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Kadoka Press, Thursday, August 16, 2012

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KADOKA PRESS

The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 5
August 16, 2012
News Briefs …
Kadoka Area School Board
meeting Wednesday, August
15, 7:00 p.m., Kadoka School.
Summer Reading Program
at the Jackson County Library
on Wednesdays, 3:00 p.m. for
children ages 3-6.
Watch for the Back-to-School
insert in next week’s Kadoka
Press.
~ by Ronda Dennis ~
participate in Partners in Policy-
making. Applications for Year 20
can be obtained by contacting
Sandy Stocklin Hook, SD Advocacy
Services, 221 S. Central Ave.,
Pierre, SD 57501 or by calling 1-
800-658-4782. Applications are also
available on the SDAS website at
www.sdadvocacy.com or emailing
hooks@sdadvocacy.com.
The training program is de-
signed to provide information,
training, and skill building so those
who participate may obtain the
most appropriate state-of-the-art
services for themselves and others.
The training initiative is funded
in parts by grants from the SD
Council on Developmental Disabil-
ities, Children’s Care Hospital and
School, USD Center for Disabilities
at Sanford School of Medicine at
USD and SD Parent Connection.
Applications for South Dakota
Partners in Policymaking, a lead-
ership training program for self-ad-
vocates and parents of children
with disabilities, are now ready for
Year 21. Partners in Policymaking
provides state-of-the-art knowledge
about disability issues and builds
the competencies necessary to be-
come advocates who can effectively
influence system change. This
training will change your life! Ap-
plications are due September 20,
2012.
South Dakota Advocacy Services
(SDAS) is currently seeking appli-
cations from interested people who
have disabilities or who are par-
ents of children with disabilities to
Don’t delay - apply now;
SD Partners in Policymaking
Ciara Stoddard in the 13-14 year old poles
Breezy Amiotte in the 6 & under barrels
Hunter Johnson
10-12 year old goat tying
--photos by Nancy Haigh
Lunch and learn about the pro-
grams and services available
through the South Dakota Depart-
ment of Social Services/ Division of
Adult Services and Aging.
Stop by the Gateway Apart-
ments community room on Thurs-
day, August 12 at 12:00 noon.
You are invited to join in on a
complimentary lunch while you
learn how to access available sup-
port and service options available
in your local community.
Learn more about:
•Your right to be free from
abuse;
•Residents’ right in long-term
facilities;
•Medicare and the low-income
subsidy program;
•Senior Health Information &
Insurance Education (SHIINE);
Services available through Adult
Services and Aging program;
This is open to anyone who is in-
terested in learning more about he
topics mention above, regardless of
your age.
For more information, call the
Division of Adult Services and
Aging at 1-866-854-5465.
Please call Penny Stout at 837-
2413 if you plan to attend.
Lunch and learn
just stating their opinion.
He also said he’d like to have
Patrick Solon look at the street in
front of his house as the old asphalt
is breaking up.
Glenn Freeman commended the
city for the asphalt work done on
Locust Street.
Moving on to the agenda item of
the comprehensive plan, Mayor
Harry Weller asked if the council
was ready to vote. He informed the
council and the audience of approx-
imately 15 people, that if it passes
it may go through the referendum
process; if it fails it may go through
the initiative process.
With only four members of the
council present, Glenn Freeman re-
quested there be a full council be-
fore the council makes a decision.
Ryan Willert agreed.
There was discussion as to
whether they should go forward
with a full council or the next meet-
ing.
Brad Jorgensen said maybe the
council should just vote on it and
let the people have their say.
Mayor Weller said, through an
executive order, I will postpone the
vote until the September 10 meet-
ing.
A building permit for Bill Mur-
phy was approved for a 12’x40’
open-front storage building.
Finance Officer Patty Ulmen
presented two quotes for city insur-
ance for the next year.
The quote from BankWest In-
surance was $7,698.00. South
Dakota Municipal League’s four-
month quote prorated out to be
$7,706.00.
Ulmen recommended that the
city continue with BankWest and a
motion carried.
Under the council reports, Colby
Shuck said Jackie Stilwell is put-
ting together facts and figures for
the council to make an informed
decision as to raise or not to raise
the water rates. This will be dis-
cussed at the next meeting.
It was questioned during the
street report if the city gets any tax
dollars from the garbage pickup
businesses. The answer was yes,
sales tax comes back to the city.
JoBeth Uhlir said she would like
to have karaoke or a dance the last
weekend in September.
Brad Jorgensen said he’d talked
to Rich Hildebrand about sidewalk
repairs which included the side-
walk in front of the bar and fire
hall.
Hildebrand said he would cut
out a strip of cement along the
front of the bar, put a tan die in it
to give a decorative look.
Hildebrand will also put to-
gether a quote for the fire hall side-
walk where the grate is bad and
cement is crumbling.
The auditorium is ready to use
and the swimming pool will close
on Thursday, August 16.
Kieth Prang questioned stump
removal at the city park.
It was noted that information is
being compiled for work to be done
at the softball field and will be pre-
sented to the Horizon committee.
The last changes to the budget
will or can be made at the special
budget meeting on August 22 and
will need to be finalized by Septem-
ber 1.
On a high note, the city will not
be looking at raising taxes.
The Kadoka City Council met
Monday, August 13 for their
monthly meeting. With Micki Word
and Dick Stolley absent, there was
just enough for a quorum.
Prior minutes, the bills and fi-
nancial statement were approved.
Under citizen’s input, Cindy
Willert addressed the council with
a request. She asked that Mayor
Weller forward a letter she had
written to Harvest States to the
city attorney. In that, she re-
quested that the old Hubbard ele-
vator be torn down. She said a
portion of it had already been dis-
mantled by Irelands, however, in
strong winds, pieces of the building
are being blown from the building.
Weller said the council couldn’t
take action at the time, but he
would work on the request and
make final approval at the next
meeting.
Bob Fugate said those that
stated their opposition to the com-
prehensive plan at the last meet-
ing were not using scare tactics,
City takes no action on comprehensive
plan, will be on September 10 agenda
There will be a Tablet handbook
meeting at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday
August 22. The meeting will be
held in the help desk room at the
Kadoka School.
This meeting will be for all 6th
graders, freshmen and any new
students entering the Kadoka Area
School District.
Tablet meeting
for students
Lower Brule Ranch Rodeo …The team of Tyler Jones (L),
Lex Grooms, Frank Carlson and Michael Jones took second place at the
Lower Brule Ranch Rodeo on Sunday, August 12. The team also took fast
time in the crazy man bat race and relay race. --photo by Robyn Jones
All around saddles …were awarded to Taylor Schmidt (L) of
Sturgis and Becca Lythgue of Colton. Badlands Rodeo Bible Camp was
held August 6-9. Watch next week’s paper for results and more photos.
Tough competition at the Masonic Rascal Rodeo held in Philip
Cy and Dorothy Porch Memorial Bibles …were pre-
sented to Justina Cvach (L) of Midland and Ryne Baier of Buffalo. Roger
Porch, son of Cy and Dorothy, presented the Bibles on behalf of the fam-
ily.
Badlands Rodeo Bible Camp was held in Kadoka on August 6-9, with
106 campers attending. Each year two campers are chosen by the staff to
receive the Bibles that are provided by the Porch family.
--photos by Robyn Jones
Supporting the community youth …On behalf of J. Scull
Construction, John Neisner (R) presented the Kadoka Rodeo Club a $500
donation and receiving the donation was Dale Christensen, who is the
rodeo club advisor. Neisner is a KHS graduate and J. Scull Construction
is the contractor for the Great Hall project.
--photo by Ronda Dennis
Paula Vogelgesang. Many commu-
nity members and merchants do-
nated prizes and cakes to add to
the event.
It was an incentive to attend to
have a chance to dunk Heidi Coller,
Ruby Sanftner and Nikki Bonen-
berger in the dunk tank. Heidi and
Nikki paid their dues up on top
along with Kerri Schofield while
Ruby supervised. Others that were
dunked were Jerica Coller,
MacKenzie Stilwell, Ryder Sanft-
ner and Paula Vogelgesang. In the
end, COO Sanftner didn't go home
dry!
The nursing home hopes to host
this for the community again next
year! See pictures on page 4.
It was a success! On August 12,
the Kadoka Nursing Home held
their annual resident/family and
staff/family potluck. To follow was
the KNH Carnival fundraiser that
was put on from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Many residents helped with
games and some just supervised as
the children played. The games in-
cluded a dunk tank, fish pond,
duck pond, balloon darts, hoop
shoot, cake walk, bean bag toss and
a blow up jumping castle. The fa-
vorites were the dunk tank, jump-
ing castle and cake walk.
Concessions were available and
all enjoyed a snow cone, some pop-
corn or a hot dog and even home-
made ice cream, compliments of
KNH carnival very successful
Giving back to the community
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to the Kadoka Press. PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Church Page …
August 16, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
For Sale:
Newsprint
End Rolls
$5.00 each
Great for craft projects,
painting, drawing & more.
Kadoka Press
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . . . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . . . . . .344-2500
All others call . . . . . . . . . .911
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Pastor Art Weitschat
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
Church Calendar
Monday, August 20
Swiss steak with tomato gravy,
parsley potatoes, peas, bread, and
apricots.
Tuesday, August 21
Barbecue pork, baked potato,
corn, dinner roll, and pears.
Wednesday, August 22
Roast beef philly sandwich, old
time macaroni salad, green beans,
and berry fruit dessert.
Thursday, August 23
Roast turkey, mashed potatoes
and gravy, broccoli, crunchy cran-
berry salad, bread and pumpkin
pie square.
Friday, August 24
Taco salad with meat, beans,
chips, etc., melon, and cookie.
Meals for
the Elderly
Isaiah 40:28-31
God has a purpose and plan for your life, and His
timing is perfect. Sometimes He answers our prayers
with "yes" or "no." But at other times, He says "not
now"--when that is the case, we can avail ourselves of
the rich rewards that come when we wait.
One very practical blessing is that God strengthens us as we lean on Him during delays. Isaiah 40:31
tells us that "those who wait for the Lord will gain new strength." We are given the metaphor of an eagle
with wind beneath his wings. It is interesting to note that the words "wind" and "spirit" come from the
same Greek word--pneuma. The spirit of God lifts us up, and His energy and strength sustain us as we
abide in Him.
When we are facing a difficult decision, the real key is learning to wait. There is no verse of Scripture
that tells us to take control and fight our own battles. God is the one who fights them on our behalf (2
Chron. 20:15). We are to be patient and trust in Him.
When David faced his greatest battles, he waited upon the Lord. God delivered him from destruction
and set his feet on solid ground. (Ps. 40:1-3) He will do the same for you. When you abide in Him, He
gives supernatural energy to accomplish the things He requires of you--His Spirit does for you what you
cannot do for yourself.
In reading through the Scriptures, we see that every time one of God's saints gains a victory, he or she
is waiting and trusting in the Lord. You can likewise experience triumph in your life. When you have the
omnipotent Creator of the universe acting on your behalf, you cannot lose.
Strength in Waiting
Inspiration Point
As the years go by, I feel like I
am turning into a true cynic.
I am especially critical of push-
ing the advance of technology
when it costs so very much, carries
with it significant risk, and then
doesn’t offer a better result for the
patient.
Take for example ordering CT
scans of the head for children or
adults who have had minor head
trauma. In a blink it adds $2000+
to the bill, causes significant life-
time radiation exposure, and, un-
less the trauma resulted in a
CHANGE IN MENTAL STATUS
OR loss of consciousness, does not
improve outcomes over simply
monitoring the child through the
night. Yet expectations of family
and liability risk have made CT
scans of head almost standard of
care for minor head trauma.
I find myself critical of excessive
surgeries. There are studies find-
ing many more back surgeries in
certain parts of the country com-
pared with others; causing great
expense, significant risk, and no
evidence of less pain as a result.
The C-section rate is significantly
higher in one community than an-
other, also expensive, risky, and
without improved health statistics
for the mother or baby.
Take a look at cholesterol lower-
ing medicine, which accounts for a
$55 billion dollar yearly expense to
our country, causes significant side
effects of muscle pain especially in
the elderly, while for people who
have NOT already had a heart at-
tack, there is no good evidence or
science to show statins prevent
heart attacks, or save lives. What’s
more many patients may have a
false sense of security by taking
these drugs and are thus less will-
ing to make good lifestyle choices
such as exercising daily AND A
HEALTHY DIET.
But there is something in mod-
ern medicine that gets tremendous
bang for the buck, carries very low
risk, and has made a huge impact
on the health of millions of people,
in this country and world-wide.
This is the technology of targeted
stimulation of the individual im-
mune system with vaccine. Immu-
nization programs have stopped
dreaded polio in the 50’s, reduced
heart and neural disability from
measles in the 60’s, wiped small-
pox from the earth in the 70’s, and
greatly reduced life-threatening
meningitis, pneumonia, and in-
fluenza during the 80’s, just to
name a few examples of the suffer-
ing that didn’t happen because of
vaccines and the immune system.
I am a cynic, but still awestruck
at the value of immunization.
Rick Holm, M.D., Medical Editor
A Cynic looks at immunization
I was reminded recently that
the only thing growing in my fam-
ily tree are fruits and nuts. Per-
sonally, I am not sure if I am a
fruit or a nut. Just do not ask my
wife.
I had been away for so long I
had forgotten many things about
my family. My recent visit served
as a refresher course reminding
me why I had moved away in the
first place. Memory sometimes
