   21 Desulfurized LN+HN  SEP‐C4 7 NS 13 To split Light Naphtha (LN) from  Heavy Naphtha (HN)     22 Desulfurized Kerosene  product  K‐SP   8 Storage tank Storage     23 Desulfurized Kerosene   K‐SP   8 GOP 21 To blend and produce auto diesel  and heating oil    24 Gaseous FCC product  FCC 9 GT   12 Sulfur recovery and fuel gas  production     25 Unsaturated Light Ends  FCC 9 ALK   26 Light cracked naphtha  FCC 9 GP 76  17 20 Conversion of C3‐4 to alkylates Togenerate Premium and regular  .

 heavy  fuel oil and bunker oil     30 Saturated light ends (<  C3s)  SEP‐C3 10 SEP‐C2 11 To separate C3s from the stream   31 C4s (normal and  Isobutane mixture)  SEP‐C3 10 B‐SP 15 To by‐pass the stream   32 Fuel gas + H2S  SEP‐C2   11 GT   12 To recover sulfur and produce Fuel  gas    33 C3s  SEP‐C2   11 LPGP   19 To recover sulfur and produce Fuel  gas    34 Fuel gas  GT   12 Fuel gas  storage tank  Storage    35 Sulfur   GT 12 Sulfur storage  tank  Storage    36 Desulfurized LN  NS 13 GP 20 To prepare Premium and Regular  gasoline products    37 Desulfurized HN  NS 13 CR 14 To crack heavy naphtha into lighter  products    38 Reformer off‐gas  CR 14 N‐HDS 4 H2 purication by loss of Light Ends  in N‐HDS process    39 Cracked Light ends  CR 14 SEP‐C3 10 To separate < C3’s from Butanes   40 Reformate  CR 14 GP 20 To prepare premium and regular  gasoline products    41 Normal Butane  B‐SP 15 LPGP 19 To produce C3 LPG and C4 LPG  products    42 Normal Butane  B‐SP 15 GP 20 To produce premium and regular  gasoline products    43 Normal Butane  B‐SP 15 ISO 16 To convert nC4 into iC4   44 Isobutane  ISO     16 ALK     17 To reactant unsaturates with  isobutane and produce alkylates    45 C3s  ALK 17 LPGP 19 To produce C3 LPG and C4 LPG  products    46 C4s  ALK 17 LPGP 19 To produce C3 LPG and C4 LPG  products    47 Alkylate ALK 17 GP 20 To produce premium and regular  gasoline products    48 Desulfurized LVGO  LV‐SP 18 GOP 21 Togenerate Auto diesel and  heating oil products   77  .Refinery Mass Balances  gasoline     27 Heavy cracked naphtha  FCC 9 GP   20 Togenerate Premium and regular  gasoline    28 Cycle oil FCC 9 GOP   21 Togenerate Auto diesel and  heating oil products     29 Slurry   FCC 9 FOP 22 Togenerate haring diesel.

   ∑ξ v i ≠ 1  i   For both chemical as well as physical processes.Refinery Mass Balances    49 Desulfurized LVGO  LV‐SP 18 FOP   50 C3 LPG product  LPGP 19 Storage tank Storage    51 C4 LPG product  LPGP 19 Storage tank Storage    52 Premium gasoline  GP 19 Storage tank Storage    53 Regular gasoline  GP 20 Storage tank Storage    54 Auto diesel  GOP 21 Storage tank Storage    55 Heating oil  GOP 21 Storage tank Storage    56 Haring diesel  FOP 22 Storage tank Storage    57 Heavy fuel oil  FOP 22 Storage tank Storage    58 Bunker oil  FOP 22 Storage tank Storage  22 Togenerate haring diesel. since mass can neither be created nor  destroyed.   ∑ξ v i = 1  i   b) Chemical process: A chemical process is a process in which the sum of the  volumetric split fractions associated with the products of the system is not equal to  1. mass based split fractions associated to the products shall always sum up to 1.3 Refinery modeling using conceptual black box approach    All refinery processes on a conceptual mode can be classified into physical and chemical  processes.      3. split fraction of ith product (with volumetric  flow rate Pi) emanating from a process fed with feed F (volumetric flow rate) is defined as:    ξi v = Pi   F   a) Physical process: Physical process is a process in which the sum of the volumetric  split fractions associated with the products of the system is equal to 1.1: Summary of streams and their functional role as presented in Figures 3.  For conceptual modeling purposes.2.    78  .1  and 3. heavy  fuel oil and bunker oil     Table 3. the mass split fractions can be defined as    ξi m = PM i   FM where PMi and FM are the product and feed mass flow rates     For both chemical as well as physical processes.

  these  can  be  determined from these two equations as two unknowns.    Since  sulfur  is  an  important  parameter  that  needs  to  be  monitored  throughout  the  petroleum  refinery.   The specific gravity of the products is evaluated as a function of the product TBP and crude  SG  assay. H and R).      The steady volumetric balance for the CDU is defined as  Fcrude = FGN + FK + FL + FH + FR             (1)  where F refers to the volumetric flow rates of various streams (crude.   Therefore.Refinery Mass Balances  ∑ξ m i = 1  i   In a physical  process. L.  For  a  chemical  process. the above expression can be reformulated as  Fcrude SGcrude SU crude = FGN SGGN SU crude + FK SG K SU K   + FL SG L SU L + FH SG H SU L + FR SG R SU L               79                (4)  .    In  summary.4 Mass balances across the CDU     A CDU produces five different products namely gas + naphtha (GN). GN.    The mass balance for the CDU is defined as  MFcrude = MFGN + MFK + MFL + MFH + MFR   Where MF refers to the mass flow rates associated to the feed and product streams.    The mass flow rate of a stream is related to the volumetric flow rate (barrels per day) using  the expression:  MPi = Pi × 42 × 8.  pilot  plant/licensor’s  data  based  on  detailed  experimentation  is  required  to  specify these volumetric or mass based split fractions. H and R). the mass balance expression can be written in terms of the volumetric balance as  Fcrude SGcrude = FGN SGGN + FK SG K + FL SG L + FH SG H + FR SG R     (2)  Where SGi refers to the specific gravity of various streams (crude. Kerosene (K). K. GN.    Eventually.  sulfur  balance  is  also  usually  taken  care  in  the  refinery  mass  balance  calculations.    Usually.  residue  flow  rate  and  residue  specific  gravity  is  not  provided  and  hence. the specific gravity of the crude is usually given in the crude assay.    Detailed  procedures  for  the  same  are  presented  in  the  earlier  chapter.    In the above expression. heavy gas oil (H) and residue (R).33 × SGi   Where SGi refers to the specific gravity of the stream i.  Sulfur balance across the  CDU is expressed as  MFcrude SU crude = MFGN SU GN + MFK SU K + MFL SU L + MFH SU H + MFR SU R   (3)    In terms of the volumetric flow rates.  both  equations  (1)  and  (2)  can  be  used  to  determine  two  unknowns. the volumetric split fractions are not possible to estimate from the feed data itself. Light gas  oil (L). K. the  volumetric split fractions of product i  can be evaluated from the  TBP  assay  of  the  crude  which  indicates  the  volume  assay  of  the  crude. L.      3.

8758  A.220             2.8  50.742  LGO  10.803103  0.18  2.281   2.995  45.639  1.Refinery Mass Balances  Once  the  residue  flow  rate  and  specific  gravity  are  known  from  the  above  expression.877  Atmospheric  Residue  52  15600  Crude (Total)  100  0.8  1740  0.281    Thereby.2254 0.965  0.8  Kerosene  8.16  0.716473  0.05  S%  22.715  2640  0.77845  15.    The  crude  product  properties can be assumed to be those obtained in Chapter 2.011             0. sulphur assay  of the crude is presented below:    Properties  Whole  Naphtha  Kerosene  LGO  HGO  Residue  crude  Cut volume  (%)  100  S.P.8758      80  0.    Q 2.96467  65.6  3180  0.842  HGO  5.8  10.220185  2.8773646  0.    We next present an illustrative example for the mass balance across the CDU for the heavy  Saudi crude oil.0109 0.8  6840  0.I  30.010954  0. the mass balances across the CDU are presented as follows:       Sulfur  Sulfur  S.353             1.0026 0.048658  4.30642  36.54565  29.    Solution:    The average properties of various products as obtained from their TBP and SG.G  0.353414  1.716  0.0002 0.0114 0.1: Assuming that the refinery processing capacity is 30.000 barrels per day.2426  . conduct the  mass  balances  across  the  CDU  processing  heavy  Saudi  crude  oil.36393  0.8420331  0.6  5.265  9.   Mass flow  Stream  Vol %  Flows  flow  content  rate  (Barrels  (wt %)  (lbs/day) per day)  (mmlbs/day)  Gas +  Naphtha  22.937  30000  0.  residue  sulfur  content  can  be  evaluated  and  the  mass  balance  across  the  CDU  can  be  completed.192            4.049   5.8  8.534            0.G.803  0.

    Q 2.5 Mass balances across the VDU    With  atmospheric  residue  as  feed. the volumetric flow rate of the vacuum residue and the properties of  the vacuum residue (SG & SU) can be estimated.  Eventually.  The cut  temperatures corresponding to these products is taken as follows:  a) LVGO: 650 – 750 oF  b) HVGO: 750 – 930 oF  c) Vacuum Residue: 930 oF    The  specific  gravity  and  sulphur  content  of  LVGO  and  HVGO  are  evaluated  with  the  TBP  curve  data  of  these  products  and  crude  SG  and  sulphur  assay  curves.2: Assuming the atmospheric residue flow rate.     Below we illustrate the procedures for mass balance across the VDU for Saudi heavy crude.  the  VDU  produces  three  products  namely  LVGO.  This  is  because  the  end  point  correlation  was  not  providing  good  predictions  for  100  %  cut  temperatures. the following cut range data is assumed with the fact that the HGO cut for  the CDU varied till 680 oF but not 650 oF:    a) LVGO: 680 – 780 oF  b) HVGO: 780 – 930 oF  c) Vacuum Residue: 930 oF +      81  .    The  TBP  curves  of  these  products  is  estimated  by  assuming  that  their  50%  and  70  %  TBP  data  points  match  with  the  corresponding  crude  TBP  cuts.  HVGO  and vacuum residue.  ASTM  temperature  evaluation is carried out using probability chart and the ASTM to TBP conversion is carried  out using Edmister correlation. specific gravity and sulphur content to  be those obtained from the previous solved problem (Q1).    Solution    For the VDU unit. conduct the mass balances across  the VDU.  Mass balance expressions for the VDU are presented as follows:    FR = FLVGO + FHVGO + FVR                 (4)    FR SG R = FLVGO SG LVGO + FHVGO SG HVGO + FVR SGVR           (5)    FR SG R SU R = FLVGO SG LVGO SU R + FHVGO SG HVGO SU HVGO + FVR SGVR SU VR     (6)    In  these  expressions.Refinery Mass Balances  It can be observed that most of the sulphur is present in the atmospheric residue for the  Saudi crude.      3.  having  known  the  volumetric  flow  rate  of  LVGO.    The volumetric flow rate of the LVGO and HVGO can be obtained from their respective yields  that is evaluated using the range of the cut temperatures on the crude TBP assay.  HVGO  and  their  properties (SG and SU).

2 to 56.2 %    TBP 50 % = 852 oF    From Edmister correlation ASTM 50 % = 815 oF    TBP 70 = 882 oF  From Edmister correlation ASTM 70 % = 835 oF    Using  probability  chart. HVGO cut range volume (780 – 930 oF): 56.Refinery Mass Balances  Evaluation of LVGO ASTM & TBP:    From crude TBP assay.2 % = 8 %    TBP 50 % = 730 oF    From Edmister correlation ASTM 50 % = 709 oF    TBP 70 = 750 oF  From Edmister correlation ASTM 70 % = 722 oF    Using  probability  chart.  Calculations are summarized as follows:    Volume  ASTM  TBP  o o o %  F  F  ∆T ( F)  ∆T  o ( F)  IBP  656  25  48  628  10  681  19  37  676  30  700  9  17  713  50  709      730  70  722  13  20  750  90  746  24  33  783  EP  784  37  41  824      Evaluation of HVGO ASTM & TBP:    From crude TBP assay.2 to 67.4 = 11.  Calculations are summarized as follows:    Volume  ASTM  TBP  o o o %  F  F  ∆T ( F)  ∆T  o ( F)  IBP  760  21  42  747  10  781  20  38  789  30  801  14  25  827  50  815      852  70  835  20  30  882  90  857  22  30  912  EP  900  43  47  959    82  .  the  ASTM  data  at  other  points  was  obtained  which  is  eventually  converted to TBP using the Edmister correlation.  the  ASTM  data  at  other  points  was  obtained  which  is  eventually  converted to TBP using the Edmister correlation. LVGO Cut range volume (680 – 780 oF): 48.

× 100 = 15.96467 and sulphur = 4.904679   ∑ [ A] ∑ [ A][ B] = 0.901274 2.2  19  2.75  17  28.538%   52 Vacuum residue = 100 – 15.8 0.   The  same  is  presented  as  follows  along  with  the  mid‐point  specific  gravity  and  sulphur  content (from crude assay data):    Psuedo  Vol %  Mid pt.9 0.7 53.952862 3.35  Total  100 100 ‐ ‐      ∑ [ A][ B] = 0.6 0.6  16  21.  LVGO S.940199 3.2.6087   ∑ [ D] ∑ [C ][ D] = 2.078   Average sulphur content of the vacuum residue product  83  . wt %  14  4.930853 = 0.384%   52   HVGO =  = 11.946488 3.05  18  13.9121   Average sulphur content of HVGO product  = ∑ [ D] Average sulphur content of LVGO product  =   From  mass  balance  calculations  of  the  CDU.1 0.281    Normalized volume fractions of the VDU system are:    Feed (Atmospheric residue) = 100 %  LVGO =  = 8.078 %    Average specific gravity of the Vacuum residue product    = 100 × 0.384 – 21.6 0.538 × 0.921824 2.99084   63.930853   Average specific gravity of HVGO product  = ∑ [ A] Average specific gravity of LVGO product  =   ∑ [C ][ D] = 2.1 1.    Atmospheric  residue  (which  is  VDU  feed)  properties are: Specific gravity  = 0.Refinery Mass Balances  Using these TBP data. × 100 = 21. the pseudo‐component distribution is evaluated for both these cuts.384 × 0.G.876161 2  15  74.96467 − 15.2 0.538 = 63.904679 − 21.  Component  Vol % HVGO Mid pt  sulphur  No.

60876  19816. pilot plant/licensor’s data is required.   Mass flow  Stream  Vol %  Flows  flow  content  rate  (Barrels  (wt %)  (lbs/day)  per day)  (mmlbs/day)  LVGO  15.265  4. Gasoline.538 × 0.28457 = = 5.5002 =   Therefore.3 5.760  2.094  2. mass balances across the VDU are presented as follows:    Sulfur  Sulfur  S.    Maples  (2000)  presented  various  correlations  for  the  thermal  cracker  balances.  it  was  found  that  the  gasoil and residue represented in Maples (2000) matched the cracked residue mass balance  84  .  However.    These  include API gravity.99084  Atmospheric  Residue  100  15600  0. naphtha (TCN).09252  173710.    Volumetric.96467 − 15.281 − 15.6 Mass balances across the Thermal Cracker    The Thermal cracker produces 4 products namely gas with H2S) (TCG).6087 − 21.41 3.384 × 0.  one  unknown  in  each  equation  can  be  obtained  with  the  prior  information for all other unknowns.93085  VR  63.Refinery Mass Balances  100 × 0.384  2400  0.904679 − 21. sulphur content. Distillate.3       3.538  3360  0.91210  31865.    Below.930853 × 2.9121 100 × 0.90468  HVGO  21.96467 × 4. H2S wt % in the themal cracker product etc.G.09252% 62. Gasoil and Residue.538 × 0.078  9840  0.281  225394.  However.  we  present  a  procedure  to  extract  the  desired information for the mass balances across the thermal cracker.  When Maples (2000)’ correlations were  studied  for  the  mass  balances  provided  by  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006). mass and sulphur balance relationships are presented as follows:    FVR = FTCG + FTCN + FTCGO + FTCR               (4)    FVR SGVR = FTCG SGTCG + FTCN SGTCN + FTCGO SGTCGO + FTCR SGTCR       (5)    FVR SGVR SU VR = FTCG SGTCG SU TCG + FTCN SGTCN SU TCN + FTCGO SGTCGO SGTCGO + FTCR SGTCR SU TCR                       (6)    In  the  above  expressions.85 1.  pilot  plant  data  can  be  difficult  to  analyze.930853   318.904679 × 2.  Maples  (2000)  provides  data  for  5  different  products  namely Gas.    Since thermal cracker is a chemical process.411  5. gas oil  (TCGO) and residue (TCR) from the vacuum residue feed (VR).  unlike  for  four  different  products.384 × 0.96467  0.

  firstly.8  and  9.0058 exp 7.  distillate.1  as  many  correlations  in  Maples  (2000)  are  provided as functions of wt % conversion.  9.  b) The  weight  percent  distributions  of  the  products  were  evaluated  using  Table  9.    h) The specific gravity of the gas product from the thermal cracker is obtained from the  mass balance expression  SGTCG = i) j) FVR SGVR − FTCN SGTCN − FTCGO SGTCGO − FTCR SGTCR   FTCG With product volumetric flow rate and specific gravity known.  9.  wTCR  which  correspond  to  the  weight  percents  of  gas.7.6.  d) Using SLVTC.  distillate and residue products.  Using  Fig.  determine  the  sulphur  content  of  the  gasoline. the relation between CCR with  the  specific  gravity  of  the  thermal  cracker  feed  is  presented  by  Dolomatov  et  al  (1988) using the following expression:  CCR = 0.  85  .8499×SG   Using Table 9.  Also note the wt %  conversion  value  from  Table  9.  SLVTC  equivalent  thermal cracked products is obtained.  distillate.    a) For the feed stream.   These are designated as vTCG. vTCGA.  The sum of these volume % data  termed  as  SLVTC  will  not  be  equal  to  100  and  would  be  higher  than  100.1  (Visbreaker  database)  of  Maples  (2000)  (pg. vTCR.  125).wTCD.    The  LV%  value  signifies  that  when  100  LV  equivalent  of  feed  is  taken.  the  weight  percent  distribution  of  various  products  is  given  as  a  function  of  the  thermal  cracker  feed  and its condrason carbon residue (CCR).  c) Using the plot given in Figure 9.12  of  Maples  (2000).  9.  determine  the  oAPI  of  gasoline.  This is possible with the fact that the cut range  temperatures for distillate match very much with the gas oil cut range temperatures and for  gas  oil  and  residue  the  cut  range  temperatures  were  fairly  high. determine the weight percent distribution of products. evaluate mass flow rate (in mmlbs/CD) of the product as well as  the sulphur.. gas oil and residue products. determine the total product volumetric flow rate (barrels per day) from  thermal cracker using the expression:  FTTC = SLVTC FVR   100 e) The specific gravity of the total products SGTTC is evaluated using the expression:  SGTTC = f) FVR SGVR   FTTC Determine  the  individual  flow  rates  (BPCD)  of  various  products  using  the  expressions:  FTCG = FTTC vTCG FTTC vTCN .  wTGO. vTGO.  9.  These are  conveniently  expressed  as  wTCG.9  of  Maples  (2000).  mass  balances are conducted assuming five products are generated from the thermal cracker and  later they are adjusted to suite the requirements of four different products.  gas  oil  and  thermal  cracked  residue  products.  SLVTC SLVTC g) Using  Fig.1. conduct mass balance  calculations for feed and products.  In  this  table.  FTCN = etc.Refinery Mass Balances  data presented by Jones and Pujado (2006).13 convert the wt% data to LV% (liquid volume) data.  wTCGA.  gasoline.  Fortunately.  Therefore.  The sum of these weight percent distributions is 100.vTCD. The sequential  procedure for the evaluation of thermal cracker mass balances is presented as follows.

    Q  2.e.99085 = 13.5 CCR with  a conversion of 11.5/0.56 % and residue 50.  The total volume  of these LV% i.3 API and 13.73%.5 = 11. The closest available data is that corresponding to 12. SLV = 104.  gasoil 27.  specific  gravity  and  sulphur  content  to  be  those  obtained  from  the  previous  solved  problem  (Q2).173712 mmlbs/day    b) API gravity of the feed = 141.    Solution    a) Vacuum residue specifications:    Flow rate = 9840 barrels/day  Specific gravity = 0.  distillate  11.573%.99085   Mass flow rate = 3.423 % and residue 50.83 %..8499×0.27  %.  conduct  sulphur  mass  balance for all products  o) Having obtained mass and sulphur balances across the thermal cracker configuration  provided by Maples (2000).5%.Refinery Mass Balances  k) Using  Fig.  9.    Total product flow rate = 104. determine its sulphur content using the expression:  F SG SU − ( FTCG SGTCG SU TCG + FTCN SGTCN SU TCN + FTCGO SGTCGO SGTCGO )   SU TCR = VR VR VR FTCR SGTCR n) Having  determined  the  sulphur  content  of  all  the  products.  determine  the  weight  percent  H2S  (twH2S)  in  the  gaseous product  l) Determine the sulphur content of the gaseous product using the expression  twH 2 S × SU TCG = 32 34 FTTC   FTCG SGTCG m) Having  known  the  sulphur  content  of  all  products  other  than  the  thermal  cracked  residue.  gasoline  9.3:  Assuming  the  vacuum  residue  flow  rate.    d) From  Fig.46/100 x 9840 = 10279 barrels/day  86  .  conduct  the  mass  balances  across  the thermal cracker.    c) The  weight  percent  of  products  are  gas  3.84     In Table 9.    We present below an illustrative example for the thermal cracker mass balances. distillate 12.56%.5 API and 14.3    CCR of the feed =  0.1 of Maples (2000).827%.91. the data corresponding to 11.907 %.99085 – 131.  the  corresponding  LV%  of  these  streams  is    gas  4.  The total of these wt% values is 100 %.46%.  gasoline  8.  9.09252  Sulphur mass flow rate = 0. gasoil 26.411 mmlbs/day  Sulphur content = 5.0058 exp 7.13.84 CCR is not  available. adjust the mass.1  of  Maples  (2000). specific gravity and sulphur content of  the  gas  oil  and  thermal  cracker  residue  of  Maples  (2000)  to  the  thermal  cracker  residue of Jones and Pujado (2006).

173712  –  (0.37 wt %  m) For  residue.817 – 0.8660  0.9000 0. specific gravity of the gas product   = 0.2400  0.1 respectively.9909  3.3795  2.24 0.3067 0.  the  volumetric  flow  rates of  various  products  can be determined as gas 475 barrels/day.33 0.0925  0.0133 wt %  l) Sulphur wt % in gas = 0.2553  1.8488  57.24.012521  +  0.01055  +  0.0031  Gas oil  1252.1137 wt fraction or 11.1737 Gas  474.6320  31.1737   Mass balance table for products based on Jones and Pujado (2006) configuration    Flow  S.12.78 0. distillate and residue products are 1.0105  Residue  7576.0495 Crack Res  4976.9334  0.Refinery Mass Balances    e) After  normalization  of  the  LV%  data.9485  3.1000 0.  j) From Fig. gasoline 975 barrels/day. 0.866.5.1 and 4.666 5.    f) From  Fig.0125  Naphtha  974.0979 Total  10278.4064  1.0032 Distillate  1252.8168  5.  the  oAPI  of  gasoline.6  –  9.3900  0.0925  0.0057 2.380  – 0.003166  +  0.411 = 0.4111  5.7487.110 x 1000000/(42 x 8. 9.632  0.147475          87  .3375  0.9768  0.866 0.1000 1. Sulphur  Stream  (bbls/day)  Mmlbs/day SU (wt%) mmlbs/day  Gas  474.39 wt %  k) H2S in gas = 0.097925)]/1.378 2.1104  11.6646 0.8488  0.39 % respectively.817 = 5.  These when converted to  SG are about 0.  2.7487  0.7487 0.9768  0.0125 Gasoline  974.9  of  Maples  (2000).  distillate.G.9334 and 1.3832  4.849 – 0. 9.1.390 wt %    Mass balance table for products based on Maples (2000) configuration    Flow  (barrels per  Total  Sulphur  o Stream  day)  API  SG  mmlbs/day SU (wt %)  mmlbs/day  VR Feed  9840.  gas  oil  and  residue products are 57.8360  0.110 = 0.411 – 1. mass flow rate of the gas = 3.8490  5.0232  20.0435  1.39/100 x 3.4111  5. 20. gasoil 2600 barrels/day and cracked residue 4976 barrels/day.8640  0.110 mmlbs/day    h) From mass balances.255 = 0. sulphur content of gasoline.256 1.9.7800  0. 31.78 and 5.6646  0.    g) From overall mass balance.0000  11.0106 Gasoil  2600.  9.0133 x 32/34/0.5320312 0.33) = 0. H2S wt % in the gas product = 0. 0. distillate 1225  barrels/day.  sulphur  content  =  [0.5000 0.110 11.0435 respectively.6646    i) From Fig.

