Changes
to
Biking
and
Walking
in
MAP‐21,
the
 Transporta$on
Law


Since
1991,
transporta0on
laws
have
included
programs
to
fund
projects
such

 as
bike
lanes,
bike
paths,
and
sidewalks.
These
funds
enable
states
and

 communi0es
to
access
federal
resources
for
safer,
more
accessible,

 economically
vibrant
streets.

 Moving
Ahead
for
Progress
in
the
21st
Century
(MAP‐21)
will
determine

 how
federal
transporta0on
funds
are
to
be
spent
at
the
state
and
local
level.

 The
law,
which
takes
effect
on
October
1,
2012,
retains
funding
for
biking
and

 walking
in
a
renamed
and
restructured
program.




Transporta$on
Alterna$ves


In
the
past,
three
programs
were
designed
to
fund
non‐motorized
projects:
Transporta0on
Enhancements
 (TE),
Safe
Routes
to
School
(SRTS),
and
Recrea0onal
Trails
Program
(RTP).
In
the
last
three
years,
these
 three
programs
represented
48%
of
federal
funding
for
walking
and
biking
projects.

 MAP‐21
consolidates
TE,
SRTS,
and
RTP
into
into
one
program:
Transporta0on
Alterna0ves.

 Transporta$on
Enhancements
is
renamed
Transporta0on
Alterna0ve
ac0vi0es.
The
new
law
makes
 several
important
changes
to
the
program:

 •  Biking
and
walking
projects
remain
eligible.
States
can
con0nue
to
fund
biking

 



and
walking
infrastructure
under
the
consolidated
program.
The
program

 






includes
a
new
eligibility,
“safe
routes
for
non‐drivers,”
for
biking
and
walking
 







networks.
 •  Some
eligibili$es
are
eliminated:
The
new
law
eliminates
eligibility
for

 
museums,
bicycle
and
pedestrian
educa0on,
and
acquisi0on
of
scenic
and

 

historic
sites.
Construc0ng
turnouts
is
s0ll
allowed.
Other
eligibili0es
have
been

 modified.
 •  New
eligibili$es
have
been
added.
Environmental
mi0ga0on
was
expanded
from
the
 specific
uses
in
current
law.
Scenic
byway
program
uses
are
now
included.

 Safe
Routes
to
School
(SRTS)
ac0vi0es
—both
infrastructure
and
non‐infrastructure
—
are
eligible
 under
the
Transporta0on
Alterna0ves
program,
but
it
is
no
longer
a
stand‐alone

 program
with
guaranteed
funding.
 Recrea$onal
Trails
Program
(RTP)
remains
unchanged
and
is
funded
at

 2009
levels.
Now,
though,
governors
have
a
choice
to
opt
out
of
the

 program
30
days
prior
to
when
funding
is
available.
 Addi$onal
use:
Redesigning
and
construc0ng
roadways
in
the
right‐of‐way
of

 former
interstates
is
now
eligible.



Funding
Levels
and
Alloca$on

MAP‐21
keeps
overall
transporta0on
funding
level,
but
cuts
funding
for
key
biking

 and
walking
programs.
In
2013,
only
$808
million
will
be
available
for

 Transporta0on
Alterna0ves,
compared
to
the
high
of
$1.2
billion
combined
for

 TE,
SRTS,
and
RTP
in
2011.
Actual
funding
levels
under
the
new
law
will
depend

 on
how
well
biking
and
walking
projects
fare
in
the
new
Transporta0on

 Alterna0ves
program
and
in
other
programs
where
funding
has
been
increased.

 States
can
also
choose
to
transfer
funds
from
other
programs
into
the
TA
program.
 MAP‐21
also
changes
how
biking
and
walking
funds
are
distributed.
First,
funding
for
the

 Recrea0onal
Trails
Program
is
taken
off
the
top,
provided
a
state
has
not
chosen
to
opt
out
of
funding.
 Remaining
Transporta0on
Alterna0ves
funding
is
divided
up
into
two
equal
pots.

 50%
funding
by
popula$on:
Departments
of
Transporta0on
(DOTs)
will
distribute
half
of
 Transporta0on
Alterna0ves
funds
according
to
the
share
of
popula0on
within
the
state.


 •  MPOs
with
popula$on
greater
than
200,000:
DOT
will
sub‐allocate
funds
to
Metropolitan
 Planning
Organiza0ons
(MPOs).
MPOs
will
distribute
their
funds
through
their
own
compe00ve
 grant
process.

 •  Communi$es
with
a
popula$on
of
5,000
to
200,000:
DOT
will
hold
a
compe00ve
grant
 process
for
communi0es
to
compete
for
funds.

 •  Rural
areas
with
a
popula$on
under
5,000:
DOT
will
hold
a
compe00ve
grant
process
for
 communi0es
to
compete
for
funds.

 50%
funding
by
grant
program:
State
DOTs
will
distribute
the
remaining
half
of
Transporta0on
 Alterna0ves
funds
through
the
compe00ve
grant
program
without
regard
for
popula0on
size.
 Eligible
en00es
include
local
governments,
school
districts,
tribal
governments,
and
public
 lands
agencies.
State
DOTs
are
not
eligible.
Changes
to
transferability
of
highway
funds
mean
a
state
 can
transfer
a
larger
percentage
of
these
funds
than
under
SAFETEA‐LU.



Eligibility
Under
Other
Programs

Biking
and
walking
infrastructure
con0nues
to
be
eligible
under
all
highway
programs,
including
the
 
 
 
Surface
Transporta0on
Program
(STP),
Conges0on
Mi0ga0on
and
Air
Quality
 
 
 






(CMAQ),
and
the
Highway
Safety
and
Infrastructure
Program
(HSIP).
States
 
 
 










can
also
transfer
funds
from
other
programs
like
HSIP
and
STP
into
the
TA
 
 
 
 
program.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 









 
New
requirements
under
HSIP
require
befer
data‐gathering

 
 
on
biking
and
walking
crashes
and
safety.
Biking
and

 










walking
infrastructure
also
con0nues
to
be
eligible

 For
more
informa$on,
contact:
 Caron
Whitaker
 








under
some
transit
programs.

Campaign
Director,
America
Bikes
 caron@americabikes.org
 (202)
215‐3908


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