pays little tricks causing us to re-
member the "good old days" and
forgetting that sprinkled in among
the good are ample portions of
what I call good-challenged mo-
ments and characters.
I cannot speak about anybody
else's family; my family seems to
run the gamut between good and
bad. I certainly have some wonder-
ful relatives but then, I also have
those who are on the other side of
that description. Overall, they
serve to make my family what it is
today.
I enjoyed visiting with some of
my relatives I had not seen for
years. In fact, I could not remem-
ber the last time I had seen some
of them. For the most part, it was
a wonderful time at family re-
union.
I had really forgotten about
good old Aunt Bessie. She has al-
ways been one of my favorite
aunts. Nobody knows how old she
really is, and she ain't telling. Con-
ferring with some of my older rel-
atives none could remember a time
when good old Aunt Bessie was not
around. Some of us have guessed
her age and we figure she is prob-
ably our oldest living relative.
One of the oddities about good
old Aunt Bessie has to do with her
physical appearance. As far as
anybody could remember, she was
always consumed with her looks.
Not just her clothing but her face
as well. The one thing that was
anathema to her was a wrinkle.
She has what we all said behind
her back, a wrinkle-phobia. If I
had the money she spent on wrin-
kle creams I could retire and live a
life of luxury.
I do remember a time (and I had
forgotten it until now and I just
hoped she did) when I was not
Aunt Bessie's favorite nephew. It
was years ago and I had not seen
her for a while and when I did see
her, I said, half jokingly, "Is that a
new wrinkle, Aunt Bessie?"
Visiting my family is a relative experience
You would have thought I had
shot her only child. She shrieked
and then went to the bathroom to
examine her face. She was so irate
with me that she did not speak to
me for over a year. Of course, look-
ing back, there was no downside to
that. I was tempted to remind her
of that incident, but I remembered
the old hymn, "Yield not to temp-
tation, for yielding is sin."
Then there was Uncle Harold. I
had not seen him for I cannot re-
member how long. When I saw
him, I noticed he had not changed.
I think he was wearing the same
suspenders he wore the last time I
saw him. His suspenders were a
fashion statement, according to
him, but nobody knew exactly
what they were saying.
The great thing about Uncle
Howard was his stories. He had a
repertoire of stories that he re-
peated ad nauseam. Behind his
back we often said, "Uncle Howard
will tell no stories he hasn't told a
thousand times before." Probably
the most amusing thing about his
stories was the fact that he often
confused the punchline of one-
story with the punchline of an-
other story. None of his punchlines
ever went with the story. That
made them even funnier. We
laughed, he thought we were
laughing at his story, we were re-
ally laughing at him.
Just before I was ready to leave,
who should come in but dear old
Aunt Sylvia. As soon as I saw her,
I smiled. Not only was I glad to see
her, but I remembered her. If any-
body was the cat’s meow, it was
Aunt Sylvia.
She loved to go out to eat, par-
ticularly with a group. I thought of
the last time we all went out to eat
together and Aunt Sylvia was with
us. One of her peculiarities was
along the line of tipping the wait-
ress. She was the self-appointed
guru of making sure the waitress
got a good tip. When everybody fin-
ished eating and the bill had come,
Aunt Sylvia would take charge.
She would collect money from
each person for the tip. If you did
not give enough, she made you dig
into your pocket again until you
came up with an amount she was
happy with to give to the waitress.
With appropriate pomp and cir-
cumstance, she would call the
waitress over to our table and
present her with the tip of the
evening.
As I was flying home, a thought
tugged at my mind; if the world is
made up of such people like my rel-
atives, what chance does the world
really have?
The world, as God has designed
it, is made up of all kinds of people
that He loves with an everlasting
love. "For God so loved the world,
that he gave his only begotten Son,
that whosoever believeth in him
should not perish, but have ever-
lasting life" (John 3:16 KJV).
Thinking of my family on the
plane coming home I thought, why
am I the only sane person in my
family? Then another thought
emerged. Or, am I?
Family of God Fellowship
Rev. James L. Synder • Ocala, FL
Benefits of Aerobic Activity
I know some individuals that
wish exercising could be as easy as
turning pages of a magazine or
would rather run their television
remote control then actually “run”.
Some people might feel like they
are too tired to exercise or that
they don’t have enough time in
their day. Whatever their reason
or justification, they have excluded
exercise from their lifestyle. To
sum it up, of the different ways to
improve your physical health, ex-
ercise is one of the safest and eas-
iest methods.
Everyone has a different percep-
tion of what it means to exercise
and the level they prefer or are ca-
pable of carrying out. Some indi-
viduals may choose planned and
structured exercise to maintain or
improve fitness. Others may rely
on moving their body through the
day to use energy; this is physical
activity. This could include wash-
ing dishes, gardening or taking the
dog for a walk. Energy your body
takes in as calories is hopefully
balanced with energy your body
uses while moving during the day.
Adults should have at least 2
hours and 30 minutes each week of
aerobic physical activity at a mod-
erate level or 1 hour and 15 min-
utes each week at a vigorous level.
It is best to spread aerobic activity
out over at least 3 days a week.
Each activity should be done for at
least 10 minutes at a time.
Aerobic activities speed your
heart rate and breathing as they
help improve heart and lung fit-
ness. They can also help maintain
or lose weight, as long as you con-
sume calories equal to or less than
you burn off. Examples of moder-
ate aerobic exercise include: bik-
ing, tennis (doubles), walking
briskly, canoeing, push mowing,
raking and line dancing. You will
know if you are participating in
vigorous activities if you can only
say a few words without stopping
to catch your breath. A few exam-
ples of vigorous activities include
jogging, jumping rope, aerobic
dance, and sports with a lot of run-
ning, such as basketball.
You might feel wiped out di-
rectly after an aerobic workout,
but aerobic exercise can increase
your overall stamina and ability to
fight fatigue. This is due to your
heart and lungs improving to work
more effectively and efficiently
through the aerobic workouts.
Here are some ideas to get you
started: Pick activities that you
like and start by doing what you
can. If you haven’t been active in a
while, start slowly and build up
over a period of time. Be sure to
utilize the right sports and safety
equipment. Choose activities that
are appropriate for your fitness
level and pick a safe place to do
your activity. Keep track of your
aerobic exercise. Use a journal, a
log, mark your activity on a calen-
dar or use “SuperTracker” a phys-
ical activity tracker found at
https://www.choosemyplate.gov/Su
perTracker/default.aspx. Being ac-
tive throughout your lifetime can
help you live a healthier, longer
and happier life.
Ann Schwader, Nutrition Field Specialist
SDSU Extension-Winner Regional Extension Center
Irene Fortune___________________
Irene Fortune, age 94 of Philip,
died Tuesday, August 7, 2012, at
the Philip Nursing Home.
Irene Clements was born April
20, 1918, in Haakon County, S.D.,
the daughter of Ernest and El-
freida (Meyers) Clements. She
grew up and attended rural schools
in the area. During her high school
years, she lived with Mrs. Senechal
in Philip. She learned many things
from her, including cooking and
cleaning.
Irene was united in marriage to
Howard “Bill” Fortune on Septem-
ber 23, 1940, at the Sacred Heart
Catholic Church in Philip. They
ranched in the Quinn area all their
married life. They moved into
Philip from 1970 to 1979, where
they resided while some of their
daughters were attending Philip
High School.
After 1979, they returned to
their ranch near Quinn, where
they continued to reside. Her hus-
band preceded her in death on Sep-
tember 4, 2000. She later moved
into Philip, where she has since
resided.
First and foremost, Irene was a
prayer warrior. She told Kay that
she didn’t know where she got her
faith except for seeing how impor-
tant going to Mass was for her dad
as he shoveled snow so they could
get there.
Irene was a true German, every-
thing was clean, neat and tidy, win-
dows clean, everything ironed, and
the garden and yard had not a
weed.
She loved feeding friends and
family, and playing cards. She
could whip up a meal in 30 min-
utes. She baked cakes, cookies, and
pies. She was always expecting
company.
Survivors include five daugh-
ters, Kay Williams of Philip, Judy
Harrington and her husband, Dan,
of Ridgefield, Wash., Billie Hett
and her husband, Donn, of Buffalo,
Pam Dale and her husband, C.K.,
of Philip, and Mary Lou Guptill
and her husband, Pat, of Quinn; 25
grandchildren; 40 great-grandchil-
dren; two great-great-
grandchildren; one sister, Helen
Louison of Rapid City; and a host
of other relatives and friends.
Irene was preceded in death by
her husband, Howard “Bill” For-
tune, on September 4, 2000; a
daughter, Janet Waara; a son, Scott
Fortune; her parents; four broth-
ers, Carl, Charles, John and Ray-
mond Clements; a sister, Catherine
Hawley; and a son-in-law, Dick
Williams.
Mass of Christian burial was cel-
ebrated Saturday, August 11, at the
Sacred Heart Catholic Church in
Philip with Father Kevin Achbach
as celebrant.
Music was provided by Mari-
anne Frein, pianist, and Shelby
Schofield, vocalist.
Altar servers were Sammy
Schofield and Tristen Rush. Lector
was Rita O’Connell. Eucharistic
ministers were Lloyd Frein and
Debby Prouty.
Pallbearers were grandsons
Paul, Mark and Ross Williams,
Jason and Tyler Hett, Michael
Rotzien, William and Heath Morri-
son, and Tate, Troy and Paul Gup-
till.
Interment was at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Kadoka Police
Department
Forrest L. Davis,
Chief of Police
Monthly Report
7/10/12 ~ 8/13/12
Accidents: 1
Parking Violations: 0
Calls for Service: 25
Warnings:
Verbal: 2
Written: 0
Investigations: 9
Citations: 3
Complaints: 12
Arrests: 2
Court: 3
Agency Assists: 8
E-mail your
news and
photos
to the
Kadoka Press:
press@kadokatelco.com
editor@kadokatelco.com
Bel videre News …
August 16, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
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I don’t remember much about
first grade. It was…er…quite a
while ago. I do remember that it
was held in a one-room school
about five miles from home, and
there were five other students.
One of those schoolmates was my
sister, and the other four were all
siblings from another local fam-
ily—three girls and one boy, Char-
lie, who was in first grade with me.
As I recall, the bathrooms were
outdoor biffys with one being for
girls and the other for boys. There
were blackboards, of course, and a
picture of George Washington—
you know the one that has an odd
blank part that the artist never
quite finished. About the only
other thing inside besides desks
was an old foot-pump type organ.
It was a wheezy thing that we
played on or with from time to
time.
Despite the school being named
“Harmony,” there was little musi-
cal talent amongst the students.
Singing together was not a joy so
we didn’t do it much. We did, how-
ever, get along okay and were
“Harmonious” in that way. During
recess, there was a lot of rope
jumping. This was the kind where
two people swing the rope and one
or two more do the jumping. I
learned how to do it somewhat, but
I don’t think I was ever very good
at it. Everyone had a nickname for
the jumping events, and mine was
“Popcorn Popper.”
I also assume that Charlie and
I sometimes got on the teacher’s
nerves since she frequently told us
to go outside and play when we
were done with our classes or
work. We may have been causing
trouble, I suppose, as unlikely as
that might seem. Anyway, Charlie
and I were glad to run around out-
side or else in the basement when
it was cold. There was coal in one
part of the basement since the
place was heated with it. As you
can imagine, the school was some-
what chilly when we first arrived
in the morning in the winter, but it
warmed up nicely after awhile.
Our teacher was my cousin,
Marilyn, who was fairly young and
quiet, but I think she was a good
enough teacher. She was bright
and kind as well and lived with us
during that year. She drove my sis-
ter, Pat, and me to school each day.
When the roads were muddy, we
took the jeep which was an old rat-
tletrap if I ever saw one. If the
road was apt to be particularly bad
at the creek with all its gumbo,
Dad and Marilyn decided we
should go down the ridge instead
of the road. Then, when the ridge
came to an end, there was a very
steep hill we dived over to the
creek. I didn’t like that hill. It
scared me a bit although Marilyn
was an excellent driver, and we
never had any trouble. Going up
out of the creek on the east side
was no big deal since it was a more
gradual incline.
Oh, yes. One of Marilyn’s jobs at
home was to light the kerosene
lamps every night. She also re-
filled them with fuel and trimmed
the wicks. Does that give you some
idea of how long ago all this was?
Yes. It was before electricity ar-
rived in rural areas although it
was just a few years prior to that,
and we originally had 32-volt
power from a generator for a cou-
ple of years before the high lines
were strung our way. In first
grade, though, we were still on
kerosene lamps with a few bright
Aladdin ones and some dimmer
regular wick ones. I even had a
small wick one of my own and still
do.
Well, after that first year at
Harmony, the neighbor kids moved
away leaving just Pat and me. For
the next three years, then, the
school moved to the upstairs of our
house. Mom was our teacher for
two of those three years, and the
neighbor lady, Myrt, taught us the
middle year. Another boy from six
miles away came to join us for
awhile and lived with us when the
roads were bad. After that, Pat
was ready for high school so we
bought a house in town to live in
when school was in session al-
though we returned to the ranch
most weekends and during the
summer.
Some now think country schools
are outdated and town school is
better. I doubt it. A good education
depends a lot more on teachers
than facilities. Home-schooled kids
even seem to have a slight advan-
tage over those taught in class-
rooms which I suspect might be
the result of a lot of personal atten-
tion.
Well, as I said, I don’t remember
a lot about first grade at Harmony
schoolhouse, but what memories I
do have are pleasant enough.
What I learned there gave me a
good enough start to go on for fif-
teen more years of schooling and
do okay. I have no complaints.
Country School