 M1 and M2 are multiplication factors to convert the flow terms into  mass  terms.  once  again  volumetric  split  fractions  based  on  feed  data  could  not  be  used  in  carrying  out  an  approximate  calculation  of  the  mass  balances across the HVGO hydrotreater.  only  one  unknown in each equation can be evaluated with the knowledge of the remaining items.    The mass balance across the hydrotreater is presented as follows:    FHVGO SG HVGO M 1 + FHH MWHH M 2 = FNH SG NH M 1 + FGOH SGGOH M 1 + FLEH MWLEH M 2 + FVEH SGVEH M 2        FHVGO SG HVGO M 1 SU HVGO + FHH MWHH M 2 SU HH = FNH SG NH M 1 SU HVGO + FGOH SGGOH M 1 SU GOH + FLEH MWLEH M 2 SU LEH + FVEH SGVEH M 2 SU VEH     In the above expressions.  88  .    The  feed  streams  to  the  HVGO  hydrotreater are termed as HVGO and HH    Since  hydrotreating  is  a  mild  chemical  process. This is usually about 80 – 90 ppm.  obtain  the  sulphur  content  of  the  desulfurized naphtha product.7 Mass balances across HVGO hydrotreater    The  HVGO  hydrotreater  according  to  the  refinery  block  diagram  produces  four  different  products  namely  desulfurized  naphtha.    Also.  VEH.  c) Assume the molecular weight of hydrogen as 11 (due to the presence of other light  ends).  light  ends  with  H2S  and  vent  gas stream that consists of H2S with other light ends.      Since  the  feed  H2  gas  is  not  having  any  sulphur  in  it. This is usually about 0. From this determine the flow rate of H2 in scf/day.  e) From  data  tables/licensor’s  data  sheet.    M1  is  42  x  8.  LEH.    a) FHH.  desulphurized  gas  oil.3 – 0.7  of  Maples  (2000).  for  gases  instead  of  specific  gravity.Refinery Mass Balances    3.  SUGOH  can  be  obtained  from  virgin  gas  oil  data  base  provided  in  Table  15.  85  %  sulphur loss is assumed from the final product. the desulfurized gas oil product can be  determined from the following sulphur balance expression:  FGOH ⎛ SR ⎞ FHVGO SG HVGO M 1 SU HVGO × ⎜1 − H ⎟ 100 ⎠ ⎝   = SGGOH M 1 SU GOH Where SRH refers to the sulphur wt % removed (on a total feed basis).  obtain  the  sulphur  content  of  the  desulfurized HVGO product.7 of Maples (2000).    The following procedure is adopted to sequentially freeze various terms in the expressions  and proceed towards mass balance.  SUH2  can  be  taken  as  zero.5 wt % (3000 – 5000 ppm).33  and  M2  =  1/379.  SGGOH.  These products are designated as NH.  obtain  the  scf  H2  required  for  barrel  of  HVGO  desulphurization.    As  expressed  by  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006).   g) From  data  tables/licensor’s  data  sheet.  GOH.  f) Since amount of sulphur removed is known. molecular weight is taken as a basis for mass balance calculations as their flow rates  are  usually  expressed  in  scf/day  and  not  barrels/day.   b) From  Table  15.  in  the  above  expressions.  d) Usually  80  –  90  %  sulphur  removal  is  assumed  by  weight  and  in  general.

  k) For the gaseous products.e.  For this purpose. in Table 2.907051.257   j) Having  obtained  all  terms  in  the  light  ends  balance  expression  other  than  FNH.4: Assuming that the HVGO hydrotreater is fed with HVGO obtained from the VDU along  with  the  evaluated  properties  in  Q2.  SUMEH). we need to specify their flows (FVH. Prakash  reported  that  for  a  feed  SG  of  0.9121  HVGO overall mass flow rate = 1.  Jones and Pujado  (2006) reported that for a HVGO feed SG of 0.573SG HVGO + 0.  Similarly.    We  next  present  an  illustration  of  the  above  procedure  for  the  HVGO  hydrotreater  mass  balance in the Saudi heavy crude oil processing example.  In other words. the closest data for HVGO hydrotreater is as follows:  Feed API = 21.. their molecular  weights  (MWVH.  FLEH).9218. it is assumed that the light ends + H2S product is 10 % of  the  feed  H2  on  a  volume  basis.    Eventually.  Further.6  o API of desulphurized HVGO product = 24. the following  expression is used further to solve the mass balances:    1− FNH SG NH M 1 + FGOH SGGOH M 1 = 0.5.  conduct  mass  balances  across  the  HVGO  with  the  methodology outlined in this section.7 of Maples (2000).7716. the naphtha SG is 0. four parameters need to be specified.  SUMEH. either SUVEH or  SULEH is assumed to conduct the sulphur mass balance.  Assume that this is about 2 %.  assume  MWVH  and  MWLEH  from  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)  and  use  the  overall  mass  balance  expression  to  determine  the  FVH.Refinery Mass Balances  h) Usually  2  ‐  3  %  of  the  light  ends  on  a  weight  basis  gets  removed  from  the  liquid  products  (desulphurized  Naphtha  &  gas  oil  products)  and  enters  the  light  ends  stream mixed with H2S.    A  convenient  correlation  is  obtained  from  data  presented by Jones and Pujado (2006) and Prakash in their books. based on  Jones and Pujado (2006).    Amongst  these  since we have two mass balance expressions.12 of his book.  MWLEH)  and  their  sulphur  content  (SUVH.  the  other can be obtained from the sulphur mass balance.  89  .8967.  by  specifying  either  SUVH.  the  naphtha  density  is  0.21 of Jones and Pujado (2006) book). a linear correlation is developed to relate the naphtha specific gravity  as function of the feed SG as  SG NH = 0.    Q 2.    Solution:    HVGO SG = 0.094 mmlbs/day  HVGO sulphur mass flow rate = 0.    Using  these  two data sets. Feed sulphur wt % = 2. 28 for H2S rich stream (vent) and 34 for LE rich stream.  The  average  molecular  weights  of  the  gaseous  products  are  assumed  to  be  similar  to  those  provided  by  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)  i.93085 (oAPI = 20)  HVGO flow rate = 3360 bbl/day  HVGO sulphur content = 2.    Conduct  mass  and  sulphur  balances  for  both  desulphurized naphtha and gas oil products.02   FHVGO SG HVGO M 1   i) Assume the desulfurized naphtha products have a specific gravity that is dependent  on  the  feed  specific  gravity.786 (Table  2.   In  this  case  we  specify  the  FLEH  using  suitable  multiplication  factor.  This implies that product SG = 0.031865 mmlbs/day    From Table 15.  determine  FNH  using  this  expression.

       1− FNH × 0.036034  66  0.5 85 ) 100 = 3012.955962  0.  Eventually. SULEH =  50.790377 0.031865    90  .003209  ‐  Total  ‐  ‐  1.114721  0.907051 0.907051 × 42 × 8.    It is further assumed that SUVEH = 67. from overall sulphur mass balance.257 = 0.00478  Naphtha  420.93085 × 42 × 8.    Therefore.93085   From the above expression.08     FGOH = 3360 × 0.   Overall mass and sulphur mass balances are presented in the following table    Sulphur  Flow  (bbl/day or  SG or  Mass flow  Sulphur  mass flow  scf/day)  MW  Mmlbs/day (wt %)  Mmlbs/day  Stream  HVGO  3360  0.  using  these  values.  assume  SUNH  =  0. In other  words.1 x 705600 = 70560 scf/day    Assume that the average molecular weight of the gases are MWVEH = 28 and MWLEH = 34.02   3360 × 0.790377 + 3012.116394  0.    Assume  that  85  %  sulphur  removal  from  the  feed  on  a  weight  basis.7%.907051 = 0.4 × 0.9121 × (1 − 0.92  0.5 (wt %)  SCF/barrel of H2 required = 210. This amounts to about 69.023782  H2S+LE  70560  34.7  0.33 × 0.5  0. FNH = 420.  once  can  determine  FVEH  from  overall mass balance    FVEH from overall mass balance = 487746 scf/day.094242  2.4 bbl/day    FHH = 210 x 3360 = 705600 bbl/day    It is assumed that 2 % of total light ends are lost to the gaseous products from feed.41  0.020479  0  0  Total in  ‐  ‐  1.114721  ‐  0.94 bbl/day    Assume FLEH = 0.    Also.031865  H2  705600  11  0.08  9.93085 + 0.  from  overall  mass  balance.93085  1.12 volume % of  the feed flow rate.00  0.08 wt %.790377   SU NH = 0.00633  50.573 × 0.031865  Des. HVGO  3012.31E‐05  H2S vent  487746  28  0.33 × 2.9121  0.Refinery Mass Balances  SUGOH = 0.      SG NH = 0.

    The illustrative example presented below elaborates the above salient features.7. Feed sulphur wt % = 2.888819 × 42 × 8.90468 × 42 × 8.888819.8 Mass balances across LVGO hydrotreater    LVGO hydrotreater produces four fractions namely Gas to C5.  conduct  the  mass  balances  across  the  LVGO  hydrotreater  along  with  suitable  assumptions.     LVGO SG = 0.90468 + 0.  assume  SUNH  =  0.      SG NL = 0.3  o API of desulphurized HVGO product = 27.257 = 0.5  %  by  weight  of  light  ends  is  assumed to enter the gaseous products from the LVGO hydrotreater.43 (wt %)  SCF/barrel of H2 required = 240    Assume  that  85  %  sulphur  removal  from  the  feed  on  a  weight  basis.05 bbl/day  .08 wt %.  This implies that product SG = 0.    A  detailed  sequential  procedure  is  presented  as  follows  for  LVGO  hydrotreater mass balance. gas oil and vent gas. Naphtha.019817 mmlbs/day    From Table 15.    Q 2.    Solution:    Once again Licensor’s data is not available and one has to depend on data banks provided by  Maples  (2000).5: Assuming that the LVGO hydrotreater is fed with the LVGO with properties generated  in  Q  2.    The  following  salient  features  apply  for the same:    a) Since  LVGO  is  lighter  than  HVGO.08     FGOL = 2400 × 0.  not  more  than  0.6.  Once  again  two  gaseous  products  and  two  liquid  products  are  produced  from  the  LVGO  hydrotreater.  Mass balances across the LVGO hydrotreater are carried out using procedure  similar  to  that  presented  for  the  HVGO  hydrotreater.  b) Certain  values  of  molecular  weights  and  sulphur  content  of  the  gaseous  products  may have to be adjusted to obtain an acceptable mass balance.  SUGOH = 0.90468 (oAPI = 25)  LVGO flow rate = 2400 bbl/day  LVGO sulphur content = 2.33 × 0.573 × 0.60876  LVGO overall mass flow rate = 0.7 of Maples (2000).43   FHL = 240 x 3360 = 720000 bbl/day    91  85 ) 100 = 2223.2.    Also.60876 × (1 − 0. the closest data for LVGO hydrotreater is as follows:  Feed API = 24.33 × 2.Refinery Mass Balances  3.775382   SU NL = 0.7596 mmlbs/day  LVGO sulphur mass flow rate = 0.

  it  is  interesting  to  note  that  while  many  parameters  evaluated  were  similar with the calculations reported by Jones and Pujado (2006).  once  can  determine  FVEL  from  overall mass balance    FVEL from overall mass balance =  226616 scf/day.019817  Des.020897  0  0  Total in  ‐  ‐  0. This amounts to about 31.064544  0.16E‐05  H2S vent  226616.92  0.1  23  0.60876 0.    Therefore.92 bbl/day    Assume FLEL = 0.47 volume % of  the feed flow rate.  from  overall  mass  balance.019817  H2  720000  11  0.002973  Naphtha  237. the molecular weight of  Gas to C5 is quite low (52.Refinery Mass Balances  It  is  assumed  that  0.  In  other words.    It is further assumed that SUVEL = 80.43  0.019817    In  the  mass  balance. LVGO  2223.775382 0.90468  0.780524  ‐  0. from overall sulphur mass balance.005791  Total  ‐  ‐  0.775382 + 2223 × 0.759627  2.005   2400 × 0.9267  0.                      92  .       1− FNL × 0.888819 0.08  5.00  0.780524  ‐  0.010942  52.  Eventually.013752  80  0.12 x 720000 = 86400 scf/day    Assume that the average molecular weight of the gases are MWVEH = 23 and MWLEH = 48.  using  these  values.92 instead of 80).691286  0. This  data is taken from Jones and Pujado (2006).90468   From the above expression.9      Overall mass and sulphur mass balances are presented in the following table    Sulphur  Flow  (bbl/day or  SG or  Mass flow  Sulphur  mass flow  scf/day)  MW  Mmlbs/day (wt %)  Mmlbs/day  Stream  LVGO  2400  0.011002  Gas to C5  86400  48.5  %  of  total  light  ends  are  lost  to  the  gaseous  products  from  feed. SULEL =  52. FNL = 237.888819 = 0.053  0.

    Therefore.  oAPI.  a) Gas fraction (wt % only)  b) C3 LV%  c) C3‐ (Unsaturated) LV%  d) C4‐ (Unsaturated) LV%  e) nC4  f) iC4  g) Gasoline  h) Light cycle oil  i) Heavy cycle oil    A critical observation of Maples (2000) data and the correlations provided by him in his book  for  estimation  of  oAPI  and  sulphur  content  indicates  that  the  gasoline  data  has  not  been  distributed  towards  both  light  and  heavy  cracked  naphtha.  conducting  mass  balances  requires  many  data  such  as  conversions. as this is the feed that will be sent to alkylation unit and therefore.9 Mass balances across the FCC    The FCC unit according to the refinery block diagram produces six different products namely:    a) Gas to C3   b) C3 to C5  c) C5 to 300 oF (Light Cracked Naphtha)  d) 300 to 420 oF (Heavy Cracked Naphtha)  e) Light cycle oil (LCO)  f) Slurry    For  these  products.  LV% conversion and sulphur content.    In  these  tables.  The  FCC  mass  balance  therefore  is  pretty  complex  even  when  a  macroscopic mass balance is considered.  liquid volume yield (with respect to the feed). specific gravity and sulphur content. at this conversion.Refinery Mass Balances    3.  This is because.  Also  gas  fraction  is  presented  with  respect  to  weight  and  not  volume.1  a  –  g.  appropriately larger quantity of gasoline is produced in the FCC.    a) Assume a LV% conversion of about 70 – 75 %.  Maples  (2000)  provided  the  following  data  as  a  function  of  feed  characterization  factor  (K).1a‐g  from  available feed data including its oAPI and sulfur content.    Therefore. is desired  in  the  mass  balance  data.  b) Carefully  match  the  most  relevant  data  from  Maples  (2000)  Tables  12.    Maples  (2000)  summarized  FCC  data  base  in  Tables  12.  Amongst  several products.7 93  . Always choose a data that  provides  maximum  information  with  respect  to  the  LV%  of  all  9  products  listed  above.  c) Convert  the  gas  fraction  (wt  %)  provided  by  Maples  (2000)  to  LV%  using  the  expression:  LVGFCC = WTGFCC 8. a microscopic breakdown of C3 to C5 product is very much desired in the  FCC operation.  the  macroscopic  balances  need  to  be  conducted with certain approximations.1   4. the following procedure is adopted for the mass balances across the FCC.

41 bbl/day  Specific gravity = 0.    Solution    Desulphurized HVGO flow rate = 3012.7%)  volume  of  the  gasoline  distributes  towards  light  cracked  naphtha  and  the  balance  towards  heavy  cracked  naphtha. 12.  Determine the specific gravity of gasoline. 12.  Else.7  94  .  12.7  Feed sulphur = 0.9  %LV Conversion  = 72.  Determine the sulphur content of gasoline from Fig.  then  fix  the  specific  gravity  of  the  gasoline  from  the  Maples  (2000)  data  base.907051.  it  appears  that  about  2/3  (66.  Assume sulphur content of C3 to C5 and light naphtha to be negligible (that is zero)  Adjust  all  sulphur  available  in  the  gasoline  (from  Maples  (2000))  to  the  heavy  cracked naphtha product.  Determine the sulphur content of LCO and slurry from Fig.  use  data  provided  by  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006) for LCN and HCN specific gravity. LCO and slurry from Fig.  From  a  mass  balance  of  sulphur  (overall)  determine  the  sulphur  content  of  the  gaseous product.8 of Maples (2000).955961 mmlbs/day  Feed sulphur mass flow rate = 0.Refinery Mass Balances  d) e) f) g) h) i) j) k) l) m) n) o) These  multiplication  factors  were  obtained  from  an  analysis  of  mass  balance  calculations provided by Jones and Pujado (2006).000478    From Maples (2000) Table 12.  Assume  that  gasoline  LV%  gets  distributed  by  a  conversion  factor  to  both  light  cracked naphtha and heavy cracked naphtha.13 and  12.    These  procedural  steps  are  illustrated  in  the  following  illustrative  example  for  the  macroscopic balances of the FCCU.12 of Maples (2000). Feed oAPI = 24.  From  an  overall  mass  balance  determine  the  specific  gravity  of  heavy  cracked  naphtha.6 wt %    Products:   Gas wt% =2. 12.  Assume that the heavy cycle oil designated in Maples (2000) data base refers to the  slurry in the FCC block diagram considered here  Determine  the  specific  gravity  of  C3  to  C5  product  with  their  known  compositions  and individual specific gravities.6:  Conduct  the  mass  balances  across  the  FCC  unit  with  the  assumption  that  the  properties of the feed correspond to the desulphurized HVGO stream in Q4.5  Feed sulfur content = 0.16 of Maples (2000) respectively.11.    Q  2.1c the following data is chosen to be the closest to represent  the FCC process:    Feed API = 24.5 wt %  Feed mass flow rate = 0.5204  (from  Jones  and  Pujado (2006)).  From Jones and Pujado (2006) mass  balance  calculations.  If  a  feasible  mass  balances  case  arises.  Assume  gas  to  C3  product  specific  gravity  to  be  about  0.

  For this purpose.633478  23  692.34  7  210.85 bbl/day  LC Naphtha = 1188.83 3416.049 Total  4.85  134833.718 1518.7 29099.8  144.8  nC4 = 1.61 bbl/day  Slurry = 186.25 9236.3  219.9059 46180.Refinery Mass Balances  C3 = 2.2 + 7.22  2.73 6073.9 = 39.019 nC4  4.9  LCO = 21  HCO = 6.8 +1.7532    Since LV% is known for all products.3 = 23 %    Light cracked Naphtha = 0. we move towards the evaluation of specific gravities for different products. the specific gravities  presented by Jones and Pujado (2006) (in page 93) for C3 to C4 components are taken.15 8856.2    From these data.77 bbl/day  Total products flow rate = 3426.8687 38437.2  C4‐ = 7.7  C3‐ = 7.    Flow of Gas fraction = 4.485 iC4  4. we  focus on the specific gravities of the C3 to C5 product.073 C3‐  4.67 x 58. the following LV% of the products was obtained:    Gas fraction = 2.7  81.0  iC4 = 4.437 %    Light cracked naphtha = 21    Slurry = 6.255 C4‐  5  7. the flows of other products are   C3 to C5 product = 692.17 bbl/day    Similarly. their flow rates can be determined next.65 %    C3 to C5 = 2.9 = 19.2    Total LV% = 113.  The  specific gravity calculation is presented in the following table:    Flows  lbs/gal  Vol %  bbl/day  Lbs  gal  C3  4.463 %    Heavy cracked naphtha = (1‐0.65  x 3012.7 x 8.3  Gasoline = 58.86  1.1/4.71 bbl/day    Next.33507 14415.7 = 4.52 bbl/day  LCO = 632.2  36.79 bbl/day  HC Naphtha = 585.55) x 58.7 + 7 + 4.41 = 140.  First.88 95  .14892 7378.68  4.5957 28421.

 assume LC naphtha SG = 0.756684  SG of LCO = 0.    When compared with the data provided by Jones and Pujado (2006).  This value is significantly higher  than that provided by Jones and Pujado (2006) (SG = 0.    SU HCN = 0. the SG of the heavy cracked naphtha = 0.    On  an  average.06143 (from interpolation of data in the graph).3.  it is solved to get the sulphur content as 10.e.19 wt %)..  sulphur content of     LCO = 0.5    These when converted to SG were about    SG of Gasoline = 0.  using  these  two  values  of  SG. 12.54  Slurry = 1  Gasoline = 0.8.842  which  is  about  oAPI  of  36.    Proceed for overall mass balance to evaluate the SG of heavy cracked naphtha.    Since  we  assume  that  LCN  does  not  have  any  sulphur  in  its  product.57%.1663   0.13 and 12.  Therefore.  the  gasoline  naphtha  from  specific  gravity  blending  calculations  is  about  0. only sulphur wt % in the gas fraction is not known.11.16.5  LCO = 18  Slurry = 15.20948 = 0.Refinery Mass Balances  Specific gravity of the C3 to C5 product = 134833.  we  evaluate  the  distribution of sulphur into the HCN according to gasoline sulphur mass balance i.  From Maples (2000) Fig.5).                96  .06143 × 0.946488  SG of Slurry = 0.962585    From Jones and Pujado (2006) Mass balances.9159).9431.20948   Since in the overall sulphur mass balance.2 and 12.55624  From Maple Fig.7/29099.193196 + 0.  This  value  is  quite  o significantly different from that provided by Maples (2000) in his correlation ( API = 55. API of various products are:    Gasoline = 55. it can be observed that Jones and Pujado (2006) Naphtha SG is higher than the  gasoline SG presented by Maples (2000).88/42 = 0. 12.    Next we proceed towards the sulphur mass balance.793518    In this regard.  From this  calculation. the sulphur content is  significantly high (Jones and Pujado (2006) value is about 2. SG data of gasoline is ignored in future  calculations to serve as an important parameter to check. 12.

7: Conduct the mass balances across the LGO hydrotreater assuming that it is fed with  the LGO streams generated from the CDU and TC units processing heavy Saudi crude oil.866 2.962585034 1  0.010551  Total LGO feed  4432.  where  applicable.   Diesel  hydrotreater  is  fed  with  LGO  generated  from  both  CDU  and  thermal  cracker.  diesel  hydrotreater calculations are similar to the LVGO and HVGO hydrotreater calculations.5 = 35.85  0.793518  0  0.8488 – 131.5/0.955961      Sulphur mass  flow  (mmlbs/day)  0.    Solution:    Firstly.57288 0.00478  3.   Therefore  these  two  streams  need  to  be  consolidated  first  to  get  the  overall  feed  stream  properties (density and sulphur content).61  0.842 1.  Therefore.632  0.134834  LC  Naphtha  39.632  0.    Regarding  diesel  hydrotreater  data  base.52  0.  In  summary.54  0.936771 0.330031  HC  Naphtha  19.653191  140.G.001131  0.943107451 0.  necessary  adjustments  in  %  sulphur  removed  are  carried  out.79  0. LGO streams are consolidated and evaluated for the feed stream specific gravity and  sulphur content.193196  LCO  21  632.00478  0.316292 0.    These  adjustments are carried out in order to obtain the diesel product flow rate lower than the  consolidated LGO feed stream to the hydrotreater.556239887 0  0.669788 1.20948  Slurry  6.062898  Total  products  113.  (wt %)  (mmlbs/day)  Des  HVGO    3012.71  0.166323 0.22 0.3  of  Maples  (2000).Refinery Mass Balances  The overall mass balance for the FCC unit is presented below    Sulphur  Flow  content  Mass flow  Stream  LV%  (bbl/day)  S.5  0.907051  0.025521  C3 to C5  23  692.10 Mass balances across the Diesel hydrotreater    The  LGO  hydrotreater  desulphurizes  both  diesel  and  kerosene  as  two  blocked  operations.17  0.437  585.2  186.5204  10.946488294 0.2  97  .002698  0  0  0.000321  0.379521 0.77  0.7532  3426.848782 1.011429  LGO from TC  1252.955961  Gas to C3  4.463  1188.41  0.000629  0.  during  calculations  it  was  observed  that  there  is  lack  of  consistency  in  the  data  base  presented  in  Table  15.    Q 2.    Sulf  Flow  content  Mass flow  Sulf mass  Stream  (bbl/day)  SG  (wt%)  (mmlbs/day) (mmlbs/day)  LGO from CDU  3180  0.021979  LGO consolidated feed oAPI = 141.     All  necessary  assumptions  are  illustrated  in  the  following  example.78 0.

632  0..8353 = 0.e.021979  H2 required  509752. naphtha flow rate = 212.669788 1.5 + 37.6 = 509752.88) × 1000000   42 × 8.9  Product %S  0. one can evaluate the naphtha flow rate expression as     1− FNLGO × 0.021979    From Maples (2000) hydrotreater data base    Diesel product SG = 141.8353  Diesel product sulphur content = 0.5/(131.7935    Assume sulphur content in naphtha product = 0.  SG  of  Naphtha = 0.3  of  Maples  (2000)  (Diesel  hydrotreater  data  base).7  bbl/day.21    Assume  %  sulphur  removed  by  weight  =  88%.08 wt %    Assume that 0.32  Product API  37.21  SCFB H2  115    Hydrogen feed flow rate = 115 x 4432.8487 = 4297.7 scf/day. the diesel product flow rate =  0.001   1.7935 + 4297 × 0.  assume  its  SG  is  equal  to  the  SG  of  FCC  Naphtha  product  i.331087 0.Refinery Mass Balances    From  Table  15.      With this assumption.316292 From this equation.316292 0.e.1 wt% of the total LGO feed enters the gaseous products i.    For  naphtha  product.33 × 0.    Total feed entering the hydrotreater is presented as follows:      Flow  (bbl/day  Sulf  or  SG or  content  Mass flow  Sulf mass  scf/day)  MW  (wt%)  (mmlbs/day) (mmlbs/day)  Stream  Total LGO feed  4432.7  11 0 0.9  %S  1.014795 0  Total  Feed to  hydrotreater  1.848782 1.    From this balance.9) = 0.  the  following  data  matches the closest with the feed oAPI and sulfur content    Feed API  35. Assume its molecular weight is  11. Gas to C5 and  Vent gas.  This  value  is  assumed  so  as  to  obtain  an  appropriate flow rate of the diesel product.021979 × (1 − 0.  98  .58 bbl/day.

5%.08 0.Refinery Mass Balances    Based  on  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)  mass  balance  calculations.021979  H2 required  509752.848782 1.013217 0. These  values are assumed from Jones and Pujado (2006) mass balances.7  11 0 0.316292 0.  no  lighter  streams  are  produced  from  the  hydrotreater.    Once again Maples (2000) data base is used for the kerosene hydrotreater mass balance to  obtain the product oAPI.  from  overall  sulphur  mass  balance.    Using these values.002638  Naphtha  product  212.    99  .5. kerosene hydrotreater produces highly  pure H2S as product along with desulphurized kerosene product.    Using  these  values.017268  Total        1.  one  can  determine  the  vent  gas  sulphur  content to be 76.    Further  assume  the  sulphur  content  of  Gas  to  C5  to  be  70%  (Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)).5 bbl/day.059016 4.21 1.  Also.721  0.  one  can  calculate  the  Vent  gas  flow rate as 135380.  Since kerosene itself is a lighter  stream.11 Mass balances across the kerosene hydrotreater    Kerosene hydrotreater operates to desulphurize kerosene.  sulphur  removal  is  considered to be about 99 wt % usually.021979  Diesel Product  4297.5  37 76.53657 0.835301 0.331087 0.255959 0.79 0.002895 0.7 = 19339.002026  Vent gas  135380.014795 0  Total  Feed to  hydrotreater  1.   Eventually.  it  is  assumed  that  Gas  to  C5  product  flow  rate  (scf/day)  to  the  consolidated  LGO  feed  stream  (bbl/day)  is  about  4.    The  illustrative  example  presents  the  mass  balance  across  the  kerosene  hydrotreater  in  a  lucid way.021979      3.  Losses are possible from  strippers within the unit in minute quantities which can be ignored.   Jones and Pujado (2006) value is about 4.72E‐05  Gas to C5  19946.  from  overall  mass  balance  expression.65 bbl/day.    Gas to C5 product flow rate = 4.  Therefore.9.    Further.669788 1.5 x 4297. the feed and product mass balance is summarized as follows      Flow  (bbl/day  Sulf  or  content  Mass flow  Sulf mass  SG or  scf/day)  MW  Stream  (wt%)  (mmlbs/day) (mmlbs/day)  Total LGO feed  4432. assume the molecular weights of Gas to C5 to be 55 and Vent gas to be 37.632  0.331087 0.5844  0.84  55 70 0.