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Bob Fortune attended the fu-
neral of his aunt, Irene Fortune, on
Saturday at Philip. She was 94 and
had been confined to a wheelchair
for a few years at the Philip Nurs-
ing Home. Irene was married to the
brother of Bob’s dad, and lived on a
ranch just a couple of miles from
where Bob did near Quinn when he
was growing up. Chuck Fortune
and Francie Davis and their fami-
lies also attended. Bob said they
got to see a lot of relatives that they
don’t get to see very often.
Jim, Georgann and Jami Addi-
son attended the wedding of Geor-
gann’s niece, Kamri Iverson, in
Philip on Saturday. The wedding
was held in the yard of Georgann’s
mom, Audrey Carley, although the
reception was held at Draper.
Kamri married Chauncy Labrier,
and both are from the Murdo area.
Georgann’s son and daughter, Matt
and Marissa, were also able to at-
tend and came with their spouses
and children. Matt and Marissa
and families mostly stayed in
Murdo area and “relatived up,” but
they came out several times to Jim
and Georgann’s. On Sunday, Jim
was planning to take them fishing.
Scot and Jodie O’Bryan gained
another grandson this week when
Nathaniel Conn was born to their
son, Taylor, and his wife, Vicki, of
Yankton. Nathaniel joins an older
brother, Thomas, who was a born
close to Christmas of the year be-
fore last. Taylor is an engineer
there in Yankton but gets flown
around the country doing his work.
Scot says he hopes to get ac-
quainted with the new grandson
this week if he can sneak in a trip
to Yankton before Wednesday when
he has to leave for Wyoming where
he is scheduled to judge some cattle
at the state fair there. The trip to
Yankton is also complicated by
Jodie’s work schedule at 1880
Town. Three of Scott and Jodie’s
kids, Scotty, Wacey and Grady, con-
tinue to live in Texas so they don’t
get home very often. Scot said he
has been fortunate in finding some
hay to buy lately in the eastern
part of the state where various
friends or business associates have
helped him out. He was able to get
some hay cheaper there than lo-
cally in this dry year that didn’t
produce a lot of hay.
John Addison said the surgery to
remove a lump on his son, Koye’s
back went well a couple of weeks
ago. It was done in Sioux Falls,
started early, and they were
headed back home shortly after
noon. Koye seems to be running
around doing fine. He wasn’t both-
ered a lot although he needed some
Tylenol a few times. This weekend,
John did some rodeoing. He was in
one at Fergus Falls, MN, where he
didn’t have much luck. In Onida,
though, he came in second. Travel-
ing companions included Jace Nel-
son and Wade Yost who ride saddle
bronc while John does bareback.
Larry, Jo and Jenny Johnston
spent the weekend in Rapid City.
They helped daughter, Cora Jo, cel-
ebrate her birthday, but stayed
with their son, John, and wife,
Amanda. A good bit of time was
spent boating at Angostura near
Hot Springs since both Cora and
John have boats and like to use
them. There was both skiing and
tubing, and the weather was coop-
erative with it being neither too hot
or too cold—just pleasant. John
lives at Piedmont, and Cora is a
nurse at the hospital in Rapid City.
Jo said they had quite a good time.
At home, Mary Johnston came over
and watered the flowers and toma-
toes and kept an eye on things.
Jenny will start school on Wednes-
day since she will be attending
school at Philip this year and it
starts earlier than some others.
Eric and Pam Osborn haven’t
had much luck with gardening this
year due to grasshoppers and their
work schedules. Eric is working at
Moses Building in Philip and Pam
at the diner over at 1880 Town.
They have kept the lawn green, but
the garden not so much. They do
have a few tomatoes but not much
else. On Saturday, Wib Osborn
came for supper, and daughter, Syd
Beth, stayed overnight one time
last week. She is doing some lawn
mowing in Kadoka this summer.
Her sister, Mackenzie, is a life
guard at the swimming pool in
Kadoka. Pam said the dog brought
them a nice present this week in
the form of a dead raccoon. The cat,
not to be outdone, brought them a
dead mouse.
Bunny Green was visited on Sat-
urday by her daughter, Darlene
Wiedemer, of Murdo. The gals went
over to Midland where Bunny got a
permanent. They then came home
for dinner and visited a while until
Darlene went home later in the
day. On Sunday, Bunny made it to
church. Bunny said they’ve had re-
ports of quite a few rattlesnakes in
Kadoka so she’s been on guard for
them in Belvidere, although none
have shown up so far.
Aaron Mansfield said his wife
and son, Michelle and Tyrel, are
starting to gear up for school which
will start fairly soon. Michelle is
getting some things ready for her
teaching duties, and Tyrel will be
starting second grade. Aaron said
he is just catching up on things
around the ranch that were neg-
lected somewhat during busier
times.
Geoffrey DeVries said he is
somewhat looking forward to
school starting again soon. He and
his mom, Nicci, and brother,
Greyson, were in Idaho visiting
Nicci’s folks for quite a while but
have been back home a couple of
weeks now.
Brett and Nikki Bonenberger
and kids attended the carnival held
at the Kadoka Nursing Home on
Sunday and helped put it on. There
was a cakewalk and various enter-
taining events including people
getting dunked in a tank. Kids
MaKaylan and McCoy thought it
was a fine event. They were
watched part of the time by Pam
and Delores Bonenberger when
their folks were busy helping with
the carnival. Last week, Nikki’s
mom, Diane McDaniel, of Philip
came, and Nikki and she butchered
some chickens and put up some
pickles. On Sunday, Nikki was try-
ing to write up a schedule for the
nursing home of who will work
when. This was somewhat tricky
since various summer helpers are
getting ready to leave which com-
plicates things and leaves a short-
age of help here and there.
Taya Iversen spent Friday with
her grandparents, Rick and Ronda
Dennis. After spending the night,
Ronda and Taya went to Rapid City
with Lori and Carter on Saturday
to do some school shopping.
Syd, Corinne and Chance Iwan
were visited this week by Syd’s sis-
ter and her husband, Pat and Gary
Jones, of Huron. They came by
plane. Their son, Lee, and his wife
and son, Brenda and Aiden, of San
Antonio, TX, came by land with the
other two of Pat and Gary’s grand-
kids who belong to Jason and his
wife, Tasha. All were headed to the
Black Hills where Gary’s sister and
her husband have a house close to
Strawberry Hill near Deadwood.
Jason and Tasha of Pierre were al-
ready in the Black Hills since
they’d ridden their motorcycles to
Sturgis earlier in the week.
for the school term.
Patrick Allard of Rapid City vis-
ited with his grandma, Maxine Al-
lard, for a few days. He always
finds plenty of projects and fun
things to do while here. He re-
turned home on Thursday. Tuesday
evening, Edna and Rebekkah Kary
visited Maxine Allard.
The James Letelliers conducted
business in Philip and Kadoka on
Tuesday morning. Marjorie enjoyed
another visit with Ellen Totton
while in Philip. It is so hard to
leave after a good visit with a dear
friend and neighbor.
The Burmas have been busy this
week delivering blue and red
heeler puppies. They sent one to
Dupree and one to Wessington
Springs, Midland and Long Valley.
Tuesday, JoAnn Letellier at-
tended an executive board meeting
of the SD Master Gardeners held in
Murdo.
Jo Ann Letellier and Colleen
Letellier enjoyed attending Birth-
day Club at the home of Viola
Olson south of Kadoka on Wednes-
day afternoon.
Guests in the Robert and Sharon
Ring home were Linda Ring, Je-
remy and Tyler. They delivered
some peaches to grandma, Janice
Ring, also visited Sharon that day.
Bill and Marjorie Letellier ac-
companied Colleen Letellier to
Philip on Thursday and kept ap-
pointments.
Friday, Jakki Burma and her
grandma, Marjorie Anne Letellier,
kept hair appointments in Kadoka.
Jakki got a perm and came away
looking, as she said, “just the way
I always dreamed.” Now she is re-
ally ready for school. The Burmas
will be returning to Sunshine Bible
Academy for another school year
soon.
Cason Brown and sons, Cayden
and Brady, of Rapid City came Fri-
day to the Grandpa and Grandma
Bill and Marjorie Letellier home.
They spent the weekend and re-
turned home Sunday after lunch. I
don’t know who enjoys the time
more the great grandkids or the
grandparents.
June Ring was a supper guest at
the Bruce and Jessie Ring home on
Friday.
Dan Taft and Morgan helped
work cattle at the Clifford Allard
home on Saturday.
Saturday afternoon, the Dan
Tafts made a trip to Custer to bring
Heather’s horse home. Heather
herself drove home with the rest of
her belongings from her summer
job at Outlaw Ranch in the Black
Hills. Heather has worked there for
a few summers now and is prepar-
ing to return to classes at SDSU in
Brookings.
Saturday luncheon guests of
Gale and JoAnn Letellier, Gary and
Jerry, were Hiram Neiffer of Hill
City, Arlene Anderson of Florida
and Joe and Kathleen Leutenegger
of Kadoka. They are all classmates
and longtime friends of the Letel-
liers. Can’t you just hear the remi-
niscing that was going on?
Saturday, the father and son
team of Kelly and Ken Koistenen
came and did a few errands for
Maxine Allard.
Carol and Ed Ferguson and
most of their family attended the
reception for retiring postmasters
at the Gateway Apartments com-
munity room in Kadoka on Sunday
afternoon. Carol Ferguson retired
from her position as Norris post-
master on July 31, 2012. Manager
of Post Office Operations Steve
Carter of Rapid City presented
service awards to the postmasters
who were present. Several current
postmasters, previous retirees, and
postmaster relief and numerous
family members also joined in the
celebration. Other postmasters
honored were: Kathy Strain, White
River; Rose Mooney, St. Francis;
and Alta Christensen, Martin.
The Kadoka Nursing Home held
their annual resident/employee
BBQ on Sunday, August 12. The
meal was in honor of the 30 resi-
dents, staff and their families. In
the afternoon a carnival fund
raiser was held. There was a
tremendous turnout of community
support. It was a beautiful day and
a great time for everyone. JoAnn
Letellier helped serve the picnic
dinner.
Sunday, fourteen members of
the St. John Lutheran Church con-
gregation enjoyed the evening meal
at the new home of Gene and Mar-
jorie Popkes in the Lakeview com-
munity southwest of Mission. The
group was treated to tours of the
home and beautiful yard as well. It
was a real fun evening for every-
one.
Orlana Schmidt recently re-
turned from a ten-week stay in Ver-
million, where she worked and
studied in the chemistry depart-
ment of the university.
Lori Schmidt and family, and
Cheyenne and Orlana and family
joined other relatives and friends
July 23 in Sioux Falls for the wed-
ding of Cheyenne’s cousin,
Chastity, to Casey Bush.
All parents and students, re-
member school starts in Norris on
Tuesday, August 21 with the bus
route same as last year.
The thermometer read 46 de-
grees on Monday morning, the
coons got in the corn, the air feels
crisper, the ground is dry, fire dan-
ger is high and school is about to
start. It must be fall. Drive care-
fully as those kids will soon be out
and about.
Character is made by
what you stand for;
Reputation by what you fall for.
On Sunday, August 5, Gary, Gale
and JoAnn Letellier were guests in
the Gene and Bertie Schoon home
in Corsica.
Last Sunday, Susan Taft and
Morgan met up with her sister-in-
law, Michelle Simmons, and her
daughter, Gwyneth, of Sturgis and
Gwyneth came home with the Tafts
to spend a few days. They met
Michelle in Wall again on Friday so
Gwyneth could return home.
JoAnn has been busy judging
county fairs lately. July 19 she
helped judge at the Jones/Mellette
county fair in Murdo. August 2 she
was in Philip for the Haakon/ Jack-
son county fair and more recently
JoAnn helped judge the Bennett
County Fair on August 9.
Once again Norris is the home of
champions. Last weekend, the Red
Leaf fast pitch softball team came
home the champions of the Pine
Ridge Tournament. Pitcher
Richard Charging Hawk and his
team walked off with the top spot
and the $1,700 prize money. Now
they will really be practicing for
the Rosebud Fair. Good job and
good luck at Rosebud!
Last Saturday, JoAnn Letellier
was among those attending Master
Gardeners held at the Donita
Denke home at Long Valley. They
all enjoyed making tin men.
Monday, JaLynn Burma,
Beaver, Jade, Jakki and Jimmy,
Julie Letellier of Kilgore and
Grandma Marjorie Anne Letellier
traveled to Pierre for the annual
“school shopping trip” with the
grandma. Sue Larson of Rapid City
met up with the bunch at the Paul
Beckwith home. Paul and Lu-
Anne’s home is always the head-
quarters for meals, switching
shoppers, etc. While different ones
took their turn at shopping, the
others enjoyed swimming. Hard to
believe school is about to start, but
it was a real fun day.
Monday, Samantha Taft re-
turned home after a summer in
Yankton. She got some appoint-
ments and errands done while
home before returning to Yankton.
Wednesday she and Dan went to
Rapid City and then for a fun thing
they went on to Sturgis to the rally.
One day this week, the Gale
Letelliers, Bernard Herbers and
Blake Hicks families were supper
guests at the Dave Letellier home
in Norris. They were just celebrat-
ing another good summer at the
ranch in South Dakota. They will
soon be returning to Hulett, WY,
pect of the 811 program. “Calling
811 is critical to the protection of
the complex network of under-
ground utilities, but it is also vital
to remember that lives can be
saved when 811 is called before dig-
ging,” he said. “Every digging proj-
ect—whether big or
small—requires a call to 811.”
“Call, wait and dig. It’s that sim-
ple,” said Kurt Pfeifle, South
Dakota One Call Board chairman.
An excavator makes the free call to
811, gives the One Call representa-
tive the location details of their
project and waits for the utility op-
erators to be notified to mark any
underground utilities at a project
site,” he said. “It’s fast, easy and
can give people peace of mind when
digging.”
Even after utilities have been
marked by utility operators, exca-
vators are encouraged to always
dig with care.
Visit www.SDOneCall.com for
more information about 811 and
the call-before-you-dig process.
Remember the importance of
calling 811 before beginning any
digging project, suggests the South
Dakota Public Utilities Commis-
sion and the South Dakota One
Call Board.
When planning outdoor projects,
residents should always consider
the possibility that underground
utilities could be directly below
them. When an excavator calls 811
before they begin their project, they
significantly reduce the risk of se-
rious injury to themself and those
around them as well as disruption
of utility service. Excavators that
hit an underground utility can be
held financially responsible for any
damages caused.
Projects as modest as planting a
shrub or installing a mailbox all re-
quire calls to 811 at least 48 hours
prior to digging. The possibility of
striking a line still exists even