8: Conduct mass balances for the kerosene hydrotreater assuming that the kerosene fed  to the hydrotreater is generated from the CDU fed with heavy Saudi crude oil.353  Kerosene mass flow rate = 0.9/32 = 80.248 0. This corresponds to SG of 0.    Product stream flow rate = 99.8  SCFB H2= 40    Actual Product API (by adjustment) = 44.803 0.736873 26.72 bbl/day    From  sulphur  balance.8/44 = 45.72) = 0.7994 0.00355%    H2 required = 40 x 2640 = 105600 scf/day (278.99 lbmol/day = 30695 scf/day    Unreacted H2 = 105600 – 30695 = 74905 scf/day.803 (oAPI = 44.  However.  data  base  is  not  conveying  the  same.772649 2618.  We  stick  to  the  data  base  in  this section). the closest data base is    Feed API = 44.    Mass balance table is presented as follows for the Kerosene hydrotreater    Flow  SG or  Sulf  Mass flow  Sulf mass  Stream  (bbl/d MW t t ( lb /d ) (lb /d ) Kerosene feed  2460  0.0  Feed %S = 0. total sulphur in product = 26.5.030649 0  0.1).353 0.00355 0.035776 2591.2  100  .72  0.7)  Kerosene sulfur content = 0.7*44.742 2618.18  x  100/(42  x  8.18  105600  128.    Solution:     Kerosene product flow rate (from CDU) = 2640 bbl/day  Kerosene SG = 0.7994  x  2634.18 lbs/day.6 lbmol/day)    H2S generated = 2591.  product  stream  flow  rate  is  =  26. (In Jones and Pujado (2006) book.11 lbs/day    From Maples (2000) data base (Table 15.4    Product API = 44. all H2 fed  is  consumed.7994     Assume 99 % sulphur removal.6 7.8 x 2640 = 2634.742 mmlbs/day  Kerosene sulfur mass flow rate = 2618.33  x  0.    Therefore.Refinery Mass Balances  Q 2.11  2634.11  H2 required  Total  Feed to  h d t t Kerosene        P d t Vent gas (+LE  l t) 105600  11 0 0.

 the consolidated naphtha stream (inclusive of Gas to C5.    Assume gas sulfur content to be zero.465 (same as Thermal cracker Gas to C5 of the Jones  and Pujado (2006) problem). TC.Refinery Mass Balances  3. Jones and  Pujado  (2006)  data  is  assumed  on  a  volumetric  basis  and  scaled  to  the  overall  volumetric flows of the chosen problem.1104  101  .  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)  volumetric  distribution is assumed.    The following illustrative example summarizes the procedure for naphtha consolidation case  of heavy Saudi crude oil refining problem. one needs to consolidate naphtha  stream as. one can identify that gas to C5 steams are  emanating  from  CDU  and  TC. Light naphtha and heavy  naphtha  gathered  from  various  units)  is  sent  to  naphtha  hydrotreater  first  whose  product  splitter feed is fed to naphtha splitter and eventually the heavy naphtha from the naphtha  splitter is sent to the catalytic reformer. evaluate the heavy naphtha properties of various streams.  TThese  are     a) Since component wise breakdown of lighter components is not available. HVGO.    Q 2.9: For the refinery block diagram.    Data  gathered  from  the  thermal  cracker  mass  balance  indicates  the  following  information  for Gas to C5 streams:    Flow rate = 474.  Naphtha  streams  are  emanating  from  CDU.    Since  mass  balances  now  onwards  require  component  wise  breakdown  of  lighter  products  emanating from various units. LVGO and LGO.6646  SU = 0.    On  the  other  hand.  Gas  to  C5  stream  flow  rate  for  the  heavy  Saudi  crude  oil  processing  case  =  855/50000*30000 = 513 BPCD    Assume Gas to C5 stream density = 0.  Eventually.  b) The specific gravity and sulfur content of light naphtha streams from various units is  assumed (as they are not known) and heavy naphtha streams from various units are  evaluated for their specific gravity and sulfur content.    A) Consolidated Gas to C5 streams    For  Gas  to  C5  streams  emanating  from  the  CDU.    Solution:     From an analysis of the refinery block diagram.97 BPCD  SG  = 0. gather results obtained from Q1‐Q7 to consolidate the  naphtha  and  light  gas  stream  data. it is essential that certain assumptions shall be made.12 Naphtha consolidation    In order to carry out mass balances across the reformer.    Thus.  with  certain  assumptions  for  the  light  naphtha SG and sulfur content.

08 LGO Naphtha  212.5 7100 0.5 940.5 577.6646 0.    Stream  Flow   SG SU (wt%) Gas +Naphtha  (From CDU MB)  6840  0.465 0 TC  475  0.4305 TC  Naphtha  436. it can be observed from the mass balance of the CDU that the LSR stream consists  of  both  gas  +  naphtha.3  0.5             102  . LVGO.  from  overall  LSR  stream.  fraction  Unit  LN  HN  LN  0.  the  following  information  is  used  to  evaluate the volume distributions between light and heavy naphtha.56092 0.2559 missing)  323.G.  corresponding  CDU  Naphtha  stream properties are evaluated using the above gas to C5 stream properties i.e.    Flow  SU (wt  Stream  (BPCD)  SG %) TC Naphtha  975.011 Gas  513  0.24 HVGO  Naphtha  420.92  0.736351 0.6  0.1104 Total  988  0. HVGO and LGO.Refinery Mass Balances    Therefore..7903 0.  (wt %)  CDU  513  0.011563   From the mass balance tables of TC.4237 CDU  Naphtha  5219.79 0.    Vol. consolidated Gas to C5 streams are summarized as follows:    Sulfur  Flow  content  Stream  (BPCD)  S. the following data is summarized  for the naphtha stream.08 LVGO  Naphtha  238  0.716 0.5 All Hydrotreaters (data  0.062833     Further.7753 0.7487 1.08   From  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)  mass  balance  tables.    Therefore.465 0 CDU Naphtha  stream  6327  0.

715 0.Refinery Mass Balances    From these values of volume fractions of LN.015968 TC  555.04 Total  3323.75789 0.764545 0.72755 0. it is essential to know  the product flow rates as well as compositions of the lighter stream from the reformer.76521 0.703923 0.04 LVGO  60.4192 0.7412 0.401 0.08385     From the values of the total naphtha (LN + HN) summarized previously.5421 0.802064 0.787029 0.08385 Consolidated  HN  4850. Subsequently.04 LGO  54.7561 0.411472 0.1925 0.401 0.0878 0.219015     In summary.39 0.703923 0.  These are summarized as follows    LN  LN   LN SUL  Source  LN  SG   (wt%)  CDU  2680.  103  .    Since  catalytic  reformer  produces  H2  along  with  lighter hydrocarbons along with the highly desired reformate product.09297 LVGO  177.698 0.093185 Total  4850.13 Mass balances across the reformer    The  catalytic  reformer  unit  is  fed  with  the  heavy  naphtha  generated  from  the  naphtha  splitter.769998 0.912184 0.56092  0. the LN yields are evaluated.6101 0.686617 HVGO  313. LN  SG and sulfur content are evaluated.1885 0. and known values of  the  LN  flows.062833 Consolidated  LN  3323.6 HVGO  107.      3.769998 0.  HN  streams  from  various  units  is  evaluated  and  is  presented as follows:    HN  HN SUL  Source  HN  HN SG  (wt%)  CDU  3646.219015     The  consolidated  data  is  very  essential  to  proceed  towards  the  mass  balances  associated  with the reformer and naphtha hydrotreater.4192 0.005 TC  419.798527 0.  SG  and  sulfur  content. consolidated naphtha + gas streams are summarized as follows:    Gas to C5  stream  988  0.  The  properties  of  the  reformer  feed  will  be  similar  to  the  heavy  naphtha  fraction  consolidated  from  various  source  units.092957 LGO  158.774163 1.

      Q 2.  Their  compositions will be different from the light end stream product compositions.769998374 0.306657 0.  Further.    Weight percent yield with respect to reformate product mass flow rate for hydrocarbons is    C1  1.26 = 39.9.    Always. the following data is obtained.002862    The feed SG corresponds to an API of 52.Refinery Mass Balances    Maples (2000) summarized catalytic reformer data base based on many pilot plant studies.  certain  assumptions  or  degree  of  freedom  shall  be  left  as  illustrated  in  the  following  illustrative example.    Solution:    Feed data is presented as follows:    Sulf  Flow  Sul (wt  Mass  mass  Description  (BPCD)  SG  %)  Mmlbs/d  Mmlbs/d  Ref feed  4850.1  nC4  3.    The calculation procedure for the reformer mass balance is simple provided a fairly accurate  data  base  is  provided.    From the reformer it is important to observe a few concepts:    a) It  is  important  to  know  upon  the  compositions  of  the  light  end  stream  from  the  reformer unit.401  0. it is important to observe that while reformate product rates are  provided in terms of LV%.  Therefore. the lighter hydrocarbons are provided in terms of the wt% of the  reformate product.5  H2 = 2.  b) Hydrogen (Reformer off gas) is also generated in which light ends are present.10: Conduct mass balances across the catalytic reformer assuming that it is fed with the  heavy naphtha with properties presented in the solution of Q 2.8982.32 which corresponds to reformate SG of 0. for it may not provide necessary balances.26. where applicable.2  C2  2.  Maples  (2000)  data  base  cannot  be  also  regarded  as  a  absolute data base.1  104  .   A  critical  observation  of  these  data  sets  indicates  that  only  few  data  sets  exists  where  iC4  yield is presented.219015 1.2  C3  3.3 wt %  Product API = 41    Adjusted API = 41/54.    Feed API = 54.2  iC4  2.    From Maples (2000) reforming data base.5 x 52.5  Product LV% = 80.

    Since mass can neither be created nor destroyed.2/100 x 1. 17.5 x 4850.013579 mmlbs/day  C2  =   2.1316 = 0.78% and not 80.4 bbl/day    iC4 = 132.3 bbl/day    C2 = 190.3 wt % of H2 corresponds to 1125  scf/barrel.1316 mmlbs/day    Off gas flow rate = 1125 x 3904/1e6 = 4.392715 mmscf/day.86 lbs/gal    With these flow rates. With MW of 12. the barrels/day (volumetric) flow rates of the lighter components and  light end product are    C1 = 129.23 lbs/gal  nC4 = 4.026027 mmlbs/day  Total LE =  0.024895 mmlbs/day  C3  =  0. LV% was found to  be 74.5 bbl/day    nC4 = 177/4 bbl/day    The total mass flow rate of the products = 1.5% as provided by Jones and Pujado (2006).  Total mass flow rate of the  feed = 1.    Assume H2 purity in reformer off gas = 70 %.4 bbl/day.1316 = 0. After trail and error.    From Maples (2000) correlation presented in Fig.    105  .11 lbs/gal  C3 = 4.5 lbs/gal  C2 = 3. 2.33 /106 = 1.Refinery Mass Balances    RON of the reformate product = 100.59 bbl/day    C3 = 197. the LV% of the reformate is adjusted so as  to equate the incoming and outgoing mass balances.     Reformate product flow rate = 80.4 = 3904.    Lighter product component and total mass flow rates are     C1   =   1.2/100 x 1.135792 mmlbs/day    The specific gravities of these lighter components are assumed as    C1 = 2.036211 mmlbs/day   iC4  =  0. This corresponds to 3904 x 42  x 8.67 lbs/gal  iC4 = 4. the H2 stream  mass flow rate = 0.30657 mmlbs/day.139083 mmlbs/day.03508 mmlbs/day  nC4  =  0.7.40675 mmlbs/day.

   However.14 Mass balances across the naphtha hydrotreater    The mass balance across the hydrotreater needs some assumptions.126155  1. We assume it to be 4 %  b) Reformer off gas purity is about 70%.053444  iC4  20.93  35.080963 120.129213  0. in mass balance calculations this is unlikely to happen.  This is because.8  1.  it  should  again lead to an appropriate balance of the H2 from back calculation.5845 4033.18  37. According to Jones  and Pujado (2006).02418  0. if  one  evaluates  the  amount  of  light  ends  lost  from  the  reformer  off  gas.74  1.    a) Certain amount of H2 is lost in the hydrodesulfurization process.3  22.8113 768.03259  0.204259  Total  100  100  ‐    106  .894  0.23 4.5 3.828 12 2.4402 123.769998374 1.401 0. mass balance table for the reformer is presented as follows      Flow  Mass  Description  (BPCD/mmscf/day) SG/MW  Mmlbs/d  Feed  4850.  the  exiting  hydrogen  stream  is  told  to  be  of  a  purity  of  92  %.012615  0.  H2  C1  C2  C3  iC4  nC4  Light ends  Total  products  3627.033641  0.52 4.05129  0.12303  nC4  31.  e) The mole % of the gas lost from the light ends and gained by the light end stream  product  is  evaluated  based  on  the  following  data  provided  by  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006).    c) The reformer off gas looses light ends present in it and these light ends are gained  by  the  debutanizer  overheads  stream  (light  end  product  stream  from  the  naphtha  hydrotreater).11 4.55  1.  d) After  hydrotreating.1474 177.90807475 1. it is about 6%.788 0.023128  0.Refinery Mass Balances    Subsequently.306657  Ref.1194 164.26717  C3  33.676 4.86 3.57  3.       LEs transferred from  LE product  the off gas to the LE  stream from  Reformer  product stream of  Multiplication  (vol%)  Component  hydrotreater (vol%)  factor  Gas to C3  14.0662 183.306657      3. prod.

703922592 0.11:    Conduct  the  mass  balances  across  the  naphtha  hydrotreater  with  the  following  assumptions for the Saudi heavy crude processing scheme:    a) H2 consumption = 4 % by volume  b) Reformer off gas purity = 70%  c) Reformer off gas MW = 12  d) H2 rich product stream  MW = 11    Solution:    Feed mass balance is presented as follows:    Flow  Mass  Stream  (BPCD/mmscf/day) SG  Mmlbs/day Gas to C5  988 0.    This  is  summarized as shown below            107  .7424/ 0.9129 mmscf/day    Volume of the gas (light ends) absorbed = 4.9129 = 0.7 – 0.080962985 12 0.1142 = 2.769998374 1.      Q  2. multiplication factors are  used to evaluate the normalized composition.818473 HN  4850.    H2 leaving the unit = 4.Refinery Mass Balances      The following illustrative example summarizes the modified procedure of that presented by  Jones and Pujado (2006) for the mass balance across the hydrotreater. it can be  understood  that  the  lack  of  appropriate  data  can  lead  to  difficult  to  accept  circumstances  such  as  the  inability  to  enhance  the  purity  of  H2  in  the  naphtha  hydrotreater  which  is  ofcourse a reality in the industrial processing schemes.    To evaluate the composition of the light ends in the H2 rich stream.419221 0.129213 Total  9161.  Eventually.193903 LN  3323.35 lbs/day.448246    H2 volume lost = 4 %.7424 mmscf/day    Assuming no change in product purity.08096 – 3.16803 / 379  x 1000000 = 443. This corresponds to 0.400779 0.82 2.08096 x 0.1142 mmscf/day (H2 component only). naphtha hydrotreater off gas flow rate = 2.7  = 3.16803 mmscf/day    Moles of gas (light ends) absorbed = 0.306657 H2  4.  evaluate  the  volume  %  composition  of  the  reformer  unit  light  end  products  and  segregate  the  C1  and  C2  products  as  one  component  in  the  mass  balance  table. The procedure is summarized as follows:    First.560961538 0.

946+788.505618    Average  molecular  weight  of  the  C1  &  C2  together  =  0.21500311 108  . average SG of the C 1& C2 together = 2.Refinery Mass Balances          Component C1 C2 C3 iC4 nC4 Total bpcd  lbs/gal  120.19390291 Abs Les  113.67025 0.28 58  126154.531542216 0.8113  4.86 768.12303 17.92135 1286.946 740.86728 1.38 30  32589.86 33641.676 24179.267174 10.1239987 22.48 16  23128.28 21.708494 0.5845  3.68923 nC4  164.9898  22.01898 1.56931   These volume % are used to evaluate the BPCD equivalent of the light end gases transferred  to the debutanizer overhead product.23 32589.56930837  0.8113  4.019  4.86341 10.505618  x  16  +  (1‐0.560961538 0.3317  13.03795 23.204259 25.575  4.053165657 140.8909 580.676394 28.  the  volumetric  multiplication  factors  are  applied  to  obtain  the  normalized  volume  %  factors for hydrotreater mass balance calculations.67 16.86728 16.861332 39.427747 113.4631   Eventually.86341    Now.201084 34.69685 C3  31.438  2.  the  light  end  stream  consolidated  from  the  feed  as  well  as  that  absorbed  is  presented as follows:    Stream  Flow (BPCD)  SG Mmlbs/day Gas to C5  988  0.1194  4.4402  4.99 44  24179.86 38.2136  2.908075 vol%  15.    Flow  Component  (BPCD)  Lbs/gal  Lbs  vol%  MF  Vol %  Norm.44348 1.85831 nC4  32.4630715  0.0221     Mole fraction amongst C1 & C2 = (788.8235  32.0211  4.23 123.14284  31.67 58  33641.0662  3.053444 25.7244573 58 5668.92 lb/lbmol    Similarly.05618)  x  30  =  22.278778 58 8136. The calculations are summarized as follows:    vol  vol %  (mmscf/d)  Mol/D  Mol wt  lbs/D  lbs/gal  BPCD  C1&C2  13.11 183.581261 44 6009.03062267  0.6323 23.68923381  0.557931018 0.1474  2.037037569 97.0211002 Total  1101.021270996 56.169  4.4675/(770.6816 416.86341 35743.4675) = 0.99 23. vol%  C1&C2  297.8 Moles  788.5 177.71084 iC4  123.01898 21.71083515  0.0591 iC4  22.463072  0.4675 770.84881 Total  100  430.051764298 136.676 164.44348 lbs  Mol wt  12615.03062 C3  183.4402  4.1194  4.

 the final  product flow rates are summed up.557931018 0.35 = 413.  the  debutanizer  product  flow  rate  is  about  1294.92 % say.    However. The  same when run as an optimization problem with necessary constraints yields the following  information:    vol %  C1&C2  30  C3  30  iC4  21  nC4  19  Total  100    Interestingly.44824577     It  can  be  observed  that  the  total  products  mass  is  matching  with  the  total  feed  mass  and  hence the assumption of no enhancement in purity is justified.15 Mass balances across the alkylator and isomerizer    The  mass  balance  across  the  alkylator  and  isomerizer  is  obtained  with  the  following  procedure:    a) Consolidate the propylene and butylenes streams from the FCCU  b) Use  multiplication  factors  provided  by  Maples  (2000)  in  Table  19. then the compositions of the C1‐C4 need to be adjusted to achieve this.11956453 Rich H2 gas  3. the final products mass balance is presented as follows:    Stream  Flow (BPCD)  SG/MW  Mmlbs/day  Deb overhe  1101.  the  ratios  are  provided  for  100%  consumption  of  the  individual  olefin streams.82 0.2149742 Splitter feed  8173.      3. Eventually.    Therefore.45  bpcd  is  not  matched  upon  optimization.741186126 2.314964 0. we conclude  that  the  mass balances across the naphtha hydrotreater are the  most  difficult  to  make. Therefore. Eventually.1  for  isobutene/olefin ratio and alkylate/olefin.  109  . it will be difficult to presume that  where did a flow of about 1707 (the revised total LE stream flow rate) – 1294. according to Jones and Pujado (2006) if the hydrogen purity needs to be enhanced  to 0.    In summary.Refinery Mass Balances      Eventually. after obtaining necessary volumetric flow rates.11370704 Total out  2. evaluate the RON as well using  the  same.35  barrels/day.  it  is  obvious  that  certain  that  a  gross  assumption  of  92  %  hydrogen  purity  for  all  circumstances  in  mass  balances  across  the  hydrotreater cannot be assumed.    Here.    Very  accurate  data  and  description  of  the  unit  are  required  to  evaluate the appropriate mass balances for an acceptable format.917724466 11 0.  which  is  significantly lower than what can be obtained.

    Next we present an illustrative example to evaluate the mass balances across the alkylator  and isomerizer.14892 4.22  0.    Eventually.33507 4.86  0.28419     Stream  Isobutane for C3  Isobutane for C4  110  Flow  bbl/day 274.34  0.6363   Total  755. Make  necessary  assumptions  based  on  volumetric  distributions  provided  by  Jones  and  Pujado (2006) in the saturated light ends summary table.74 for butylenes    RON  =  90.  f) For  isomerizer.5957 4.13 for butylenes    Volume ratio alkylate/olefin = 1.2376   Alkylate from C4‐  382.  carry  out  mass  balances  to  obtain the necessary feed flow rate to the isomerizer.  d) Evaluate the necessary additional iC4 required from the isomerizer  e) For isomerizer.       Product    Stream  Bbl/day  RON    Alkylate from C3‐  373.3 for propylene and 1.12:  Conduct the mass balances across the alkylator and isomerizer for the Saudi heavy  crude oil scheme.77 for propylene and 1.007379  C4‐  219.      Q 2.038437  iC4  144.    Solution:     The consolidated FCCU light end streams are as follows:    Mass  bpcd  lbs/gal  Mmlbs/day C3  81.9059 5  0.Refinery Mass Balances  c) Assume  the  alkylate  make  up  from  propylene  and  butylenes  feed  according  to  the  table provided by Jones and Pujado (2006).68  0.1 of Maples (2000).014416  C3‐  210.028422  nC4  36.134834      From Table 19.  assume  50  %  by  weight.1293 248.    Volume ratio Isobutane/olefin = 1.8543 0.04618  Total  692.   Therefore. first consolidate the saturated light ends from various streams.8739 93.5  for  propylene  feed  based  product  and  96  for  butylenes  based  product.4937 .8687 4.

859579 0.074305  mmlbs/day.  the  consolidated light end stream data is presented as follows:    111  .771573  17.81966 594.5424   Alkylate product flows are    Stream  BPCD  Lbs/gal  mmlbs/CD Total alkylate  755.6  –  144.49 = 522.3263 100  577.4669 C8  10 5.623 barrels/day    Isobutane in the feed stream = 144.  isobutene  make  up  (to  be  generated  from  the  isomerizer)  =  522.529847 23.764706 10.94415 Total  100 5.08629 C7  68 5.798935 57.    We  next  proceed  towards the isomerizer mass balance.73  11.323529 7.8  1.761905 4.945424  16.8739  5.714286 9.6339 C9+  12 6.894125 51.86736 68.34509 Total  100 5.71573 C9+  9 6.Refinery Mass Balances          The  composition  of  the  products  (along  with  the  assumed  distributions  provided  by  Jones  and Pujado (2006)) are as follows:    Propylene based alkylate product    Flow  Component  % wt lbs/gal  vol fac  vol %  (bbl/day)  C5  9 5.12 + 248.89  13.361664 2.89085 C8  80 5.53  0.25  0.638846 51.    The  feed  to  the  isomerizer  is  the  nC4  and  iC4  streams  together  obtained  from  the  consolidated  saturated  light  ends.75279 475.25  1.174736 23.1573     Butylene based alkylate product    Flow  Component  % wt lbs/gal  vol fac  vol %  (bbl/day)  C5  4 5.02  mmlbs/day.186022     Total isobutane required = 274.150244 11.075192 11.8  1.49336 392.723327 4.697793 9.    With  volume  distributions  of  various  components  assumed  as  per  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)  for  LE  streams  emanating  from  CDU  and  TC.34904 2.7817 C6  2 5.89  1.94415 C6  4 5.73  0.58234 80.89085 C7  2 5.  This  corresponds  to  about  0.5  =  378.53  0.49193 71.5957 barrels/day    Therefore.

9331 0. it is desired to obtain highest product flow rates from these pools.72446 450.67 0. 0. both premium and regular grade gasoline are produced whose octane no.64378 wt fraction iC4 and the  balance i..399 309.2788  735.4507 165. The average density of the stream is 4. feed should be 0.060631 mmlbs/day)  nC4 = 735.8222 136.124 615.02744     nC4  333.28757  wt  fraction  iC4.1181 110.  about  64.    In terms of mass fraction.877  x  4.56425 260.378  lbs  of  isomer  product  is  obtained.8977 4.13 C3  iC4  61.095419 mmlbs/day.0354 4.28757 iC4 + (1‐0.11  x  4.5864  93.877      Total butanes available are     iC4 = 309. the above stream has 0.115419 mmlbs/day     The  left  over  iC4  +  nC4  stream  flow  rate  =  (309.150207 mmlbs/day).16 Mass balances across the gasoline pool    The  gasoline  pool  is  byfar  the  most  important  pool  for  mass  balances  as  the  products  generated  from  the  pool  generate  far  more  revenue  than  any  other  pool  products.      Flow    Lbs/gal Mmlbs/day Stream  (barrels/day)   iC4  139.97183 33.095419      3.5277 56.074305 x 64.1215 86.Refinery Mass Balances          Source  CDU  TC  Reformer  Naphtha HDS  Total  Gas to  C3  30.803796.115419 =  0.12 nC4  353. In the gasoline  pool.877 barrels/day (0.1188 barrels/day (0.    For  a  requirement of 0.    112  .  for  100  lbs  feed.   Therefore.28757 wt fraction of iC4 and the balance  for nC4.9155 267. is desired to  be atleast 90 and 82 respectively.378/100 = 0.    In  other  words.3498  140.074305.86)  x  42  x  10‐6  ‐ 0.  the  product obtained will be 0.    Assuming  50  %  wt  conversion  of  nC4  for  the  feed  fed  with  0.67  +  735.28757)/2 iC4 = 0.7278 67.86 0.067979   Total  472.66197  148.    This  corresponds  to  the  following  left  over  stream  balance  (for  usage  towards  blending  pools).3562 wt fraction nC4.5813 97.e.

 LC naphtha. The reid vapor  pressure is evaluated using a bubble point calculation to evaluate the volume % butanes to  be added for the feed.5221 89 LC Nap  1188. we try to generate data based  on the information provided by Maples (2000) and adjusting it for our calculations.    113  .66661      For various streams such as alkylate.8 LSR Nap  556. for octane number calculations. we consolidate the streams entering the gasoline pool    Flow  (bbl/day)  RON  Alkylate  755.85041 70447.36102 107047.38 Total  3307. butanes (both nC4 and iC4)  are added to the streams to obtain the reid vapor pressure of about 7 psia.922881 299918.79  94 Reformate  3265.3626487 10.    Stream  Flow  Ron  RON  (bbl/day) Vol % factor product  Alkylate  755.2 HC Nap  585.13: Conduct mass balance calculations for the gasoline pool to evaluate the product flow  rates for the refinery processing scheme fed with heavy Saudi crude oil.Refinery Mass Balances  For the gasoline pool.    Solution:    Firstly.45 HC Nap  585. For this purpose therefore.47 LC Nap  339.    Q 2.  From  Blend  TBP  appropriate  vol  %  is  evaluated  for  various  pseudo components. we  assume  the  data  provided  by  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)  for  various  streams  is  applicable. HC naphtha.8739 93. bubble  point calculation is conducted to obtain the total product flow rate. it is also desired to obtain the reid vapor pressure of the product to be  atleast 7 psia for both the products.    We next present an illustrative example that elaborates upon the mass balance calculations  for the gasoline pool.7006 52111.8739172 22.419 69     For  premium  gasoline. after meeting the octant number constraint.1 90.203 100 LSR Nap  3323.  However.  since TBP data are not provided.    Since the TBPs of various streams that are mixed is not available for the RVP calculation.25909 31900. TBPs provided by Jones and Pujado (2006) are assumed to  evaluate  the  TBP  of  the  blend.  The pseudo‐component range is the same as  provided by Jones and  Pujado (2006). Therefore.09 Reformate  1070. Reformate and LSR naphtha. firstly.6866367 16. as far as possible.  the  following  blending  volumes  (bbl/day)  are  assumed  to  obtain  a  RON greater than or equal to 90.5221317 17.477546 32.82889 38411.