when digging a short depth.
South Dakota Public Utilities
Commission Chairman Chris Nel-
son further stressed the safety as-
Call 811 before you dig At the county fair…
Ashlyn Carlson in the 6 & under barrels
Locals …
August 16, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
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STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605-837-2259 for more information.
An Open House
will be held at
People’s Market
to honor
Lila Whidby
for her many years of
dedicated service.
Stop by for refreshments and
wish her well!
Fri., August 17 • 4 to 6 p.m.
Shorty Ireland's son, Hal, and
daughter-in-law, Edie, were his
guests on Sunday.
Wilma Daniel visited with Gene
and Doris Daniel on Sunday after-
noon.
Alice Wilmarth had company,
Rick and Paulette, join her for the
BBQ on Sunday.
Dwight Louder's family joined
him Sunday for lunch.
Our halls, dining room and
courtyard were filled with friends
and family on Sunday as many
came to join us for the annual resi-
dent/employee barbeque. This year
we added a carnival to raise money
to support the activity fund for the
residents. The dunk tank and cake
walk were especially popular. We
so appreciate the many donations
for the cake walk. There were too
many wonderful cake concoctions
to count. This writer has four chil-
dren who brought home enough
cake to feed an army for a month!
The dunk tank was popular be-
cause our beloved staff, Heidi,
Nikki and Carrie, were the targets.
A few gracious volunteers also
stepped in to get dunked. Thanks,
Paula! It was a good day of food,
fun and fellowship.
Polly Kujawa enjoyed taking
walks with her son, Jim, this week.
Patty Patterson visited with her
daughter, Tammy Carlson, on Mon-
day. Her daughter, Cindy Vander-
May, came in on Tuesday for a
while.
Shirley Josserand came by to
chat with several of her friends
here in the nursing home.
Mary Bull Bear had a good time
with her granddaughters, Nevaeh
Pierce and Raya Garnett and Ash-
leigh, on Sunday.
Frances Terkildsen visited with
her sister, Betty VanderMay.
Frances and Geraldine Allen called
Bingo for our Tuesday activity.
Winona Carson had a nice time
with her son, Ron, and daughter-
in-law, Renate, on Friday.
Lova Bushnell came in on Satur-
day for a visit with a few friends
and to join the group in a bowling
match. Charity Edwards won the
game with Lova following in a close
second. Mary Ellen Herbaugh
rounded out the top three.
Elmer William's family was here
on Sunday to partake in the festiv-
ities. Among those visiting were
Jim and Bobbie Williams and
Frank and Ruth Ina.
Item Sturgis Rapid City Southern Hills Badlands District Total Last Year
DUI Arrests 187 46 11 7 251 235
Misd Drug Arrests 88 79 0 18 185 149
Felony Drug Arrests 25 8 0 1 34 43
Other Felony Arrests 2 0 0 0 2 9
Total Citations 623 407 72 87 1189 1267
Total Warnings 2556 1099 236 305 4196 4234
Cash Seized $0 $9368 $0 $0 $9368 $1853
Concealed Weap. Arrests 0 0 0 0 0 6
Vehicles Seized 5 2 0 0 7 5
For Drug Poss. 5 2 0 0 7 5
For Serial No. 0 0 0 0 0 0
Non Injury Accidents 14 20 8 8 50 42
Injury Accidents 24 15 5 6 50 80
Fatal Accidents 4 3 1 0 8 4
# of Fatalities 5 3 1 0 9 4
Highway Patrol’s final Sturgis Rally daily information
The South Dakota State Historical Society is taking ad-
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South Dakota History started in 1970 and has won mul-
tiple national awards, including a 2011 Leadership in His-
tory Award from the American Association for State and
Local History. It is both an invaluable resource for re-
searchers and an engaging read for anyone interested in
South Dakota’s past.
To keep up with current articles, join the South Dakota
State Historical Society and receive four issues each year. A
subscription to South Dakota History is a benefit of mem-
bership in the South Dakota State Historical Society. For in-
formation on membership, call (605) 773-6000. To purchase
individual issues, call (605) 773-6009.
Thirty-two years of award-winning journal
South Dakota History now available online
SD History… Featuring an article on the
Wild West shows of William F. (“Buffalo Bill”)
Cody and others, this is one of the many out-of-
print issues of South Dakota History now avail-
able online.
--Courtesy of SD State Historical Society
Heidi Coller takes the plunge …at the 1st annual Kadoka
Nursing Home Carnival held Sunday, August 12.
--courtesy photos
Activities … Above, Melissa
Ammons explains the duck pond
game to the Varner children.
Below, Scott Patterson shares a
moment with his mom, Patty, and
Molly, the dog, who was a big hit
among the children.
All out of state visitor left for their
homes on Sunday evening.
Jim, Robyn and Tanner Jones
and her parents, Ray and Florence
Osburn, of Valentine, NE, attended
the wedding of Jim Costello and
Lindsey Jungwirth in Pierre on
Saturday. On Saturday evening
Tyler, Michael, Kylie and Kelton
arrived and on Sunday they at-
tended the rodeo in Lower Brule.
Wilma Stout and Sydne Lenox
spent Friday attending the Bennett
County Fair in Martin. Wilma’s
great grandson, Mayson Mansfield,
had several 4-H projects and ani-
mals entered for competition. He
took home several ribbons, includ-
ing three, purple first places and a
plaque for best showmanship,
showing his lamb. He also was in
the cake decorating division which
was a very popular class for many
4-Hers. Wilma and Sydne visited
and had lunch with Joyce Richard-
son, who is home now after her hos-
pitalization in Sioux Falls. She is
doing quite well and getting
around with a cane.
Sunday was a very busy day on
Interstate 90 as the Sturgis Rally
ended and the sounds of motorcy-
cles going by Kadoka was quite
constant. Reports are that the rally
saw an increase in visitors this
year and the weather was good all
week, with no rainouts for the
evening shows, as was the case last
year. Although we need rain, it was
good that the weather co-operated
with rallygoers this year.
Save the Pearl members will
meet at the Gateway Apartments
Community Room on Tuesday, Au-
gust 21. Members are urged to at-
tend as final plans will be
discussed for the upcoming second
annual 5K run which is scheduled
for late September. Watch for
brochures and advertisements in
the coming weeks.
A new rodeo schedule was given
to this correspondent Monday. Jeff
Willert has been nursing a sore
arm and didn’t do much riding last
week, but has entered several
rodeos and is hoping to get back on
the riding circuit. His upcoming
schedule follows: Caldwell, ID,
Aug. 16; Burley, ID, Aug. 17;
Canby, OR, Aug. 18; Baker, MT,
Aug. 19; Kennewick, WA, Aug. 23
and San Juan Capistrano, CA,
Aug. 26.
Maye Alma Stout and her son,
David, of Winner, left on Friday,
August 3 for Arvada, CO, where
they went to take part in the 80th
birthday celebration of Maye
Alma’s brother, Harold Moulton.
Harold’s birthday was Saturday,
August 4, and about forty people
enjoyed his birthday dinner. The
Stouts returned to their homes on
Sunday. On August 7th the Moul-
tons left for an extended trip
through Europe.
Jim and Venessa Plaggemeyer
drove to Sturgis on Tuesday of last
week to visit at the home of his
brother, Gary Plaggemeyer. Gary
recently returned to his home in
Sturgis after several weeks in two
hospitals, Mayo Clinic at
Rochester, MN, and in a Sioux
Falls hospital. He is battling cancer
and now has some home health
care. They returned home the same
day, reporting that Sturgis was a
very busy place with all the motor-
cyclists.
Curtis and Casey Huffman of
Wessington Springs spent Wednes-
day afternoon and night at the
home of his parents, Tim and Car-
men Huffman. Thursday they went
to Rapid City where they visited
friends, came back to stay in
Kadoka Friday night and returned
home Saturday.
Friends and former students of
Kay (Norton) Jensen will be inter-
ested to know that she is in Foun-
tain Springs Nursing Home in
Rapid City. Her daughter, Shivaun
Williams, said she had a fall last
week and was admitted to the
nursing home on Friday. She and
Glen have been living in Rapid City
near their other daughter, Shawn
Pahlke, for some time. Visitors and
cards will be welcome.
Bob and Ardis McCormick of
Kadoka accompanied Jim and Barb
Petoske of Midland to Buffalo, WY,
for the weekend. On Sunday,
Nancy, Marv and Andrea Majerus
hosted a graduation party for Ryan
Majerus, who graduated from Buf-
falo Wyoming High School. Other
guests included Ed and Marcia
Morrison of Philip, Bruce and Nor-
man Brugman of Rapid City, and
other local friends. On Saturday,
the group attended a musical by
the Creek Side Performing Arts
Theater. Andrea Majerus, who is
thirteen, was a member of the cast.
Carson Good of Long Valley, son
of Allen and Beth Good, qualified
and competed at the 2012 National
Little Britches Finals Rodeo
(NLBFR), which was held in
Pueblo, CO, on July 23-28.
Good, 14 years old, competed for
his last year in the Junior Boys Di-
vision (ages 8-13) in the breakaway
roping, goat tying, team roping and
dally ribbon roping.
For the year, Good took 6th
place in the first go round and 2nd
in the final go in breakaway roping.
He finished 10th in the breakaway
roping world standings for the
2011-2012 year, and 14th in the
breakaway roping average at the
NLBRA.
“It was a good time again,” said
Good. “I felt a little disappointed in
some of my events, but since this
was my last year in the junior boys
division, I thought that it was just
another good year.”
Good’s 2012-2013 NLBRA rodeo
season will start in Edgemont on
August 18-19, where he will com-
pete in the senior boys division in
tie down roping and team roping,
not to mention he still has one
more rodeo finals to compete at,
which is the SD State 4-H Finals
Rodeo that will be held in Ft.
Pierre on August 24-26.
With more than a dozen rodeos
that Good plans to attended,
“Hopefully everything goes well,”
Good said. “I’m already looking for-
ward to another year of rodeo.”
Good qualifies and competes at the
National Little Britches Finals Rodeo
Kadoka Nursing Home carnival
Welcome Back to School
Monday, August 27
Administration • Faculity
School Calendar • Athletic Schedules & More
Page 6 of this week’s issue.
Watch next week for the Back to School insert.
Happy 57th Anniversary
Bud & Clara Belle Weller
Please join us to honor
them with a card shower.
Cards may be sent to
25606 SD Hwy 73
Kadoka, SD 57543
From Katie, Terri, Keith
& families
Chuck & Janet
VanderMay & family
This & That …
August 16, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
Snacks
Food
Coffee
Ice • Beer
Pop
Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
PO Box 544 • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Open Tuesday & Wednesday
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA
COUNTY OF JACKSON
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
JACK LOUIS BRUNSCH,
DECEASED.
PRO. NO. 12-9
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Notice is given that on July 23, 2012,
Carol Anderson, of 24755 Wooden Ring
Drive, Belvidere, SD 57521, was ap-
pointed as Personal Representative of
the Estate of Jack Louis Brunsch.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four (4) months after the
date of the first publication of this notice
or their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the personal
representative or may be filed with the
clerk with a copy of the claim mailed to
the personal representative.
Dated this 23rd day of July, 2012.
/s/ Carol Anderson
Carol Anderson
Personal Representative
24755 Wooden Ring Drive
Belvidere, SD 57521
Carol Schofield
Jackson County Clerk of Courts
PO Box 128
Kadoka, South Dakota 57543
605-837-2122
Alvin Pahlke
Attorney at Law
PO Box 432
Winner, SD 57580
605-842-1000
[Published August 2, 9 & 16, 2012]
)
)SS
)
NOTICE OF HEATING
FUEL BIDS
Bids for the furnishing of fuel oil and
propane for the various schools within
the Kadoka Area School District for the
2012-2013 school year will be accepted
at the Kadoka Area School Business Of-
fice up until 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
August 15, 2012. Bids should be submit-
ted by school site. Bids will be opened at
this time in the office of the business
manager.
Bids will be considered by the Board of
Education at their meeting to be held on
Wednesday, August 15, 2012 at 7:00
p.m.
Denote on outside of envelope:
BID ON FUEL OIL:
INTERIOR SCHOOL
BID ON PROPANE:
KADOKA SCHOOL
BID ON PROPANE:
LONG VALLEY SCHOOL
BID ON PROPANE:
INTERIOR SCHOOL LUNCHROOM
The Board of Education of the Kadoka
Area School District reserves the right to
accecpt or reject any or all bids.
Kadoka Board of Education
Eileen C. Stolley,
Business Manager
[Published August 9 & 16, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $17.88]
NOTICE
FOR BUS/SCHOOL
VEHICLE FUEL BIDS
Bids for furnishing of regular gasoline
and diesel fuel for the school vehicles of
the Kadoka Area School District will be
accepted until 2:00 p.m., Wednesday,
August 15, 2012. Bids will be opened at
this time in the office of the business
manager.
Bids will be considered by the board of
education at their regular meeting to be
held Wednesday, August 15, 2012 at
7:00 p.m.
Bids will be for the 2012-2013 school
term.
Bidders please bid for the following
buses and bus routes:
KADOKA SCHOOL: gas: pump price,
full service/self service price; diesel fuel:
pump price, full service/self service price.
INTERIOR ROUTE: bulk price, diesel
fuel, delivered to Larry Manley residence,
Interior, SD.
WANBLEE ROUTE: diesel: pump price,
full service/self service price.
LONG VALLEY ROUTE: bulk price,
diesel fuel, delivered to the Paul Gropper
Ranch, Long Valley, SD; and bulk price,
gasoline, delivered to the Matt Vander-
May Ranch, Long Valley, SD (300 gallon
tank).
Diesel vendors shall be responsible
for federal tax exemption.
Denote on outside of envelope:
GAS BID DIESEL BID
The Board of Education of the Kadoka
School District reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any or all bids.
Kadoka Board of Education
Eileen C. Stolley,
Business Manager
[Published August 9 & 16, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $21.13]
UNAPPROVED MINUTES OF
THE SPECIAL MEETING OF
THE KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL BOARD MEETING
HELD TUESDAY,
AUGUST 2, 2012 AT THE
KADOKA SCHOOL AT
8:00 P.M.
Members present: D.J. Addison, Dale
Christensen, Ross Block; Present via
phone conference: Dawn Rasmussen,
Mark Williams. Absent: Dan VanderMay,
Ken Lensegrav.
Also present: Supt. Jamie Hermann;
Eileen Stolley, business manager; Jeff
Nemecek and George Seiler, principals.
Visitors present: Robyn Jones, Bob Fu-
gate, Patty Ulmen, John Madsen, Pam
Bonenberger, Chad Eisenbraun, Jackie
Stilwell, Len Sanftner, Arla Patterson,
Tasha Peters, Colby Shuck, Teresa
Shuck, Ben Latham, Grant and Susan
Patterson, Kay Reckling.
The meeting was called to order by Pres-
ident Vice President Ross Block.
The purpose of the special meeting is to
discuss staff housing needs.
Supt. Jamie Hermann explained that
rental housing is needed for the elemen-
tary principal and his family. There are
houses for sale however searches for
rentals for a family of five have been un-