77  283.48  585.0169  0.2571  0.0959  0.0055  0.0979  0.0764  0.1270  0.64  128  1.03  73  11  0.48  2  15.50  7  74.0770  3.51  2  15.  Here.64  15  50.17  81  5  0.83  148  1.2571  0.  The obtained data is presented in the following table:    Comp  lbs/gal  lb/lbmol  VP  vol fr  wt fac  mol fac  mol fr  K=VP/7  mole liq  mol gas  1  75  5.0633  0.0048  0.01  8  85.0040  0.5881  0.0073  0.5862  0.39  100  1.14  514.0875  0. vapor pressure @ 100  oF is 22 psia.  7.2571  0.8  0.2  0.87  3307.01  8  300  12  128.0079  0.55  90.84  13  506.9182  0. the equilibrium constant (K) is  evaluated  as  vapor  pressure  divided  by  the  desired  RVP  i.97  5  29. its molecular weight  and  vapor  pressure  are  evaluated  from  Maxwell  (1950)  (Please  refer  to  refinery  property  estimation for the same).97  143.10  8  27.8  0.58  98.25  7  275  20  214.0343  8  285  6.0775  4  155  6.8  0.Refinery Mass Balances  Psuedo‐components.12  315.8  0..36  BPCD  %vol  BPCD  Total  45  340.90  8  60.98  19  64.48  222.76  468.0848  0.0252  7  260  6.23  5  16.0979  0.1334  0.0875  0.4104  0.64  14  47.46  5  16.0858  0.0061  0.0326  10  375  6.0572  0.46  10  33.93  19  64.2571  0.1531  1.52  100  755.0086  0.  For each pseudo‐component based on its mid boiling point.56  119  1.0303  6  225  6.8857  0.97  192.0210  0.0053  0.92  10  400  3  32.1334  0.27  5  200  10  55.  from  the  obtained  TBP  the  volume  %  of  various  pseudo‐components  are  evaluated. we assume the data provided by Jones and Pujado (2006) to  be appropriate to represent the case.0848  0.28  9  350  12  128.8  0.7143  0.29  3  150  15  83.67  100  1070.0036  0.11  10  58.3469  0.5  0. Then for butane whose  molecular weight is 58.1160  0.11  43  251.0674  0.53  2  125  15  83.0770  0.12  317.0353  9  315  6.92  4  175  30  167.1371  0.    This  is  carried  out  for  all  pseudo‐components  to  evaluate  the  mole  fraction  of  butane  that  will  agree  to  the  expression:    xi = yi   ∑ ∑ Where  yi = Ki xi.6128  0.09  75  6.96  72  22  0.2612  0.4774  0.26      Eventually.82  5  16.1415  0.1371  0.0633  0.49  110  1.68  6  250  10  55.0433  0.67  17  181.69  BPCD  Hy Cracked  Naphtha  1  45‐100  Total  BPCD  Light Cracked  Naphtha  100  339.0163  114  .25  90  2.47  252.2420  2  115  6.15  30  226.92  556.89  11  475  3  32.e.1429  0.0572  1.1556  1.1270  0. vol% distribution and pseudo‐component flow rates and total flow rate  in the premium gasoline stream are presented as follows:          LSR  Comp  o Temp  F  %vol  Reformate  %vol  %vol  Alkylate  %vol  BPCD  20  111. Then mole % data is evaluated.3571  0.0582  0.34  6  64.0953  0.2571  0.0899  3  135  6.50  4  42.67  8  85.5714  0.1160  0.94  42  245.0829  5  185  6.0083  0.

0048  8.82744    10  0.79457  1.8  0.19409    3  0.2612059  13.520223  0.063299  9.    Next.2208461  7.5 Total  5810.087455  6. total premium gasoline product = 3307.726 219472.9302415  5.0012  0.044527  0.137126  16.52326  9.    Therefore.4475584  14.42 bbl/day.    Stream  Flow  Ron  RON  (bbl/day) factor product  LC Nap  849.0274  0.116031  9.3724  1. butanes to be added to the premium gasoline product = 3.126967  16. Therefore.524708  4  0.0770304  6.Refinery Mass Balances  11  420  6.5245002  3.0435).17745) x  3307.506952  100              Total    From the above table.4380615  2.285763    7  0.25179  2.95  12  Butanes  162  1.097946  9. These are summarized as follows:    Mole liq  wt  vol  vol %      Butane  0.4247 79845.92 + 108.635453    2  0.69851    8  0.     All calculations are summarized as follows:    Firstly.395951    6  0.92 Reformate  2194. we proceed for similar calculations for regular gasoline.54424  0.55 bbl/day.55 = 3416.309396  11  0.883 490223.17745.0435.0188  60  0. the vapor and liquid sum of mole values were found to  be equal (about 1.6538  16.06945    9  0.174668  0.630288  1.36822  1.31805  2. the volumetric flows to produce the desired product and its RON is presented.1905  0.0435  1.2571  0.3716281  8.5714  0. IN due course of calculations it  was observed that the total vapor moles were higher than the total moles liquid.0188  0.084781  7.      Therefore.  no butane is added to the regular gasoline product.733 190904.6 LSR Nap  2766.559115  1.0435    For a butane mole liquid of 0.36          115  .018793  3.  Next. it can be observed that the vol% of butanes is 3.227991  5  0. the evaluated mole liquid is back calculated to evaluate the  vol% of the butanes to be added to the gasoline.6923164  4.17745/(100‐3.17745    1  0.67523  2.0435  0.5327965  9.057187  4.077003  5.92 = 108.133411  14.043452  2.1 84.4875074  15.398514  1.

5714  0.0348  6  225  6.84  65.1255  0.0872  0.0161    Therefore.4583  2  115  6.17  81  5  0.0724  0.0938  0.1458  0.3571  0.0526  0.2571  0.16    7  275  20  438.1396  0.8857  0.6235  0.1252  0.3980  0.1091  0.95    162    1.10  19  161.85 bbl/day.1091  1.73  100  849.1935  1.0019  11  Total  420    6.56  119  1.e.67  17  373.2571  0.8  0.2074  0.2571  0.8  0.1714  3  135  6.2571  0.39  100  1.34  6  131.7651  0.0074  0.85      Finally.03  73  11  0.94  348.1255  0.8  0.1429  0.0599  0.84    9  350  12  263.7462  0.49  110  1.1435  0.92  1124.0323  7  260  6.2571  0.  the  volumetric  flow  rate  of  the  pseudo‐components  and  total  flow  are  summarized:      Light Cracked    LSR  Reformate  Naphtha    o Comp  Temp  F  %vol  BPCD  %vol  BPCD  %vol  BPCD  Total    1  45‐100  20  553.58  14  118.0724  0.84  65.0998  0.01  4  87.1940  0.90    8  300  12  263.37  10  84.27      3  150  15  415.42  5810.51    5  200  10  276.5658  0.1435  0.47  727.01  7  153.8    0.0078  0.0113  0.7  100  2194.0186  8  285  6.8920  0.0975  0.84    11  475  3  65.39  811.79  5  42.8  0.5  0.31      10  400  3  65.09  75  6.63  19  161.47  545.95  506.2  0.0005  0.0089  0.0068    0.2074  0.        Comp    lbs/gal  lb/lbmol  VP  vol fr  wt fac  mol fac  mol fr  K=VP/7  mole liq  mol gas  1  75  5.1458  3.0102  0.66    6  250  10  276.1271  4  155  6.47  305.25  90  2.67  8  175. the total mole % liquid and gas are summarized for all components to observe that  the mole percent total gas is higher than the mole % total liquid i.0069  0.96  72  22  0.64  128  1.0774  0.0408  0.5661  0.01  8  175.83  148  1.0438  0. no extra butanes are added to this product.0787    0.0105  9  315  6.0029  0.0113  10  375  6.7143  0.0005    0.49    2  125  15  415.            116  .84    Total  2766.37  5  42.95  8  67.0031  0.0068  1  0.58  15  127.0018  1.03    4  175  30  830.0113    0..0051  0.0975  0.1256  0.41  579.0408  0.0438  0.     Regular grade gasoline product flow rate = 5810.1482  5  185  6.Refinery Mass Balances  Secondly.8  0.0147  0.68  5  42.39  730.3453  0.2571    0.0074  0.0104  0.

 TC.8236 C4 from depropanizer  Total Butanes  Butanes to Alkylation  Balance Butanes  Butanes to Gasoline Pool  Total C4 LPG  1044.962585 1         117  . 80% of  thermal  cracker  residue  will  enter  heavy  fuel  oil  product. firstly. the available intermediate streams i. assume 50% vol of LVGO enters Marine diesel product..Refinery Mass Balances  3.7694 0.  Regard all relevant  data from Jones and Pujado (2006) book to be appropriate.43 TC Res  7576.0057 2. Gasoil and fuel oil pools is now a relatively easy exercise  with  all  the  flow  rates.      Q 2.5569 463.    Other  data  such  as  pour  point  are  optionally checked to meet the product requirements.5058 Bbl/day  Bbl/day  Bbl/day  Bbl/day  Bbl/day      Fuel oil pool    For this pool.996 472.    Solution:     LPG pool  C3 from debutanizer   382.      SUL  Stream  Bbl/day SG (wt%) LVGO  2223. Gasoil and fuel oil pools    The mass balances across the LPG.  Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)  data  is  assumed.4885 Bbl/day  C3 from alkylator   81. LVGO.  SG  and  sulfur  content  of  various  streams  available.9331 572.17 Mass balances across the LPG.888819 0.  Where  data  is  missing.e.  All product specifications are chosen  to be the same as presented by Jones and Pujado (2006).053 0. assume.  The  balance  thermal  cracker  residue will mix with FCC slurry to produce the high sulfur bunker fuel. Gasoil and fuel oil pools to evaluate the final product flow rates.666 Slurry  186.0628 108. conduct the mass balances across  the LPG.  Also.  Slurry are summarized.33507 Bbl/day  Total C3 LPG  463.14: For the Saudi heavy crude oil processing scheme.406 1.        To proceed further for calculations.

 Therefore.526  0. Check that  both are satisfied and adjust the TC Residue flow rate accordingly. the following is the jist of the calculations    Marine diesel:     Product  SUL (wt  Product  SUL  %)  SG  Stream  Flow  SG  (wt%)  LVGO  1111.5  oF which is lower than  45 oF.839656  TC Res  335.    For the chosen example.    Heavy fuel oil: Adjust the LVGO flow rate such that all constraints are satisfied.  All  other  data  are  assumed from Jones and Pujado (2006).    50 %  vol fr  ASTM  A x B  PP oF  Index  Blend  LVGO  1111.105514  Total  1  751.888819  0.666   All conditions are satisfied.9033  0.915944 TC Res  335.      Bunker  fuel  oil:  Check  whether  balance  flow  rates  are  such  that  all  product  specification  constraints are satisfied. LVGO flow rate to this blend will be 335.94 (assumed as 9).999755 0.526  0.    118  .94517    For the blend with a ASTM 50 % of 751  oF and pour point index of 8.0551 8.Refinery Mass Balances      The specifications of various products is summarized as follows    Product  Pour  Stream  SG  Sul  point  Marine  Diesel  >0. the following procedure is adopted:    Marine Diesel: First ensure the SG is satisified and then look for Sulfur content.5033 65 22  5. the desired specification.9033  1.0057  2.9 bbl/day    Next  we  check  the  pour  point  using  pour  point  blending  index  data.767931  700 537.22  ‐    To meet these requirements. the  pour  point  from  pour  point  index  graph  presented  by  Maxwell  (1950)  (please  refer  to  Refinery Property Estimation section for detailed information) is 28.05  <6.83  <1%  < 45 oF  Heavy  fuel oil  <1  <5  <65  Bunker  fuel  <1.43 0.232069  920 213.5518 15 5  3.

378  1.835301 0.446716 0.888819 0.  all  product  flow  rates  are  confirmed to be acceptable. These are summarized  as follows:    Product  Product  SG (wt  SUL  SUL  %)  (wt%)  Stream  Bbl/day  SG  (wt%)  TC Res  1179.83 –  Diesel  0.    Next the bunker fuel stream is checked for its product specifications.5   IT can be observed that the product SG and sulfur content are satisfied.5264  0.7694  0.843402    Des    LGO  4297.84 –  Gas oil  0.35  0.    The product flow rates for these streams are presented as follows for Autodiesel and gas oil.  It can be observed that all product specifications are satisfied.0057 2.    Product  Product  SUL  SUL  SG (wt  Flow  Bbl/day  SG  (wt%)  (wt%)  %)  TC Res  6061.245092 0.86  < 0.    Product  Product    SUL  SUL  SG (wt    Stream  Bbl/day  SG  (wt%)  (wt%)  %)    LVGO    lef  766.    Gas oil Pool    The following constraints are required to be satisfied for the product:    SUL  Stream  SG  (wt%)  Auto  0.999806 FCC  Slurry  186.999405  LVGO  345  0.0057  2.125  1.21     119  .888819 0.    Therefore.666 2.86  <0. assume that  a) All left over LVGO will mix with cycle oil to produce Auto diesel  b) Mix appropriate amount of kerosene with Light Cycle oil (FCC product) to produce  gas oil.666 2.562258 0.962585  1   Here  as  well  as  product  specifications  are  satisfied.Refinery Mass Balances  Fuel  oil:  We  only  check  sulfur  wt  %  and  SG  of  the  product  as  pour  point  will  be  satisfied  (according to Jones and Pujado (2006)).43 0.721  0.3    For these specifications.

  Therefore.    All  in  all  refinery  mass  balances  is  a  fruitful  exercise  on  which  a  refinery  process  engineer  shall have expertise.6722  0.  b) At times. other specifications such as ASTM 50 %.    These  calculations enable him to understand the complexities involved in the distribution  as well as processing of mass across the refinery.946488 0. first  hand information shall be obtained from the refinery to correct the mass balances.299936 Kerosene 606. SG and sulfur content)  in these calculations is assumed.54 0. This shall not be the case for an operating refinery.8236 BPCD  Total C4 LPG  463.00355 Product  SG (wt  %)  0.48 BPCD  Regular Gasoline product  5810.5058 BPCD  Kerosene product  1748. mass balances when conducted for an operating refinery will significantly  enhance the confidence levels of the refinery engineer in operation.  viscosity needs to be also checked.43 BPCD  Heavy fuel oil  6406.      3.7994 0.Refinery Mass Balances    Product  SUL  SUL  Stream  Bbl/day  SG  (wt%)  (wt%)  LCO  632. We assume that they are satisfied.305 BPCD  Marine Diesel  1447. Since we don’t have all these data at hand.125 BPCD  Bunker Fuel  1366.021 BPCD  Premium Gasoline product  3416. we did not  check them.247 BPCD  Gas oil  1519. For those circumstances.18 Summary      The following conclusions are applicable for the refinery mass balances:    a) Refinery  mass  balances  are  very  important  for  a  refinery  engineer.883 BPCD  Auto Diesel  5064.    Eventually.874483      Other than the above product specifications.147 BPCD      With this the mass balance calculation for the refinery block diagram is completed.      120  . it is possible that we violate from the conventional processing schemes and  purities (As observed in the case of the hydrotreater).61  0. all products produced are summarized in the following table:    Total C3 LPG  463.  c) Significant amount of data (such as intermediate stream TBP.

4. Design of Crude Distillation Column 
 

4.1  Introduction 
A crude distillation unit (CDU) is very common in petroleum refineries.  Crude distillation unit involves 
complex  stream  interactions  with  various  sections  of  the  main  column  that  is  supplemented  with 
secondary columns.  Of late, the utilization of live steam is prominent in petroleum refineries.  Before 
we  attempt  to  deliberate  upon  various  design  aspects  of  crude  distillation  column,  we  first  orient 
towards the technological knowhow of the CDU.  The following itemized descriptions suits the operation 
of most modern CDUs. 




Crude oil is pumped from storage and is heated using hot overhead and product side streams 
using a heat exchanger network (HEN). The HEN enables the crude to achieve a temperature of 
about 200 ‐ 250 oF 
Eventually, the pre‐heated crude oil is injected to remove salt in a desalter drum which does not 
remove any organic chlorides and removes dissolved salt. 
Dissolved  salt  in  the  crude  is  removed  using  electrostatic  precipitation  as  salt  water.    The  salt 
water is sent to sour water stripper, cleaned and sent to oily waste sewage disposal. 
Eventually crude enters a surge drum and some light ends entrained with water are flashed off 
the drum. The removed light ends are directly fed to the flash zone of the main column of the 
CDU. 
A  second  HEN  would  energize  the  crude  oil  to  higher  temperatures  after  which  the  crude  oil 
enters  a  furnace  and  is  heated  to  a  temperature  that  will  vaporize  distillate  products  in  the 
crude tower. 
Crude  oil is often  heated  to vaporize about  5  % more  than  required for  the distillate streams.  
This is called overflash and this ensures good reflux streams in the tower. 
The heated crude then enters the fractionation tower in a lower section called flash zone. The 
unvaporized  portion  of  the  crude  oil  leaves  the  bottom  of  the  tower  via  a  stream  stripper 
section. The distillate vapors move up.  
Distillate  products  from  the  main  column  are  removed  from  selected  trays.  These  are  called 
Draw off trays. The streams are called draw off streams.  These streams are steam stripped and 
sent to storage. 
From the tower top of the main column, full range naphtha (both light and heavy) will leave as a 
vapor.    Eventually,  the  vapor  will  be  condensed  and  separated  in  a  phase  separator.    The 
separated naphtha product will be partially sent for reflux and the balance sent as reflux stream 
from the overhead drum. 
In addition, pump around units are included at the  LGO draw off and HGO draw off.  A pump 
around involves removing a hot side stream cool it and return it back to the column at a section 
above the draw off tray.  The pump around is an internal condenser that takes out heat of that 
section and ensures reflux below that section. 
121 

 

 
 

Separator 

 

Condenser 

 

Naphtha 
Water 

Reflux 

Water 
 
 
Crude oil 

HEN 1 

Desalter 

HEN 2 

Furnace 

Steam 

 
Main Column 

Kerosene 

 
Sour water 
 
 

Steam 
LGO 

 
 

Steam 

 
HGO 

 
Steam 
 
 

Residue 

 
 
Figure 4.1: A Conceptual diagram of the crude distillation unit (CDU) along with heat exchanger networks (HEN).

122 
 

Design of Crude Distillation Column 

 
 
 

Naphtha + Steam 
Naphtha product

 
 
 

Condensed water 

 
Cold Naphtha Reflux 

 
 
45 

 
43 

 
 

41 

 

39 
37 

 

 Steam + Light ends 

35 

 

Kerosene Draw off tray
33 

 

31 

 

29 

 

27 

 

Steam 
Kerosene product 

25 

 

Top pump around (TPA) 

23 

 

LGO Draw off tray 
21 

 

19 

 
 

17 

 

15 

Steam 
LGO product 

 
13 

 

Bottom pump around (BPA) 

11 

 

HGO Draw off tray 

 

 

 

Steam 

 

HGO product 

 
 

Crude oil 

 

(Liquid + Vapor) 

 

 
 

 

Steam 

 
 

Atmospheric  residue 
product 

Figure 4.2: Design architecture of main and secondary columns of the CDU. 
123 
 

   The typical design architecture The following features summarize the design architecture of the complex  distillation arrangement:  a) The  main  column  consists  of  45  trays  and  the  secondary  columns  (side  strippers)  consist  of  4  trays each.    The  purpose  of  secondary columns is to strip the side stream distillate products from entrained light ends.  These  are  stripped  free  of  entrained  light  ends  in  separate  stripping  towers  (called  secondary  columns).   124    .  Therefore.  A conceptual diagram of the CDU is presented in Figure 4.    The  stripped  steam  (with  light  ends) is allowed to enter the main column just above the side stream draw off tray.    Finer  trade  offs  are associated  with  the  design  of  main and secondary columns involving effective heat integration and reduction of the total annualized  cost.  further  changes  in  the  design architecture is carried out using either trial and error approach or an algorithmic approach to  yield  the  best  design  architecture.  a  typical  design  architecture of the main and secondary columns along with their interaction is presented in Figure 4. In  these columns.  it  enables  the  flashing  of  the  streams  at  a  reduced  partial  pressure  and  therefore  contributes  significantly  for  the  removal  of  light  ends  throughout the main and secondary column.Design of Crude Distillation Column    ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ Side  stream  distillate  products  are  kerosene  (Jet  fuel).2 Architecture of Main and Secondary Columns  Main and secondary column interaction for the processing of crude oil to produce products is a trivial  task.  The residue product leaves the flash zone at the bottom of the main column.    From  literature  (Jones  and  Pujado  (2006)). steam is injected below the bottom tray which moves up the tower and leaves at  the  secondary  column  top  along  with  light  ends  stripped  out.  4.    Subsequently.  In certain circumstances such as kerosene stream sent to jet fuel blending.  The flash  zone  is  where  the  crude  oil  partially  vaporized  is  fed  to  the  main  column. stripping is effected  using a re‐boiler.  Live steam is pretty useful in the CDU operation.    There  are  about  4  trays below the flash zone and 41 trays above the flash zone of the main column.  It is stripped free  of light ends using steam injected at the bottom of the main column. it can be easily observed that the optimal design of the main and secondary columns is  based  on  a  trial  and  error  approach  in  which  the  design  architecture  is  fixed  first  and  eventually  simulation  is  carried  out  for  the  chosen  design  calculations.  b) The main column has two sections that are distinguished with respect to a flash zone.  The bottom  most tray (residue stripping tray) is numbered as 1 and the top tower tray is numbered as 45.  light  gas  oil  (diesel)  and  heavy  gas  oil. LGO and HGO  products. side  stream  stripper  units  (secondary  columns)  are  stacked  above  one  another  in  a  single  column  (with distributed liquid and vapor traffic) so as to ensure free flow of side stream product from  the draw off tray to the secondary column.  While steam enabled the reduction of installed  costs  of  reboiler  from  cost  perspective.    About  4  –  6  trays  are  required  in  these  secondary  columns.  Three side strippers are used to strip the light ends from kerosene.1. the design architecture  of  the  CDU  along  with  secondary  columns  evolves.2.  After significant amount of simulation as well as pilot plant based studies.  Often.

  Therefore. LGO draw off product is taken (as liquid) and sent to the LGO side stripper  unit.  The cold naphtha stream obtained from the phase separator is sent back to the main column as  reflux stream. From tray 22. another liquid stream is taken out and sent to tray 24 via a top pump  around  unit  (TPA)  that  enables  cooling  of  the  liquid  stream. that tray is often ignored in counting.  Trays  34  to  45  (12  trays  above  the  Kerosene  processing  zone)  process  the  naphtha  product  portion of the crude.  11. It is interesting to note that tray 34 is regarded as a tray processing both  LGO as well as naphtha processing zone.  This is because there is no pump around associated  to the tray 34. from tray 22.  1  10  11  12  22  23  24  34  35  45  Description Atmospheric Residue draw off  HGO Draw off.  Trays 13 to 22 (10 trays above the HGO processing zone) process the LGO product portion of the  crude. BPA draw off   Vapor from HGO SS enters the tray  BPA return stream  LGO drawoff. the liquid stream is drawn and sent to tray 12 via a bottom pump around  unit  that  enables  cooling  of  the  liquid  stream.  It  is  interesting  to  note  that  steam  enters  main  column  at  trays  1.  the  kero  draw  off  stream  is  taken  and  sent  to  the  kerosene  side  stripper unit.    From  tray  34.  From  tray  10. steam balances  throughout the column are very important.  35  and  therefore  is  present along with the vapor stream along with the hydrocarbons.  Trays 5 to 10 (6 trays above the flash zone) process the HGO product portion of the crude.   From tray 10 as well.  Trays 24 to 34 (10 trays above the LGO processing zone) process the kerosene product portion  of  the  crude.  HGO  draw  off  product  is  taken  out  (as  liquid)  and  enters  the  HGO  side  stripper  unit.  23.Design of Crude Distillation Column    c) d) e) f) g) h) Trays 1 to 4 process the atmospheric residue portion of the crude in the section below the flash  zone.  The steam + light ends of the kerosene side stripper enter tray 35.  Where pump around is associated.  Also. TPA drawoff  Vapor from LGO SS enters the tray  TPA return stream  Kerosene draw off  Vapours from Kerosene SS enters the tray  Vapours with Naphtha + Gas + stream leave to enter the condenser      125    .    The  steam  +  light  ends  from  the  HGO  side  stripper enter tray 11 of the main column.    The  steam  +  light  ends  from  the  LGO side stripper enter tray 23 of the main column.  In summary we have the following important trays that contribute towards the main column hydraulics:  Tray No. as it  affects to a large extent the tray hydraulics and contributes less towards the separation of the  components.

   Typically.      Therefore. condenser and trays. main column pressures are taken as follows:   Condenser reflux drum = 5 psig  Pressure drop across the condensers = 7 psi  Pressure drop over all trays = 10 psi (@ 0. Typically. Typically. It is defined as  the difference in the 5 % ASTM temperature of a heavier product and 95 % ASTM temperature  of a lighter product.3  Design aspects of the CDU  In the due course of the design process of the CDU.    The  rule  of  thumb  for  these  calculations  is  to  define  the  product  specifications using cut range and the concept of ASTM gap. The  mass balances are desired for the overall CDU as well as the flash zone.  For  fractionation  efficiency. Eventually. molecular weight of various streams  is carried out using first principles of refinery property estimation (as presented previously).    Eventually.25 psi per each tray for 40 trays)  Pressure at flash zone = 22 psig  b) Conduct  mass  balances  across  the  CDU  as  well  as  flash  zone:  The  mass  balance  along  with  relevant properties such as API. the following issues need to be taken care (in  similarity to a conventional distillation column):  a) Fix pressures across the column: Typically the pressures across the column are assumed with  approximate assumptions of pressure drops across the reflux drum.  further  product  specifications  are  provided  in  the  form  of  ASTM  gaps.Design of Crude Distillation Column    4.  The ASTM gap refers to the separation efficiency of two adjacent products. the following ASTM gaps are achievable:  Naphtha – Kerosene: 25 oF  Kerosene – LGO: ‐10 oF  LGO – HGO: ‐35 oF  It is further interesting to note that ASTM gaps could be +ve or –ve.  126    . both overall mass balance and flash zone mass balance are  carried out. This is due to the fact  that  flash  zone  mass  balance  eventually  leads  to  energy  balance  across  the  flash  zone  and  determination  of  residue  product  temperature. A +ve gap indicates 100 %  separation of fractions where as a negative gap indicates difficulty to completely separate the  fractions.  it  can  be  seen  that  naphtha  can  be  fully  separated  from  the  kerosene  fraction but not for kerosene to get separated from LGO and LGO from HGO fractions. the following cut range is  assumed  Upto 375 oF: Gas + Naphtha product  375 – 480 oF: Kerosene product  480 – 610 oF: LGO product  610 – 690 oF: HGO product  690+ oF: Atmospheric residue.  These  data  are  used  to  estimate  the  TBPs  of  the  products  using  which  the  average  product  properties are estimated.  all  other  sections  of  the  main  column  are  solvable. K (characterization factor).

  LGO  and  HGO  temperatures are estimated from the energy balances for these products in respective sections  of the CDU. estimate the residue temperature.Design of Crude Distillation Column    c) Estimate  steam  requirements  in  various  sections:  From  pilot  plant  data  or  correlations.  127    .  h) Estimate tower top temperature: The tower top temperature is estimated using a bubble point  calculation across the condenser.  estimate  total  liquid  and  vapor  flow  rates  (including  steam).   These data will be useful for diameter calculations.  the  steam required to produce a required product mass flow rate is available.   The partial pressure concept is extremely important in mass and energy balances carried out in  various sections of the CDU as steam enthalpy is a function of the partial pressure of steam that  exists in the chosen zone of calculation.  k) Estimate BPA duty: Using energy balance across the chosen section of the CDU and the concept  of fractionation efficiency. side stream strippers) are estimated.  g) Estimate  side  stream  stripper  product  temperatures:  The  products  kerosene. therefore.  Eventually.  condenser  duties. We do about six energy balances across  the  CDU  to  estimate  the  tower  temperatures.   i) Conduct  overall  tower  energy  balance  and  estimate  condenser  +  BPA  +  TPA  duties:  From  overall tower energy balance. determine the column diameter using flooding correlations.  Eventually estimate the TPA duty.  m) Determine column diameter at various sections: Using estimated vapor and liquid flow rates at  various trays. estimate the condenser duty.  These  correlations are used along with relevant assumptions to estimate the draw off temperatures.    e) Estimate residue temperature: Using flash zone temperature and heat balance across the flash  zone.  f) Estimate  draw  off  temperatures:  Typically  correlations  exist  (such  as  Packie’s  correlation)  between  side  stream  draw  off  temperatures  and  amount  of  light  ends  stripped. characterization factor estimation requires API value. Also.  j) Estimate  condenser  duties:  From  the  top  section  energy  balance  (with  known  top  section  temperature).  d) Determine  flash  zone  temperature:  The  flash  zone  temperature  is  estimated  using  the  EFV  curve of the crude for assumed overflash conditions and partial pressure of the hydrocarbons.  careful selection of envelope to carry out energy balances is very important.  Therefore. Using this steam flow  rates in various sections of the CDU (main tower bottom. estimate the BPA duty. API of each intermediate stream is not known.    Since  K  value  is  an  estimate  of  MEABP. for  each  stream  for  which  enthalpy  data  is  required.  hydrocarbon  enthalpy  requires  characterization  factor  and  temperature. the following issues are very relevant to observe:  a) The energy balance across the CDU is very important.  b) Energy  balance  requires  the  estimation  of  hydrocarbon  enthalpy  at  various  instances. From this estimate the total BPA + TPA heat duty.  prior  knowledge  of  the  API  and  K  values  is  mandatory.  BPA  duties  etc.  l) Establish  column  hydraulics:  At  various  important  trays  that  were  outlined  previously  where  tray  hydraulics  are  prominent. total energy loss requirements across the CDU can be estimated. IN summary. average properties need  to be assumed for calculations.  In the above procedure.    From  Maxwell  (1950)  correlations.  some  assumptions  are  required  for  the  same.

  Cumulative  volume %  TBP oF  0  1  1.  4. the average API of the products  (other than  the residue) is estimated. we use end point correlation and demister correlation and TBP cut range in the crude TBP assay  to evaluate the TBP and ASTM of naphtha.5  2  3  4  6.   While previously we evaluated average product properties in refinery property estimation chapter using  end point correlations.  a  modified  procedure  for  refinery  property  estimation  is  adopted.04  0. sulfur and API assay are presented below.  Eventually using crude API data.  In  other  words. the  ASTM  data  of  LGO  and  HGO  are  determined.1: For the Ecudaor crude stream whose TBP.5  9  11. Approaches similar  to those presented in the refinery property estimation chapter are adopted to estimate other properties  such  as  molecular  weight. the same cannot be used here. determine  the TBP of the products emanating from the CDU unit using the concept of ASTM gaps. Eventually.035  0.  For residue. product properties need to be estimated first.  Below.  In  this  procedure.    Q 4.07  0.  In similarity using ASTM gap data.045  0.  This is because the products are more stringently  defined  using  ASTM  gaps  and  the  products  need  to  meet  these  specifications.035  0.08 .  characterization  factor  (K).  MEABP  etc.4 Mass balances across the CDU and flash zone  To conduct mass balances across the CDU and flash zone.055  0.5  ‐30  30  60  90  120  150 180  210  240  270  310  330  350  370 o API        100  85  80 72  64  60  55  50  48  46  45 128    Sulfur  content  (wt %)        0.045  0.Design of Crude Distillation Column    In  the  following  sections.06  0.  Eventually.5  14  17.05  0.04 0. using ASTM gap data of naphtha – kerosene.  first  the  TBP  (and  ASTM)  of  naphtha  is  determined  using  first  principles  associated  to  the  TBP  of  the  naphtha  product.  these  ASTM  data  are  converted  to  TBP  data  using Edmister correlation.5  19  21  22.  we  present  two  illustrative  examples in sequence to elaborate upon a) the determination of product TBP and ASTM data and b) the  average API data. API is determined from a volumetric balance.  we  deliberate  upon  each  relevant  design  issue  of  the  CDU  to  hierarchically  estimate  required  design  variables  associated  to  the  design  and  operation  of  the  main  and  secondary  columns of the CDU. the  ASTM data of kerosene is determined using the probability chart.  Therefore.

    129    .48  0.5  44.91  0.5  25  24.71  0.10  0. Once again using Edmister correlation we  obtain  the  ASTM  of  the  naphtha  product.12  0.14    Assume the following cut range of the products on the crude TBP  Naphtha: ‐30 to 310 oF  Kerosene: 310 to 475 oF  LGO: 475 to 585 oF  HGO: 585 to 680 oF  Solution:   I) Naphtha product ASTM & TBP Data  Firstly.5  63.   For this we use end point correlation and TBP 50 % of  the Naphtha cut to obtain ASTM 50 % and ASTM 100 % data.25  0. we evaluate the TBP data of Naphtha cut.5  26  25.96  0.5  42.85  0.57  0.19  0.43  0.89  0.5  66  68  70  390  410  430  450  470  490  520  540  560  580  600  620  640  660  680  700  720  740  760  780          43  42  41  40  38  37  36  34  33  32  31  30  29.63  0.5  47  49  52  55  57  59  61  62.93  0.5  23  0.8  64.36  0.5  29  28  27  26.87  0.5  26  28  30  32  34  36  38.5  39.    The  hierarchy  of  these  steps  along  with  obtained  data  are  presented as follows.77  0.80  0.Design of Crude Distillation Column    24.16  0.02  1.98  1.3  0.06  1. Using these two data points and using end  point correlation. the ASTM data of naphtha cut is obtained.5  24  23.

714  1. ASTM 50 % = 215  o F  Naphtha cut end point = 310 oF.  From end point correlation.  From Edmister correlation.5  8.142  9  51.571  2  11.714  14  80  17.Design of Crude Distillation Column    TBP data of naphtha cut  Cumulative  Differential  volume %  volume %  0  0  1  5.5  37.5  100  TBP oF  ‐30  30  60  90 120  150  180  210  240  270  310    TBP 50 % of the Naphtha cut on the crude assay = 208 oF.5  65.428  11.857  6.143  4  22.428 3  17. ASTM end point = 310 – 1 = 309 oF  From  Probability  chart  and  Edmister  correlation.  the  naphtha  product  ASTM  and  TBP  are  obtained  as  follows:  ASTM data of Naphtha  Cumulative  volume %  0  10  30  50  70  90  100  TBP oF  152  178  198  215  230  255  309    Product TBP (from Edmister correlation)  Vol %  0  10  30  50  ∆TASTM  (0F)  26  20  17  NR  0 ∆TTBP     TTBP ( F) 0 ( F) 49  37  30  NR  92  141  178  208  130    .

 ASTM 95 % of naphtha = 295 oF  Therefore. ASTM end  point of kerosene cut = 456 oF  From Probability chart and Edmister correlation.5 48 38 30 NR 22 34 57 249 297 335 365 387 421 478   131    .  For this value from end point correlation. ASTM 5 % of kerosene = 295 + 25 = 320 oF  Kerosene product end point on the crude = 385 oF. the kerosene product ASTM and TBP are obtained as  follows:  ASTM data of kerosene product  Vol %  TASTM  (0F)  0  10  30  50  70  90  100  305  330  350  367  380  405  456    Kerosene product TBP   Vol %  0  10  30  50  70  90  100  ∆TASTM  (0F)  ∆TTBP      (0F)  TTBP (0F)  25 20 17 13 13 25 51.Design of Crude Distillation Column    70  90  100  15  25  54  24  34  60  239  273  333    II) Kerosene product TBP & ASTM data  ASTM gap of naphtha –kerosene = 25 oF  From ASTM data of Naphtha product.

 ASTM end point  of LGO product = 585 – 10 = 575 oF. ASTM 5 % of LGO = 445 – 10 = 435 oF  LGO product end point on the crude = 585 oF.Design of Crude Distillation Column    III) LGO product TBP & ASTM data  ASTM gap of kerosene – LGO = ‐10 oF  From ASTM data of Kerosene product. ASTM 95 % of Kerosene = 445 oF  Therefore.    ASTM data of LGO (from Probability chart)  Vol %  0  10  30  50  70  90  100  TASTM  (0F)  458 480 492 505 520 545 575   TBP data of LGO product (from Edmister correlation)                Vol %  ∆TASTM  (0F)  ∆TTBP      (0F)  TTBP (0F)  0  10  30  50  70  90  100  22  12  13  NR  15  25  30  44  25  24  NR  24  34  34  407  451  476  500  524  558  592        132    .  For this value from end point correlation.

 HGO product ASTM data is  Vol % 0 10 30 50 70 90 100 TASTM  (0F) 522 552 571 575 600 627 675   From Edmister correlation. 90% ASTM point = 627 oF. the HGO product TBP is   Vol %  ∆TASTM  (0F)  ∆TTBP      (0F)  TTBP (0F)  0  10  30  50  70  90  100  29  19  4  ‐  25  27  48  55  37  8  ‐  38  37  53  466  521  558  566  604  642  695            133    . 90% TBP point of HGO on the crude assay = 670 oF  Using the 90% correlation available in the end point correlation data.  From probability chart.  TBP end point of HGO on crude assay = 680 oF.Design of Crude Distillation Column    IV) HGO product TBP & ASTM data  ASTM gap between LGO and HGO products = ‐35 oF  From LGO ASTM data. ASTM 5 % of the HGO product = 573 – 35 = 538 oF. ASTM 95 % of LGO product = 573 oF  Therefore.

            Psuedo‐ component  No.5  40.5 20.5  51.5  49.5  30.5  34. molecular weight.25  8.5  38.5  Based  on  product  TBPs  evaluated  previously.5  16.  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  TBP range on  crude (oF)  60 – 100  100 – 140  140 – 180  180 – 220  220 – 250  250 – 280  280 – 310  310 – 330  330 – 350  350 – 370  370 – 390  390 – 410  410 – 430  430 – 450  450 – 480  480 ‐500  500 – 520  520 – 540  540 – 560  560 – 610  610 – 630   630 – 650  650 – 670  670 – 700  Mid Boiling  point on crude  o F  75  125  160  195  235  265  295  320 340  360  380  400  420  440  470  490 510  530  550  595  620  640  660  685 Mid vol % on  crude  Mid oAPI  2.    Sulfur  calculations  are  ignored in this section.  determine  the  average  product  properties  (including  residue product) such as API.25  18.  the  corresponding  volume  %  of  various  pseudo‐ components in product TBPs is obtained graphically. characterization factor.5  24. Appropriate pseudo‐component  selection could be made on the TBP and API assay of the crude.2:  Using  the  product  TBPs  estimated  in  Q1. the following pseudo‐component range along with mid vol.5  32.25  3.  Solution:  For the crude.25  5.      134    .5  28. average API for each pseudo‐ component  are  summarized  based  on  the  TBP  and  API  assay  of  the  crude  oil.5 36.25  11  13.Design of Crude Distillation Column    Q  4.5  44  47.5  26.5  54 90  81  71  64  58  53  52  52  46  45  42  41  40  39  37  37  36  34  33  32  31  30  29  27. as sulfur balance is not going to affect design calculations associated to the CDU.5  22.  The same is summarized in the next table.

5  10  11  13  14.  1  2  3  4  5  Mid Boiling  point on crude  o F  75  125 160  195  235  135    Mid oAPI  Molecular  weight  90  81 71  64  58  70  80 87  94  108  .  The same is  presented in the next table. their molecular weight as a function of their API and mid boiling point is  determined from Maxwell’s correlations presented in Refinery Property Estimation chapter.2  20  28  19  15  3  3                                  97*  Kerosene  product  differential  vol%            5.  For these pseudo‐components.8  8.5  12  7.5  18  13  7  4 4                    100  LGO product  differential vol  %  HGO product  differential  vol %                          3  5 24  17  17  13  10  10          100                                5  4.Design of Crude Distillation Column                                      Psuedo‐ component  No.8  7.4  40.  Psuedo‐ component  No.9  4  100  *For the very first component API gravity is not available and hence volume% is not reported.3  14.  Naphtha product  differential vol %  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  Total  1.1  3.

  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Vol % distilled  [A]  Mid pt API    S. With the background information  ready  for  calculations.698765  0.G.746702  0.5  110  115  118  141  144  151  159  165  175  191  197  203  218  230  254  270  283  291  300  Since  molecular  weight  needs  to  be  accommodated  on  a  mass  basis  and  since  product  TBPs  do  not  match  with  the  crude  TBPS  due  to  anamolies  associated  in  the  volumetric  balance  pointed  earlier.  I) i) Average Naphtha product properties  API and specific gravity                Psuedo‐ component  No. as only these are  required for the design calculations of the CDU.8 7.638826  0.  we  next  present  the  calculations  involved  for  the  estimation  of  average  properties of the products namely API.771117    136    .2  20  28  19  15  3  3  90 81  71  64  58  53  52  52  0.Design of Crude Distillation Column      6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24                      265  295  320  340  360  380  400  420  440  470  490  510  530  550  595  620  640  660  685  53  52  52  46  45  42  41  40  39  37  37  36  34  33  32  31  30  29  27.665882  0.  all  molecular weight calculations are carried out using crude data only.771117  0.723785  0.  [B]  1.766938  0. characterization factor and molecular weight.

Design of Crude Distillation Column    Average specific gravity of the naphtha product  ∑ 0.998824 80 0.493404 108 0.815562  0.927793 115 0.746914 87 0.5.020079 2.300813 110 0.5 oF  From Maxwell’s correlation.3 oF  Naphtha  product  characterization  factor  which  is  a  function  of  the  MEABP  and  API  is  obtained  from  Maxwell’s correlation as 12.  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Total   Vol %  on  crude  0. MEABP = 269.665882 0.723785 0.766938 0.5  18  13 7  53  52  52  46  45  42  41 40  0.86264/0.128655 = 99.2 = 266.G 0.5 – 3.63333  The volume average boiling point TVABP = (T0 + 4T50 + T100)/6 = (92 + 4x298+333)/6 = 269.016763 1.698765 0.5  2  S.020916 1.638826 0.86264 0.5  2  3  2.82029  0.  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  Vol % distilled  [A]  Mid pt API    S.533248 94 0.  II) Average Kerosene product properties  Psuedo‐ component  No.788301  0.771117  0.797183  0.012485 1.825073  137    .702993  ∑     ii)   Characterization factor (K)  Slope of the Naphtha product TBP = (T70 – T10)/60 = (239‐141)/60 = 1.G.  [B]  5.771117 0.013828 2.542234 118 0.319413 70 0.  iii)   Molecular weight  Psuedocomponent   No.766938  0.026949 1.004563 0.5  1.746702 0.97799 = 100 (approximately).771117 Mole  Weight  Molecular  Factor Factor Weight  0.128655   Average molecular weight = 12.5  3.5  10  11  13  14.8017  0.01307 12.5  2.

603399 1.63266   Average molecular weight = 17.79         138    Molecula r Weight  110 115  118  141 144  151  159  165  175  191  Mole  Factor  0.631124 1.829912  0.062682 1.Design of Crude Distillation Column      14  15  4  4  39  37  0.797183 0.5  The volume average boiling point TVABP = (T0 + 4T50 + T100)/6 = (249+4x365+478)/6 = 364.839763    Average specific gravity of the kerosene product  ∑ 0.8017  0.650146 1.011135 0.85.008793 0.46087 2.G  0.010001 0.126134       .650146 1.825073 0.659824 1.825073 0.829912 0.013984 0.5 oF  From Maxwell’s correlation.010318 0.017936 0.82029 0.632/0. MEABP = 364.64058  1.5 – 0 = 364.010802 0.011308 0.679525 17.    iii) Molecular weight   Psuedocomp onent  No.594366 1.82029  0.022372 0.126134 = 139.839763 Weight  Factor  2.803868  ∑   ii)   Characterization factor (K)  Slope of the kerosene product TBP = (T70 – T10)/60 = (387‐297)/60 = 1.5  2  2 2  2  2  2  2  2  100  S.815562 0.825073 0.5 oF  Kerosene  product  characterization  factor  which  is  a  function  of  the  MEABP  and  API  is  obtained  from  Maxwell’s correlation as 11.009485 0.  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  Total  Vol % on  crude  3 2.

83 + 7 = 506.844776  0.839763 0.327217   139    Molecula r Weight  165  175  191  197  203  218  230 254  Mole  Factor  0.G  1.017036               .012298 0.008323 0.6.076046 1.152091 1.846336.00864  0.152091 2.2167  The volume average boiling point TVABP = (T0 + 4T50 + T100)/6 = (407+4x500+592)/6 = 499.G.008526 0.679525 1.865443 Weight  Factor  2.00748 0.007844 0.Design of Crude Distillation Column    III) Average LGO product properties  i) Average specific gravity            Psuedo‐ component  No.650146 1.825073 0.829912  0.854985  0.  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  Vol % on  crude  2  2  2  2  2  2  2 5  S.844776 0.013043 0.  ii) Characterization factor  Slope of the LGO product TBP = (T70 – T10)/60 = (524 – 451)/60 = 1.076046 0.720365 4.  iii) Molecular weight  Psuedocomp onent  No.  [B]  3  5  24  17  17 13  10  10  40  39  37  37  36 34  33  32  0.854985 0.83 oF  LGO  product  characterization  factor  which  is  a  function  of  the  MEABP  and  API  is  obtained  from  Maxwell’s correlation as 11.860182 0.70997  1.839763  0.860182  0.865443  Average specific gravity = 0.  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  Vol % distilled  [A]  Mid pt API    S.689552 1.839763  0.83 oF  From Maxwell’s correlation. MEABP = 499.825073  0.

864055  ii) Characterization factor  Slope of the HGO product TBP = (T70 – T10)/60 = 1.08/0.839763  0.876161  0.38  The volume average boiling point TVABP = (T0 + 4T50 + T100)/6 = 570.76324 140    Molecula r Weight  197 203 218 230 254 270 283 291 Mole  Factor  0.876161 0.152091 2.9  4  37  36  34  33 32  31  30  29  27.865443  0.5  12  7.006022 0.006059 .83  oF  From Maxwell’s correlation.076046 0.021182 0.076046 0.88162  0.380228 1.076046 1.870769 0.076046 1.8  8.006192 0.152091 5.222462 2.  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  Vol % on  crude  2  2  2  2  5  2  2 2  S.88162 Weight  Factor  2.  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24                Vol % distilled  [A]  Mid pt API    S.870769  0.88994  Average specific gravity = 0.009872 0.3  14. MEABP = 574.G  1.83 oF  HGO  product  characterization  factor  which  is  a  function  of  the  MEABP  and  API  is  obtained  from  Maxwell’s correlation as 11.00645 0.752322 1.5  0.1  3.844776  0.860182  0.611231 1.009357 0.4 40.08319 = 205.G.741538 1.  [B]  5  4.152091 1.Design of Crude Distillation Column    Average molecular weight = 17.010924 0.  iii) Molecular weight  Psuedo  component   No.854985  0.55.328  IV) Average HGO product properties  i) Average Specific gravity    Psuedo‐ component  No.

  iii) Residue molecular weight  First determine molecular weight of the crude and from mass balance determine the molecular weight  of the residue.887147 0. This is also due to the reason that residue TBP is not known.3545  V) Average residue properties  i) Residue specific gravity  The residue specific gravity is determined from mass balance.  ii) Residue characterization factor  Assume MEABP of the residue as 910  oF.874  From Maxwell’s characterization factor correlation.0019  0.7.  From  this  expression.1.833    VABP = (T20 + T50+ T80)/3 = 686.5x    From  volumetric  balance.6667 oF  From Maxwell’s correlation.  (46.Design of Crude Distillation Column    24  1  0.8039  12.873996 or 0.   Crude SG is 0.874.703  12.5  0.985/0. MEABP of the crude = 686.  Vol %  [A]  S.  specific  gravity  of  the  residue x = 0.6 oF  Crude SG = 0.8463  11. crude characterization factor = 11.97171 or 0.  The characterization factor of the crude is determined as follows  Slope of TBP =‐(T70 ‐ T10)/60‐=(870‐220)/60 = 10.002957     Average molecular weight = 20.972 approximately.084841 = 247.874.0487  x  46.  From Maxwell’s molecular weight correlation.6 – 68 = 618.2155)/100  =  0.5x+42. From residue API of 0. crude molecular weight = 252.8641  6.3025  0.    141    .887147 300 0.972 and Maxwell’s correlation.5  16  13  7  46.G [B]  [A] X [B]  17.8624  0. residue  characterization factor K = 14.

 establish the mole balances across the CDU.5  16  13  7  46.053582 6.0019  205.6  205.G (B)  0.198/z+0.198/z    Average molecular weight of the crude = 87.    Therefore.703  12. the evaluated properties of the crude and products are as follows:      Molecular    Stream  SG  K  weight      Crude  0.3025  99.1 CDU mass balance table    The overall mass balance across the CDU is carried out using the following procedure:  a) Fix a basis of the total crude flow rate.328  0.5  S.198  z  45.5  99.85  139. Typically it is about 30.  This is equal to 252.978  0.5          4.024466 45.000 to 50.328    Heavy Gas Oil  0.978      Kerosene  0.      In summary.972  Mole  Weight  Molecular  Factor  Factor  Weight  12.8624  139.35 0.000 barrels per day of  crude oil processing in the CDU.794    Light Gas Oil  0.35    Residue  0.1  843.4  252    Naphtha  0. equating the above expression to 252.8463  0.577 which is the residue molecular  weight.8039  11.86455 0.8039  0.                142    .703  0.4. we get z = 843.874  11.123052 12.051867 247.972  14.2933). establish volumetric and mass balances with the evaluated  specific gravity values of the products  c) Using molecular weights.8463  11.4135/(45.794  0.86455  11.  b) For the chosen crude flow rate.Design of Crude Distillation Column      Product  Naphtha  Kerosene  Light Gas Oil  Heavy Gas Oil  Residue  Vol %  (A)  17.09201  11.55  247.

  molecular  weight.906 13  6500  11375  0.    Solution:     From average product properties.  These  variables  refer  to  the  residue  liquid  stream  that  is  bereft  of  condensable part (of the overflash).0856  7  3500  6125  0.58  205.8629  89776.21034  44163.5  8750  15312.  barrels/day.9  670.      Range  (oF)  Stream  Crude  ‐  Vol  %  100  BPSD  50000  GPH  87500  S.55  46. the CDU mass balances are summarized in the following table.  conduct  the  mass balances across the CDU and the overflash zone.86  14.10345  329710.3  391.    % Overflash = 3%    This means that the cumulative volume% = 53.88  12.4.35  178.000 barrels/day of crude  oil processing in the CDU.74 14.8645  7.9716  8.07  99.3:    For  the  Ecudaor  crude  stream  whose  average  product  properties  are  estimated.5 to 56. The following procedure is adopted for the flash zone mass balance.    Q  4. specific gravity without the overflash variables  from  total  mass  balance.6  100  252  2530.577  390.05845  80289.  specific  gravity  etc.  from  crude  assay  and  first  principles  of  refinery property estimation.     We next present an illustrative example for the mass balances across the CDU and overflash zone.97  898. Wt  Mol/hr  637798.  Consider a basis of 50.804 6.2 Flash zone mass balance table    The crude stream fed to the flash zone in a partially vaporized state (3 ‐5 % of overflashing is usually  done).5  0.4  6.85      For the overflash stream.    The purpose of the over flashing is to enable the arrangement of the internal reflux for the  control of the product quality.038  16  8000  14000 0.5  23250  40687.92  247.69  843.G  0.70426 93859.947  CDU Products  Naphtha  Kero  LGO  HGO  Residue  IBP –  310  310 –  475  475 –  585  585 –  680  680 +  17.71  139.    a) Assume  3%  overflash.5  0.2891  lbs/hr  Wt %  Mol.  specific  gravity  etc    using  the  known  variables associated to the overflash and other products (Naphtha to HGO)  c) Estimate the residue variables such as flow rates.  b) Establish  the  total  vapor  variables  such  as  flow  rates.5   TBP range on the crude: 680 – 700 oF  Mid volume % = 55  143    .    For  the  3  %  overflash  stream.9  51.8463  7.  estimate  cumulative  volume  %.Design of Crude Distillation Column    4.874  Density (lbs/gal)  7.703  5.

G  0.  b) Assume 1.6  100  252  2530.  The point is estimated using vapor  pressure curve data presented in Table 2. Therefore.18 (follow solved example 2.898413  7.5  28250  49437.84  2141. This is due  to  the  fact  that  flash  zone  temperature  will  enable  heat  balance  across  the  flash  zone  to  yield  the  residue product temperature.5  0. we need to draw a new EFV  curve. With this assumption.6  100  252  2530.947  0.  d) Estimate the partial pressure (PPHC)  of the hydrocarbon using the expression  PPHC= moles HC vapor/(moles HC vapor + moles steam) x flash zone pressure  e) Adjust the EFV curve to the desired partial pressure.  Since live steam is present in the main column (along with hydrocarbon vapors).7  psia.    The  existing  EFV  data  point  is  taken  at  50  %  and  14.5  26750  46812.6  48.18 at the hydrocarbon partial pressure for 50 % point.873996  7.2891  lbs/hr  Wt %  Mol.08  327.  c) Assume flash zone pressure = 40 psia. the hydrocarbon partial  pressure needs to be estimated and using the same.492764  19668.789067  6.5  21750    100  50000  Overflash  Total  3  1500  2625  53. estimate  the steam flow rate in lbmol/hr.Design of Crude Distillation Column    Mid boiling point = 695 oF  API = 26.2 lbs of steam used to produce one gallon of residue. Wt  Mol/hr  637798.24  Flash zone products  Products  Total  Vapour  680 ‐ 700  IBP –  680  IBP ‐  700  Residue  700 +  43. SG = 0.66  56. all we require  is a point (as the slope is known) to draw the new EFV line.5  48.5  0. the flash zone temperature shall be estimated at  the desired hydrocarbon partial pressure.976765  8.289127  637798.04  0.5 Estimation of flash zone temperature  Flash zone temperature estimation is an important task in the design procedure of the CDU.874  Density (lbs/gal)  7. The new EFV curve FRL will be the same as that exists at 1 atm.51  3.947  87500      4.9 for further delibeations  on  calculations).  The procedure is elaborated as follows:  a) Draw  the  equilibrium  flash  vaporization  curve  of  the  crude  oil  at  1  atm  using  Maxwell’s  correlations summarized in refinery property estimation chapter.  144    .  The  new  vapor  pressure is determined from Table 2.61496  948.1  51.30123  143.  The Crude EFV curve is the starting point for the flash zone temperature.898413  Molecular weight = 316        Mass balances across the flash zone are presented as follows    Range  (oF)  Stream  Crude  ‐  Vol  %  100  BPSD  50000  GPH  87500  S.14622  310065.90  38062.62924  327733. In other words.794873  6.083812  316  62.38504  148.580818  308064.71  2203.5  0.