successful.
The meeting was opened for public input.
Members of the audience who ex-
pressed opinions were opposed to the
school district purchasing property and
renting it to staff.
The purpose of the executive session
item on the agenda and the notice of the
meeting were also questioned. Supt.
Hermann responded that legal counsel
was consulted on the matter of the exec-
utive session.
At 8:45 D.J. Addison moved to enter into
executive session for the purpose of
marketing and pricing strategies. Motion
was seconded by Dale Christensen and
carried. The board came out of executive
session at 9:02.
No action was taken.
Dale Christensen moved that the meet-
ing be adjourned. Motion was seconded
by D.J. Addison and carried.
Ross Block, Vice President
ATTEST:
Eileen C. Stolley
Business Manager
[Published August 16, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $27.44]
The second-longest state fish
record in South Dakota, a blue cat-
fish caught by Edward Elliot in
1959, is a thing of the past.
On July 21, 2012, Steve Lem-
mon from Elk Point grabbed his
own place in the record books by
landing a 99-pound, 4-ounce blue
catfish from the Big Sioux River,
edging out the previous record by 2
pounds, 4 ounces.
With the aid of only a rod, reel
and a creek chub for bait, Lemmon
managed to wrangle in the trophy
fish from his fishing hole in Union
County.
His fish stacks up well with
those from nearby states. The Ne-
braska state record blue catfish
weighed in at 100 pounds, 8 ounces
while neighboring Iowa currently
boasts a state record blue catfish of
101 pounds. Kansas, a state known
for having some large catfish, has
a slightly smaller state-record blue
cat weighing it at 94 pounds even.
State fishing records for South
Dakota can be viewed at
h t t p : / / g f p . s d . g o v / f i s h i n g -
boating/state-fish-records-list.aspx
If you believe you have caught a
qualifying fish, the state record fish
application and guidelines can be
found at the same website.
New state
record for
blue catfish
The South Dakota Game Fish
and Parks Commission has
changed the restrictions on the use
of body-grip traps on public lands
and road rights-of-way.
No one may set or operate a
body-grip trap with a jaw spread
greater than 6 ¾ inches in conjunc-
tion with any bait, lure or scent un-
less the trap is recessed in a
plastic, wood or metal cubby with a
minimum of 7 inches from the front
end of the cubby to trigger the trap,
or the trap is set below the water’s
edge in a stream, river or other
body of water.
The change was made because of
concerns about dogs getting caught
in the traps, and it applies only to
public lands and road rights-of-
way.
The GFP Commission also clari-
fied the legal size of muskrat
colony traps. A previous rule did
not address square traps. The size
of colony traps used for muskrats
may not exceed 36 inches in overall
length. If using a round colony
trap, the diameter cannot exceed
12 inches. If using a box colony
trap, the height may not exceed 12
inches, and the width may not ex-
ceed 12 inches.
GFP amends trapping regulations
The South Dakota Game Fish
and Parks Commission has final-
ized two popular waterfowl hunt-
ing seasons.
The biggest change for the 2012
Duck Hunting Season will allow
hunters to also harvest four scaup,
also known as bluebills.
Hunters will be allowed to har-
vest six ducks daily, comprised of
no more than: five mallards (may
include no more than two hens),
three wood ducks, two redheads,
four scaup, two pintails and one
canvasback.
SD Duck Hunting Season
•High Plains, Oct. 13, 2012 –
Jan. 17, 2013
•Low Plains North and Middle,
Sept. 29 – Dec. 11, 2012
•Low Plains South, Oct. 13 –
Dec. 25, 2012.
SD Goose Hunting Season
•Light geese and white fronted
geese,– Sept 29 – Dec. 23, 2012.
Statewide Canada geese
and brant geese seasons
•Unit 1 – Oct. 1 – Dec. 16, 2012
•Unit 2 – Nov. 3, 2012 – Feb. 15,
2013
•Unit 3 – Jan. 12 – 20, 2013
A daily limit of three Canada
geese, 20 light geese and one white-
fronted goose is in place, with a
possession limit of twice the daily
limit for Canada and white-fronted
geese and an unlimited possession
limit for light geese.
Duck and goose
hunting seasons
set by GFP
Lewis and Clark: Investigators
The legend was that any human
who approached would be killed.
That legend was apparently
enough to make Capts. Meriwether
Lewis and William Clark want to
find out if it was true.
The captains, accompanied by a
contingent of nearly four dozen
men, had set off on May 14, 1804,
from Camp Dubois near St. Louis,
Mo., on their journey to the Pacific
coast and back.
As they traveled up the Missouri
River, the captains heard about a
cone-shaped hill about eight miles
north of what is now Vermillion.
Called Paha Wakan by the
Lakota, the American Indian tribes
in the area believed the hill to be
the home of sprits or devils. The
devils were reported to be 18-
inches high, human in form, but
with large heads and armed with
sharp arrows that could kill all per-
sons who attempted to approach
the hill. The tribes in the area
would not go near the place.
Accompanied by 10 or 11 men
and Lewis’ Newfoundland dog, Sea-
man, Lewis and Clark set out on
Aug. 25, 1804, to hike to the top of
the hill. They lived to explore an-
other day, as they found no devils.
What they did find was what Clark
described in his journals as a most
beautiful landscape, with numer-
As the expedition journeyed fur-
ther up the Missouri River, an
Arikara legend captured Clark’s
imagination. The legend was that a
man and a woman were in love, but
the girl’s parents would not let
them marry. The pair and their dog
wandered off to mourn.
All turned to stone gradually, be-
ginning at their feet. They fed on
grapes, and the woman has a
bunch of grapes yet in her hand,
Clark wrote in his journal on Oct.
13, 1804.
The Arikara pay great reverence
to the stones, Clark wrote. He paid
reverence to them by naming a
creek Stone Idol Creek in their
honor.
The stones can be found on the
northeast corner of West Pollock
Resort near Pollock.
This moment in South Dakota
history is provided by the South
Dakota Historical Society Founda-
tion, the nonprofit fundraising
partner of the South Dakota State
Historical Society. The South
Dakota Cultural Heritage Center in
Pierre is an official site on the
Lewis & Clark National Historic
Trail. Find the Foundation on the
web at www.sdhsf.org
ous herds of buffalo feeding in var-
ious directions and the plain ex-
tending without interruption as far
as eye could see.
Spirit Mound, as the hill is now
called, has been restored to native
prairie. It is one of the most signif-
icant stops on the Lewis and Clark
National Historic Trail because it is
one of the few places where histori-
ans know that the explorers actu-
ally stood there.
South Dakota history & heritage
The Mellette County Livestock
Improvement Association has an-
nounced the date for its annual Pen
of Three Heifer Show. It is set for
Wednesday, August 22, 2012, at the
Frontier Days Arena in White
River. Weigh-in will be from 8:00
a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Four divisions will be contested:
English Heavyweight, English
Lightweight, Purebred Heavy-
weight, and Purebred Lightweight.
An overall Champion Heifer will be
selected from the Pen of Three en-
tries.
A steer calf division is also being
offered again this year. Producers
are asked to bring their top steer to
the show where it will be judged
against other steers for the overall
Grand Champion Steer prize.
Bull calves may also be exhib-
ited but will not be judged.
Mellette County
Pen of Three
Heifer Show
Haakon/Jackson 4-H Members
who participated at the South
Dakota State Horse Show in Huron
on July 24-26 were Dustin Enders,
Wyatt Enders, Sage Gabriel, Cedar
Gabriel, and Gage Weller. Events
and ribbon placings are:
Beginner Western Showman-
ship: Cedar Gabriel, red
Junior Western Showmanship:
Dustin Enders, red; Sage Gabriel,
red
Junior Pony Western Showman-
ship: Gage Weller, red
Senior Western Showmanship:
Wyatt Enders, white
Beginner Stock Seat Equitation:
Cedar Gabriel, blue
Junior Stock Seat Equitation:
Sage Gabriel, red
Junior Pony Stock Seat Equi-
tation: Gage Weller, blue
Junior Western Riding: Sage
Gabriel, white
Junior Reining: Gage Weller, red
Junior Barrel Racing: Sage
Gabriel, blue, 20.795
Junior Pony Barrel Racing:
Gage Weller, red, 26.302
Junior Illustrated Talk: Gage
Weller, “Hand It To Your Horse” -
purple
Junior Demonstration: Dustin
Enders, “How to Saddle a Horse” –
purple
State 4-H Horse Show results
Welcome Back to School …
August 16, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
ADMINISTRATION
Jamie Hermann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Superintendent
George Seiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .High School Principal
Jeff Nemecek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elementary Principal
Chad Eisenbraun . . . . . . . . . . .Technical Coordinator/Head Football
Eileen Stolley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Business Manager
Kay Reckling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Administrative Assisstant
Danielle Stoddard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elementary Secretary
Susan Sudbeck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .High School Secretary/Registrar
Cindy VanderMay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Payroll Clerk
ELEMENTARY STAFF - KADOKA
Karen Byrd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Reading First Program Coach
Becky Keegan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kindergarten
Gail Reutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .First Grade
Cassie DeRocher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Grade
Maribeth Roghair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Third Grade
Mary Graupmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fourth Grade
Arlene Hicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fifth Grade
Michelle Mansfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Middle School Language Arts
Barry Hutchinson . . . . . . . . .Middle School Social Studies/Head VB
Laurie Prichard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Title I Technology/Asst. VB
Jean Holzkamp . . . . . . . . . . . .Middle School Science, P.E. & Health
Ben Latham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K-12 Instrumental Music
Pamela Bonenberger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pre-School/Speech
Abby Carlson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
Ruth McCubbin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
Joan Enders . . . . . . . . .1/2 time Speech Facilitator 1/2 time Library
Kathy Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education
Dana Eisenbraun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education/Asst. Track
Merilee Grimes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education Aide
Nicole DeVries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education Aide
Carmen Huffman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Middle School Response to Intervention (RTI)
Kristie Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Guidance Counselor
INTERIOR
Edna Kary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kindergarten
Mia Whirlwind Horse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .First & Second Grades
Sandra Short Bull . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Third, Fourth & Fifth Grades
Jennifer Van Pelt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sixth, Seventh & Eighth Grades
Carrie Bergen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education
Kate Latham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Ed Aide
Barb Ireland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Title I
Valarie Kruse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Instructional Aide
LONG VALLEY
Nancy Weller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Teacher
Nicole Thompson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Teacher
Valerie Ohrtman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Teacher
Misty Hamar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Title
MIDLAND
Mary Parquet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Teacher
Renee Schofield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Teacher
Nicole Nelson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aide
HIGH SCHOOL STAFF
Jessica Magelky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .English
David Ohrtman . . . . . . . . . . . . .Social Science & History/Asst. Track
Kristie Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Guidance Counselor
Jean Holzkamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Science/First Aid
Brandy Knutson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Industrial Technology & Vo-Ag
Carol Kroetch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Math/Title I
Dylan Moro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Science
Joan Enders . . . . . . . . .1/2 time Speech Facilitator 1/2 time Library
Bill Murphy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Business Computers
Mark Reiman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P.E./Head Boys’ Basketball
Colby Shuck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K-12 Vocal/Pep Band
Teresa Shuck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Psych/Soc/Elective
Amy Smiley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Special Education
Deetta Terkildsen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Computer Technology
Harry Weller . . . . . . . . . . . . Title I/Activities Director/Cross-Country
Christy Willert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .High School Math
Ben Latham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K-12 Band/Pep Band
CUSTODIANS
Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Custodian - Kadoka
Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assistant - Kadoka
Larry Manley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assistant - Interior
FOOD SERVICE
Richard Ireland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Cook - Kadoka
Kim Ireland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assistant - Kadoka
Linda Riggins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kitchen Helper - Kadoka
Tara Leach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cook - Interior
Larry Manley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kitchen Helper - Interior
EXTRA-CURRICULAR/NON-STAFF
Jody Sudbeck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assistant Football Coach
Annette VanderMay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assistant Girls’ Basketball
Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Girls’ Basketball
Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assistant Boys’ Basketball
Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Coach Track
Nicole DeVries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cheerleading Advisor
Kadoka Area School District Administration and Faculty
INCLEMENT
WEATHER SCHOOL
CLOSINGS