Design of Crude Distillation Column 

 
f) For the new EFV curve draw the line with known co‐ordinates and slope of the FRL 
g) On the new EFV curve, find the flash zone temperature as that temperature that corresponds to 
the overflash cumulative volume %. 
An example is presented next to elaborate the above steps. 
Q 4.4: For the Ecuador crude stream, determine the flash zone temperature in the main column. 
 
Solution: We first determine the slope of the EFV curv 
 
Slope of TBP = STBP =  (TTBP,70 ‐ TTBP,10) / 60 = (890 ‐ 220) / 60 = 11.167     
 
Equation of DRL 
 y ‐ y(at x=10) = STBP(x ‐ x(at x=10)      
y ‐ 220 = 11.167(x ‐ 10),  
y = 11.167x + 108.33       
        
The slope of the FRL, SFRL is found from the Maxwell’s correlation as SFRL = 8.1        
        
From another Maxwell’s correlation, we obtain the difference between the DRL and at 50 % volume 
distilled, and this is, 
        
∆t50(DRL ‐ FRL) = 40 0F       
        
TDRL,50 = 666.7 0F       
        
Then,        
TFRL,50 = 666.7 ‐ 40 = 626.7 0F       
        
Equation of FRL 
y ‐ y(at x=50) = SFRL(x ‐ x(at x=50))     
y ‐ 627 = 8.1(x ‐ 50)       
y = 8.1x + 222       
        
The table for Crude TBP, DRL and FRL Temperature Data  is presented as follows: 
        
Vol %  TTBP (0F)  TDRL (0F)  TFRL (0F)

‐30 
108 
222 
10 
220 
220 
303 
30 
450 
443 
465 
50 
650 
667 
627 
70 
890 
890 
789 
90 
1250 
1113 
951 
100 
1430 
1225 
1032 
        
From Maxwell’s third correlation for the EFV, data is summarized as follows 
145 
 

Design of Crude Distillation Column 

 
 Calculation of EFV:      
        
At Vol % = 30   
TDRL = 443 0F  
TFRL = 465 oF    
∆tTBP ‐ DRL = TTBP,30 ‐ TDRL,30      
                  = 450 ‐ 443 = 7 0F     
∆tEFV ‐ FRL/∆tTBP‐DRL = 0.34 
        
from which,  TEFV,30 = 467 0F       
        
The EFV data is summarized as follows 
  
Vol % 
TEFV (0F) 

185 
10 
303 
30 
467 
50 
629 
70 
789 
90 
998 
100 
1102 
Calculation of flash zone temperature 
 
Assume 1.2 lbs of steam/gal residue 
 
Steam flow rate (lbs/hr) = 48825 
Steam flow rate (lbmol/hr) = 2712.5 
 
Flash zone pressure = 40 psia 
Partial pressure of hydrocarbon = 17.93 psia 
 
EFV 50 % of the crude = 629 oF 
From Table 2.18, first locate the first point corresponding to 50 % EFV on 14.7 psia line and then extend 
this line parallel to the existing graph till 17.93 psia to obtain the new EFV value. 
 
From graph, EFV 50 % at 17.93 psia = 665 oF 
 
Slope of the FRL = 8.1 
 
EFV at 17.93 psia is defined using the line y = 665 + 8.1 (x‐50) where x refers to the cumulative volume 
%.    For  a  value  of  56.5  %  of  x  (which  is  the  overflash  value),  y  =  717.65  oF  which  is  the  flash  zone 
temperature. 
 
 
 
 
146 
 

Design of Crude Distillation Column 

 

0% point of cut on atmospheric TBP 
curve of product oF 
197.75 
301.27 
300.12 
500.32 
599.31 
686.79 
743.21 
798.48
851.45 
897.52 
 

Theoretical side draw 
temperature – Actual side 
draw temperature 
9.29 
24.43 
24.43 
66.37 
95.31 
122.62 
142.95 
162.21 
183.06 
201.23 

 
Table 4.1: Packie’s correlation data to estimate the draw off temperature.  
 
  

4.6  Estimation of draw off stream temperatures 
 
The following procedure is adopted for the estimation of draw off temperatures which are useful for the 
energy balance calculations to yield the side stripper products (kerosene, LGO and HGO) temperatures: 
a) Estimate  the  steam  requirements  for  different  products.    Use  the  following  assumptions  on  a 
mass ratio basis: steam to HGO ratio = 0.5; steam to LGO ratio = 0.5; steam to kerosene ratio = 
0.65. 
b) Estimate the FRL of the draw off TBP cut.  This is done using the TBP cuts of the crude.  Establish 
its IBP at atmospheric pressure.  This is regarded as 0% vol temperature on the FRL. This value is 
required for using packie’s correlation to estimate the actual draw off temperature. 
c) Predict overflow from the draw‐off tray as a liquid reflux to the tray below using the following 
rules of thumb 
Molar ratio of overflow liquid to HGO product = 2.9 
Molar ratio of overflow liquid to LGO product = 1.2 
Molar ratio of overflow liquid to kero product = 0.9 to 1.0 
d) Calculate hydrocarbon partial pressure using the expression: 
Partial pressure = (Product vapor moles + Moles overflow)/(product vapor moles + moles steam) 
x tray pressure 
Here product vapor corresponds to total products that are vaporized and leaving the tray. These 
include HGO + LGO + Kerosene + naphtha for the HGO draw off tray, LGO + Kerosene + naphtha 
for the LGO draw off tray, Kerosene  + naphtha for the kerosene draw off tray.   Also in the 
above expression, steam moles corresponds to steam entering at tray 1 for HGO draw off tray, 
steam entering at residue and HGO for LGO draw off tray, steam entering at residue, HGO and 
LGO for kerosene draw off tray.  Estimate the tray pressure from assumed pressure drops. 
e) Using vapor pressure curves, determine the IBP of the cut at the evaluated partial pressure. 
f) Use  Table  4.1  (Packie’s  correlation  data)  to  determine  the  differential  temperature.  For  this 
curve,  the  x‐axis  data  is  to  be  taken  with  respect  to  atmospheric  TBP  cut  point  and  not  the 
partial pressure based cut point. 
147 
 

Design of Crude Distillation Column 

 
g) Use  differential  temperature  and  0  %  point  on  the  FRL  (adjusted  to  the  partial  pressure)    to 
estimate the draw off temperature. 
 
Q 4.5: For the Ecudaor CDU design problem, determine the draw off streams temperatures associated 
to HGO, LGO and Kerosene. 
 
Solution:  
 
For all three draw‐off stream trays, the tray pressure is evaluated first. 
 
HGO draw off tray  = 10 
Flash zone pressure  = 40 psia 
HGO draw off tray is located 6 trays above the flash zone. 
Average pressure drop per tray = 0.32 psia per tray 
 
HGO draw off tray pressure = 40 – 6 x 0.32 = 39.1 psia. 
 
Similarly, LGO draw off tray pressure = 40 – (6 + 10) x 0.32 = 34.88 psia 
 
Kerosene draw off tray pressure = 40 – (6 + 10 + 12) x 0.32 = 31.04 psia 
 
Next, we evaluate the steam requirements in the side stream strippers. 
Residue zone fresh steam flow rate (from flash zone calculations) = 2712.5 lbmol/hr 
 
HGO zone fresh steam flow rate = 6125 x 0.5/18 = 170.13 lbmol/hr 
 
LGO zone fresh steam flow rate = 11375 x 0.5/18 = 5687.5 lbmol/hr 
 
Kerosene zone fresh steam flow rate = 14000 x 0.65/18 = 505.55 lbmol/hr 
 
From mass balance table summarized previously, 
 
Naphtha vapor flow rate = 898.03 lbmol/hr 
 
Kerosene vapor flow rate = 670.9 lbmol/hr 
 
LGO vapor flow rate = 391.1 lbmol/hr 
 
HGO vapor flow rate = 181.63 lbmol/hr 
 
I)
HGO draw off tray temperature calculation 
 
Moles overflow = 2.9 x 181.63 = 526.72 lbmol/hr 
 
Hydrocarbon vapor flow rate = 898.03 + 670.9 + 391.1 + 181.63 = 2140 lbmol/hr 
 
Steam flow rate = 2712.5 lbmol/hr (Only that steam that is reaching the HGO draw off tray is the steam 
that enters at the bottom of the main column). 
148 
 

Design of Crude Distillation Column 

 
 
Therefore,  partial pressure of  hydrocarbons  at HGO  draw  off tray  = (2140 + 526.72)/(2140 +  526.72 + 
2712.5) x 38.1 = 18.89 psia. 
 
Now,  the  EFV  of  the  Heavy  gas  oil  is  determined  using  Maxwell’s  correlation.  The  procedure  is  not 
shown here.  The obtained IBP from EFV curve is 561 oF. 
 
From  vapor pressure  curves,  estimated theoretical HGO draw off  temperature  at a partial pressure  of 
18.89 psia (instead of 14.7 psia) is 620 oF. 
 
From Packie’s correlation, for an x‐axis data point of 561 oF, the y‐axis point (Table 4.1) is 83 oF. 
 
Therefore, actual HGO draw off temperature = 620 – 83 = 537 oF. 
 
II)
LGO draw off tray temperature calculation 
 
Moles overflow = 1.2 x 391.08 = 469.3 lbmol/hr 
 
Hydrocarbon vapor flow rate = 898.03 + 670.9 + 391.1 = 1960.03 lbmol/hr (All HC vapors other than the 
HGO and residue products). 
 
Steam flow rate = 2712.5 + 170.13 = 2882.64 lbmol/hr (This is the steam that enters at the residue zone 
and also in the HGO side stripper). 
 
Therefore, partial pressure of hydrocarbons at HGO draw off tray = (1960.03 + 391.08)/(1960.03+391.08 
+ 288.26) x 34.2 = 15.66 psia. 
 
Now, the EFV of the LGO is determined using Maxwell’s correlation. The procedure is not shown here.  
The obtained IBP from EFV curve is 485 oF. 
 
From  vapor  pressure  curves,  estimated  theoretical  LGO  draw  off  temperature  at  a  partial  pressure  of 
15.66 psia (instead of 14.7 psia) is 510 oF. 
 
From  Packie’s  correlation,  for  an  x‐axis  data  point  of  510  oF,  the  y‐axis  point  (Table  4.1)  is  60  oF.  
Therefore, actual HGO draw off temperature = 510 – 60 = 450 oF. 
 
 
III)
Kerosene draw off tray temperature calculation 
 
Moles overflow = 0.9 x 670.9 = 603.81 lbmol/hr. 
 
Hydrocarbon vapor flow rate = 898.03 + 670.9 = 1568.03 lbmol/hr (All HC vapors other than the LGO, 
HGO and residue products). 
 
Steam flow rate = 3198.611 lbmol/hr 
 
Therefore,  partial pressure of  hydrocarbons  at HGO  draw  off tray = (1568 + 603.81)/(1568 +  603.81 + 
3198.6) x 30.2 = 12.5 psia. 
149 
 

Design of Crude Distillation Column 

 
 
From EFV, vapor pressure curves and packie’s correlation, actual draw off‐temperature = 320 oF. 
 

4.7 Estimation of tower top temperature 
 
The  tower top temperature is  very important to determine,  as  the know‐how  of the temperature  will 
lead to further delineating the condenser duty.  The tower top temperature is determined from a dew 
point  calculation.    The  procedure  for  the  same  is  similar  to  that  provided  in  the  gasoline  blending 
problem  illustrated  in  the  refinery  mass  balances  chapter.    The  procedure  for  the  same  is  outlined 
below: 
 
a) Set  the  reflux  drum  temperature  and  pressure  as  100  oF  and  10  psig.  Assume  5  psia  pressure 
drop and hence, tower top pressure = 15 psig or 29.7 psia. 
b) Assume external reflux as 0.8 times the total moles overhead product. Determine external reflux 
flow rate 
c) Determine partial pressure of hydrocarbons in the tower top section. 
d) Assume a tower top temperature of 250  oF. This value is required to determine the equilibrium 
constants (K) for different pseudo‐components. 
e) As  reflux  will  have  a  composition  similar  to  the  gas  +  naphtha  fraction  whose  pseudo‐
component  distribution  is  previously  known,  determine  the  vapor  pressures  of  each  pseudo‐
component as a function of its mid boiling point and API. 
f) Determine mole fraction of each pseudo‐component. 
g) Calculate  equilibrium  constant  for  each  pseudo‐component  as  the  ratio  between  its  vapor 
pressure  (determined  from  Maxwell’s  vapor  pressure  correlations)  and  the  partial  pressure  of 
the hydrocarbons (determined in step c) 
h) Assume  the  determined  mole  fractions  to  correspond  to  the  vapor  stream.  Eventually, 
determine liquid stream mole fraction using the expression x = y/K where K is the equilibrium 
constant. 
i) Eventually, evaluate summation of all x values 
j) For the last pseudo‐component,  determine its new equilibrium constant using the expression K2 
= K1 (sum of all x values). 
k) From the K2 values, determine the new tower top temperature. 
l) If significant differences exist between the new tower top temperature and assumed value (250 
o
F), then iterate the procedure until a converging tower top temperature is determined. 
 
Q 4.6: For the Ecudaor CDU design problem, determine the tower top temperature. 
 
Solution: 
 
Tower top pressure = 29.7 psia 
 
Vapor flow rate = (1+0.8) x 898.03 = 1616.46 lbmol/hr 
 
Steam flow rate in the tower top section = 3704.1 lbmol/hr 
 
Partial pressure of hydrocarbons in the tower top section = 1616.4/(1616.4 + 3704.1) x 29.7 = 9.02 psia. 
 
150 
 

942632 0.G Factor (y) Maxwell  K  X=y/K 1  75  1.068001 6  9.  we  determine  the  corresponding  vapor  pressures.384898 0.7  1.  All evaluations are presented below in the table.032812 0.46392  0.185451 0.092784  0.000807 2  125  7.56  0.85986 0.032812 0.01631 12.68416 1 0.698765 14.42268  0.20128  0.084019 5  235  19.190714  0.766938 11.032019 4  195  28.771117 2.198221 3.      2     2    Liquid Reflux at top stripping tray.85567  0.40753 0. At this  temperature.86598  0.89277 0.    3      3     4    Fresh steam for the flash zone          4       Residue product (At unknown temperature)        Figure 4.Design of Crude Distillation Column    For determining the tower top temperature.638826 1.092784  0.384898 0.35  0.16317 0.570197  0.774811  0.421184  0.201228 1.006957 3  160  20.4  20.58763  0.    Mole  Vol % on  Wt  Fraction PS from  Component  Mid BP  crude  S.035965 8  320  3.746702 14.771117 2.723785 20.  using  Maxwell’s  vapor  pressure  correlation.912316  0.143082 7  295  3.          151    . we first assume a tower top temperature of 250  oF.1  3.3: Envelope for the enthalpy balance to yield residue product temperature.8  6.665882 4.287446 2.451217                          1       Product vapor (Naphtha + Kerosene + LGO + HGO)    + Steam (at partial pressure of top stripping tray) +  1    Vapor reflux.140395  0.215624  0.62612 0.61856  0.057545 Total  72.36  2.090822 6  265  15.

03  1216.3  30  250.28  1202  1228.  The  Maxwell’s correlations need to be interpolated for both average MEABP of the stream as well as  its K value.04  1204  1230.2  1483.1  1532.    For all calculations.9 1382.5  1532.35 = 0.    From  the  enthalpy  balance  of  both  consolidated  incoming  and  outgoing  streams.3  1584.4  20  227.0 1333.Design of Crude Distillation Column    Psia  Saturation  (psi)  Temp.5  1281.  We take this as the tower temperature for future calculations.    For  the  chosen  envelope.  the  unknown  enthalpy  of  the  residue  product  is  determined.6 1382.71  1208.9  1284.  for  pseudo‐component  8.5  1430.8  1802.2  1585.2  1534.6 1379.7 1480.2  1380  1430.6 1802 Enthalpy (Btu/lb) at temperature  o o o o o o o o o o o o   Table 4.8  1532.8 x 20 = 236 oF.8  1692.8 1533.2 1332.1 1332. the following important information needs to be remembered always:    a) Hydrocarbon  stream’s  liquid  or  vapor  enthalpy  is  determined  from  Maxwell’s  correlation.2  1383.7 1236.8  1286.6  80  312. ( F)      350  F 400  F  500  F 600  F 700  F 800  F 900  F 1000  F  1100  F  1200  F 1300  F 15  213.   152    .    K2 = 0.9  1383.1  1803.9  1585.8  1433.9  1287.451217 x 0.1  1692.2  1383. its  enthalpy  is  determined  at  its  partial  pressure  that  exists  in  the  flash  zone  and  using  steam  tables.0  1334. it is mandatory to determine first the MEABP and K value.6  1237.  To determine K value.  assume  that  their  temperature is 5  oF lower than the flash zone temperature.0  1432.3  1330.257283.3 for  the  flash  zone.4  1285.3 1329.0 50  281. The fresh  steam is usually taken as superheated steam at 450  oF and 50 psig.3  1692.2  1802.  Relevant  data  from  steam  tables  is  summarized  in  Table  4.2  40  267.2  1286.5 1431.0  1232.02  1209.5  1482.7 1803.3  1586.2  1239.4 1802.25  1211.  Therefore.2: Steam table data relevant for CDU design problem. strip out liquid (at flash zone temperature) and fresh steam (entering tray 1).0 1431.  this  vapor  pressure  corresponds  to  220 + 0.4  100  327.8  1534  1586.5 1802.6  1381.8 70  302.4  1691.9  1280.6  1584.5 1429.7 1482.  the  incoming  streams  are  residue  liquid  (at  flash  zone  temperature).9 1234.3  1693.4  1585.5  1283.4  1239.5  1481.3 1481.9  1380.0  1282.  The outgoing streams are residue  liquid  at  unknown  temperature  t.4  1534.2  1331.2 1533.6  1691.34  1213.9  1334.96  1215.9  1803.9 1227.2  1803.5 1533.5 1432.    From  Maxwell’s  vapor  pressure  curves. we have to know its API.1 1482.1  1692.9  1483.4  1279.5  1586.9  1481.6  1692.93  1206.9 60  292.0 1233. for any stream.8  Estimation of residue product stream temperature    The residue product stream temperature is determined by consider the envelope shown in Figure 4.7  1585.4 1532 1584.0  1430.5  1432.3  1330.1  1480.    For  stripout  vapor  +  hydrocarbon  vapor  leaving  the  flash  zone.3  1335.9  1692  1802.5  90  320.82  1199.  strip  out  vapor  at  flash  zone  temperature  and  steam  at  flash  zone  temperature.   For steam at flash zone temperature.    4.3 1381.5  1693.2.

 their MEABP is assumed to be known.    From  Maxwell’s  correlation  upon  interpolation. superheated steam data at 450 oF is taken from steam tables. Same is the case for the K value as well as API. it is approximated  to be same as the its VABP.3   197.64  Steam  Total            396845.25  Stripout  L  23.1  910  F  11.329710x  Stripout  V  23.1  780  11.77  +  0.6  61.4  401  7.3 provides the following information for the  incoming streams to the flash zone.  c) For  stripout  streams.65  329710.45  717.    Q 4.4  487  8.75  712  18309.65  18309.329710x    Equating  the  incoming  and  outgoing  heat  balance  total.07  psia)  Total            396845.4 Btu/lb.3   76.  the  consolidated  stream  enthalpy  data  is  presented  as  follows  in  the  flash  zone:    o F  Lb/hr  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  Stream  V/L  API  MEABP  K  o Residue  L  14. If not known.Design of Crude Distillation Column    b) For all product streams.75  717.  d) For fresh steam. its saturated  vapor enthalpy  at  the prevalent partial pressure  of  the steam is determined.    o F  Lb/hr  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  Stream  V/L  API  MEABP  K  o Residue  L  14.85  22.8 389  128.2    For  the  outgoing  streams.1  910  F  11.8 x  0.92  Steam  V  (PP  =        712  48825  1389.  their  MEABP  is  determined  as  an  average  of  the  MEABP  values  corresponding to the adjacent cuts.we  get  T  =  686.    Solution:     The enthalpy balance for the envelope shown in Figure 4.              153    .1  780  11. For steam at any  other  location in the  column.7: For the Ecudaor stream determine the residue product stream temperature.34  Fresh  V  ‐      450  48825  1262.7  67.45  t  329710.    An illustrative example is presented below to highlight these issues.  we  get  the  enthalpy    of  the  residue  liquid  product as x = 365.5  oF  which  is  the  residue  product  temperature.

   The  product  draw  off  stream  (liquid)  consists  of  two  portions  namely  the  hydrocarbon  vapor  equivalent  to  the  final  product  flow  rate  and  strip  out  stream  that  enters  the  side  stripper  as  liquid and leaves the side stripper as vapor.81  strip  out  Stripout  L  33.  b) Fresh steam at 450 oF and 50 psig.7 t 44163.2  575  11.    Solution: We present the enthalpy balance table for the HGO side stripper first.  one  can  determine  the  side  stripper  product’s  temperature.9  Estimation of side stripper products temperature    Consider the side stripper itself as an envelope for the heat balance.5  3.5  1302.   From  the  enthalpy  values  using  Maxwell’s  correlation.44163x  Stripout  V  33.21  psia)  Total                4. the outgoing streams are:  a) Side stripper product stream at unknown temperature. For the side stripper the incoming  streams are:  a) Product draw off stream at draw off temperature that was evaluated using packie’s correlation. determine the side stripper product temperatures.6  3.31    Outgoing streams  o F  Lb/hr  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  Stream  V/L  API  MEABP  K  HGO  L  32.8665  Steam  V  (PP  =          3062.4 290  12.  c) Steam at its partial pressure and vapor temperature.9   17.9  545  11.    Similarly. API is determined to be  the  average  of  the  corresponding  API  values  of  the  adjacent  cuts.5  1262.  the  stripout  vapor/liquid  flowrate  is  estimated  to  be  5  %  for  HGO  side  stripper unit and 8 % for LGO and Kerosene side stripper units.7  537  2205  292  0.  In  these  enthalpy  balances. LGO and HGO side strippers.2 575  11.      Q 4.8 x 0.  Subsequently.    Since  in  the  above  consolidated  enthalpy  balance  stream  only  side  striper  product  stream  enthalpy  is  unknown  it  can  be  determined.9889  19.7  537  44163.    Incoming streams    o F  Lb/hr  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  Stream  V/L  API  MEABP  K  Feed  ex  L  32.8: For the Ecudaor CDU. The same procedure is applicable for Kerosene.8554  +  0.Design of Crude Distillation Column    4.64  Fresh  V        450  3062.86  Steam  Total            49430.44163x  154    .9  545  11.  b) Stripped hydrocarbon vapor whose temperature is assumed to be 5  oF lower than the draw off  temperature.7  532  2205  393  0.

246  Fresh  V        450  9100  1262.8 x  0.1  285  12. we present the LGO stripper enthalpy balance    Incoming streams    o F  Lb/hr  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  Stream  V/L  API  MEABP  K  Feed  ex  L  35.0802x  Stripout  V  40.09 Btu/lb    From Maxwell’s correlations and interpolation.6  11.65  320  93859. Finally.6  7. x = 225.36363      From heat balance.8 234  18. LGO product stream temperature = 435.7  500  11.1  421  11.194  Steam  V  (PP  =        445  5687.7  500  11.4  oF.181  Steam  Total                27.169  17.6  445  6215.1  421  11.43  psia)  Total                0.3  241  1.5  1262.497  Fresh  V        450  5687. we get HGO product stream temperature = 526. we  present Kerosene stripper heat balance    Incoming streams    o F  Lb/hr  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  Stream  V/L  API  MEABP  K  Feed  ex  L  44.65  450  80289.5 Btu/lb.    From Maxwell’s correlation and interpolation.489  Steam  Total                28.466      Outgoing streams    o F  Lb/hr  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  Stream  V/L  API  MEABP  K  LGO  L  35.65  t  80289.Design of Crude Distillation Column      Solving for x we get x = 282.7 163  15.8 oF.0802x  +  9.78  strip  out  Stripout  L  40.034  155    .299  strip  out  Stripout  L  57.5  1260.5  364  11.      Next.6  7.6  450  6215.3  353  2.1  320  7000  178  1.

    Q 4. x = 160. Kerosene product stream temperature = 315 oF.079  Steam  V  (PP  =        315  9100  1199.Design of Crude Distillation Column        Outgoing streams    o F  Lb/hr  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  Stream  V/L  API  MEABP  K  LGO  L  44.65  t  93859.    Solution:      Crude enthalpy data evaluated from first principles is presented as follows:      156    .01    psia)  Total        12.    Outgoing streams:    a) All products at their respective stream temperatures that were determined previously.    From Maxwell’s correlation and interpolation.1  315  7000  297  2.1  285  12. using first principles.  b) Steam:  Fresh  steam  with  its  total  flow  rate  is  estimated  and  its  total  enthalpy  (mmBTu/hr)  entering the CDU is estimated.6  10.  An illustrative example is presented next  for the Ecuador crude CDU. bottom and top pump around (Qc + QBPA + QTPA).91  15. total enthalpy (mmBtu/hr) is evaluated.10 Total Tower energy balance and total condenser duty estimation    The total tower energy balance is carried out to consolidate the following streams:    Incoming streams:     a) Crude (Vapor + Liquid): Its flow rate is determined from mass balance for both liquid and vapor  streams separately.7 x  0.995      From heat balance.    The balance energy of the incoming and outgoing streams is determined as the energy removed from  condenser. determine the total condenser and pump around duties with the  help of the total tower balance.09386x  Stripout  V  57. Eventually.5  364  11.      4.9: For the Ecuador crude stream.3 Btu/lb.

1897  377.5 686.7 717.4 80289.  steam (at its partial pressure).6 329710.  157    .11 Estimation of condenser duty    The  condenser  duty  is  estimated  using  the  heat  balance  envelope  presented  in  Figure  4.4.6 lb/hr  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  IN  Crude  V+L  Steam  V  66675 Total  293.9 315.6 390  120.3132  11.3 15.4773  HGO  L  11.5028  4.3876  310065.7582  Refluxes  206.3132  1263 704473.65 lb/hr  V/L  V  13.1 12.0467  Naphtha  L  12.88 225.1 526  172.5 637798.5  360  11.65 637798. We next present an illustrative example for the determination of  condenser duty.      377.4 390  L    Overall  enthalpy  balance  is  summarized  in  the  following  table  from  where  the  total  condenser  and  pump around duties can be estimated:      Stream  V/L  K  T (oF)  11. reflux vapor (from tray 45).5 18.  The temperature of these streams is the tower top temperature that was  estimated  as  a  dew point  earlier.6565  Total      From the above table.86 53 4.55 526.  Eventually.65 mmBtu/hr.6 435.5028  OUT  Residue  L  11.9 44163.    For  the  chosen envelope.  The only  term  that  is  missing  in  the  outgoing  enthalpy  balance  is  the  condenser  heat  duty.6 84.7 717.1 93859.4  910  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  327733. the incoming streams are naphtha vapor (from tray 45).4582  LGO  L  11.75 100 89776.   The  outgoing  streams  for the  envelope are  naphtha liquid product.Design of Crude Distillation Column    Stream  Crude  Vapour  Crude  Liquid  Total  o F  API  MEABP  K  46. total pump around duties is determined from the previously known total  heat removed minus the condenser duty.  This  is  therefore  estimated from the enthalpy balance.9 365.38 282. QC + QBPA + QTPA = 206.9255  293.4 120.74 160.1059  Kero  L  11.  All these streams are assumed to be at 100  oF.  water liquid product and cold naphtha reflux.

4630 Total  228273.      Q 4.2087 OUT  Naphtha  L  12.      158    .75  236 89776.3 100 119.4613 Total  228273.3 6.4: Heat balance Envelope for condenser duty estimation.75  100 71821. condenser duty = 104.Design of Crude Distillation Column                            3 4 1  2    1   Product (Naphtha) Vapor + Steam (at  PP) + Vapor Reflux.49 53 3.33 18.33 23.    Solution:     The enthalpy balance table for the evaluation of condenser duty is summarized as follows:      Stream  V/L  K  T  lb/hr  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr IN  Naphtha  V  12.10: Determine the condenser duty for the Ecuador crude oil CDU problem.75  100 89776.46 = 102.49 258. bottom + top pump  around duties = 206.4888 Refluxes  L  12.86 258.2087   From the enthalpy balance table.46 mmBtu/hr.3 119.5911 Water  L  100 66675 67.86 53 4.5536 Steam  V  236 66675 1161.75  236 71821.  Therefore.8 77.19 mmBtu/hr.1921 Reflux  V  12.    2   Naphtha cold reflux at 100 oF    3   Condenser duty (Unknown)    4   Naphtha product + Condensed water  at 100 oF      Figure 4.65 – 104.6675 Cond  duty  104.

5: Envelope for the determination of tower top tray overflow.    2   Liquid Reflux leaving the first tray  from the top    3   Naphtha cold reflux    4   Condenser duty (Also known)    5   Naphtha and Water products     Figure 4. naphtha liquid product (at 100 oF).          4. it is important to assume the overflow liquid and vapor temperatures.    For  the  chosen  envelope.  However. We next present an illustrative example for the estimation of overflow from the top tray. for these calculations. water (at 100 oF).  In  these  terms.12 Estimation of Overflow from Top tray    The  top  most  tray  overflow  is  important  to  determine.  The tower top most tray overflow is determined also from the enthalpy balance  by  considering  an  envelope  shown  in  Figure  4.  the  incoming  streams  are  naphtha vapor (from tray 44).Design of Crude Distillation Column                                      4 5 3  1  2    1   Product (Naphtha) Vapor + Steam (at  its  partial  pressure)  +  Vapor  reflux  approaching  the  second  tray  from  top.5.   It  is  fair  to  assume  that  the  overflow  liquid  is  5  oF  higher  than  the  tower  top  temperature  and  the  overflow  vapor  is  5  –  6  oF  higher  than  the  over‐flow  liquid.    This  rule  of  thumb  will  be  applicable  in  future calculations as well that the approaching vapor and liquid are at a temperature difference of  5oF.  the  overflow  enthalpy  is  estimated  from  where  the  overflow  rate  (lbs/hr)  is  evaluated.  Eventually heat  is lost in the condenser duty and overflow liquid.  as  later  it  will  be  checked  to  meet  the  fractionation efficiency. overflow vapor (from tray 44) and steam (from tray 44).                        159    .

43+274.5 is presented below:    Stream  V/L  IN  API  MEABP  K      T (oF)  lb/hr  Naphtha  V  69.2497 lbs/gal.11: For the Ecuador crude CDU.   Therefore.03  mmBtu/hr  24.9     66675 Naphtha  L  69.25 252 x  Steam  V  Total  OUT  89776.487228 104.55 GPH.   Therefore.98308 103.  For different combinations of product streams. the top tray overflow in gallons per hour = 13851.975  141. In fractionation efficiency calculations.      4. we need to determine the  hot GPH.758174 129.5x 102.    Solution:     The energy balance table for the envelope presented in Figure 4.046 89776. we get x = 86568.  the  fractionation  criteria  is  defined  using  the  product  vapor  flow  rates and corresponding  reflux rates.Design of Crude Distillation Column      Q 4.5x      Btu/lb  1169.86 252       156451.8x  66675 67. API of the overflow = 57.  Therefore.  However.  the  generation  of  adequate  amount  of  vapor  requires  adequate  amount  of  liquid.3  4.25 246 x  Water  L    Cond  duty      Total    100 268. it  is  important to note this concept in the design calculations.6  77.1  315  12.1  315  12.75 252 O/Flow  V  57.  fractionation  criteria is  usually  defined as the ratio  of vapor and liquid (reflux) flow  rates. determine the top tray overflow rate in lbs/hr.8x      From the enthalpy balance.75 100 O/Flow  L  57.14 lbs/hr.86 53  4.9+x     156451. the factor F is defined as  160    .1 which corresponds to  6.  in  the  case  of  CDU.    Fractionation criteria is defined using the following terms for the performance of the CDU:    A) Factor F: Defined as the ratio of the hot gallons per hour (GPH) of the lighest product from draw  off tray to the total vapor product (cold GPH) leaving the lightest product draw off tray.011+141. This is regarded as  cold  GPH.4613   156451.13 Verification of fractionation criteria    In  a  distillation  column.675  274.06289 264.8  266  12.8  266  12.9+x    116.

  b) Kerosene  draw  off  tray:  Provides  appropriate  liquid  flow  rate  (reflux)  to  sections  below  the  kerosene draw off tray   c) LGO draw off tray: Provides appropriate liquid flow rate (reflux) to sections below the LGO draw  off tray.     After applying the fractionation criteria.   d) HGO  draw  off  tray:  Provides  appropriate  liquid  flow  rate  (reflux)  to  sections  below  the  HGO  draw off tray.Design of Crude Distillation Column    i) Naphtha‐Kerosene          ii) Kerosene‐LGO        iii) LGO‐HGO         iii) HGO‐LGO          A convenient correlation between the cold stream specific gravity (at 60  oF) and the hot stream specific  gravity  (at  desired  temperature)  is  presented  in  Table  4. the hot GPH is usually higher than the cold  GPH. one would be able to carry out mass and energy balances as  follows:  a) Top tray: Provides appropriate liquid flow rate (reflux) for sections below the top tray.    B) No of trays in various sections (N):     The number of trays in various sections is taken as follows for various combinations:    i) Naphtha‐Kerosene: N = 12 (No pump arounds.3.  the  following expression is used to convert the cold GPH values (which are usually known from CDU mass  balances):        Since usually hot stream SG is lower than the cold stream SG. therefore.  Using  these  two  specific  gravities. all trays included in the evaluation)  161    .

    C) ASTM Gaps (G):    ASTM Gaps are usually defined as per the following product specifications for the CDU    i) Naphtha‐Kerosene: G = 25 oF  ii) Kerosene‐LGO: G = ‐10 oF  iii) LGO‐HGO: G = ‐25 oF    The fractionation criteria is defined as a correlation between Reflux Ratio.  If  desired  ASTM  gap  values  are  not  met.  iii) LGO‐HGO: N = 11 (2 pump around trays get a credit of only 1 tray).4 – 4.   Eventually. we have been able to determine the condenser  duty. verify whether desired ASTM gap has been  met  or  not. This is due to the fact that usually ASTM gaps are defined  for Naphtha‐kerosene. N.  b) From energy balance of the tower top section.  The  tower  top  temperature  enabled  the  evaluation of liquid and vapor enthalpies at the top section for the energy balance. Kerosene‐LGO.    The fractionation criteria can be applied in two ways which are summarized as follows:    a) Assume  ASTM    Gap  as  desired  for  the  combination  of  products  and  determine  the  hot  GPH  liquid reflux flow rates.8 (on a molar basis) has been assumed previously.  fractionation  criteria  is  correlated  between  (Reflux  ratio  x  N)  and  G  for  various values of ∆T50% TBP.Design of Crude Distillation Column    ii) Kerosene‐LGO: N = 11 (2 Pump around trays get a credit of only 1 tray).  b) Assume the value of the unknown parameter such as pump around duty and determine the hot  GPH  as  an  unknown  parameter  from  energy  balances  of  respective  sections  of  the  CDU. LGO‐HGO combinations and the final TBP temperature of  the residue is usually specified.  iv) HGO‐residue: Criteria not required.  Typically.5  for steam stripping conductions in the CDU. conduct energy balance to determine unknown parameters  such as pump around duties etc. G and ∆T50% TBP between  the  adjacent  cuts.                   162    .  Eventually.  then  unknown  parameters  need  to  be  adjusted. The reflux ratio enabled the  determination  of  the  tower  top  temperature.  The fractionation criteria correlation data are presented in Table 4. with the known values of the hot GPH.  From this the total pump around duties can be estimated.      A careful dissection of the CDU design calculations conducted so far indicates the following information:    a) Reflux ratio of 0.

Design of Crude Distillation Column 

 
SG = 0.5 

SG = 0.52 

SG = 0.54 

SG = 0.58 

SG 

o

T ( F) 

SG 

o

T ( F) 

SG 

o

T ( F) 

80.07 

0.48 

81.38 

0.50 

79.02 

0.52 

100.84 

0.46 

102.17 

0.48 

101.03 

119.16 

0.44 

121.73 

0.47 

120.59 

139.92 

0.42 

141.28 

0.45 

160.66 

0.39 

160.82 

178.94 

0.36 

182.58 

0.35 

o

T ( F) 

SG = 0.6 

SG = 0.62 

SG = 0.64 

SG = 0.66 

SG = 0.68 

SG 

o

T ( F) 

SG 

o

T ( F) 

SG 

o

T ( F) 

SG 

o

T ( F) 

87.81 

0.58 

86.67 

0.60 

90.42 

0.62 

85.62 

0.64 

0.55 

115.94 

0.56 

117.26 

0.58 

122.24 

0.60 

110.09 

0.53 

137.96 

0.54 

146.61 

0.56 

151.60 

0.58 

138.24 

141.55 

0.52 

164.86 

0.52 

177.18 

0.54 

182.18 

0.56 

0.46 

163.55 

0.50 

197.88 

0.50 

204.10 

0.52 

217.67 

180.47 

0.44 

183.12 

0.49 

227.23 

0.48 

228.56 

0.51 

213.42 

0.39 

200.23 

0.47 

262.66 

0.45 

267.70 

0.48 

232.93 

0.37 

216.12 

0.46 

289.53 

0.42 

301.92 

239.00 

0.35 

249.10 

0.43 

309.05 

0.39 

267.40 

0.40 

323.68 

0.37 

289.37 

0.37 

301.54 

0.35 

SG 

o

T ( F) 

80.39 

0.56 

0.51 

99.96 

0.49 

121.98 

140.15 

0.48 

0.43 

160.93 

184.00 

0.40 

198.64 

0.38 

212.02 

0.35 

SG 

T ( F) 

SG 

101.59 

0.65 

98.01 

0.68 

0.63 

139.54 

0.64 

139.62 

0.66 

0.62 

171.36 

0.62 

181.23 

0.63 

168.82 

0.60 

201.95 

0.60 

217.94 

0.61 

0.54 

200.63 

0.58 

233.77 

0.58 

257.10 

0.59 

251.93 

0.52 

230.00 

0.56 

260.68 

0.57 

287.69 

0.58 

293.50 

0.49 

259.37 

0.55 

288.83 

0.55 

339.09 

0.55 

0.45 

330.20 

0.47 

285.06 

0.53 

335.32 

0.53 

377.03 

0.53 

331.24 

0.42 

368.10 

0.44 

322.99 

0.51 

367.14 

0.51 

411.29 

0.51 

367.87 

0.38 

397.43 

0.41 

351.12 

0.49 

395.26 

0.49 

445.55 

0.49 

386.16 

0.35 

427.95 

0.38 

373.13 

0.47 

430.74 

0.47 

487.14 

0.46 

446.23 

0.35 

403.72 

0.45 

463.76 

0.44 

520.17 

0.44 

428.16 

0.43 

491.89 

0.42 

549.52 

0.42 

453.82 

0.41 

523.66 

0.39 

580.08 

0.39 

483.13 

0.38 

557.85 

0.36 

604.51 

0.37 

501.44 

0.35 

616.69 

0.35 

 
 
(a) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
163 
 

SG = 0.7 
o

Design of Crude Distillation Column 

 
 
SG = 0.72 
o

T ( F) 

SG 

SG = 0.74 
o

T ( F) 

SG 

SG = 0.76 
o

T ( F) 

SG 

SG = 0.78 
o

T ( F) 

SG 

SG = 0.8 
o

T ( F) 

SG = 0.82 
o

SG 

T ( F) 

SG 

SG = 0.84 
o

T ( F) 

SG 

SG = 0.88 
o

T ( F) 

SG 

SG = 0.94 
o

T ( F) 

SG 

SG = 0.98 
o

T ( F) 

SG 

100.53 

0.70 

114.07 

0.71 

101.91 

0.74 

100.78 

0.76 

102.08 

0.78 

118.07 

0.79 

101.01 

0.82 

119.54 

0.86 

111.21 

0.92 

104.01 

0.96 

140.91 

0.67 

165.48 

0.68 

139.85 

0.72 

142.41 

0.74 

160.85 

0.76 

175.62 

0.77 

157.35 

0.80 

185.67 

0.83 

178.55 

0.90 

154.23 

0.95 

181.30 

0.65 

225.45 

0.66 

182.70 

0.70 

188.92 

0.72 

223.29 

0.73 

230.73 

0.75 

208.78 

0.78 

248.12 

0.81 

254.48 

0.87 

195.86 

0.93 

221.69 

0.63 

285.43 

0.63 

224.33 

0.68 

237.88 

0.70 

283.28 

0.71 

291.96 

0.73 

263.89 

0.77 

311.80 

0.79 

310.81 

0.85 

244.85 

0.92 

263.30 

0.61 

341.73 

0.60 

263.49 

0.66 

286.87 

0.68 

344.51 

0.68 

343.38 

0.71 

311.63 

0.74 

375.46 

0.76 

385.51 

0.82 

302.41 

0.90 

293.90 

0.60 

401.70 

0.57 

299.00 

0.65 

323.58 

0.66 

404.50 

0.66 

398.48 

0.69 

353.27 

0.73 

451.38 

0.73 

440.62 

0.80 

357.52 

0.88 

336.73 

0.57 

462.88 

0.53 

336.94 

0.63 

361.54 

0.65 

458.35 

0.63 

462.13 

0.66 

404.69 

0.71 

515.04 

0.70 

485.92 

0.79 

413.85 

0.86 

383.24 

0.55 

522.83 

0.50 

381.00 

0.61 

404.38 

0.63 

504.86 

0.61 

541.70 

0.62 

447.54 

0.69 

581.14 

0.67 

544.70 

0.76 

477.53 

0.84 

424.83 

0.52 

569.31 

0.47 

422.62 

0.59 

434.97 

0.61 

550.15 

0.58 

593.09 

0.59 

491.60 

0.67 

655.81 

0.64 

588.77 

0.74 

524.07 

0.82 

477.45 

0.50 

612.12 

0.44 

465.46 

0.56 

475.36 

0.59 

588.09 

0.57 

635.92 

0.57 

530.78 

0.65 

721.89 

0.60 

634.06 

0.72 

576.72 

0.80 

520.27 

0.47 

659.79 

0.40 

503.38 

0.54 

524.32 

0.56 

635.80 

0.54 

675.08 

0.55 

566.26 

0.63 

773.28 

0.57 

690.39 

0.70 

624.47 

0.78 

565.53 

0.44 

549.88 

0.51 

564.69 

0.54 

671.28 

0.52 

721.55 

0.51 

604.22 

0.61 

816.10 

0.54 

752.83 

0.68 

668.54 

0.76 

610.77 

0.40 

593.90 

0.48 

603.84 

0.52 

710.43 

0.49 

772.92 

0.48 

645.83 

0.59 

879.71 

0.51 

810.37 

0.65 

717.53 

0.74 

639.17 

0.46 

644.21 

0.49 

744.66 

0.46 

814.50 

0.45 

686.20 

0.57 

865.44 

0.62 

766.51 

0.72 

673.41 

0.43 

678.45 

0.47 

776.44 

0.44 

842.62 

0.43 

722.89 

0.54 

903.38 

0.60 

815.47 

0.70 

702.73 

0.40 

712.68 

0.44 

811.86 

0.40 

754.71 

0.52 

863.23 

0.68 

756.68 

0.40 

785.30 

0.51 

904.86 

0.67 

819.54 

0.48 

850.10 

0.46 

 
 
(b) 
 
 
Table 4.3: Variation of specific gravity with temperature (a) Data range: SG = 0.5 to 0.7 at 60 oF (b) Data range: SG = 0.72 to 0.98 at 60 oF. 
 
 
 
164 
 

Design of Crude Distillation Column 

 
 
 
∆TBP50% = 100  F 
ASTM Gap 
o
F = RR x N 
( F) 
o

∆TBP50% = 150  F 
ASTM Gap 
o
( F) 
F = RR x N 

∆TBP50% = 200  F 
ASTM Gap 
o
( F) 
F = RR x N 

o

o

∆TBP50% = 250  F 
ASTM Gap 
o
( F) 
F = RR x N 
o

23.30 

100.63 

45.40 

101.75 

65.18 

101.56 

81.08 

102.75 

22.13 

69.63 

43.85 

70.40 

64.79 

81.21 

79.92 

49.84 

19.81 

50.12 

41.52 

50.02 

63.63 

60.80 

77.59 

40.39 

15.54 

34.69 

38.03 

34.62 

62.85 

49.92 

76.81 

34.04 

12.83 

29.24 

33.38 

24.60 

61.30 

39.92 

75.26 

29.85 

9.72 

24.65 

29.50 

19.93 

59.75 

34.54 

73.32 

24.50 

6.62 

21.62 

22.13 

14.93 

56.26 

24.54 

69.83 

19.60 

4.29 

19.46 

14.76 

11.64 

53.16 

19.37 

64.79 

14.68 

‐0.36 

16.41 

9.72 

10.08 

46.95 

14.90 

59.75 

12.06 

‐3.85 

14.78 

5.46 

8.84 

39.97 

11.02 

54.32 

9.90 

‐7.73 

13.48 

0.80 

7.96 

36.09 

9.92 

50.83 

8.80 

‐11.22 

12.46 

‐3.85 

7.07 

29.50 

8.04 

46.95 

7.92 

‐15.87 

10.93 

45.01 

7.32 

‐19.36 

9.84 

‐24.79 

8.98 

‐28.67 

8.19 

 
Table 4.4:  Fractionation criteria correlation data for naphtha‐kerosene products. 
 
∆TBP50% = 100  F 
ASTM Gap 
o
( F) 
F = RR x N 
o

∆TBP50% = 150  F 
ASTM Gap 
o
( F) 
F = RR x N 
o

∆TBP50% = 200  F 
ASTM Gap 
o
( F) 
F = RR x N 
o

∆TBP50% = 250  F 
ASTM Gap 
o
( F) 
F = RR x N 
o

o

‐24.82 

5.72 

‐16.37 

4.75 

‐2.75 

5.26 

1.47 

4.51 

12.65 

4.33 

‐22.69 

6.73 

‐9.70 

6.13 

1.19 

6.38 

8.44 

5.88 

16.29 

5.15 

‐19.36 

7.68 

‐2.11 

8.41 

6.65 

8.07 

16.02 

7.82 

20.54 

6.31 

‐16.02 

9.14 

4.86 

11.42 

12.41 

9.60 

24.51 

9.99 

26.60 

7.58 

‐11.77 

10.76 

10.33 

14.44 

16.96 

11.18 

30.27 

12.00 

33.27 

9.20 

‐7.22 

12.79 

17.61 

21.28 

24.23 

14.43 

37.85 

15.64 

38.43 

11.17 

‐3.58 

15.06 

21.26 

27.47 

28.18 

18.06 

46.34 

22.81 

43.89 

13.69 

0.36 

18.10 

24.61 

38.08 

32.43 

22.84 

51.21 

32.27 

51.16 

18.21 

4.31 

21.52 

36.69 

29.47 

51.82 

36.48 

54.50 

21.44 

7.35 

26.94 

37.91 

36.89 

59.36 

28.24 

10.09 

32.37 

62.11 

37.97 

12.21 

37.72 

 
Table 4.5: Fractionation criteria correlation data for side stream‐side stream products. 
 
 
 
165 
 

∆TBP50% = 300  F 
ASTM Gap 
o
( F) 
F = RR x N 

Design of Crude Distillation Column                                                                        1   Product (Naphtha+Kerosene +LGO) Vapor +  Steam (at PP) + Vapor Reflux approaching  LGO  Draw off tray.      Since the design calculations of the CDU follow in a sequential manner.    2   Liquid reflux leaving LGO draw off tray.    166    . This unique variable  has the key for all design calculations and satisfaction of the fractionation criterion.6: Energy balance envelope for the estimation of reflux flow rate below the LGO draw off tray.    8   Residue product    9   Crude (V +L)    10   Bottom Pump around duty    11   Top pump around duty    11  2  1  3 4 10  5 6 9  7  8    Figure 4.    3   Fresh steam entering LGO SS    4   LGO product    5   Fresh steam entering HGO SS    6   HGO product    7   Fresh stream entering the flash zone.    a) A wrong choice of reflux ratio may provide negative flow rates. it is inevitable that the selection  of the reflux ratio (on a molar basis) at the tower top section is very important.  This is unacceptable.

    167    . positive reflux flow rate values  may be obtained.  for  the  heat  balance  envelope.    Therefore.    With  this  knowledge.  b) Conduct energy balances for the section below the kero draw‐off tray whose envelope is shown  in Figure 4.  in  this  lecture  notes  we  uniquely  wish  to  provide  elabotations  towards  this  important  variable.6.  which  is  obtained  from  the  total  refluxes  and  condenser  duties. fractionation criteria needs to be satisfied.  the  immediate  issue  that  we  can  consider  in  the  CDU  calculations is to execute the following calculations:    a) Apply  fractionation  criteria  for  the  naphtha‐kerosene  section  and  verify  whether  fractionation  crtieria is satisfied or not.e.   If we get negative flow  rates  then we enhance the reflux  ratio systematically   until  we  get both  applicable  criteria satisfied  i. positive reflux flow rates (hot GPH) and fractionation criteria.  Temperature  is  known  from  tower  temperature profile).  However.  We consider different values of naphtha reflux ratio in the tower top section and we wish to  elaborate upon this     Coming  back  to  the  fractionation  criteria.    Solution:     From previous solutions.  determine the liquid reflux flow rates (GPH) and apply fractionation criteria.  The heat balance envelope consists of the following consolidated stream data    Heat in  Heat out  Crude Vapor + Liquid (Obtain data from flash zone  Overflow  vapor  (Mass  will  be  same  as  unknown  mass and energy balance calculations)  reflux  rate.  one  requires  the  knowledge  of  the  total  pump  around  duties.12: Verify the fractionation criteria for the Ecudaor crude oil case and determine the optimal reflux  ratio that provides all criteria (positive flow rates and ASTM gap based fractionation criteria) satisfied.    c) Very high values of reflux ratio enhances the column diameters and contributes to the cost.  Total fresh superheated steam at 450 oF  Vapor products to draw off tray (known from mass  balance tables)..65 mmBtu/hr (from previous solution).46 mmBtu/hr (from previous solution).  Condenser duty + TPA duty + BPA duty = 206.Design of Crude Distillation Column    b) Even if one chooses an appropriately high value of reflux ratio. we obtain the following information:    Condenser duty = 104.  LGO  draw  off  tray  liquid  reflux  rate  (Flow  rate  is  Steam  to  tray  34  (all  steam  other  than  kerosene  unknown but temperature is known from assumed  fresh steam)  tower temperature profile)    LGO product     HGO product   Total Pump around duties    From  the  above  table.  We  next  present  an  illustrative  example  that  elaborates  upon  the  choice  of  the  reflux  ratio  and  subsequent energy balance calculations:    Q 4.

 we apply the fractionation criteria for naphtha‐kerosene combination:    From the solution of Q9.29 GPH  Cold Naphtha product GPH (from mass balance table) = 15271.8  mmBtu/hr  293.9  450  321.    From fractionation criteria correlation data (Table 4.9  44163.29/15271. we obtain the cold GPH of the liquid reflux as 13851.7694  18.    First. we get X = ‐84.4  1203.4  713225.8  325.5378+293X    Solving for X.5  325.587393.4582  120. the fractionation criteria is concluded to  be satisfied.705736 (at 60 oF)  Hot GPH = 13851.5317  90.6.6  162.4  225.35  = 1.25  22.    Specific gravity of the stream at tower top temperature (246 oF) = 0.     We next carry out the energy balances for the energy balance envelope presented in Figure 4.4773  102.16    N = 12    Ordinate on fractionation criteria correlation = 1.587393  From mass balance table.5  57.55  11.9  12.55*0. we conclude that the naphtha reflux ratio is not enough to  meet even the column mass balance requirements.3X  293X  55.8  325.83  11.5  408  45.9  293.  168    .3132  95.5  282.6  1262.2  408  315  PP=  35.0  302.8  435.1  365.35 GPH    Factor F = Hot GPH/Naphtha product rate = 17692.6  75425.2316  388.6  11.1952  399.5 GPH.4  526.106.4).  A  summary of the energy balance table is presented below:    Stream  IN  Crude  Steam  Tray 34 overflow  Total  OUT  O/F to tray 34  Vapor to tray 34  Steam to tray 34  LGO  HGO  Residue  PA  Total  API  V+L  V  L  V  V  V  L  L  L  MeABP  45.16 x 12 = 13.19 mmBtu/hr. ∆T50% = 157.9    From product TBP curves.2  14.0  80289.1059  12.6  lb/hr  Btu/lb  637798.7  32.1  T (oF)  K  11.0  X  713223. SG of Naphtha = 0.9  686.705736/0.6  75425. pump around duty = 102.2    Since we obtained a negative flow rate.Design of Crude Distillation Column    Therefore.3  X  183636.4  329710. ASTM gap = 27 oF  Desired minimum ASTM gap = 25 oF    Since obtained ASTM gap is greater than desired ASTM gap.5448+162. = 17692.1  11.

5  on  a  molar  basis  and  repeat  all  relevant  calculations.0692  36.1373  4.75  12.5455   SG at 60 oF = 0.7057  Hot GPH = 47090   Naphtha GPH = 15721.86  53  x  143.3  66675  291117.9+x  GPH     121.8697  138.0427       Next we carry out the energy balance for the envelope presented in Figure 4.7      SG at 258 oF = 0.Design of Crude Distillation Column      We  next  increase  column  reflux  ratio  to  a  value  of  1.75  12.65273     274.25           264  264  264        12.75  12.75  100  100  100        84.9        53  53  67.86  274.1038  77.7  156451. we next apply the fractionation criteria for naphtha‐kerosene  combination.0427     4.4872  121.    Cold GPH = 34241.3   F = 3.9  66675  67.9+x        89776.86  134665.3  165  100     mmBtu/hr     24.  Eventually. Relevant energy balances are summarized in the following table.3898     103.8x          Using information from the above table.6600  138.08  N = 12  Factor = 37  169    .86  134665.3  66675     291117.6600     116.5x     78. For First we determine the tower top temperature.5x        4.1  268.    Stream  IN  Naphtha  O/Flow  Steam  Total  OUT  Naphtha  O/Flow  Water  Cond  duty  Total  x=        V  V  V        L  L  L  K     T     12.1  1167.2     89776.487228           156451. condenser duty and total pump around duty are evaluated as follows:    Stream     K  IN        Naphtha  V  Reflux  V  Steam  V     Total        OUT        Naphtha  L  Refluxes  L  Water  L     Cond duty        Total        Total pump around duty=  T (oF)     12.1  66675  1175.8x     4.2  mmBtu/hr  Btu/lb     268.3  mmBtu/hr           24.75  12.6  x  274.43+274.7582  7.758174     141.7  lb/hr  100  258  100        34241.9965  lb/hr     89776.75  248  248  248        12.  From dew point calculations.25                 214000.011+141.71   lb/hr  Btu/lb        89776.6  to determine the tower  top tray reflux stream flow rate. tower top  temperature = 248 oF.