For various reasons it may be
necessary to close school or to
alter school hours. In case of
any emergency, such as a bliz-
zard, making it necessary to
close school, the announcement
will be made over radio stations
KIMM, Rapid City; KGFX,
Pierre; KILI, Pine Ridge; Chan-
nel 6, KCLO (CBS); Channel 3,
KOTA (ABC). If weather condi-
tions indicate that school may
be closed or delayed in opening,
please keep tuned to one of
those stations for such informa-
tion or for other changes in the
bus schedules. Hear announce-
ments between 6:30 - 7:30 a.m.,
for these announcements.
SCHOOL POLICY

The Kadoka Area School will
not discriminate because of sex,
race, color, national origin or
handicap.
CEO/Superintendent Jamie
Hermann is the designated co-
ordinator of Title IX and Title
VII. Telephone number: 837-
2175.
Principals George Seiler and
Jeffery Nemecek are the desig-
nated coordinators of Section
504/ADA.
STATEMENT
FROM THE
DEPT OF HEALTH

From time to time during the
year, screenings or education
may be provided through a con-
tract with the SD Department
of Health (DOH), who is subject
to the rules and regulations of
the Health Insurance Portabil-
ity and Accountability Act
(HIPAA). You may view their
notice of privacy practices on
the DOH website or request a
printed copy by contacting them
at 1-800-305-3064.
DELTA DENTAL
ACCIDENT PLAN

Provides coverage around-the-
clock. No deductible - pays 100
percent of customary fees up to
$2,000 per accident.
Your child will receive applica-
tion forms from the Kadoka Area
School for these insurance plans.
Parents are encouraged to look
them over carefully and mail
them back to the company. If
your child does not bring the ap-
plications home, please contact
the school business office.
STUDENT
ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
Through: Student
Assurance Services, Inc.

Since children are particu-
larly susceptible to injuries, we
encourage you to review your
present health and accident in-
surance program to determine
if your coverage is adequate. If
you do not feel your insurance is
adequate because of a de-
ductible or co-insurance clause,
or if you do not have insurance,
we encourage you to review the
student insurance program.
This plan will provide benefits
for medical expenses incurred
because of an accident. An ex-
planation of the cost and bene-
fits is explained on the
premium envelope. Please re-
turn envelope and check to
school if coverage is needed.
SUPPORT
THE
Kadoka Area
KOUGARS
Kadoka Area Kougars
Sports Center

BUS SCHEDULE
School begins at 8:00 and
ends at 3:40. Students need
time to eat breakfast if the
school serves breakfast.
Long Valley
Brenda & Paul Gropper
& Melissa VanderMay
Leaves 6:50 a.m.
Arrives 7:50 a.m.
Leaves 3:45 p.m.
Interior - Larry Manley
Leaves 6:15 a.m.
Arrives 7:45 a.m.
Breakfast
Leaves - 3:45 p.m.
Wanblee - Ted Schnee
Leaves 6:00 a.m.
Arrives 7:45 a.m.
Breakfast
Leaves 3:45 p.m.
REMINDER
TO PARENTS:
If you change residence
during the school year, con-
tact the school to determine
your closest bus stop.
PARENT TEACHER
CONFERENCES
Oct. 4 & Feb. 7

Two parent-teacher confer-
ences are scheduled: Thursday,
Oct. 4 and Thursday, Feb. 7, 3:00
to 8:30 p.m. both days. As educa-
tion of the child is a cooperative
school and home responsibility,
all parents are urged to attend
parent-teacher conferences; and
all parents are encouraged to
visit the school buildings and the
school lunch program at any
time.
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
December
8 Faith - T - 3:00
10 RC Stevens JV - T - TBD
14 Dupree - H - 5:30
17 Philip - H - 3:00
21 Stanley County - H - TBD
28 Lyman Classic - T - TBD
January
5 New Underwood - T - 2:00
10-12 Jones Co. Tourney - TBD
22 White River - H - 5:30
24 Jones County - H - 3:00
25 Bison - H - TBD
29 Bennett County - T - 6:00
31 RC Christian - H - 3:00
February
1 Wall - H - 2:00
5 New Underwood - H - 6:00
8 RC Christian - T - 5:00
15 Lyman - T - 5:30
22 Philip - T - 6:00
District 15 …
Feb. 25, 28, Mar. 1 - Lyman
Regions …
Mar. 5 - TBD
State …
Mar. 14, 15 & 16 Aberdeen
Gymnastics
Wall/Kadoka
December
7 Hot Springs - 5:00
15 Stanley Co. - 11:00
January
4 Chamberlain - 5:15
5 Stanley Co. Inv. - 10:00
18 Stanley Co. Tri. - TBD
25 Hot Springs - 5:00 p.m.
February
1 Wall Inv. - 12:00
Regions …
Feb. 9 - TBD
State …
Feb. 15 & 16 - Rapid City
April
4 Todd County
9 Harry Weller
13 Belle Fourche
16 Kadoka Community
19 People’s Market
20 Chamberlain
25 Lyman Invite

May
4 Lead/Deadwood
10 Winner
11 Kadoka Area HS
Regions …
May 16 IV-B - Kadoka
State …
May 24-25 - Sioux Falls
Kadoka Area
School District
School Calendar
2012-2013
August
27 First Day of School
September
3 Labor Day - No School
7 School in Session
21 Homecoming
School in Session
October
4 Parent/Teacher Conferences
Dismiss at 2:30
12 Teacher In-service
25 End of 1st Quarter
November
16 Teacher In-service
21 Dismiss at 2:30
22-23 Thanksgiving Vacation
December
24 Christmas Vacation Begins
No School
January
2 School Resumes
4 School in Session
10 End of Semester
February
1 Teacher In Service
7 Parent/Teacher Conferences
Dismiss at 2:30
March
14 End of 3rd Quarter
15 Teacher In-service
April
1 Easter Monday - No School
5 School in Session
22 TIE Conference - No School
26 School in Session
May
16 End of 2nd Semester
16 Last Day of School
Dismiss at 11:00
17 Teacher In-service
19 Graduation - 1:00
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
December
6 White River - H - 5:30
8 Faith - T - 3:00
11 Jones Co - T - 5:30
17 Philip - H - 3:00
21 Stanley Co. - H - TBD
27 Lyman - H - TBD
January
5 New Underwood - T - 2:00
10 Philip - T - 6:00
17-19 Southern Plains
White River / Colome TBD
24 Jones County - H - 3:00
25 Bison - H - TBD
28 New Underwood - H - 6:00
31 RC Christian - H - 3:00
February
1 Wall - H - 2:00
2 Highmore Classic - T - TBD
8 Colome - T - 5:30
12 Dupree - T - 5:30
14 Bennett County - H - 6:00
District 15-B …
Feb. 18, 19, & 21 - Kadoka
Regions …
Feb. 28 - TBD
State …
Mar. 7, 8 & 9 - Huron
TICKET PRICES ~ HS Athletic Activities
Adults • $3.00 Students K-12 • $2.00
Double-Header (Boys/Girls’ Events)
Adults • $5.00 Students • $3.00
Family Season Ticket • $100.00
Good for all athletic contests (excluding drama & tournaments),
for all members of the immediate family.
Adult 10-Punch • $25.00 ~~ Students K-12/All Activities • $20.00
Students & children under age 5 are admitted free.
Free admission to grade school games.
FREE SENIOR GOLD PASS
60 years & older, residing in the district
Get pass request at the business office of the Kadoka School.
The pass must be presented at every sporting event.
FOOTBALL
August
24 Edgemont - H - 7:00
Parents Night
31 New Underwood - H - 7:00
September
7 Lyman - T - 6:00
14 Wall - T - 7:00
21 Jones Co. - H -7:00
Homecoming!
28 Open
October
5 White River - T - 6:00
12 Colome - H - 6:00
18 Philip - T - 7:00
Playoffs …
Oct. 23 - 1st Round
Oct. 29 - 2nd Round
Nov. 3 - Semi-Finals
Nov. 8-10 - State Finals
@ Vermillion
WRESTLING
Philip/Kadoka/Wall
December
7 Rapid City Trny - TBA
8 Rapid City Trny - TBA
15 Valentine, NE Trny - TBA
January
4 Lyman Trny - 11:00
5 Lyman Trny - 9:00
11 Philip Trny - 3:00
12 Philip Trny - 9:00
19 Winner Trny - TBA
26 Wagner Trny - 8:00
February
2 Black Hills Invite
Hill City - 9:00
Regions …
Feb. 18 IV-B - Rapid City - TBA
State …
Feb. 22 & 23 - Aberdeen - TBA
VOLLEYBALL
August
25 Little Wound - T - 4:00
28 Kadoka Tri. - H - 4:30
30 - Philip - T - 6:00
September
4 Little Wound - H - 5:00
6 Wall - H - 6:00
8 Philip Tourney - T - 9:00
13 New Underwood - H - 6:00
15 Faith - T - 1:00
20 White River Tri - T - 4:00
25 Bennett Co. - T - 5:00
29 - Lead/Deadwood
Tournament - T - 8:30
October
2 Lyman - H - 6:00
11 New U. Tri - T - 5:00
13 Douglas Tourney - T - 9:00
16 Jones Co. - T - 5:30
22 RC Christian - H - 6:00
District 15 Tourney …
Oct. 30 & Nov. 1 - Jones Co.
Region 7 Tourney …
Nov. 6 - Site TBD
State …
Nov. 15, 16 & 17 - Mitchell
Let’s Go
Kougars!
CROSS-COUNTRY
August
24 Douglas
30 Spearfish
September
1 Faith
7 Lyman
13 Chamberlain
19 Western Great Plains
25 Lead/Deadwood
27 Sturgis
October
4 Eagle Butte
6 Philip
Regions …
Oct. 10 - TBD
State …
Oct. 20 - Huron
Picture
Schedules
Community pictures
at 7:30 a.m.
Pictures start with pre-
school at 8:00 a.m.
Midland School
Mon., Sept. 24
morning
Long Valley School
Mon., Sept. 24
morning
Interior School
Mon., Sept. 24
afternoon
Kadoka School
Thurs., Sept. 27
SCHOOL
LUNCH SERVICE

We look forward to an excellent
school lunch program this year,
with school lunches and the milk
program beginning on the first
day of school. Parents, please en-
courage your children to partici-
pate in the school lunch program.
Ala cart program will also be of-
fered. Prices are as follows:
Breakfast
Kadoka & Interior
K-8: $1.10/$22.00 per ticket

Lunch
Kadoka, Midland & Interior
K-5, $2.25/$45.00 per ticket
6-12, $2.65/$53.00 per ticket
Adults, $3.75/$75.00 per ticket
Extra Milk
30¢/$6.00 per ticket.
Student Second Meals
$1.40/$28.00 per ticket - Lunch
$1.35/$27.00 - Breakfast
All tickets pay
for 20 servings.
Track
All times listed - MT
ELEMENTARY TRANSPORTATION MILEAGE:

Transportation mileage is paid to parents who transport their ele-
mentary children to a bus stop or to school if the miles traveled are in
excess of five (5) miles. The mileage rate for this transportation is state
rate -- currently .37 per mile. Transportation is paid to the school or
bus stop closest to the residence. If the parent chooses not to use the
bus or to send their child to another school within the district, mileage
is paid only to the closest bus stop or closest school.
If your residence within the district changes during the school year,
contact the school to determine the bus stop closest to you.
At the beginning of the school year, a calendar is sent to each parent
who will be claiming transportation mileage. Parents are asked to use
this calendar to keep track of the days driven. At the end of the year a
transportation mileage claim voucher will be sent to the parents for
the purpose of submitting the mileage claim. The mileage voucher is
to be completed and the school asks that you also attach the calendar
to this voucher. If there are any questions regarding transportation
mileage, please call the school business office at 837-2175.
Requests for assignment to an alternate attendance center within
the district: A parent or guardian must submit the request, in writing,
to the elementary principal to be approved by the school board. Mileage
will be paid according to the above policy.
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
August 16, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
LOOMIX® FEED SUPPLEMENTS is
seeking dealers. Motivated individu-
als with cattle knowledge and com-
munity ties. Contact Bethany at
800-870-0356 /
becomeadealer@adm.com to find
out if there is a dealership opportu-
nity in your area.
WANT A WAY TO PAY off that sum-
mer vacation? Join our team! Sell
Avon! Work from home. Earn 40%
on your first 4 orders. 1-877-454-
9658.
EMPLOYMENT
CITY OF HOT SPRINGS is accept-
ing applications for a certified
Water\Wastewater Superintendent.
Salary $32,500 - $50,000. Contact,
Harley Lux, (605)745-3135.
hlux@hs-sd.org
JACKSON COUNTY HIGHWAY DE-
PARTMENT Worker. Experience in
road/bridge construction /mainte-
nance preferred. CDL Pre-employ-
ment drug and alcohol screening
required. Applications / resumes ac-
cepted. Information (605) 837-2410
or (605) 837-2422 Fax (605) 837-
2447.
SERVICE MANAGER, IMMEDIATE
OPENING. 5-star Chrysler, Dodge,
Jeep dealership. Excellent earnings,
benefits, job security. Apply: Jim
Gesswein, Gesswein Motors, PO
Box 71, Milbank, SD, 57252
BOOKKEEPER AT THE MADISON
DAILY Leader and Leader Printing in
Madison, SD. Responsibilities in-
clude AP, AR, GL and Payroll ac-
counting. Resumes may be sent to
Karen@madisondailyleader.com.
PIERRE SCHOOL DISTRICT has
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
open teaching positions for middle
school math for the 2012-13 school
year. Apply online at
www.pierre.k12.sd.us/employment
or Pierre Schools, 211 S Poplar,
Pierre SD 57501. EOE
CUSTER CLINIC IS accepting appli-
cations for a full-time LPN or Li-
censed Medical Assistant to join our
team in the beautiful southern Black
Hills. Salary based on experience; in-
cludes excellent benefits. Contact
Human Resources at (605)673-2229
ext. 110 for more information or log
onto www.regionalhealth.com to
apply. EEOC/AA.
EVENTS
The Menno Pioneer Power Show:
Make plans now for the September
22 and 23 show. For more informa-
tion, visit www.pioneeracres.com or
call 605-387-5166.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put the
South Dakota Statewide Classifieds
Network to work for you today! (25
words for $150. Each additional word
$5.) Call this newspaper 605-837-
2259 or 800-658-3697 for details.
OTR DRIVERS
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com
WANTED
BUYING ANTIQUES. One ITEM to
Collection. Also Antique Indian
ITEMS. Beadwork, Quillwork, Arrow-
heads, Artifacts, Guns, Spurs, Coins,
Toys, Slot Machines. Serious Buyer.
605-890-0539.
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
All others call . . . . . .911
TIRE & SERVICE WORK - CALL 837-2376
HOURS:
Mon - Fri: 7:30 to 5:30
Saturday: 8 to Noon
We’re here for all your
vehicle maintenance!
Give us a call today!
NOW BUYING!
Cars for salvage, call today!
We make hydraulic hoses &
On-the-farm tire service!
Full Service
Mechanic
Shop!
J&S ReStore
Kadoka, South Dakota
USED VEHICLES!
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Brakes • Fuel Pumps
Alternators • Starters
Timken Seals
& Bearings
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
For all your automotive
supplies -- give us call!
GARAGE SALE: Fri., Aug. 17, 8-6,
Sat., Aug. 18, 8-noon, 720 9th Ave.,
Casey & Sarah Bauman home. Girls
clothes 10-12, womens’ clothing size
6-L, shoes, jewelry, DVDs, 1982
Glastron boat, 1965 Chevy pickup,
toys and more will be added!
K5-1tp
FOR SALE: Large round bales of
straw, 605-222-5126. KW5-1tp
HELP WANTED: Part time cashier,
2-10 shift. Friendly, positive work en-
vironment, flexible schedule. Perma-
nent position. Must be 21. Apply at
Kadoka Gas & Go. KP5-2tc
HELP WANTED: Cook/clean/stock
9-5 shift. 2-3 days a week, some
weekends, flexible schedule, perma-
nent position. Apply at Kadoka Gas
& Go. KP5-2tc
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE: 1999
Redman, 28x72, 3 bed, 2 bath,
150x75 lot, shed, double carport,
Midland. Call Paula 441-6967.
$49,500 (negotiable). KP4-4tp
LOCATION! PRICE! Central
air/heat, country kitchen, 3 bdrm
house for sale. 2 garages, sunporch,
700 9th St. Kadoka. 605-837-1611.
KP52-tfn
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Department Worker. Expe-
rience in road/bridge construction
/maintenance preferred. CDL Pre-
employment drug and alcohol
screening required. Applications / re-
sumes accepted. Information (605)
837-2410 or (605) 837-2422. Fax
(605) 837-2447. K52-6tc
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
BACKHOE AND TRENCHING: Pe-
ters Excavation, Inc. Excavation
work of all types. Call Brent Peters,
837-2945 or 381-5568 (cell).
KP24-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Thank you to the Kadoka and
Long Valley Fire Departments and
all our friends and neighbors for re-
sponding to the fire on our land last
Tuesday. Thanks to your quick re-
sponse we only lost eight bales of
hay. It’s a comfort to know there are
so many who are willing to help
when called upon.
Steve and Shivaun Williams
We know so many of you have
celebrated anniversaries with bigger
numbers; but we were so pleased to
have celebrated our 40th. Thanks to
the Moon family, thanks to all who
came, thanks to all who sent cards,
and thanks to all who called. It was
a fabulous day.
Thanks again,
Melvin and Marilyn Jorgensen
Thank Yous
Agricul ture …
August 16, 2012 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 21: FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
SALE TIME: 10 A.M. (MT}
TUESDAY, AUG. 2S: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY SPFINC
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 4: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 1S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 2S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 2: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 9: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 16: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 1?: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 30: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
2DJ2 Horse So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 21: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE
SALE FOLLOWINC THE CATTLE SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22: DAD FIVEF FALL
EXTFAVACANZA HOFSE SALE. CO TO WWW.PHILIP
LIVESTOCK.COM TO VIEW CATALOC OF CALL PLA AT
605-859-2577.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 3: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF
SALE & WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. ?: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 2?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS PFECONDITIONED
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE,
MUST DE WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE
PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS (FOUF-WAY, PASTEUFELLA, 7-WAY,
& HAEMOPHILUS}.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL
DULL & FEMALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S: NO SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
80UTh 0AK0TA ßRAN0 8ELL|NC 0N
TUE8., AUC. 28Th AT 12:00 HT:
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s
our vo1oe 1n governmen1 1o represen1 U.S.
oo111e produoers 1n 1rode morKe11ng 1ssues.
]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering
video saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD

CATTLE REPORT
TUESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2012
B1g run o] ]eeder oo111e ]or our speo1o1 geor11ng
so1e. Lo1s o] bugers ond o verg ogress1ve
morKe1. Cous & bu11s Þ1gÞer.
FEEDER CATTLE:
GENE MICHAEL - PHILIP
74 ........................................DLK STFS 792= ......$147.00
67 ........................................DLK STFS 891= ......$139.00
SDSU EXPERIMENT STATION - PHILIP
136............................DLK & DWF STFS 803= ......$146.25
GREG & JACE SHEARER - WALL
68 ........................................DLK STFS 803= ......$144.50
67 ........................................DLK STFS 746= ......$147.00
138 ......................................DLK STFS 817= ......$142.75
LANDERS LIVESTOCK CO - HOT SPRINGS
263............................DLK & DWF STFS 880= ......$140.00
65..............................DLK & DWF STFS 964= ......$135.00
WHEELER RANCH - PHILIP
57..............................DLK & DWF STFS 1006= ....$132.10
38..............................DLK & DWF STFS 919= ......$137.00
FORREST STEWART - CODY, NE
66..............................DLK & DWF STFS 905= ......$138.00
21..............................DLK & DWF STFS 839= ......$139.00
SCOTT BRECH - QUINN
74..............................DLK & DWF STFS 819= ......$141.50
174............................DLK & DWF STFS 890= ......$137.75
TERRY HAMMEL - HOT SPRINGS
71 ................................DLK SPAY HFFS 828= ......$136.00
70 ................................DLK SPAY HFFS 817= ......$137.00
50 ................................DLK SPAY HFFS 758= ......$130.00
18 ..............................HEFF SPAY HFFS 724= ......$124.50
BRENT NELSON - HOT SPRINGS
75 ................................DLK SPAY HFFS 791= ......$137.50
59......................FED & DLK SPAY HFFS 730= ......$132.60
JERRY LANE JOHNSTON - INTERIOR
30 ...............................DLK OPEN HFFS 748= ......$136.75
LARRY SMITH - PHILIP
11 ........................................DLK STFS 635= ......$151.50
LYNN FIELDS - ELM SPRINGS
4 ..............................CHAF & DLK STFS 684= ......$151.00
11 ...........................CHAF & FED HFFS 699= ......$135.50
SANDERS RANCH PART. - RAPID CITY
11 ....................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 613= ......$149.00
20 ...............................DLK OPEN HFFS 724= ......$135.00
17 .............................CHAF OPEN HFFS 779= ......$130.00
DUSTIN & WES REEVES - OWANKA
10 ........................................DLK STFS 743= ......$144.75
RICHARD & JACOB RAUSCH - HERMOSA
24..............................FED & DLK STFS 701= ......$146.00
44......................FED & DLK SPAY HFFS 679= ......$137.75
ARLIE RADWAY - HOWES
22 ...............................DLK OPEN HFFS 908= ......$127.00
TERRY & LEVI BUCHERT - PHILIP
20...............................FED OPEN HFFS 919= ......$125.25
MATT REEDY - PHILIP
17.....................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 867= ......$127.00
RICHARD ALDREN JR. - NEW UNDERWOOD
4........................................CHAF HFFS 711= ......$130.00
ROXY RICHARDSON - LONG VALLEY
9.................................FED OPEN HFFS 925= ......$124.00
QUINT & JODY MORELAND - RED OWL
6 ..............................CHAF & DLK STFS 706= ......$145.00
7 .....................CHAF & DLK OPEN HFFS 689= ......$136.00
MADSEN RANCH CATTLE - MIDLAND
9 ...............................DLK & DWF STFS 860= ......$131.25
LARRY GABRIEL - QUINN
6..........................................DLK STFS 806= ......$137.50
DAVID E. SCOTT - OWANKA
9 .................................DLK OPEN HFFS 926= ......$123.00
CHUCK & TOBY KROETCH - PHILIP
8 ..............................CHAF & DLK STFS 832= ......$137.50
14 ........CHAF & DLK OPEN & SPAY HFFS 743= ......$125.00
HELEN PFEIFER - PHILIP
3 ...............................DLK & DWF STFS 935= ......$129.50
2EB HOFFMAN - CREIGHTON
11................FED & DLK EXPOSED HFFS 818= ......$125.00
LEE BALDWIN - ELM SPRINGS
4..........................................DLK STFS 705= ......$143.00
CHARLES & ROSALIE TENNIS - VALE
4.......................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 1051= ....$116.00
AARON & JIM MANSFIELD - KADOKA
8 .................................DLK OPEN HFFS 881= ......$127.50
RANDY NEUHAUSER - MIDLAND
17 .............................HEFF OPEN HFFS 774= ......$126.00
JOSEPH AMIOTTE - INTERIOR
12.....................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 793= ......$127.00
TRAVIS & TATE THOMPSON - WANBLEE
17.....................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 892= ......$121.75
CHUCK CARSTENSEN - PHILIP
8..........................................DLK STFS 868= ......$136.75
HEATH & LARRY FREEMAN - OWANKA
8 ...............................DLK & DWF STFS 764= ......$140.50
TED IMSLAND - FAITH
18.....................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 651= ......$131.75
WEIGH-UPS:
TED IMSLAND - FAITH
1..........................................FED COW 1620= ......$91.00
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1515= ......$89.00
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1335= ......$82.00
SHARON HERRON - UNION CENTER
1...............................X DFED COWETTE 1480= ......$97.00
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1630= ......$88.00
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1830= ......$86.50
5...............................FED & DLK COWS 1549= ......$86.75
RICHARD ALDREN - NEW UNDERWOOD
1........................................CHAF DULL 1835= ....$111.00
O'DEA FAMILY TRUST - HOWES
1..........................................DLK DULL 2125= ....$109.00
BOB HELMS - CREIGHTON
1 ........................................HEFF COW 1810= ......$87.00
DAN PETRIK - MARTIN
1..........................................FED COW 1565= ......$86.50
1.....................................X DFED COW 1715= ......$86.00
CHARLES & ROSALIE TENNIS - VALE
1..........................................DLK DULL 2180= ....$108.00
2 ........................................DLK DULLS 2010= ....$102.00
RISSE HALF BOX V RANCH - MARTIN
1..........................................DLK DULL 1955= ....$107.00
1..........................................DLK DULL 1915= ....$106.00
LEE BALDWIN - ELM SPRINGS
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1565= ......$86.00
ED BECKWITH - KADOKA
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1425= ......$86.00
TIM MERCHEN - KADOKA
1........................................CHAF DULL 2025= ....$106.00
1........................................HEFF DULL 2050= ....$102.00
BART GUPTILL - INTERIOR
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1185= ......$85.00
TERRY & CHERYL HAMMERSTROM-NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1475= ......$84.50
ROBERT HEIDGERKEN - RAPID CITY
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1510= ......$84.00
1 ........................................HEFF COW 1635= ......$82.00
1..........................................DLK DULL 1860= ....$107.00
RONNIE WILSON - KYLE
3 ......................................CHAF DULLS 1762= ....$106.00
ROBERT THOMSEN - LONG VALLEY
1..........................................FED COW 1370= ......$84.00
CHUCK CARSTENSEN - PHILIP
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1325= ......$83.50
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1445= ......$79.50
DAVID CUNY - BUFFALO GAP
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1625= ......$83.00
2 ..............................DLK & DWF COWS 1505= ......$79.00
ARLIE & JASON RADWAY - HOWES
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1555= ......$83.00
BRANDON MITCHELL - KADOKA
1 .........................................FED DULL 1615= ....$102.50
CREW CATTLE CO. - PHILIP
1........................................CHAF DULL 2085= ....$102.00
1........................................CHAF DULL 2215= ....$100.00
TOM GRIMES - KADOKA
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1430= ......$83.00
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1235= ......$78.00
RICK JOHNSTON - UNION CENTER
2.........................................DLK COWS 1413= ......$83.00
SCHOFIELD BROTHERS - PHILIP
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1330= ......$83.00
GENE CROSBIE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1..........................................DWF COW 1300= ......$83.00
1..........................................DWF COW 1295= ......$80.50
1..........................................DWF COW 1280= ......$77.50
ARLEN CARMICHAEL - NEW UNDERWOOD
1..........................................DLK DULL 1975= ....$101.00
HARLAN & LINDA EISENBRAUN - CREIGHTON
1..........................................DLK DULL 1780= ....$101.00
JUDY DALY - MIDLAND
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1260= ......$82.50
CLINT HAMMERSTROM - STURGIS
1 ..........................................DLK COW 1460= ......$82.00
LEO & JOANN PATTON - MILESVILLE
1..........................................DWF COW 1385= ......$82.00
DAN PIROUTEK - MILESVILLE
1..........................................DWF COW 1510= ......$81.50
LEONA FIELDS - ELM SPRINGS
1........................................CHAF DULL 1745= ....$100.50
KELLY RIGGINS - PHILIP
1..........................................DLK DULL 1760= ....$100.00
This Ad
will
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in seconds
if we put
it on
the radio.
SEEING
is
BELIEVING
Ravellette
Publications, Inc.
with offices in:
Kadoka
605-837-2259
Philip
605-859-2516
Wall
605-279-2565
Faith
605-967-2161
Bison
605-244-7199
Murdo
605-669-2271
New
Underwood
605-754-6466
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
Ear Molds in Corn
With the hot, dry weather this
summer, corn ear molds are a con-
cern around the state. One
wouldn’t expect hot, dry weather
would be conducive for mold
growth, but high humidity and
dew during the night, accompa-
nied by hot, dry conditions during
the day can be ideal for ear molds
in corn. Not all molds on corn form
mycotoxins. Aspergillus spp. and
Fusarium spp. may produce toxins
of concern, while other fungi such
as Penicillium and Diplodia are
generally more benign, especially
if grain is generally intact and un-
damaged physically.
In areas that will produce some
corn, scouting for ear molds is rec-
ommended and can be started as
early as the R5 to R6 stage. Check
100 ears of corn from several dif-
ferent places within the field. If
more than 10% of the plants have
ear mold, it may be beneficial to
harvest the field early. If you think
your crop has been damaged by
aflatoxin, notify your insurer. Afla-
toxin contamination should be cov-
ered as long as representative
samples of grain were taken before
the grain was moved into commer-
cial or on-farm storage. Crop in-
surance generally ends at harvest,
so it is important that your insurer
samples the crop prior to storage.
For more information, visit: the
iGrow Drought page:
http://igrow.org/agronomy/drough/.
Producers wishing to have their
grain or feed to be used for animal
feeding operations tested can send
samples to: SDSU Plant Diagnos-
tic Clinic, SDSU, SPSB 153, Box
2108, Brookings, SD 57007, PH #:
605-688-5545, Website:
http://www.sdstate.edu/ps/plant-
clinic/, or NDSU Veterinary Diag-
nostic Laboratory, NDSU, NDSU
Van Es Hall, 1523 Centennial
Blvd, Fargo, ND 58102, PH #:
(701) 231-8307, Website:
http://www.vdl.ndsu.edu/.
Nitrate Update
We were hoping by now to have
nitrate test result summaries from
some of the area laboratories to
share, but all we have are general
indications. As one would expect,
there are samples containing low
levels of Nitrates and are safe to
feed, samples too high to feed to
any class of animals, even mixed
with safe feeds, and many be-
tween. When in doubt, test.
An article was recently posted
on http://igrow.org, “Forage Ni-
trate Data from 2002 and 2006
Droughts” at:
http://igrow.org/agronomy/drought
/forage-nitrate-data-from-2002-
and-2006-droughts/ that provides
a summary of the testing results
from those years. Ron Gelderman,
SDSU Extension Soils Specialist,
drew several key points from the
summary, 1. All crops may be af-
fected but not to the same degree,
2. Weed forage can be nasty, 3.
Warm season, annual grass crops
are more susceptible, and 4. Ensil-
ing does lower problems.
An important update on wheat
straw mentioned in last weeks’ col-
umn that is suspected to have
come from was an area that lodged
and perhaps did not mature. The
straw was re-tested, and found to
contain some nitrates, but signifi-
cantly less than the first test. A
good comment was; the test is only
as good as the sample taken.
Having heard about the original
nitrate test (>2000 ppm), I ran the
Quik Nitrate Test on several sam-
ples of wheat stubble. One in par-
ticular indicated potential toxicity.
A sample of the straw baled from
the field contained 500 ppm. This
is certainly safe to feed, but the ni-
trates it contains should be consid-
ered when mixing with other
forages that are potentially toxic.
Calendar
•8/16/2012: Winter Wheat
Meeting, 6:30 pm, Auditorium,
Draper, SD
•8/21-23/2012: DakotaFest,
Mitchell, SD
•8/29/2012: Fall Winter Wheat
Tour, 10:00 am, Dakota Lakes Re-
search Farm, 17 miles east of
Pierre on SD Hwy 34
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267

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