9  686.    SG at 326 = 0.3    From product TBP data obtained earlier.038 moles/hr Moles of overhead product =  Total moles HC in the overhead vapour = 2694.9        11.2     35.  Hopefully.5448+162.5  282.8  325.03 lb/hr which corresponds to 7129.0  302. Since we got positive  flow rates. ∆T50%  TBP = 135 oF.  Therefore.6  162.  Therefore.83        325.2  14.5  57.6. we attempt  to be more careful to all calculations desired.55  11.9965  382.6  75425.4773  84.5  F = 0.    Tower top temperature calculations:      898.1        MeABP           408        408  315  PP=                 K           11.5  = ‐28 oF  Desired ASTM gap = ‐10 oF    This time we failed only in obtaining the desired ASTM gap.0  X  713223.4  329710.5        T        450  321.4        mmBtu/hr     293.4  526.3X      293X  55.4  225.Design of Crude Distillation Column      From fractionation criteria correlation ASTM gap  = 42 oF.4582  120.8   Kero + Naphtha product flow rate = 29312.1  365.3391+293X       Solving for X we get X = 47479.1  11.25  22.74 cold GPH.8  Btu/lb        1262.5.6  75425. we proceed towards applying fractionation criteria based on correlation data presented in  Table 4.9     713225.7694  18.9  44163.114 170    . this time we should satisfy all criteria desired.8  435.  We next consider a reflux ratio of 2 and  repeat all calculations.3132  95.3  N = 11  Ordinate = 3.  ASTM gap from Table 4.8  325. Desired ASTM gap = 25 oF.2316   162.5317  90.3        293.4  1203.6  11.    Stream     IN     Crude     Steam     Tray 34 overflow  Total     OUT     O/F to tray 34  Vapor to tray 34  Steam to tray 34  LGO     HGO     Residue     PA        Total        V+L  V  L        V  V  V  L  L  L        API           45.3X  388.1059  12.64  Hot GPH = 8905.7  32.9  12.    Next  we  present  the  summary  of  the  energy  balances  carried  out  for  the  heat  balance  envelope  presented in Figure 4.5        45. criteria  is satisfied.6     lb/hr     637798.0  80289.6     X  183636.

G 0.6     89776.75  12.5  2.771117 Total  Wt  Factor Mole  Fraction 0.658258  0.291436 0.35 14.052766  4.7  66675           336005.468468  1.85073 atm  To find the tower top temperature.57572  7.030405 0.36 0.86264 0.072627 0.86  179553.7 0.9  77.8697     150.001704 0.1500  269  48.01101 0.5  1.326216 Atm    From Maxwell’s correlation.86  179553.533248 1.746702 0.079785 0.3197        53  4.932045 K2 = K1 * ΣX =  0.196946 0.7582  53  9.227685 0.927793 1.598627  0.135813 0.411411  0.1 1.149875 0.1199 1 PS K  X=y/K 12.998824 1.5579  150.5  2  0.822823  0.3  4.542234 12.50573 psia  0.75  12. we proceed towards  condenser duty calculations and total pump around duties.5  3.217393 0.466752  2.698765 0.723785 0.638826 0.3197     .178876 0.5163  67.766938 0. assume initially a value of 250oF.167 PPHC in overhead vapour =  12.746914 2.771117 0.  Next.300813 1.  Table: Calculation of Tower Top Temperature  Component  Mid BP  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  75  125  160  195  235  265  295  320  Vol %  on  crude  S.319413 0.116104 0.665882 0.4 6 3.5  2  3  2.6  75.75  100  100  100  lb/hr     89776.8 2.4872  165  100  131.Design of Crude Distillation Column    Total moles of steam in the overhead vapour =  3704.3000  1167. we get tower top temperature = 250 oF.56 0.077653 0. A summary of the calculations is presented  below:    Stream     K  IN        Naphtha  V  Reflux  V  Steam  V     Total        OUT        Naphtha  L  Refluxes  L  Water  L     Cond  duty        Total        Total pump around duty=  T     12.7  66675  336005.024833 0.75  250  250  250        12.493404 2.0986  mmBtu/hr     171    Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr        269  24.383454 Vapour Pressure corresponding to K2 =  0. and then conduct dew point  calculations as given under.

8  325.35  F = 4.1  46377.    Stream     IN     Crude     Steam     Tray 34 overflow  Total     OUT     O/F to tray 34  Vapor to tray 34  Steam to tray 34        V+L  V  L        V  V  V  API           45.53   Hot GPH = 64606.2316  162.6     X  183636.86  275. we determine the reflux overflow rate from the tower top tray.43+274.3X  388.3  mmBtu/hr                 24.25  100  260  100                    lb/hr  Btu/lb              89776.9+x              131.23  Ordinate = 50.9+x  156451.4  1203.9        11.83        325.5579     116.75  12.011+141.    Next  we  carry  out  the  energy  balances  for  the  envelope  shown  in  Figure  4.5  x  275  66675  1175.  The  following  table  summarizes the energy balances and evaluated liquid reflux flow rate from the LGO draw off tray.5  57.3        293.3132  95.  Therefore.1  T        450  321.7  156451.86  53  x  145  66675  67.4  mmBtu/hr     293.53           lb/hr  GPH  12.75  12.9  12.02  Naphtha product GPH = 15721.8  325.0  Btu/lb        1262.8  172    lb/hr     637798.25              266  266  266           12.Design of Crude Distillation Column      Next.6  75425.8x  140.9           89776.5448+162.8033                     We next apply the fractionation criteria for naphtha‐kerosene products    Cold GPH = 46377.5317  90.5        45.3898     103. ASTM gap desired = 25 oF.73352     274.758174     141.487228           156451.3X      293X  55.6  75425.8  ∆T50% TBP = 157 oF  From fractionation correlation.1233           4.5x  103. the criteria is  satisfied.25  22. Calculations are summarized  below:    Stream     IN  Naphtha  O/Flow  Steam  Total     OUT  Naphtha  O/Flow  Water  Cond  duty  Total     x=              V  V  V           L  L  L  K        T                 289846.6.5x     78.0  X  713223.6  162.0  302.2     MeABP           408        408  315  PP=  K           11.8x     4. ASTM gap = 45 oF.7694  .

  the  incoming  streams  enthalpy  terms  are  itemized as:  173    .4  80289.2  14.4  282.5  11.49   Kero + Naphtha product GPH = 29312.7.6 lbs/hr which corresponds to 18501.4582  120. The procedure  outlined  will  provide  an  outlook  for  the  design  engineer  to  explore  and  understand  the  intracacies  involved in pump around duties.5  686.4 GPH  SG at 326 oF = 0.    We next present the discussion for the evaluation of top pump around duties.64   Hot GPH = 23110.5    Factor F = 0. we accept this value. we present a concise presentation of the procedure for the  estimation of top pump around duty. The  envelope considered is from tower top section to the LGO draw off tray along with  the Kerosene and  LGO  side  strippers. it can be observed that we may have slightly approximated the  reflux ratio to be on the higher side. what we presented here is more relevant  and suitable as it enabled a systematic exploration of various associated parameters.6  435. In  this lecture notes.  Very fine estimation of vapor and liquid enthalpies is required for  the  case.8     18.    For  the  chosen  heat  balance  envelope.      4. A very accurate evaluation of the reflux ratio will provide a value  of about 1.4412+293X       From energy balance calculations X = 123206.7  32.  one  may  think  that  its  better  to  force  the  ASTM  gap  criteria  first  and  then  determine  the  tower  top  temperature.14 Estimation of Top and Bottom Pump Around Duty    The estimation of TPA duty is tricky.9  225.55  526.  This calculation is carried  out only after the desired criteria are satisfied.1                       11.4                    713225.0986  372.Design of Crude Distillation Column    LGO  HGO  Residue  PA  Total              L  L  L        35.1  11.  ∆T50% TBP = 135 oF  ASTM gap from fractionation criteria correlation = ‐7.  TPA  duty  estimation  is  not  presented  including  the  famous  Jones  and  Pujado (2006) book.    After  observing  the  sequence  of  calculations.5 oF  ASTM gap desired = ‐10 oF  Since the obtained ASTM gap is higher than the desired ASTM gap. we use the values generated for a reflux ratio of 2 only. However.6  329710.    We next apply the fractionation criteria    LGO cold GPH = 18501.    The top pump around duty is estimated using the heat balance envelope presented in Figure 4.9  365.4 GPH.  For all future calculations. Since both flow  rates and fractionation criteria are satisfied.  In  many  text  books.9.9  44163.79  Ordinate = 8.  One  may  come  out  with  an  alternate  method of obtaining the desired criteria satisfied.4773  75.  Also.7. we conclude with this value.1059  12.

  c) Cold naphtha liquid reflux entering tray 1.  using  steam  tables.  174    . Consists of    Product (Naphtha + Kero + LGO) vapor + Steam    9  (Residue steam) + Vapor reflux. their enthalpy can be estimated.                 8     5   Liquid reflux leaving LGO draw off tray. The enthalpy of this stream is known from previous  calculations.        Figure 4.7: Heat balance envelope for the estimation of top pump around duty        a) Hydrocarbon product vapors (Naphtha + Kerosene + LGO) entering tray 34 (LGO draw off tray).  Once  again  by  assuming  the  partial  pressure of the steam (from Draw off temperature calculations). and assumed temperature of  the  consolidated  vapor  stream  entering  the  tray  34.  b) Steam  in  vapors  entering  tray  34  (LGO  draw  off  tray).Design of Crude Distillation Column                     1       Product (Naphtha) Vapor + Steam (at PP) + Vapor    Reflux at Tower Top temperature                 2       Naphtha cold reflux at 100 oF  1                 3 2       Fresh steam entering Kero SS                 4       Kero product                 5       Fresh steam entering LGO SS                   6 3       LGO product   4                7       Vapor approaching LGO Draw off tray.  the  enthalpy  contributed by the steam in vapors entering tray 34.   By assuming the temperature of these vapors.   8  7    6              9       Top pump around exchanger duty.

  This is unknown and should be estimated from the energy balance. However.  Therefore. its flow rate is  not known. we can estimate the top pump around duty. the enthalpy of the reflux vapor entering tray 34 is known. Its flow rate and enthalpy are known from total tower energy balance table. in reality. it needs to be assumed. However. of plates = 11  175    . For sample calculations. enthalpy can be estimated and heat lost through this stream can be estimated.Design of Crude Distillation Column    d) Reflux vapor stream entering tray 34. Its flow rate and enthalpy are known from total tower energy balance table.  The most tricky issues in these calculations is the vapor and liquid enthalpy values estimation.  From TBP data evaluated for LGO and HGO.  d) LGO product.  estimate the top pump around exchanger duty. This is at LGO draw off tray temperature.    Solution:    First  we  apply  fractionation  criteria  for  LGO‐HGO  combination  to  estimate  the  liquid  and  vapor  reflux  flow rates (lbs/hr). Therefore. The vapor reflux flow rate is determined from the fractionation criteria for LGO –  HGO product combination which will give hot GPH reflux and then this is eventually converted  to lbs/hr. vapor reflux stream enthalpy is known. ∆T50% = 575 – 505 = 70 oF  ASTM gap desired = ‐35 oF  From Graph.  Since consolidated vapor stream temperature is  known  (assumed).  c) Kerosene product.   With the temperature  known.    The outgoing streams for the chosen heat balance envelope are itemized as:    a) Reflux liquid leaving tray 34.13:  For  the  Ecuador  crude  oil  CDU  problem  assuming  data  from  solutions  generated  in  Q  1  –  10.    We next present an illustrative example for the estimation of TPA duty.  The  consolidated  vapor  stream  enthalpy  data  need  not  be  calculated  as  it  is  available  as  a  total  enthalpy  leaving  the  heat  balance envelope chosen to estimate the condenser duty.    By equating total energy out and total energy coming in.  e) Top pump around duty.   Similarly.  b) Consolidated  vapor  stream  leaving  tray  1  at  its  temperature. the LGO  product MEABP and K values can be assumed.  Since  reflux liquid could significantly contribute to the average properties. the stream data is known. one needs to adopt an  iterative procedure where by the average enthalpies of the hydrocarbon vapor and liquid are updated  in every instance to obtain a converged value of the pump around duty. we  can ignore the iterative approach and do calculations for one forward step. Ordinate – 5  No. for  the liquid  stream.  The  consolidated  vapor  stream  consists  of  naphtha  reflux  vapor  +  naphtha  product  +  steam. For instance. since  hydrocarbon vapors consist of naphtha + kerosene + LGO products.       Q  4. a rough estimation of MEABP and  K  would  be based on their cut ranges and  average values. the missing data is for the reflux liquid. Since  enthalpy estimation is a function of MEABP and K value.

 Hydrocarbon liquid enthalpy at T = 542  oF.846337  Hot LGO SG = 0.  MEABP  =  340  oF  and  K  =  11.  Top  pump  around  duty  =  244.71  Cold GPH = 18494.36 x 1262. steam enthalpy = 51887.3  Btu/lb.5+14000+11375) = 18494.5 = 51887.98 = 51.056 GPH = 109380.96 lbs/hr  Hydrocarbon  vapor  enthalpy  at  T  =  547  oF.66  mmBtu/hr.  For the envelope.36 lbs/hr  Hydrocarbon vapor flow rate = 89776.2 Btu/lb.    Therefore.5 lbs/hr  Fresh steam entering the envelope = (315.0467 mmBtu/hr  Total  energy  going  out  =  220.7+80289.7 mmBtu/hr  d) Enthalpy of told cold naphtha reflux stream at 100 oF from previous heat balance tables = 4.7777684  Steam entering vapor = 48825+3062.    Draw off temperature = 537 oF  Vapor stream temperature = 547 oF  Liquid stream temperature = 542 oF  Liquid API = (6500*0.96 x 411.85+93859. entering  streams enthalpies are:  a) Hydrocarbon vapors = 263926.87 = 263926.8645)/(6500+3500) = 0. leaving stream enthalpies are  a) Hydrocarbon liquid reflux = 109380.18 mmBtu/hr  b) Vapor enthalpy at tower top temperature (250 oF) = 150.  We next apply the energy balances for the envelope presented in Figure 4.55 mmBtu/hr  b) Steam fresh enthalpy = 14787.31 GPH.5 x  1304.67 mmBtu/hr  c) Steam enthalpy in vapor at a partial pressure of 1.71/0.2 bar and vapor temperature = 1304.11 mmBtu/hr d) Kerosene product enthalpy from overall tower energy balance table = 15.846337 = 15515.648  –  200. Bottom pump around duty = 75.42 lbs/hr LGO SG = 0.98 mmBtu/hr  Total energy in  = 244.0986 – 23.7582  mmBtu/hr  e) Hydrocarbon vapor reflux = 109380.8463+3500*0.5  (Assumed  values)  =  411.80387)/(8750+6500+8000) = 0.66  =  23.  176    .31 x 0.3/1000000 = 108.85267  Vapor API = (8750*0.3/100000 = 44.5 x 340/1000000 = 37.2/100000 = 67.8463+8000*0. MEABP = 300  oF and K = 12 (Assumed values) = 340  Btu/lb.32 mmBtu/hr c) LGO product enthalpy from overall tower energy balance table = 18.55)*18 = 14787.702995+6500*0.6/1000000 = 18.Design of Crude Distillation Column    Hot GPH = 5/11 x (15312.7.2 x 411.648 mmBtu/hr  For the envelope.11 mmBtu/hr.97+505.98 mmBtu/hr.  Thereby.

    For  this  heat  balance envelope.15 Estimation of flash zone liquid reflux rate  The flash zone liquid reflux rate is determined by conducting the energy balance across the heat balance  envelope  taken  from  below  the  HGO  draw  off  tray  and  for  the  flash  zone  (Figure  4.8: Heat balance envelope for the estimation of flash zone liquid reflux rate.  The outgoing streams in the envelope are product vapor stream consisting of  Naphtha + Kerosene + LGO + HGO.  approximate  enthalpy  values  can be obtained.  Q 4.   reflux vapor stream and residue product stream.Design of Crude Distillation Column                                        1               1   Product Vapor + Steam (at Partial pressure) +  Vapor reflux  2    2   Liquid Reflux  3    3   Crude (Vapor + Liquid)    4  5   4   Fresh steam    5   Residue product    Figure 4.8).  At  these  temperatures.    4.14: For the Ecuador crude oil CDU design problem. the incoming streams are crude (V +L).  from  Maxwell’s  correlation.  Solution:   The heat balance taken for the heat balance envelope taken as Figure 4.  The vapor stream temperature is taken as 5  oF plus the liquid  reflux  temperature. Of these. the liquid reflux stream temperature is taken  as the HGO draw off tray temperature.  The  following illustrative example summarizes the calculations for Ecuador crude oil.8  is presented below:  177    . one can determine the unknown reflux liquid/vapor mass flow rate.  Eventually. fresh steam entering at the bottom most tray  and liquid reflux stream. determine the reflux liquid stream flow rate at  the flash zone. steam in vapor at its partial pressure of the draw off tray pressure.

 X = 353277.6464 282.0 365.1  28.7  1082.0  1225.5  12.8 mmBtu/hr 293.5  1117.3  1010.3  835.15 11.0  26.9 lbs/hr which corresponds to a GPH of 48939 for an assumed  HGO SG of 0.7  580.8  816.3  151.6: Variation of Kf (Flooding factor) for various tray and sieve specifications.1  372.4  828.1  32.1  884.1 426 PP=19.3  1116.2  12.5  507.1  22.7  538.0 X 329710.4  30.7  17.0  441.1  909.4773 312.3  32.9  712.1  1156.4  28.0    25.7  643.5  1203.6  13.3    18.0  1032.2  304.6678 404X 120.2 14.5  1155.5  713.8  15.0  16.7  15.9    30.7  23.4 686625.8  1212.1X 354.9  11.4  14.5    28.9  1317.2  17.3132 61.3  20.55 11.6 308089.0 X 1262.9  917.1 686623.9  30.1  902.9 415.8573 63.8  11.9596 +282.6 V V V L 47.2  18.5  226.7  9.4  13.          Sieve & Valve tray flood  line  Tray  spacing  (inches)  Kf  Sieve and valve tray  design  Tray  spacing  (inches)  Kf  Bubble cap trays (flood)  Tray  spacing  (inches)  Kf  10.1 575 12.1  635.5  16.8 32.1  10.0  23.0024 +404X From energy balance table.4    21.2 K 11.9  25.7  605.9 48825.Design of Crude Distillation Column      Stream IN Crude Steam Liquid Reflux Total OUT Product vapor Steam in vapor Reflux vapor Residue API V+L V L MeABP 32.7  30.2  904.7  1063.0  27.9  19.4  13.3  1294.9  964.7  359.1  1256.9  786.0  980.0 1304.6  926.0  20.2  1185.8643 for the liquid reflux stream.7          Table 4.6 282.5 Total 542 542 542 686.3  14.55 T lb/hr 450 537 Btu/lb 637798.7  23.4  712.5  33.6 48825.3  25.2  14.1X 127.6  480.2  18.4  17.4  35.2  505.0 404.6  309.      178    .4  596.7  774.

 the column diameter calculations involve the following steps:  a) Calculate the consolidated liquid flow rate on the tray. For the section below the flash zone. This will be equal to liquid reflux + pump around stream flow rate + HGO product stream  flow rate for the HGO draw off tray  d. for operational convenience. Therefore. This will be equal to the liquid reflux for the section below the flash zone.16 Estimation of column diameters   A critical observation of vapor and liquid flow rates estimated at various sections of the CDU indicate  that column diameters will different for  a) b) c) d) Tower top section  LGO draw off tray  HGO draw off tray  Section below the Flash zone  Since  HGO  draw  off  tray  provides  maximum  vapor  flow  rates. this will be equal to the sum of (Naphtha + Kerosene + LGO +  HGO product vapor). This is termed as Av  179    .  g) Determine the diameter of the tray from the 80% flood mass flux and total vapor mass flux on  the tray. this will be equal to the tray 45 consolidated vapor including  naphtha product vapor + steam vapor + reflux vapor  b.  c.  it is assumed that Kf = 1100 for a tray spacing of 24 inches. the CDU is usually designed as  a column with three  different diameters. and reflux vapor. residue steam. This will be equal to tray 45 liquid reflux rate for the tower top section. HGO draw off tray. section below  the flash zone.  d) Use flooding correlation data as those presented in Table 4. these values are important design  variables as the crude oil is heat integrated with these pump around exchangers.  b. These refer to diameters of the tower top section.  e) From known value of  Kf determine the maximum allowed vapor mass flux using the expression    f) From the known value of Gf. this will be equal to the sum of residue steam +  reflux vapor.  For these sections.  c) Determine the liquid and vapor densities using suitable approximations. Actually. For the HGO draw off tray. For liquid.  if  desired  these  calculations  can  be  done  by  assuming the cooling fluid outlet to be about 150 ‐ 200  oF.  The  pump  around  cooling  fluid  outlet  is  assumed  as  300  oF  to  evaluate  the  pump  around  flow  rate  for  BPA. This will be equal to liquid reflux + pump around stream flow rate + LGO product stream  flow rate for the LGO draw off tray   c.6 to determine the Kf value. SG of various  products can be assumed. Ideally.    For  LGO. determine the maximum permissible value of Gf during operation  at 80 % flooding value. For the tower top section. SG can be estimated using ideal gas law.  For the vapor. the pump around flow rate is estimated using TPA and BPA cooling duties that  were  estimated  from  energy  balance.  b) Calculate the consolidated vapor flow rate to the tray  a.Design of Crude Distillation Column    4.   a.  In these calculations.  HGO  draw  off  tray  diameter  will  be  maximum.

1  lb/hr  446297.Design of Crude Distillation Column    h) For downcomer sizing.838087  ft3/s  Aw =  34.  Q 14.49722  Mol.6 Assume an additional 20 % area as waste area   The total area of the tray is evaluated using the expression  2   k) Calculate the diameter of the tray using the expression   4   We next demonstrate the calculations for the design of Ecuador crude oil CDU.7423  ft2  Downcomer liquid velocity=0. G/x  =  So.6 cft/s using the expression:  i) j)   0.15: Determine the diameter of the CDU processing Ecuador crude oil at three different sections  namely.    Eventually.80249  lb/cft  Gf =  3192.8177  D =  16. x =  289846.052586  m      180    . G =  So.193156  lb/ft3  5.  Solution:   Tower top section    Reflux Liquid =  Total.6 ft/s  cfs of liquid flow   1.544  A =  174.156  59.  the  down  comer  area  is  determined  by  assuming that the permissible value is 0. determine first the volumetric flow rate of liquid on the tray using total  liquid  mass  flow  rate  and  liquid  density. Wt. HGO draw off tray and section below the flash zone.126957  comers  At =  215.57673  ft  5.063478  2 down  6.94845  Adc =  3.855948  lb/gal  43.  ρv =  SG of liquid =  0.9  lb/hr  7501. tower top section.

864386072  GPH of liquid  101653.807  Reflux vapor  375354.  0.11   PA flow rate  312423.387837589  7.64  Total.18167815  ft  5.462308  114.8  Steam flow rate  48825  Product vapor  308089.64  lb/hr  6368.9  Enthalpy at 560  o F  306.7281981  Downcomer liquid velocity=0. G/x =  So. G=  So.8  HGO K = 11.20033598  53.84  Total vapor  732269.6 ft/s  cfs of liquid  flow=  3.8  HGO product  44163.85851313  Gf=  5009.291704236  At=  D=  lbs/hr  lb/ft3  lb/gal  lb/cft  ft2  ft3/s  2 down  12. x=  ρv=  SG of liquid=  Btu/lb  mmBtu/hr  lbs/hr  lbs/hr  lbs/hr  lbs/hr  lbs/hr  lbs/hr  lbs/hr  lbs/hr  732269.58340847  comers  231.75 MEABP = 575  Enthalpy at 300  o F  142.8572462  17. Wt.3841  Liquid reflux  375354.5641  Liquid SG  0.775022542  Aw=  36.54563962  Adc=  6.28187  A=  182.38  Total liquid flow   731941.236975499  m    181    .5  BPA duty  51.983744  Mol.Design of Crude Distillation Column    HGO Draw off tray    Liquid reflux  375354.

 we observe that the diameters of the CDU are 4.45893  m  In summary.  With these procedures.23 m at the HGO  draw  off  tray  and  5.056869  downcomers At=  168.14 m. Wt.Design of Crude Distillation Column    Section below the flash zone    Steam flow  rate=  Reflux vapor  Total. 3. G=  So.04 m for tower  top section and 4.028434  2  6.9  6368.    In  comparison  the  values  reported  by  Jones  and  Pujado (2006) for 30.17 Summary  In this lecture notes.  ρv=  SG of liquid=  0. G/x =  So.86873  lb/cft  Gf=  3714.05  m  at  the  tower  top  section.212491  lb/ft3  7.  One of the primary objectives of this section of  the  lecture  notes  is  to  demonstrate  the  procedure  for  the  selection  of  naphtha  reflux  ratio  and  evaluation of pump around duty for each individual pump around. 5.269  A=  135. enthalpies of steam and hydrocarbon etc.    4.0819  D=  14. Many assumptions have been taken  for the specific gravities.13 m for flash zone.62903  ft  4. it is opined  that the CDU calculations can be conducted by a process engineer with ease.00416  Adc=  3.6 ft/s  cfs of liquid  flow=  1.201702  lb/gal  53.99812  lb/hr  lb/hr  lb/hr  Mol. x=  48825  352377.49  62.000 barrels/day capacity of the crude are 2. all CDU calculations have been demonstrated.817061  ft3/s  Aw=  27.  a  design  engineer will develop maturity for these assumptions.9  401202.  These need to be further justified in  due  course  of  calculations.45 m at the flash zone.  182    . The obtained diameters are in good agreement with those obtained from Jones  and Pujado (2006) with the fact that for our case both reflux ratio and feed flow rate are high and these  do contribute towards the variations in the diameter.0208  ft2  Downcomer liquid velocity=0.  After  obtaining  significant  experience  in  the  refinery  operation.

Dolomatov M.  Von  Nostrand  Reinhold  Company.  and  Pujado  P. Maxwell    (1950).  D. V..References  1.  4.  USA. F. Y.  Springer..    Data  book  on  hydrocarbons.  Handbook  of  Petroleum  Processing. Kuzmina Z.  (2006).. Petroleum Refinery Process Economics.  5. Springer. Jones  D. Technical  Data  book  –  Petroleum  Refining  (1997). (2000). P.   Netherlands. E..  3. NewYork.  S. Maples R.  Interrelation between  carbon residue and relative density of petroleum resids. Lomakin S.  9th  Edition. (1988).                    183    . Chemistry and Technology of Fuels and  Oils.  American  Petroleum  Institute  (API).  6th  Edition..  USA.  2. Pennwell Corporation.  R. Krakhmaleva G. 2nd Edition..

  .

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful