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Metro Weekly - 08-09-12 - Wade Davis

Metro Weekly - 08-09-12 - Wade Davis

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Platform in Play
News Analysis: A marriage-equality plank in the Democratic platform
would be a first, but possibly little more
Frank
by Justin Snow
W
HEN NEWS BROKE
early last week that
the Democratic Party
had taken a giant step
toward endorsing marriage equality as
part of their national platform – with
the 15-person committee responsible
for drafting the language of the party’s
national platform unanimously approv-
ing support for marriage equality in an
initial draft – LGBT advocates were
ecstatic.
“Like Americans from all walks of
life, the Democratic Party has recog-
nized that committed and loving gay
and lesbian couples deserve the right
to have their relationships respected
as equal under the law,” Human Rights
Campaign President Chad Griffin said
in a statement.
National campaign director of Free-
dom to Marry, Marc Solomon, also
praised the move, lauding the Demo-
cratic Party’s “noble history of fighting
for the human and civil rights of all
Americans.”
The news was historic, although not
entirely unexpected. After all, the Dem-
ocratic Party had all but endorsed mar-
riage equality, having long worked to
support LGBT rights and opposing laws
– such as the Defense of Marriage Act –
that disenfranchise the gay community.
There had also been numerous hints
that the party might adopt marriage
equality, including when the chair of
the Democratic National Commit-
tee, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz
(D-Fla.), told the Philadelphia Gay News
she expected marriage equality to be
a plank in the national party platform.
Nevertheless, the news was no less
headline worthy. But in the week since,
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questions have emerged as to what,
exactly, the broader impact of a party
platform will be on American politics.
In a heated exchange with Chris
Matthews on MSNBC’s Hardball, out
Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.), who sits
on the committee responsible for draft-
ing the party platform, said he was
puzzled by the attention the platform
had received.
“A platform is supposed to tell
the officials how they should vote,”
said Frank. “We’ve already voted.”
In July, 132 House Democrats filed a
brief detailing their opposition to the
Defense of Marriage Act.
His voice echoing in the rotunda of
the Capitol, the 72-year-old Frank, who
married his partner in July and will retire
from Congress later this year, said Presi-
dent Barack Obama’s endorsement of
marriage equality and a split between the
Democratic and Republican parties on the
issue, had made the platform a nonissue.
“This worship of a party platform
— I can’t even remember a party plat-
form,” an exacerbated Frank said.
What appeared to bother Frank the
most was talk of a federal campaign for
marriage equality.
“There is a fundamental confusion
here,” Frank said. “There has never
been a federal law saying what mar-
riage is.”
As Frank noted, a party platform
is intended to instruct party members
how they should vote on certain issues.
Moreover, the Democratic Party had
all but endorsed marriage equality in
the past.
Indeed, not only had President
Obama come out in favor of same-sex
couples’ right to marry, he had also
ordered his administration to stop
defending the constitutionality of the
Defense of Marriage Act in court. Dem-
ocrats on Capitol Hill have also unified
against that 1996 law that forbids fed-
L
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News
Now online at MetroWeekly.com
News: D.C. rolls out transgender ad campaign,
plus National & Global Briefs
AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
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LGBTNews
6
Party to support the freedom to marry.”
In 2008, not one of the leading Demo-
cratic candidates for president explicitly
supported marriage equality. Now the
president of the United States has said
“same-sex couples should be able to get
married.”
Despite these advances, divisions
remain in the party. A recent poll by the
Pew Research Center shows 29 percent
of Democrats remain opposed to mar-
riage equality, despite Obama’s endorse-
ment.
The White House has not commented
on the platform
plank, only refer-
ring to Obama’s
continued com-
mitment to gay
rights and defer-
ring questions to
the DNC.
When asked
at a White House
briefing if this
move by the DNC
could lead to a
national cam-
paign for marriage
equality, Press
Secretary Jay
Carney deflect-
ed, stating that
such a question
was “conflating a
bunch of things
about a discussion
at the DNC about
a party platform
to a national cam-
paign.”
“I would sim-
ply refer you to
what the presi-
dent has said and
what his personal
views are, and
then to the DNC
for what I under-
stand is a process
that is still devel-
oping as regards
to their platform,”
Carney added.
The DNC has
not commented
publicly on the
platform, nor
released any lan-
guage as to how
the plank will
read, but sources
eral recognition of same-sex marriage,
which has led to numerous lawsuits.
And yet the move by the Democrat-
ic platform drafting committee, which
will present their draft at the Democratic
National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., in
September, has struck a particular chord.
“For one of the major political parties
to take a position on an important matter
of human rights and civil rights is a big
deal,” Solomon told Metro Weekly in a
phone interview. “You don’t have to go
back very far to find a time when it wasn’t
a mainstream position of the Democratic
have confirmed marriage equality will be
included.
Perhaps most telling has been the
response from the Republican Party.
Although a Romney spokesman reaf-
firmed his support for “traditional mar-
riage,” Mitt Romney has not addressed
the platform plank directly. The Repub-
lican National Committee has also been
silent. Requests for comment from Metro
Weekly have not been returned.
That silence, particularly as polls con-
sistently show shifting support for mar-
riage equality, could be an indication of a
party coming to terms with an issue that
increasingly appears inevitable.
Gregory Cendana, an out gay man
who will head to the Democratic Nation-
al Convention as a D.C. delegate, said
the move will create a starker contrast
between Democrats and Republicans.
“This is one thing that’s going to sepa-
rate Democrats from Republicans,” said
Cendana. “I think there’s an element of it
being a formality, but it will only be help-
ful to ensure more people are hearing the
message.”
“The wedge has lost its edge,” said
Solomon. “They’re looking at the same
data that we all are. It’s not a helpful
issue to try to score points in the same
way the party used it in the past.”
In an appearance on Good Morning
America last week, former Vice President
Dick Cheney, whose daughter is a lesbian
and married her partner in Washing-
ton in June, said he supported marriage
equality back in 2000 before becoming
vice president, but avoided the topic dur-
ing the campaign.
Even though the Bush campaign
drove voter turnout in places like Ohio
in 2004 by supporting a constitutional
amendment banning same-sex marriage,
Cheney supported the freedom to marry.
At a campaign event in 2004, Cheney said
“freedom means freedom for everyone,”
adding that “people ought to be free to
enter into any kind of relationship they
want to.”
Although the Republican Party will
undoubtedly reaffirm their opposition
to marriage equality this election cycle,
a shift grounded in young voters is tak-
ing place. While 78 percent of Republi-
cans oppose marriage equality, nearly
half of Republicans ages 18 to 44 are
in favor.
Freedom to Marry plans to contin-
ue lobbying the Republican Party and
will testify before their platform com-
mittee on behalf of marriage equality,
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ernors Martin O’Malley (D) and Christine
Gregoire (D), respectively.
In Minnesota, where same-sex mar-
riage is already banned by statute, voters
will be asked to decide if they want to
change their state’s constitution by in-
serting additional language that would
specifically ban same-sex partners from
marrying.
“This is a tipping-point year in the
fight for marriage equality that requires
significant investment,” HRC President
Chad Griffin said in a statement. “We are
committed to making sure this is the year
that our opponents can no longer claim
Americans will not support marriage
equality at the ballot box.”
Polling in Maine and Washington
show a majority of voters saying they fa-
vor allowing same-sex couples to marry,
with supporters of marriage equality
holding a 22-point edge in Maine and a
7-point edge in Washington. Polls in Min-
nesota have largely shown voters to be
evenly divided over the constitutional
ban, though a recent SurveyUSA poll gave
supporters of the ban a 15-point edge.
“Bans on marriage for same-sex cou-
ples have sent the devastating message to
young people that they cannot grow up
to live their dreams and be full and equal
citizens,” Griffin said in a statement.
“This is the year we will change that.”
HRC’s $1 million investment brings
the total amount the organization has
contributed to legislative and electoral
marriage issues for the 2011-2012 cycle to
$4.8 million.
As of Metro Weekly press deadline
Tuesday night, HRC had not responded to
a question regarding the amount of money
received by each state for the cycle. But
Fred Sainz, vice president of communica-
tions and marketing, confirmed that the
amount of money given to each state dur-
ing the cycle has been different for each
one. Sainz said the distribution to each
state has been “situational and opportu-
nistic, as to the needs of each state.”
Griffin added, “All of these campaigns
are winnable but they need resources
to educate voters and fight back the lies
from groups like the National Organiza-
tion for Marriage. The country is mov-
ing in the direction of equality and a
win in any of these states will show that
marriage equality is quickly becoming a
mainstream, American value.”
In response to HRC’s announcement,
Marylanders for Marriage Equality’s
campaign manager, Josh Levin, said the
campaign was “grateful” for the invest-
focusing on the stability and support
marriage provides for gay and straight
families alike.
What remains highly unlikely is any
federal campaign for marriage equality.
With the exception of DOMA, which has
been labeled as an overreach of federal
power, marriage is almost always left up
to the states.
As Frank noted in a column published
by The Huffington Post, there is no fed-
eral law recognizing marriage and there
never has been.
“It is possible for the federal govern-
ment to establish the right of same-sex
couples to marry everywhere, but neither
the president nor the Congress would
have any role in that,” Frank writes. “The
only way under our constitutional sys-
tem to achieve a uniform federal right
to marry is if the Supreme Court were
to declare that a denial by a state of the
right of same-sex couples to marry was a
constitutional violation.” l
HRC Cash To Aid
Marriage-Equali-
ty Campaigns
Even with marriage equality poll-
ing well, states rely on HRC invest-
ments as backup
by John Riley
MONEY MAKES THE WORLD GO
’round. And extra dollars fuel the fight
for equality.
The Human Rights Campaign (HRC),
the nation’s largest LGBT civil rights or-
ganization, announced Aug. 6 it would
spend $1 million in the four states fac-
ing marriage-related ballot measures in
November: Maine, Maryland, Minnesota
and Washington.
HRC has established a distinct PAC,
or political action committee, in each of
the states to help fund the fight at the bal-
lot box. The $1 million will be split evenly
among the four states.
In Maine, voters will be asked to ap-
prove a citizen-backed initiative to issue
marriage licenses to same-sex couples. In
Maryland and Washington, voters will be
asked to uphold marriage-equality laws
recently passed by their respective state
Legislatures and signed into law by Gov-
ment and thanked them for being a “tre-
mendous partner” in the effort to uphold
the marriage-equality law.
In Maryland, as in Maine and Wash-
ington, a majority of registered voters say
they would vote to uphold the state’s re-
cently passed marriage-equality law. The
results of a July poll by Hart Research
show 54 percent of voters saying they’d
vote in favor of the law and 40 percent
say they’d vote against it. The margin of
error for that poll was plus or minus 4.5
percentage points.
The Hart Research poll also showed
supporters of marriage equality holding
an 8-point edge in terms of intensity, with
43 percent of voters saying they “strong-
ly” support marriage equality and 35
percent saying they “strongly” oppose it.
That marks a 7-point swing since March,
when another Hart Research poll found
“strong” sentiment evenly divided. Ac-
cording to the July poll, voters who say
the referendum is “extremely important”
favor the marriage equality law by a 2-1
margin over opponents of the law, 66 per-
cent to 33 percent.
White voters favor upholding the mar-
riage law by 13 points, with 54 percent
supporting it and 41 percent opposed, up
from a 53-42 margin in March. But much
of the momentum from Hart’s last poll
came from African-Americans, who are
now evenly divided, with 44 percent in fa-
vor and 45 percent opposed. That marks
an increase from a March Hart poll, when
only 40 percent of African-Americans
supported the marriage-equality law and
49 percent were opposed.
“We’re winning over undecided and
the intensity is clearly on our side,” Levin
had said in an Aug. 2 statement following
release of the poll data. “Voters are real-
izing that this law is about treating our
gay friends, family and neighbors equally
under the law, and that no religious insti-
tution would be forced to marry anyone
they objected to.”
But the Hart Research poll, while fa-
vorable, was less rosy than a May poll by
Public Policy Polling (PPP) that found
support for the law leading by 20 points,
57-37. That poll’s margin of error was plus
or minus 3.4 percent.
That May poll also found an increase
in support among African-Americans
following the endorsement of mar-
riage equality by President Barack
Obama and the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored People
(NAACP). But it placed the margin of
support for the law among African-
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higher category. That the organization
does well is important, but recognition
from your peers is equally important. The
recognition of the umbrella organization
is absolutely the highest honor we could
receive.”
Drafting the application for the Ris-
ing Star award fell largely to Sean Bugg,
vice president of the chamber and Metro
Weekly co-publisher. He said that pro-
cess was important, but couldn’t accom-
plish anything more than what CAGLCC
had to back it up.
“An application is only as good as the
stuff the chamber is doing,” Bugg said.
“We have great leadership in terms of
what Mark, Ernesto and the executive
committee have put together. We also
have a really strong board. … For that
kind of growth and effort to be recog-
nized by the NGLCC, that is a really
amazing honor.”
Santalla agrees. He said that it’s grati-
fying to have years of effort recognized,
American voters much higher, leading
by 55 percent to 39 percent. l
D.C. Chamber
Chosen
NGCLCC names CAGLCC “LGBT
Chamber of the Year” at
Chicago conference
By Will O’Bryan
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 8, AT THE
National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of
Commerce’s 9th Annual National Busi-
ness & Leadership Conference in Chi-
cago, the organization honored D.C.’s
Capital Area Gay and Lesbian Chamber
of Commerce (CAGLCC) as the LGBT
Chamber of the Year.
According to the NGLCC, “the Cham-
ber of the Year is seen as a role model for
other chambers and an example of what
an LGBT chamber or business organiza-
tion should be.”
While it’s understandable that the
honor came as a surprise, it was particu-
larly unexpected in that CAGLCC hadn’t
applied to be considered for this top
honor. Instead, the chamber had applied
to be considered for 2012’s “Rising Star”
award, “given to a chamber that exhib-
ited vitality and relevance in its commu-
nity, brought a unified voice to the LGBT
business community it serves, and has
proven its commitment to being part of
the broader national movement.”
Mark Guenther, executive director of
CAGLCC, said from Chicago Aug. 7 that
learning of NGLCC honor just a few days
prior left him completely stunned.
“We were incredibly surprised. We
looked at the requirements for Cham-
ber of the Year and just expected the
competition would be fierce,” he said of
the decision to apply to be considered
for Rising Star. “Obviously, the national
chamber thought otherwise.”
Chamber President Ernesto Santalla,
president of Studio Santalla architecture
and interior design, accepted the award
with Guenther in Chicago. Along with
sharing the stage, he also shared Guen-
ther’s surprise.
“There were 23 applications for this
award, and we hadn’t applied for it,” San-
talla explained. “They thought enough
of us that they thought we ranked in a
and that he is trying to savor The Cham-
ber’s achievement.
“As a volunteer, as a board mem-
ber and ultimately as president, I just
went about the work we needed to do,
finally getting to a point that all this hard
work we’ve done gave me the realization
of, ‘Look what we have,’” Santalla said.
“That realization gives me tremendous
pride.”
Guenther added that regardless of
whatever connection an LGBT Washing-
tonian or ally may have to the chamber,
this NGLCC award is a point of pride for
the entire community.
“It says that D.C. has it together,”
Guenther said of the honor. “We’re a
great community with a strong, thriv-
ing LGBT chamber. Our chamber can
excel because the backbone of our com-
munity is there. Our ability to succeed
really stems from all the LGBT people in
Washington. We’re a strong organization
because we have a strong community.” l
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CHICK-FIL-A PUSH AND PULL
IN THE WAKE OF THE LATEST CHICK-FIL-A BROUHAHA
– with company President Dan Cathy making recent statements
against marriage equality, followed by debate about the com-
pany’s political donations and freedom of speech – things seem
to be heating up rather than dying down.
The Freedom Federation, a faith-based policy organization,
released a letter Aug. 6 commending Cathy’s leadership and
efforts to sustain “biblical values.” The letter’s 63 signatories
included several right-wing luminaries, including J. Kenneth
Blackwell, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Human
Rights Council; Tim Wildmon, president of the American Family
Association; and Mathew Staver, chairman of Liberty Counsel.
On the other end of the spectrum, Campus Pride, a national
organization “for student leaders and campus groups working to
create a safer college environment for LGBT students,” released
a handout Aug. 6 titled “5 Simple Facts about Chick-fil-A” to
underscore the issues in the debate.
“The real issue at hand is not freedom of speech, but
Chick-fil-A’s secretive funding of documented anti-gay hate
groups,” Campus Pride Executive Director Shane Wind-
meyer said in a release announcing the campaign. “There is
no justification for such a business operating on our nation’s
campuses. … While Chick-fil-A’s leadership has every right
to its views, beliefs and voice, students and administrators
alike need to know that revenues going to Chick-fil-A drive
funding for groups that are almost certainly in conflict with
campus non-discrimination policies.”
DETROIT CENTER LAUNCHES
EFFORT FOR HOMELESS LGBT YOUTH
DETROIT’S RUTH ELLIS CENTER, “THE ONLY MISSION
specific agency in the entire Midwest dedicated to LGBTQ
youth,” kicked off a new fundraising campaign Aug. 1 to help
homeless LGBT youth weather the 2012-2013 winter season.
With a minimum fundraising goal of $20,000 – and match-
ing pledges from area corporations – the “End the Chill: Where
Homeless Youth Sleep this Winter” campaign will enhance the
center’s ability to provide shelter, health therapy and clothing.
Announcing the campaign, Laura Hughes, executive director
of the center, said most people don’t realize the extent of youth
homelessness, or the expenses associated with trying to counter
the problem.
“There are more than 800 homeless youth on the streets of
Detroit daily, which comes as a surprise to many people because
the youth work very hard to remain under the radar,” said
Hughes. “It costs approximately $1,700 per day to operate the
Second Stories Drop-in Center. If we reach our fundraising goal,
we can keep the drop-in center open one more day per week
throughout the winter months.”
Currently, the drop-in center is open from 3 to 9 p.m. Mon-
day and Wednesday, and 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday. The “End the
Chill” campaign runs through Sept. 20. Donations may be made
through the center’s site, ruthelliscenter.org. l
NewsBriefs Compiled by Kelsey Brannan
NATIONAL
ACTIVISTS ARRESTED,
BUT UGANDA PRIDE A SUCCESS
DESPITE ARRESTS, SOME PARTICIPANTS OF UGANDA’S
first LGBT Pride festival say the inaugural event was a relative
success, Gay Star News reports. The festival, held in Entebbe
along Lake Victoria, began Friday, Aug. 3, without incident.
The following day, however, police raided the festival and
arrested several activists, though they were later released. No
charges were filed.
GSN carried a statement from Maurice Tomlinson, an activ-
ist from Jamaica and the grand marshal of the festival’s march.
“The march, dubbed Uganda Beach Pride, was held on the
grounds of the Botanical Gardens on the banks of the majestic
Lake Victoria,” Tomlinson said. “Many parents even brought
their kids over to hear the music and listen to the few speeches
and share in the jubilant atmosphere. The pride organizers even
shared food and drinks feely with the onlookers. There was a
wonderful party atmosphere and apparently one of the beachgo-
ers complained to the police that we were conducting a gay wed-
ding. … As a result, I got my first ride in the back of a police van!”
Tomlinson went on to describe the police conduct as “utterly
disgraceful.”
GSN also carried a quote from Frank Mugisha, possibly Ugan-
da’s most prominent LGBT activist, coordinator of Sexual Minori-
ties Uganda (SMUG): “Thumbs up to you all who made this hap-
pen. Next time we begin the march from the police station.”
A STATE-LEVEL STRATEGY
FOR MARRIAGE DOWN UNDER
WITH A PUSH FOR MARRIAGE EQUALITY IN AUSTRALIA
expected to fail at the federal level, Tasmanian Premier Lara
Giddings says her state may adopt such a law on its own, Pink
News reports.
“We fundamentally believe that it’s wrong that people do not
have the same choices in life that the rest of us take for granted
when it comes to marriage,” Giddings said during the Aug. 4
weekend at an Australian Labor Party conference. “The time has
now come for marriage equality to be part of the community.”
Rodney Croome of the Tasmanian Gay and Lesbian Rights
Group welcomed Giddings comments, saying, “Overnight, Tas-
mania has become a beacon of hope for hundreds of thousands
of Australians.
“Tasmania has changed profoundly since it was the last state
to decriminalize homosexuality in 1997 and we will welcome
the thousands of same-sex couples from other states who want
to marry in Australia rather than fly to North America or Europe
to wed.” l
NewsBriefs Compiled by Kelsey Brannan
GLOBAL
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BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer
organization helps with GLBT Arts Consortium
and CHAW’s presentation of Gilbert & Sullivan’s
The Gondoliers. burgundycrescent.org.
SLUTWALK DC returns to unite people of
all genders, ages, religions, ethnicities, sexual
orientations and economic statuses to end “victim
blaming and slut shaming.” Begins 11 a.m.,
Lafayette Square. slutwalkdc.com.
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707 or
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of
the LGBT community, holds Saturday morning
Shabbat services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush
luncheon. Services in DCJCC Community Room,
1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For
location/time, email braziliangaygroup@
yahoo.com.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk;
or 10 a.m. for fun run. info@dcfrontrunners.org or
dcfrontrunners.org.
DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors
Mass for LGBT community, family and friends.
6:30 p.m., Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606
Seminary Road, Alexandria. All welcome.
703-912-1662, dignitynova@gmail.com.
DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave.
NE, 2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or
straight. teamdcbasketball.org.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 12
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer
organization helps with DC Central Kitchen.
burgundycrescent.org.
LAMBDA SCI-FI holds its monthly meeting/
social of GLBT sci-fi/fantasy/horror fans. Bring
snacks or nonalcoholic drink to share. 1:30 p.m.
1425 S St. NW. James, 202-232-3141.
lambdascifi.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW.
9-10:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
The LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS MEMORIAL
EPISCOPAL CHURCH celebrates Low Mass at
FRIDAY, AUGUST 10
ARLINGTON LGBTQ YOUTH (ALY), a Metro-
DC PFLAG youth group, present an LGBTQA
teen concert. Doors 7 p.m. Free, donations
accepted. Unitarian Universalist Church of
Arlington, 4444 Arlington Blvd., Arlington.
703-892-2565, uucava.org.
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer
organization helps with GLBT Arts Consortium
and CHAW’s presentation of Gilbert & Sullivan’s
The Gondoliers. burgundycrescent.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat
services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8-9:30
p.m. Services in DCJCC Community Room,
1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.
GAY DISTRICT, a non-church-affiliated
discussion and social group for GBTQ men, 18
to 35, meets 8:30 p.m., St. Margaret’s Episcopal
Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. gd@
gaydistrict.org or gaydistrict.org.
GAY MARRIED MEN’S ASSOCIATION
(GAMMA) is a peer-support group that meets in
Dupont Circle every second and fourth Friday
at 7:30 p.m. gay-married.com or
GAMMAinDC1@yahoo.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health,
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 202-745-7000,
whitman-walker.org.
SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social
atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,
featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movie
nights and game nights. catherine.chu@smyal.org.
TRANSGENDER HEALTH EMPOWERMENT
“Diva Chat” support group. 6-8 p.m., 1414 North
Capitol St. NE. Snacks provided. 202-636-1646.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 11
LGBT DOGGY STYLE: DC, social group for
LGBT dog owners, meets for a walk in D.C.’s Fort
Mahan Park. 1 p.m. For details, doggystyledc.com.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
MAUTNER PROJECT is recruiting 25 LGBT-
identified District residents to participate in a
one-hour workshop, “Striving for Wellness! LGBT
Cancer Education Curriculum,” Wednesday, Aug.
22, at 7 p.m. Participants receive a $20 Giant Food
gift card. For questions or to register, contact
Riana by Aug. 17 at 202-332-5536.
Photographer TATJANA PLITT seeks same-sex
military couples in the D.C. area for photographic
portraits for current project. Appointments
available through January 2013. 917-531-8809,
tatjana@tatjanaplitt.com.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 9
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer
organization helps with GLBT Arts Consortium
and CHAW’s presentation of Gilbert &
Sullivan’s The Gondoliers, and at Food & Friends.
burgundycrescent.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay and lesbian square-
dancing group features mainstream through
advanced square dancing at the National City
Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30
p.m. Casual dress. Email info@dclambdasquares.
org, call 301-257-0517 or visit
dclambdasquares.org.
The DULLES TRIANGLES Northern Virginia
social group meets for happy hour at Sheraton
in Reston, 11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-
floor bar, 7-9 p.m. All welcome. Email info@
dullestriangles.com or visit dullestriangles.com.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV
testing in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave.,
and in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave.,
Suite 411. Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments
other hours, call Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978 or
Takoma Park at 301-422-2398.
US HELPING US hosts a Narcotics Anonymous
Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the
gay community, from alternative social events to volunteer opportunities.
Event information should be sent by e-mail to calendar@metroweek-
ly.com; by fax to 202-638-6831; or by mail to Metro Weekly, Attn:
Community Calendar, 1012 14th Street NW, Suite 209, Washington, D.C.
20005. Deadline for inclusion is noon on the Friday before publication.
“Announcement” submissions that are not date-specific may run for two
weeks, with the option for listing organizations to resubmit if appropriate.
Questions about the calendar can be directed to the Metro Weekly office
at 202-638-6830.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
17 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
ADVERTISEMENT
8:30 a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral Ave.
NW. For information or additional services, call
202-232-4244 or visit allsoulsdc.org.
BETHEL CHURCH-DC progressive and radically
inclusive church holds services at 11:30 a.m. 2217
Minnesota Ave. SE. 202-248-1895, betheldc.org.
DIGNITY WASHINGTON offers Roman Catholic
Mass for the LGBT community. 6 p.m., St.
Margaret’s Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. All
welcome. Sign interpreted. 202-546-2235, dignity@
dignitywashington.org, or dignitywashington.org.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST welcomes all to 10:30 a.m. service, 945 G
St. NW. firstuccdc.org or 202-628-4317.
FRIENDS MEETING OF WASHINGTON meets for
worship, 10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW, Quaker
House Living Room (next to Meeting House on
Decatur Place), 2nd floor. Special welcome to
lesbians and gays. Handicapped accessible from
Phelps Place gate. Hearing assistance.
quakersdc.org.
HOPE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST welcomes
GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130 Old
Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org.
LUTHERAN CHURCH OF REFORMATION invites
all to Sunday worship at 8:30 or 10 a.m. Welcoming
LGBT people for 25 years. 212 East Capital St. NW.
reformationdc.com
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
NORTHERN VIRGINIA services at 11 a.m., led by
Rev. Onetta Brooks. Children’s Sunday School, 11
a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-0930,
mccnova.com.
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
WASHINGTON, D.C. services at 9 a.m. (ASL
interpreted) and 11 a.m. Children’s Sunday School
at 11 a.m. 474 Ridge St. NW. 202-638-7373,
churchoffice@mccdc.com, mccdc.com.
NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclusive
church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel
worship, 8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11 a.m. 5
Thomas Circle NW. 202-232-0323,
nationalcitycc.org.
RAINBOW FAMILIES DC’s “Maybe Baby”
series for LGBT singles and couples
considering parenthood meets 3-5 p.m.
info@rainbowfamiliesdc.org.
RIVERSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, a Christ-centered,
interracial, welcoming-and-affirming church, offers
service at 10 a.m. 680 I St. SW. 202-554-4330,
riverside-dc.org.
ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an
“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community”
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
18 AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW. 202-
232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.
UNITARIAN CHURCH OF ARLINGTON, an
LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation,
offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow UU
Ministry. 4444 Arlington Blvd. uucava.org.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF
SILVER SPRING invites LGBTQ families and
individuals of all creeds and cultures to join the
church. Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New
Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring. uucss.org.
UNIVERSALIST NATIONAL MEMORIAL
CHURCH, a welcoming and inclusive church. GLBT
Interweave social/service group meets monthly.
Services at 11 a.m., Romanesque sanctuary. 1810 16th
St. NW. 202-387-3411, universalist.org.
MONDAY, AUGUST 13
WEEKLY EVENTS
GETEQUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House,
2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.
KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES,
3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
US HELPING US hosts a black gay men’s evening
affinity group. 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
202-446-1100.
WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300
Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic
swimming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-
0504; secretary@wetskins.org; or wetskins.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT
GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets
7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671,
hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 14
WEEKLY EVENTS
A COMPANY OF STRANGERS, a theater chorus,
meets 7:30-9:30 p.m. A GLBTA and SATB looking
for actors, singers, crew. Open Hearth Foundation,
1502 Massachusetts Ave. SE. Charles,
240-764-5748. ecumenicon.org.
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly happy hour, with
dinner afterward, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Cobalt/30
Degrees Lounge, 1639 R St. NW. afwashington.net.
Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY MEN’S HEALTH
AND WELLNESS/STD CLINIC opens at 6 p.m.,
1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis.
No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and
chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available
for fee. whitman-walker.org.
19 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
marketplace - professional services
20 AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
THE HIV WORKING GROUP of THE DC CENTER
hosts “Packing Party,” where volunteers assemble
safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.
KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES,
at 3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 5-7 p.m., by
appointment, for youth 21 and younger. Youth
Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
aj.king@smyal.org.
SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ YOUTH ages 13-21
meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-7 p.m. Leandrea
Gilliam, 202-546-5940, ext. 116, or
leandrea.gilliam@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a support group for black
gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave.
NW. 202-446-1100.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15
BOOKMEN DC, an informal men’s gay-literature
group, discusses selections from Seminal: The
Anthology of Canada’s Gay Male Poets, edited by
John Barton and Billeh Nickerson. 7:30 p.m. 2101 E
St. NW. All welcome. bookmendc.blogspot.com
THE TOM DAVOREN SOCIAL BRIDGE CLUB
meets for Social Bridge at Dignity Center, 721 8th
St. SE (across from Marine Barracks). No partner
needed. lambdabridge.com.
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
AD LIB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets
about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647
20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.
CAREER DEVELOPMENT is offered at The DC
Center, 1318 U St. NW. 3 p.m. Advance registration
required. 202-682-2245, careerdevelopment@
thedccenter.org.
THE GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical
languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Dupont
Italian Kitchen, 1637 17th St. NW, ground level.
RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@gmail.com.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave. Walk-
ins 2-7 p.m. For appointments other hours, call
Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-6 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 202-745-7000,
whitman-walker.org.
PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay
men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637
17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316; or Bill,
703-671-2454.
SMYAL’S LGBTQ Youth Arts Ensemble, for youth
13-21, meets 4-6 p.m., Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE.
AJ King at 202-567-3155 or aj.king@smyal.org.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 5-7 p.m., by
appointment, for youth 21 and younger. Youth
Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
aj.king@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts “A Positive U” support
group for black gay men living with HIV/AIDS, 7-9
p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW. 202-446-1100.
WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m., Takoma Aquatic Center, 300
Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic
swimming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-
0504 or secretary@wetskins.org. wetskins.org. l
21
LGBTCommunityCalendar
METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
AUGUST 9, 2012
VOLUME 19 / ISSUE 15
PUBLISHERS
Sean Bugg, Randy Shulman
EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Randy Shulman
ART DIRECTOR
Todd Franson
MANAGING EDITOR
Will O’Bryan
STAFF WRITER
John Riley
POLITICAL REPORTER
Justin Snow
SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER
Ward Morrison
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS
Julian Vankim
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Chris Heller, Rhuaridh Marr, Carrie Megginson,
Jonathan Padget, Troy Petenbrink,
Richard Rosendall, Doug Rule,
Kate Wingfield
WEBMASTER
David Uy
MULTIMEDIA
Aram Vartian
ADMINISTRATIVE / PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Julian Vankim
INTERN
Kelsey Brannan
ADVERTISING & SALES
DIRECTOR OF SALES
Randy Shulman
NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE
Rivendell Media Co.
212-242-6863
DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
Dennis Havrilla
PATRON SAINT
Chavela Vargas
COVER PHOTOGRAPHY
Todd Franson
METRO WEEKLY
1012 14th Street NW, Suite 209
Washington, DC 20005
202.638.6830 fax: 202.638.6831
www.metroweekly.com
All material appearing in Metro Weekly is protected by federal copyright law and may not be
reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publishers. Metro Weekly assumes no
responsibility for unsolicited materials submitted for publication. All such submissions are subject
to editing and will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Metro Weekly is supported by many fine advertisers, but we cannot accept responsibility for claims
made by advertisers, nor can we accept responsibility for materials provided by advertisers or
their agents. Publication of the name or photograph of any person or organization in articles or
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such person or organization.
© 2012 Jansi LLC.
LGBTOpinion
IT IS ABSOLUTE-
ly no secret that I
have a foul mouth,
a propensity for
profanity that
goes beyond those
within earshot
and often ends up
screaming across
computer screens.
During the recent derecho blackout that
left my home powerless for three-plus
days, my Facebook feed ended up being
my outlet for frustrated obscenities.
This, just about the time some of my
older relatives back home had friended
me, so I probably managed to cement
some pre-existing ideas about me.
I’ve been paying more attention to
my loose lips recently because my hus-
band, annoyed with my verbal habits,
started peppering his own speech with
random “fucks.” Because he is not even
remotely a natural-born foul mouth and
is congenitally cheerful, it’s like being
cussed out by a Nickelodeon character.
But it got his point across and I’ve tried
to cut it down a bit.
Around these parts, of course, I don’t
pepper my sentences with lots of pro-
fanities because I’m writing an op-ed, a
Washington establishment format that
rather demands that we keep things
classy through the use of, say, asterisks,
as in f*** that s***.
Where I’m generally best at rein-
ing in my tongue is when my nephew
is around. It can be close at times —
“What the fuuuuuuh-uh-rickin’ heck
are you doing in there?” — but so far
I’ve managed to keep it under control.
Yet I know from my own experience
hanging around at my father’s repair
shop, which was a social nexus for our
small town, that the kid’s going to pick
up the language anyway. I knew them
all by the time I was his age and I didn’t
have the Internet to help me along.
That’s why it struck me so strongly
when I was talking with Wade Davis
about his childhood time playing
“Smear the Queer.” It’s a game I played
fairly regularly in elementary school —
well, until they stopped us from playing
it after we broke one boy’s leg, leaving
him with a permanent limp — and I
suppose a part of me hoped that people
growing up 10, 15 or 20 years after me
would at least have come up with a
new name for it. But, no, the power of
that rhyming consonance is too sweet
to pass up. It’s still one of those insidi-
ous little language things that creeps
in from the side, teaching kids to hate
what’s different, and teaching kids who
are different that they should be afraid.
Some LGBT activists — the late
Frank Kameny prominent among them
— have never warmed to the “reclaim-
ing” of queer, generally on the principle
that you can’t reclaim something you
never owned. During the Queer Nation
era, I was all for it. It felt mean and
aggressive and sharp on the tongue.
Using an epithet used to degrade me
was an act that made me feel more like
a man. But it didn’t stick, in large part
because by becoming a catchall term
for everyone from radical academics to
slightly freaky straight people it lost its
edge. Now “queer” straddles the line
between an edgy marketing technique
and a schoolyard taunt.
And so there the word sits, on the
playgrounds of the nation where mas-
sive groups of 10-year-old boys gleefully
chase their friend with the ball, run
down the queer and tackle him with
ferocious, yet still innocent, roughhous-
ing. As Davis shows in his story, a foot-
ball field can teach a lot of lessons. It’s
just sad that after all this time, casual
bigotry remains one of them.
Sean Bugg is the co-publisher of
Metro Weekly. You can reach him at
sbugg@MetroWeekly.com or follow him
on Twitter, @seanbugg. l
Queer the Smear
No matter how much we watch our own words, some
hateful things keep hanging around our
language and our children
by Sean Bugg
22 AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
23
LGBTOpinion
BRYON WIDNER
is the subject of a
recent documen-
tary, Erasing Hate.
Widner, once a
racist skinhead,
tattooed himself
to make his dispo-
sition clear. The
documentary fol-
lows his hours of painful procedures to
remove that ink, reflecting his transition
away from all that anger. Painful for Wid-
ner, but a feel-good story, nonetheless.
Of course, he’s gotten death threats
from white supremacists still trapped in
their own cages that hate built.
Symon Hill was also in need of
redemption. He found it by walking 160
miles from Brighton, England, to London
last year. He calls that trip “a pilgrimage
of repentance for my former homophobic
attitudes and behavior.” Another feel-
good story, right?
Not for some, probably. At least one
person is too angry to forgive Hill his
trespasses. On the Guardian.co.uk site, a
post about Hill was answered with, “This
guy should fucking crawl the distance for
his forgiveness. I forgive him nothing.”
In some people there is this expres-
sion. Maybe it’s hate. Maybe it’s anger.
Maybe jealousy or fear or arrogance.
While it’s evidenced in some, we are
certainly all capable of embodying this
negative pain. That’s what I thought of
as I watched the lines of people – people
who no doubt believe they were doing
the right thing, making a righteous stand
– line-up to support Chick-fil-A.
Whatever they may have thought,
they weren’t standing up for freedom
of speech. They were standing up to
oppress gays and lesbians. They were
standing up to support donations being
made, as tracked by Equality Matters, to
the Family Research Council and Focus
on the Family. They might have thought
otherwise, but just what did they think
had everybody so upset? If you’re going
it seems to me I’ve heard plenty more
about love and forgiveness than about
righteous damnation.
There’s no need to give up your beliefs
to give up some of that anger. If you think
God frowns on romantic love between
people of the same sex, that’s between
you and God. If, however, you think mar-
riage equality is the harbinger of soci-
etal downfall, lighten up. Consider that
you’re the Jewish parent of a straight girl
engaged to a nice Mormon fellah, and
she’s going to convert. It may distress
you, but it’s not the end of the world.
Let it go. To the guy demanding the for-
mer homophobe “fucking crawl,” take a
breath. Mr. Hill didn’t put a bomb in a gay
bar. Just count to 10 and give him a small
salute for trying to make things right.
Our lives are short. As everything
moves forward, your hate will do little
but hold you back. I’m not hoping you’ll
leave it behind for my sake. I’ll be fine,
either way. But I am hoping you’ll do it
for yourself.
Will O’Bryan is Metro Weekly’s man-
aging editor. Reach him at wobryan@
MetroWeekly.com. l
to take an action against a community
– even if you’d prefer to believe it’s in
support of free speech and in opposition
to no one – you know what you’re doing.
And I forgive you.
I really wish, however, you could for-
give yourself. Forgive yourself for what-
ever shortcoming, whatever sin that has
made you so strident. If you’re anti-gay
because your kid is gay and you blame
yourself, stop; you had nothing to do
with your kid’s sexual orientation. If you
simply think two dudes getting it on is
gross, forgive yourself. That’s okay. We
don’t take it any more personally than
you do when your kids get grossed out
by seeing you kiss your spouse. If you
think you’re not being dogmatic enough
in your religious beliefs, that God will
smite you for loosening your grip, just
please stop. Forgive yourself. If most
people’s gods are famous for anything,
it’s forgiveness. At least, as an observer,
Hater, Heal Thyself
At some point, that fault you find in others is your own
by Will O’Bryan
METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
24 AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
FIELD
GOALS
I
T SEEMS FAIR ENOUGH TO SAY THAT WADE
Davis has an impulsive streak.
Six years ago on Christmas Eve, stranded in a
Chicago airport by a Midwestern snowstorm, Davis
called up the man he’d been chatting with after
meeting through an online dating site a few weeks
earlier. Davis suggested he fly back to New York City
so the two could have their first in-person date.
“When I walked in I was like, ‘Damn. This boy’s hot,’” he
laughs. “And he had an accent, too. I’m like melting.”
Later, sitting on the couch at a Christmas Eve party watching
his date from across the room, Davis had already made his deci-
sion: “I knew at that moment I would marry him. It was not a
question in my mind, I was going to be with this guy forever. Six
years later, he hasn’t gotten rid of me.”
It’s a trait that makes sense for a former professional foot-
ball player, a man whose career as a free-agent cornerback in
the NFL took him from the Tennessee Titans to the Seattle
Seahawks to the Washington Redskins. After a lifetime of play-
ing football – from pick-up games in the backyard to college ball
at Weber State University in Utah – his left knee took him out of
the game in 2004.
“I don’t have much cartilage left,” says Davis, who just turned
35, emphasizing the point with the audible grinding when flexing
his knee. It was an injury that made him a risk for an NFL team,
which is the end of the road for a free agent. “When you’re a jour-
neyman, you’re pretty much done.”
His football career may have ended, but suddenly he had the
opportunity to do the one thing that he had always felt forbidden:
crack open the door of his closet. After briefly moving back to
Colorado – the state where he moved with his family as a teen-
ager after being raised in Louisiana – he decided to take the leap
and move to New York City.
“I just felt so free — I couldn’t wait to kiss boys, go to clubs,
all of those things that I thought being gay was,” he says. But the
experience didn’t match up to his expectations.
“Going to clubs, dancing with my shirt off, it wasn’t that great.
People on drugs or they’re drunk and they’re just dancing around
and everyone’s sweaty,” says Davis. “I felt uncomfortable. I felt
awkward. I wanted to kiss a boy, but he’s sweaty and disgusting
— it was a weird phase for me.”
What ended the phase was his discovery of the New York Gay
Football League. For Davis, finally, two parts of himself – football
player, gay man – could coexist naturally.
“That was really the point where I felt, I can fit in here,” he
says. “There are gay guys that like sports; it created a whole new
family for me.”
That set him on the journey of becoming a gay man comfort-
able with himself, a journey that culminated in June of this year
when he came out publicly in a profile on OutSports, the gay
sports website. But there’s been much more to that journey for
Davis. Over the past eight years he’s focused himself on work-
ing with LGBT youth, from his day job at New York’s Hetrick-
Martin Institute, to the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education
Network (GLSEN) sports advisory board, to being part of Presi-
dent Obama’s LGBT outreach team. Using his own experience of
both success and the closet, his goal now is to help LGBT youth
of color experience much more of the former and a lot less of
the latter.
Because impulsiveness isn’t the only streak Wade Davis has.
There’s also determination.
INTERVIEW BY SEAN BUGG
PHOTOGRAPHY BY TODD FRANSON
WADE DAVIS
TALKS ABOUT LIFE
ON THE GRIDIRON,
AFTER THE NFL AND
OUT OF THE CLOSET
25 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
26
METRO WEEKLY: When did you know that
you wanted to be a football player?
WADE DAVIS: When I was 6 or 7, I was
drawn to football on television. I would
sit in front of the TV for hours and
somehow I understood the game. I
couldn’t explain it to anyone, but I just
understood it. My neighbor’s house and
ours didn’t have a fence in between, but
it had a fence going around the edges,
so we had probably a 30-by-80 football
field in our back yard. We would play
this game called “Smear the Queer.”
MW: I’ve played that.
DAVIS: I’m pissed off at the name of that
game, because the queer is actually the
toughest guy — you’re willing to go pick
up the ball and get tackled by 20 other
guys. So why are you the queer at that
point? Anyway, from that moment I
started playing and I realized I was bet-
ter than most of the kids out there. My
mother didn’t want me to play because
I was very small and skinny and frail.
And my grandmother was like, “He’s
my baby! Don’t hurt my baby!”
But I just didn’t stop playing it. And
because it was in my backyard, it was
every week or every day. Summertimes,
we’d play from 9 a.m. till the sun went
down. We’d just drink water out of the
water hose.
MW: Did you understand what the name
of that game meant then?
DAVIS: I had no clue what that meant. I
didn’t have the language to understand
what “queer” was at the time. I didn’t
even really know what “gay” meant at
the time. The only term I was conscious
of was the term “bull dagger,” cause my
grandfather used that referring to lesbi-
ans, or women who looked more mas-
culine. I remember we were in the mall
one day and he was like, “Look at those
nasty-ass bull daggers over there.” I was
like 10 years old — you don’t even know
what that means, but you start to relate
certain comments to certain people.
MW: When did you start playing team
football?
DAVIS: When I moved to Colorado, in
seventh grade. [I learned] there’s some
politics involved, even at the little-
league level. I wanted to be a running
back and the coach was like, “You can’t
make a pocket.” I knew it was bull —
his son was a starter and I was better
than his son. There was no doubt in my
mind. I was stronger, I was faster, I had
moves, but his son played. So I started
playing cornerback and receiver. That’s
when I fell in love with Deion Sanders
and I decided I’m going to play cor-
nerback forever. Deion Sanders was,
for my generation, probably like what
Willie Mays was to another generation.
He was bigger than life. I had over 40
to 50 football cards. I had a life-size
cutout. I had posters. My whole room
was a shrine.
MW: When did you first have an inkling
that you were gay?
DAVIS: I was in a gym-class locker room
— not football, but a high school gym-
class locker room. I was pretty late in
understanding that. I just remember
going home, watching straight porn for
hours trying to focus on the woman
and make myself believe that what hap-
pened was just what guys do as a com-
parison thing: “Oh, I’m just comparing
my body to this guy.” I think that that
does happen amongst adolescent boys,
but I knew at that moment it was differ-
ent. Like, when I saw this guy, I wanted
to hold his hand, kiss him, touch him. It
wasn’t just that I wanted to have a flex
off. So that was the first moment that
I knew there was something different.
MW: So you go to college, you’re playing
ball. How did you construct a closet?
DAVIS: I started to emulate every-
thing that I saw straight guys do that
I thought I should do. Having a girl-
friend, wearing oversized pants and
oversized T-shirts. Making sure that if
I went to a club I took a girl home with
me – whether we did anything or not,
which most times we didn’t. I looked
the part of a straight guy, a football
player who didn’t do anything that was
gay. And I was always a shit-talker. I
was born to talk shit, so that came easy
for me.
MW: Whenever we talk about why gay
men have not come out in professional
sports, we end up talking about locker
rooms. What is it about the locker room
that keeps people in the closet?
DAVIS: I think it’s a couple of things
that intersect. For me, in the football
locker room I never was worried about
being attracted to any of my teammates,
because that was a place that was
sacred to me. That was a place where
I was with my family, like with my
brothers. But one of the biggest issues is
that straight guys are just worried that
another man is going to objectify them.
Straight guys are used to never being
objectified unless they ask for it, unless
they take off their shirt around women.
But the idea of having another man,
who may be more physically imposing
than you, be attracted to you, is a space
where men can be objectified in a way
that makes them feel weak, so it chal-
lenges their ideas of masculinity. I think
that’s part of it.
For gay men, it’s the worry that their
teammates will assume that because
I’m gay I’m automatically attracted to
you, which is so far from the truth. I’ve
spoken to many of my other gay friends,
and when you’re in the locker room the
last thing you’re thinking about is your
teammates in a sexual way. I mean, it
never crossed my mind. No. Because
that’s the space where you’re actually
happy, you’re feeling safe and you don’t
want to make anyone else feel unsafe.
MW: During your course of time in the
NFL, did you ever come out to anybody?
DAVIS: No-ho-ho-ho. [Laughs.] No, there
was never a question in my mind. Never
a thought. There was not one football
player that I would have considered
telling.
AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
“I LOOKED
THE PART
OF A
STRAIGHT
GUY,
a football player
who didn’t do
anything
that was gay.
And I was always
a shit-talker.
I was born
to talk shit,
so that came
easy for me.”
27
MW: Was there ever anything specific
that happened that made you think, this
is why I’m in the closet, this is why I’m
not coming out.
DAVIS: Not in the NFL. Definitely in high
school and definitely in my family. And
definitely in college. I went to college in
Utah, it’s a very religious place. There
was a guy in my English class, I won’t
say he was obviously gay, but people
perceived him as gay. And I remember
I was walking through the yard with
him and my friend’s like, “What are
you doing walking with that guy, he’s a
faggot.” When someone tells you that,
and you’re a quote-unquote football
star, you automatically run even further
away from who you are.
MW: You said that you’re a natural-born
shit-talker. Did you ever find yourself
talking shit about gays and lesbians to
cover yourself?
DAVIS: One of the things I’m least proud
of is that I was a bully in high school. I
wanted to make my friends think that
I couldn’t be gay if I made fun of other
gay people. We used to do this thing at
lunchtime, we called it “holding court.”
We would sit on top of the tables right
at the door and as soon as someone
walked in we would start making fun
of them for whatever reason. And that
was part of my posturing, that was part
of me proving my masculinity, proving I
was the big dog.
MW: You’ve spent a good part of your
career in a sport where African-Ameri-
can men are expected and respected. In
general, an African-American male face
is kind of the face of a lot of pro sports.
Now you’re a black man in the gay com-
munity, and that community is perceived
as a very white face. How is it a different
experience for you, as a black man?
DAVIS: It’s saddening that the norm is
for you to be black and an athlete. It’s
not the norm for you to be black and
anything else; maybe you’re black and a
rapper, black and a musician.
I’m lucky that, because of being an
ex-athlete, I’m privileged to be able to
exist in the gay white world. I’m accept-
ed. People want to be my friend, people
want to date me. I’ve been told more
times than I can count that, “Normally
I don’t date black men but I would date
you.” And people actually think that
that’s an okay comment, that I’m going
to just say, “Oh, thanks!”
But I have a lot of black gay friends
who don’t feel like they fit into the
gay community. And I understand my
privilege there, so I try as much as I can
to have thoughtful conversations about
it. Oftentimes, if you are white and gay,
you don’t understand that you have a
built-in community, that the black gay
community is very disjointed because
of the amount of shame and stigma
that black men face. I definitely feel an
obligation to stay connected to the gay
black community, but I also want to
build a bridge between both commu-
nities, so that black gay men feel that
they can interact with the white gay
community and vice versa. You know,
like the old saying goes, all your black
friends have lots of white friends, and
all your white friends have one black
friend. And it’s kind of true. [Laughs.]
It’s so sad.
MW: Much of the LGBT community likes
to think of itself as more progressive on
race issues than the rest of the country.
Do you think the LGBT community actu-
ally is a little bit better on race, or is that
something we just tell ourselves to feel
better?
DAVIS: People won’t like this, but I think
it’s something we tell ourselves to make
ourselves look better. Gay people have
been oppressed for a while — we’re
hated and we’re fighting against it. But
as soon as we have a little bit of power
we oppress someone else in our own
community because we’re just not con-
scious of the fact that we’re doing it. It’s
like someone saying, “I’m not racist, I’m
colorblind.” When you don’t see color,
you can’t see racism.
My biggest problem with America
right now is that we’ve lost our idea
of humanity. I feel that we don’t take
care of our brother or our sister. That’s
our biggest problem. It’s not that we’re
racist or sexist or whatever, it’s that we
just don’t care about each other like we
should. I was walking down the street
in Chelsea yesterday, coming from foot-
ball practice, and I see this guy — white
guy, bald head, clearly gay — getting out
of a taxi. The taxi driver did something
and this guy calls him the n-word. And
there was a black man walking on the
street right there who stops, and the
guy looks at him and says, “I’m not talk-
ing about you.”
And I’m floored. How do we get to
the point where we understand that
our words hurt? You weren’t talking to
me, but you really were. You can’t be
racist to certain black people and not
to all of us. Like, “Oh, he’s the nigger,
not you.” That’s not possible. So when
I see things like that, I feel like we just
don’t have humanity anymore, we just
don’t care about each other as much as
we should.
MW: There is a lot of talk these days about
CTE [chronic traumatic encephalopathy]
and concussion issues in the NFL. I saw
Charles Barkley talking about how he felt
that basketball and soccer were going to
see more kids playing because parents
were going to start keeping their children
out of football. How do you feel about
this, as somebody who got his life in large
part through playing football?
DAVIS: If I had a kid I’d let him play
football, if he wanted to. Football’s done
some amazing things for me. I think it’s
hard to take one thing out of a sport and
crucify it because of it. Yes, there are
a lot of things that need to be changed
to make it safer, but there are a lot of
things that football gave me. It gave
me a sense of worth. It gave me a work
METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
“How do we
get to the point
where we
understand that
our words hurt?
YOU CAN’T BE
RACIST TO
CERTAIN
BLACK PEOPLE
AND NOT TO
ALL OF US.
Like,
‘Oh, he’s
the nigger,
not you.’
That’s not
possible.”
28
ethic. It gave me a sense of family, a
sense of community that I may not have
gotten anywhere else. It allowed me to
find myself and to see my own strength.
MW: Did you ever have concussions?
DAVIS: I remember getting at least two
concussions. I never missed a game
because of it. That says a lot. But you’re
taught that “you can’t make the club
in the tub” — if you’re hurt, especially
if you’re a free agent like I was, you
can’t miss playing time. The mentality
of sports has to change as well, so that
a player doesn’t lose his job if he’s out
with a concussion. But it’s also a busi-
ness at the same time, so there are so
many things that need to be reconciled.
The fact that I have a concussion and I
miss two weeks of training camp and
I’m a rookie, it means you’re probably
cut. There’s nothing you can do about
it. So you’ve got rookies who are going
to play, who won’t say a word.
But that also happens in soccer, it
happens in basketball. Players get con-
cussions all the time in those sports,
probably not as often, but they play
through it. No one can tell me Michael
Jordan hasn’t had a concussion in his
life. It probably doesn’t happen as often,
but it does happen.
MW: These days you’re playing with the
gay flag football league. From your own
story, you seemed shocked to discover
there were sports in the gay community.
DAVIS: Oh, so shocked.
MW: Even when you were first coming
into the gay community, moving to New
York, why did you still have that idea
that gay men don’t do sports?
DAVIS: Again, it’s the masculinity thing.
You’re taught that gay men are weak. I
got interviewed by this guy on the radio
in Chicago and he was like, “Come on,
man, it’s true, gay guys just aren’t as
tough.” People actually believe that. I
wanted to say, “If we go outside right
now, I will run through you like a Mack
truck.” And it’s not even that I’m bigger
and stronger, but I have an attitude that
comes from playing “Smear the Queer”
where I know at the end of the day
you’re going to have to kill me in order
to stop me.
That’s why I struggled playing in the
gay flag league, because my competi-
tiveness didn’t match. One of my good
friends, he’s a good friend of mine now,
but when I first was in the league he
went up for a pass and I picked the pass
off. He fell down to the ground, and I
looked down and was like, “You’d bet-
ter get in the fuckin’ weight room, kid.”
But that was how I acted in football.
And they hated me. People in the league
hated me for years. I remember a team
cheering that I got hurt, because I was
that big of an asshole. And I came back
on the field saying, “Bitches, I’m back,
what are you gonna do now?”
But that’s just me, so it was very hard
for me to play in the gay league. But now
I’ve transitioned. I had to stop play-
ing, because my mentality is such that
whether I’m playing with gay people or
not, I’m going to fucking dominate you
and that’s all that I know how to do. I’ll
join the board, I’ll teach, but I can’t play
anymore, because I’m an asshole on the
football field. I’m a different person.
MW: So you’re not playing anymore at
all?
DAVIS: I’m the captain of our traveling
team and I also play very sparingly in
our regular league. I do a lot of teach-
ing and educating and getting guys to
understand the game. I think people,
straight or gay, don’t understand the
small things about the game: what
keeping your head on the swivel is; or
about going where the quarterback’s
going to be, not where he’s at. That’s
what I feel like my gift to the league is.
MW: Weren’t you a little overqualified for
playing in the league in the first place?
DAVIS: [Laughs.] Definitely, definitely.
When I first joined I was like, “There
ain’t shit that you all can do, I’m just
better than everyone’s thought about
being their whole life.” But now I’m
like, some of these guys are really good.
There are some guys in this league who
could probably have played in college.
Now I’ve got bad knees, so whew,
I’ve gotta quit because I’m not the best
guy out there anymore. But I’m still
having the best time. I’ve met some
of the greatest people from San Diego
or Phoenix or Chicago, gay guys from
across the country. I won’t play in tour-
naments anymore, but I’ll keep going
to them just to keep the friendships
going, because the guys are just amaz-
ing. Everyone is. People like me now
that I’ve become less of an asshole. I’ve
evolved. I’ve learned how to play and
not talk shit. But I did talk shit this last
tournament. Sometimes it just comes
out.
MW: Well, there’s talking shit and then
there’s being an asshole.
DAVIS: I really don’t have a middle
ground. It just comes out, I can’t help
it! [Laughs.]
MW: Why did you time your coming out
as you did, a few years after you left the
NFL?
DAVIS: A few years ago, when [Out-
sports writer] Cyd Zeigler asked me
to do the article, I wasn’t ready. Now,
with the work that I do — whether it’s
with Hetrick-Martin or with GLSEN
or the Obama campaign or the Black
AIDS Institute — I’m doing work that
can effect change. My voice actually
counts. When I first left the NFL, I
didn’t feel that me being a gay athlete
would have counted for anything. But
now I love myself again. Back in those
days I still didn’t. I hated myself for so
long because I believed that being gay
was awful. Now I love the gay side of
Wade, so I can talk to kids about the
process that they have to go through in
order to start loving themselves again.
I feel like I understand my focus
now. I understand what I’m supposed
to do. A lot of people want me to work
AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
“When I First
left the NFL,
I didn’t feel that
me being a
gay athlete
would have
counted for
anything. Back in
those days
I still didn’t.
I HATED
MYSELF FOR SO
LONG BECAUSE
I BELIEVED
THAT BEING
GAY WAS
AWFUL.”
29
with gays and sports issues. But, real-
ly, there’s enough people talking about
that. My focus is going to be on being a
role model to change the lives of youth
of color who are impacted by oppres-
sions that people aren’t talking about.
There aren’t other black people out there
who have my voice, for lack of a better
word, who are doing the work. So that’s
what I want to do. I want to work with
LGBT youth of color to make sure that
HIV rates get lower, that homelessness is
talked about, that poverty is talked about.
And I’ll use the fact that I played in the
NFL to promote that.
MW: Have you and your partner gotten
married in New York?
DAVIS: We’re just talking about it, about
that and about kids. As of right now, we
would be getting married in Hawaii so
his parents can come over from Austra-
lia, and then have a big reception in New
York for our friends, because we can’t
expect all of our friends to fly to Hawaii.
MW: Have you met his family?
DAVIS: The first time I went over there we
were getting off the plane when he told
me, “My whole family’s going to be here.”
I was like, “Shit.” So there was his sister,
both his brothers, their wives, their kids,
his mother and his father. But I got off
the plane and I remembered everyone’s
name. It was cool. It was a little daunt-
ing, because I was the second partner
they had ever met, and the first who was
a black guy. His mother was very to the
point, which I love about her. She’s like,
“You’re black and he’s white, how does it
work?” I was like, “I see that he’s white,
but it’s not really an issue.” But I loved
her for just being honest and getting it
out there, because it’s something that
people think about.
MW: Have you found that being in a rela-
tionship with a white guy is a barrier for
you working with some of the communities
you want to work with?
DAVIS: It hasn’t been yet, but I feel like it’s
coming. [Laughs.]
MW: Right after this interview!
DAVIS: I don’t think that most people know
that my partner is white. I hope it’s not a
block, I hope that people understand that
who I date doesn’t dictate what’s in my
heart. Any man that loves me like I need
to be loved and that I’m attracted to is fair
game. It just happened to be that person
was white. I get it that there are a lot of
people out there who have these precon-
ceived notions about what it means to
be a black man who dates a white man,
especially because I have privilege. But
give me a chance first, sit down, talk to
me. Understand that I’m not just a privi-
leged black person who’s not getting his
hands dirty, who doesn’t understand how
the privileges that I have can oppress
people, how the privileges that I have can
oppress women, how the privileges that I
have can oppress other gays. I’m trying to
understand that and work to change that.
And my partner’s behind me 100 percent.
And he’s trying to educate himself about
what it means to be a white man dating a
black man.
I think a lot of it dates back to the
history of what it meant to be black and
to date someone white. It was illegal, it
was frowned upon, you could be killed
and jailed for that. A lot of people haven’t
forgotten about that. And they shouldn’t.
I shouldn’t forget about that, either. I
think within the gay community, often-
times you see people of color who are gay
and they have white partners and people
think, “Oh, once you get money you leave
your community, you don’t give back,
you don’t do the work.” I want people to
know that I’m still doing the work. And I
think if you’re not doing the work, then
we’re never going to get to that point
where we’re taking care of our brothers
and sisters. l
METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
30 AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
AUGUST 9 - 16, 2012
SPOTLIGHT
AIMEE MANN
One of the funniest skits from IFC’s hilarious show
Portlandia featured indie-rocker Aimee Mann
playing herself – as a housecleaner. The show’s Fred
Armisen and Carrie Brownstein, both occasional
indie-rockers, badger and bully a deadpan Mann,
who has taken up the cleaning side job because she
can no longer support herself with music alone. It
was all an elaborate joke, of course, and very much
not true: Mann continues to busy herself full-time
as a singer-songwriter, and she’ll tour this fall in
support of a new studio album, Charmer, due next
month. Ted Leo opens for her on not one but two
nights at the Birchmere. Tickets on sale Friday,
Aug. 10, at noon, for shows Oct. 24 and Oct. 25. The
Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria.
Call 703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com.
ARLINGTON LGBTQ YOUTH CONCERT
Arlington LGBTQ Youth (ALY), a Metro-DC PFLAG
youth group, presents an LGBTQA teen concert
featuring B. Steady, Teen Witch Rebellion and Jack
Lax, plus an open mike session. The concert is
Compiled by Doug Rule
intended as a safe space for all. Friday, Aug. 10.
Doors at 7 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Unitarian
Universalist Church of Arlington, 4444 Arlington
Blvd., Arlington. Donations appreciated. Call 703-
892-2565 or visit uucava.org.
CORCORAN’S SAVE THE DATE:
WEDDING AS PERFORMANCE ART
Kathryn Cornelius will go through the motions of
marrying – and divorcing – seven suitors, both men
and women, over the course of the day on Saturday,
Aug. 11, at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. Accompanied
by an ordained minister, the local performance
artist won’t actually get legally hitched. The point
is to make people think about how much pomp
and circumstance marriage has become, with more
focus on the ceremony and less on the commitment,
often only permanent – “till death” – on paper.
Of course, even if she weren’t going to marry at
least one woman, she’s also offering commentary
on marriage equality, and how so Saturday, Aug. 11,
a new commitment every hour starting at 10 a.m.
Corcoran Gallery, 500 17th St. NW. No admission
fees on Saturdays in August. Call 202-639-1700 or
visit corcoran.org.
KATHLEEN TURNER, MARGARET ENGEL
DISCUSS RED HOT PATRIOT
In a couple weeks, Kathleen Turner will take to the
stage at Arena Stage playing late, legendary, liberal
newspaper columnist Molly Ivins in Red Hot Patriot:
The Kick-Ass Wit of Molly Ivins. But next week she
stops by the Newseum for a discussion about Ivins
and the show with the show’s co-creator Margaret
Engel, a former Washington Post reporter and former
managing editor of the Newseum. Wednesday,
Aug. 15, at 7 p.m. Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Ave.
NW. Tickets are $20 for general admission, or
$10 for Newseum or Arena Stage members. Call
888-NEWSEUM or visit newseum.org.
TOM NICHOLS
After years as CFO of the World Wildlife Fund and
African Wildlife Foundation, Tom Nichols stepped
out of those roles a few years ago to commit to
becoming a full-time musician – going beyond work
with the Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, D.C.,
and supporting work with other local musicians,
including his partner Dan Chadburn. Nichols, who
released his first solo album Trust last year, is the
kickoff concert in a summer songwriter series at
The DC Center. Saturday, Aug. 11, at 8 p.m. The DC
31 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
32
self-assured for any professional – and she does it as
an eight-year-old amateur. Like the creatures of its
title, Beasts is an awfully rare breed. Director Behn
Zeitlin has made a gorgeous film that’s not only
technically impressive, but also undaunted by the
cynical impulses of its contemporaries. It just beams
with optimism about the human condition. It’s a
miraculously different and profoundly resonant film.
It all fits together like you’ve never seen before. Now
playing at Landmark’s E Street Cinema, 555 11th St.
NW., and Landmark’s Bethesda Row Cinema, 7235
Woodmont Ave. Visit landmarktheatres.com.
(Chris Heller)
CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER
Forever is a mighty long time – but who says high
school sweethearts can’t just end up as friends
for a lifetime? That’s essentially the hypothesis
of Lee Toland Krieger’s movie, which is billed as
shaking up the conventional rom-com, giving it
“a bracingly honest real-life vibe.” Rashida Jones
and Andy Samberg star as married lovers who are
growing apart. They decide to end the relationship
before the friendship is a casualty along with the
love. Opens Friday, Aug. 10. Landmark’s E Street
Cinema, 555 11th St. NW. Call 202-452-7672 or visit
landmarktheatres.com.
EASY MONEY
Based on Jens Lapidus’s international bestseller
Snabba Cash – the first in his Stockholm Noir
Triology – Easy Money is a Swedish thriller about
the dark world of organized crime, focused on a
poor student, a petty fugitive and a Yugoslavian
hit man. Daniel Espinosa (Safe House) directs this
fully subtitled film that stars Joel Kinnaman, Matias
Padin Varela and Dragomir Mrsic. Opens Friday,
Aug. 10. Landmark’s E Street Cinema, 555 11th St.
NW. Call 202-452-7672 or visit
landmarktheatres.com.
FAREWELL MY QUEEN
A story about the debauched and chaotic final
days of Marie Antionette’s reign just as the French
Revolution was breaking out. Based on Chantal
Thomas’s best-selling book, Benoit Jacquot’s
Farewell My Queen stars Diane Kruger in the title
role. Opens Friday, Aug. 10. West End Cinema,
2301 M St. NW. Call 202-419-FILM or visit
westendcinema.com.
GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES
As part of its “Marilyn Monroe Retrospective,” the
American Film Institute’s Silver Theatre screens
Howard Hawks’s wicked musical romp from 1953,
in which the original Material Girl sings “Diamonds
Are A Girl’s Best Friend” in an unforgettable,
iconic number. Jane Russell also stars in this movie
musical, based on Anita Loos’s novel, with songs by
Hoagy Carmichael and Harold Adamson added to
those by Jule Styne and Leo Robin from the original
Broadway version. Saturday, Aug. 18, at 11:05 a.m.,
Sunday, Aug. 19, at 11:05 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 21, at
4:45 p.m., and Thursday, Aug. 23, at 5 p.m. AFI Silver
Theatre, 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring. Tickets
are $11. Call 301-495-6720 or visit afi.com/Silver.
MAGIC MIKE
HHHHH
Did we really need — more or less — a male
version of Showgirls? Well, Magic Mike isn’t that:
It’s more comedy than conflict. Sure, we’ve got
some moralizing and near-overdosing, but there
are laughs. That’s what makes this movie so easy:
Male-stripper movies are rare enough that there’s
plenty of material left. Magic Mike is Step Up
meets Boogie Nights meets Oliver Twist, co-starring
Tampa, the B-list Florida city with a reputation
for exotic dancing. And while the moves indeed
give Mike much of his magic, Oscar-winner Steven
HUMOROUS BEHAVIOR
Michele Balan is selling jokes next week at the Birchmere
W
HEN I WAS YOUNG I STARTED BY DOING BETTE MIDLER IMPRES-
sions,” Michele Balan says. “I was a female female impersonator.”
But Balan, it turns out, didn’t see comedy as a successful career until much
later. A couple decades ago, in fact, Balan was working in sales for a computer
company. Even then, she found humor as a ticket to success. “I should really give
classes on how salesmen can make a better deal if they have a little humor,” she
reasons now. “Because I’d make them laugh over the phone and then they’d go,
‘All right, why don’t you come in for an appointment?’”
Balan long ago gave up that job to pursue standup. These days she’s prob-
ably best known for coming in fourth place on 2006’s season four of Last Comic
Standing – she was the “last female comic standing” that season. Actually only
one woman has gone further than Balan in the reality competition show’s seven
seasons: Iliza Shlesinger, who won season six.
Next Thursday, Aug. 16, Balan appears at Virginia’s Birchmere Music Hall as
part of this year’s Queer Queens of Qomedy, organized by show host and fellow
comedian Poppy Champlin. Balan has appeared as part of Champlin’s touring
comedy variety show before. “I do so many straight cruises and [straight] stuff,”
the lesbian comic says. “It’s great to have a different audience and work with my
friends.”
“It’s definitely going to be a variety of flavors,” Champlin says about the
Birchmere event. “I try to vary the comedians because comedy is so subjective.
This one should pretty much cover everything.” In addition to jokes and a couple
song parodies from Champlin, British musical comedian Zoe Lewis will offer a
show built around playing funny-sounding instruments, from the ukulele to the
spoons to the kazoo.
Balan, a regular Pride performer who’s also appeared on Comedy Central,
offers more traditional observational humor, appealing to a wide variety. She
calls herself “bi-comical,” adding that in particular she usually impresses the
men, gay and straight, more than they expected.
“There’s still a lot of sexism, and especially ageism with the sexism in com-
edy,” she says. – Doug Rule
Queer Queens of Qomedy featuring Michele Balan is Thursday, Aug. 16, at
7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are $25.
Call 703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com. l
AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
adventurous and bizarre classic. 1971’s A Clockwork
Orange was based on Anthony Burgess’s novel, and
it was initially Rated X upon release for its graphic
violence and subject matter. Malcolm McDowell
shines as a Beethoven-loving ringleader of a band of
thugs. Thursday, Aug. 16, at 9:20 p.m., Friday, Aug. 17,
at 9:30 p.m., and Saturday, Aug. 18, at 11:30 p.m. AFI
Silver Theatre, 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring.
Tickets are $11. Call 301-495-6720 or visit
afi.com/Silver.
BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD
HHHHH
Beasts of the Southern Wild is an incredible meditation
about strength and fortitude in the face of drastic
upheaval – specifically, how everything changed after
Katrina ripped Louisiana apart. It’s magic realism at
its finest, a fiercely independent film that brilliantly
harnesses the bold, enchanting power of a child’s
imagination. Hushpuppy (Quvenzhané Wallis) is
the awesome, wild-haired 6-year-old girl stomping
around the center of the film, descended from
un-distilled Americana, a rambunctious successor
to the likes of Huck Finn and Scout Finch. Watching
Wallis navigate the demands of her character is
nothing short of breathtaking. Her spunky charm
radiates through both joy and pain, and she delivers
a performance that would be shockingly poised and
Center for the LGBT Community, 1318 U St. NW.
Suggested donation is $10. Call 202-682-2245 or visit
thedccenter.org.
FILM
360
A dazzling, dramatic thriller from director Fernando
Meirelles (City of God) and writer Peter Morgan (The
Queen, Frost/Nixon), 360 weaves together stories of
people of different socio-economic backgrounds and
in far-flung places, including Vienna, Bratislava, Rio
and Denver. The common thread is a businessman
tempted to cheat on his wife, which provokes
global ripple effects – in tandem with other recent
happenings, from the international banking crisis to
the Arab Spring to Euro-Zone instability. Anthony
Hopkins, Jude Law, Rachel Weisz are just part of the
strong international cast. Opens Friday, Aug. 10. West
End Cinema, 2301 M St. NW. Call 202-419-FILM or
visit westendcinema.com.

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE
As part of its retrospective “The Films of Stanley
Kubrick,” the American Film Institute’s Silver
Theatre screens what is probably Kubrick’s most
marketplace - body
33 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
34
THE CAMPAIGN
It’s all man-children, all the time in this comedy
about rural North Carolina politics, starring Will
Ferrell and Zach Galafianakis. Director Jay Roach
(Meet The Parents) aims to take today’s money-
driven, soundbite-mad political circus to the next
level in this mud-slinging, back-stabbing, home-
wrecking comedy. If your taste in humor veers
towards Eastbound & Down – the similar-minded,
North Carolina-set HBO series co-produced by
Ferrell – The Campaign will be for you. Opens
Friday, Aug. 10. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.

THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN
Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton fill an empty box
with wishes for a child, and then plant it in their
backyard. A 10-year old shows up on their front
doorstep, and he’s got a green thumb, or is made of
plants, or something. If this sounds like the kind of
movie one of Frank Zappa’s kids would make up,
it’s because one of Frank Zappa’s kids did: Ahmet
Zappa wrote the story, which Peter Hedges (Dan In
Real Life, Who’s Eating Gilbert Grape?) adapted for
his film, which also stars Dianne Wiest, Rosemarie
DeWitt and CJ Adams in the magical title role.
Opens Wednesday, Aug. 15. Area theaters. Visit
fandango.com.
THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES
With the epic dimensions of a Shakespearean
tragedy, Lauren Greenfield’s documentary The
Queen of Versailles follows Jackie and David’s rags-
to-riches-to-rags story, which evolved during filming
in the wake of our Great Recession. The couple
intended to build the biggest house in America,
but that particular American Dream was not to
be, as this Sundance Film Festival award winner
documents. Also Landmark’s Bethesda Row Cinema,
7235 Woodmont Ave. Call 301-652-7273 or visit
landmarktheatres.com.

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW
Once a month Landmark’s E Street Cinema screens
everyone’s favorite camp classic as part of its
regular midnight screenings of classics. Landmark’s
screening comes with a live cast, meaning it’s even
more interactive than usual. Friday, Aug. 17, and
Saturday, Aug. 18, at midnight. Landmark’s E Street
Cinema, 555 11th St. NW. Call 202-452-7672 or visit
landmarktheatres.com.
STAGE
BLOODY BLOODY ANDREW JACKSON
Keith Alan Baker leads the direction of this rowdy
and irreverent musical that imagines President
Andrew “Old Hickory” Jackson as a rock star. Alex
Timbers wrote this recent Broadway show with
musician and lyricist Michael Friedman. Heath
Calvert stars as the seventh president, and the large
cast also includes Felicia Curry, Rachel Zampelli
and Alex Mills. Extended to Aug. 26. Studio Theatre,
14th & P Streets NW. Call 202-332-3300 or visit
studiotheatre.org.
IF YOU GIVE A MOOSE A MUFFIN
Celebrated local gay actor Michael Russotto stars
in the latest animals-love-pastries play concoction
from the children’s theater company Adventure
Theatre. If You Give A Moose A Muffin is based on
the book by Laura Numeroff – a sequel to If You
Give A Mouse A Cookie – and adapted for the stage
by Steve Garfinkel. Jeremy Skidmore directs. To
Sept. 2. Adventure Theatre, 7300 MacArthur Blvd.,
Glen Echo. Tickets are $18. Call 301-634-2261 or visit
adventuretheatre.org.
UKING IT UP
Strathmore welcomes thousands to celebrate the ukulele
D
ID YOU KNOW WE HAD 964 UKULELE PLAYERS LAST YEAR?”
Marcy Marxer is reminiscing about the success of last year’s UkeFest at
Strathmore, which attracted a crowd of 2,100 people. Marxer, with her partner
Cathy Fink, actually worked to ensure all 964 players knew how to play before
the feat, designed for the Guinness Book of World Records.
“It was a stunning, community group effort,” Marxer says. “It was more like
a joy fest than anything else.” And that success has inspired Marxer and Fink to
make this year’s UkeFest, the fourth annual, even larger. The duo – in music and
in life – has organized a three-day Uke and Guitar Summit preceding the UkeFest
concert and party next Wednesday, Aug. 15. This year’s event focuses even more
than before on ukulele’s place in Hawaiian music and culture, and features nota-
ble Hawaiian artists the Hula Honeys, Moanalani and Keola Beamer. “[In recent
years] the ukulele has been getting a lot of attention but Hawaiian artists aren’t
necessarily getting as much attention as we think they deserve,” says Marxer.
Marxer grew up in Detroit in a very musical family, including a grandmother
who was in a folk band that performed regularly for car pioneer Henry Ford.
Marxer started playing guitar when she was 5, and picked up the ukulele about
seven years later by happenstance. “I was walking to school past a garbage can
that had a little instrument sticking out of it,” she remembers. “It was a very
cheap ukulele, but it worked just well enough to get me hooked, before it fell
apart a couple years later.”
Marxer met Fink 32 years ago, while both were in Canada performing at a folk
festival. The couple, longtime residents of Takoma Park, would go on to work
with Cleve Jones’s AIDS Quilt-focused NAMES Project and perform at various
women’s festivals. They’re also regular studio musicians for folk stars including
Tom Paxton and Pete Seeger, and have won several Grammy Awards.
In recent years they’ve been getting an increasing number of gigs to play the
uke, after Marxer finally turned Fink onto the instrument. “Now she’s unstop-
pable,” Marxer smiles. – Doug Rule
UkeFest is Wednesday, Aug. 15, at 7 p.m., preceded by a Uke and Guitar Summit
starting Saturday, Aug. 11, at 11 a.m. Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane,
North Bethesda. No tickets required for UkeFest; $300 to participate
in the summit. Call 301-581-5100 or visit strathmore.org. l

AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN
Sugar Man is Sixto Rodriguez, who was supposed
to be a Chicano Bob Dylan – in other words, a
worldwide Latin folk superstar, promoted by two
Motown producers. But his debut album bombed
upon release and he disappeared into obscurity amid
rumors of an on-stage suicide. Two decades later a
bootleg of his album became a sensation in apartheid
South Africa, of all places. Malik Bendjelloul’s debut
documentary is a story about two fans in search of a
fallen idol. Spoiler alert: Rodriguez, a.k.a. Sugar Man,
is not only very much alive, he performs at Sixth & I
Historic Synagogue at the end of the month. In other
words, the film, however inadvertently, can serve as a
CliffsNotes introduction. You can say you were there.
Opens Friday, Aug. 3. Landmark’s Bethesda Row
Cinema, 7235 Woodmont Ave. Call 301-652-7273 or
visit landmarktheatres.com.
THE BOURNE LEGACY
Did you know it’s been five year since the last
Bourne movie? Tony Gilroy returns — this time as a
director — but Jeremy Renner, not Matt Damon, will
be throwing the punches. The dirty little secret of it
all? Without Paul Greengrass and his interminable
shaky-cam, this could be as good as the first. Edward
Norton, Rachel Weisz, Joan Allen and Albert Finney
also star. Opens Friday, Aug. 10. Area theaters. Visit
fandango.com.
Soderbergh, pulling double duty as director and
cinematographer, mines Cigar City for all its worth.
If anything, Magic Mike is a summer movie. It’s
light, even when attempting to be weighty. It’s got
skin, bromance, and enough story to pull you along
mindlessly for its 110 minutes. Now playing. Area
theaters. Visit fandango.com. (Chris Heller)
RUBY SPARKS
HHHHH
Zoe Kazan is challenging an awful lot about the
contemporary romance movie — and, impressively
enough, she’s doing it within the problematic confines
of the genre itself. Ruby is a cute oddball. Calvin is
socially inept. But, as Kazan painfully explains, those
are not defining characteristics. They’re small parts
of a whole. When those illusions shatter — and in
Ruby Sparks, they shatter in an extremely disturbing
way — we’re left to consider the differences between
what we love and why we love. Kazan’s honesty,
however, it not enough to make Ruby Sparks work.
After smartly picking apart tropes, the movie indulges
in a sticky-sweet narrative that rings false against its
refreshing self-awareness. When the credits roll,
we’re left with a half-baked satire that couldn’t
answer its own questions. It asked them, though,
which is better than nothing. Now playing. Area
theaters. Visit fandango.com. (Chris Heller)
dining
35 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
BAD DOMES
D.C.-based Rich Strayer’s one-man laptop
band chops up pop hits into fragments and then
reconstructs them bit by bit live on stage, creating
unusual and unique collages each show. Sounds a
bit like Name-That-Tune – or SongPop – times five.
Saturday, Aug. 11, at 10 p.m. DC9, 1940 9th St. NW.
Tickets are $5. Call 202-483-5000 or dcnine.com.
BARRY MANILOW
Now that Barry Manilow has left the Copcabana –
that is to say his residencies in Las Vegas – he’s free
to move about the country entertaining his many
fans of a certain age in his hits (“Mandy,” “I Write
The Songs”) as well as trying out the new tunes from
last year’s concept album, 15 Minutes. That set, his
first of all-new material in many years, was inspired
by – of all people – Britney Spears and specifically
the pitfalls of her career. Thursday, Aug. 16, and
Friday, Aug. 17, at 8 p.m. The Filene Center at Wolf
Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $35 to $95.
Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org.
BOHEMIAN CAVERNS JAZZ ORCHESTRA
Every Monday night the 17-piece jazz orchestra
performs a variety of music from the big band
repertoire — including pieces by Duke Ellington,
Count Basie, Billy Strayhorn and Maria Schneider,
plus originals from band members — at its namesake
venue. Founded by baritone saxophonist Brad
Linde and club owner Omrao Brown, features
some of D.C.’s best jazz musicians, including
Linde and trumpeter Joe Herrera, who co-direct.
Performances at 8 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. every Monday
night. Bohemian Caverns, 2001 11th St. NW. Tickets
are $7. Call 202-299-0800 or visit
bohemiancaverns.com.
36 AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
Center presents a new production of the 1982 classic
directed by Mark Waldrop and starring an 11-person
cast including James Gardiner as Seymour and
Carolyn Agan as Audrey. To Aug. 26. Olney Theatre
Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney, Md.
Tickets are $26 to $54. Call 301-924-3400 or visit
olneytheatre.org.
MEIN KAMPF – EINE KOMODIE
Subtitled “A Portrait of the Fascist as a Young Man,”
George Tabori’s Mein Kampf is an irreverent dark
comedy about, naturally, Adolf Hitler, riffing on
the title of his anti-Semitic political screed. But
the focus of this farce is on the evildoer before he
became rabid, when he was a struggling painter
forced to take shelter in a Viennese flophouse with
a motley crew, including two Jews. SCENA Theater
presents a production, directed by its own Robert
McNamara and starring Cameron McNary as Hitler,
that launched as part of the Capital Fringe Festival
last month. To Aug. 19. The H Street Playhouse, 1365
H St. NE. Tickets are $30. Call 703-683-2824 or visit
scenatheater.org.
MUSIC
ABBA – THE CONCERT
The Official ABBA Fan Club has named this outfit
“the best ABBA tribute band in the world.” The
group, which re-creates the look and sound of the
great Swedish pop act, has performed more than
1,000 concerts since it began 16 years ago, including
a number of stops at Wolf Trap. Sunday, Aug. 12, at 8
p.m. The Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road,
Vienna. Tickets are $25 to $38. Call 877-WOLFTRAP
or visit wolftrap.org.
MARATHON ’33
Virginia’s American Century Theater offers a
production of the rarely staged experimental play
by June Havoc, the real life “Baby June” from
the musical Gypsy. The show re-creates Havoc’s
harrowing years as a performer in Depression-era
dance marathons, said to be grueling precursors to
today’s reality show competitions. Jack Marshall
directs a large, 30-person cast, with Jennifer Richter
as Havoc, while Thomas Fuller directs an on-stage
six-piece band. To Aug. 25. American Century
Theater — Gunston Theater II, 2700 South Lang St.
Arlington. Tickets are $30 to $35. Call 703-998-4555
or visit americancentury.org.
A MAZE
Rorschach Theatre offers a production of Rob
Handel’s play focused on three people trying to move
on or spark change: a novelist struggling to finish a
book, a musician searching for inspiration for the
next pop hit and a young girl working to re-create
her identity. Grady Weatherford directs Sara Barker,
Robin Covington, Megan Dominy and Andrew Ferlo,
among others. Opens in Pay-What-You-Can previews
Friday, Aug. 10, at 8 p.m. To Sept. 9. Atlas Performing
Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $25. Call 202-
399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS
What does one say about a musical whose leads
include a man-eating plant? A musical that
shamelessly – and with far more delight than anyone
should really be allowed – rummages through science
fiction pulp, 1950s horror films and every great
Motown girls group to ever don a beaded gown? You
say it’s fantastic – assuming of course you’re speaking
of Little Shop of Horrors, written by Alan Menken
and Howard Ashman, the same team who later
wrote Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. Olney Theatre
KASEY CHAMBERS
A popular and critically lauded female artist in
her native Australia, and daughter of steel guitar
player Bill, Kasey Chambers stops by two venues in
the wider Washington region over the next week
in support of last year’s album Storybook. Friday,
Aug. 10, at 7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701 Mount
Vernon Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are $29.50. Call
703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com. Also Monday,
Aug. 13, at 8 p.m. Rams Head On Stage, 33 West St.,
Annapolis. Tickets are $35. Call 410-268-4545 or
visit ramsheadonstage.com.
LINKIN PARK
This pioneering California “nu-metal” rap/rock
band, one of the most successful last decade, tours
in support of its new album Living Things. Saturday,
Aug. 11, at 7 p.m. Jiffy Lube Live, 7800 Cellar Door
Drive, Bristow, Va. Tickets are $31 to $78.50. Call
703-754-6400 or visit livenation.com.
LINER NOTES:
THE CORNER STORE JAZZ TRIO, VOCALISTS
A hit at February’s Intersections: A New America
Arts Festival, B- “Liner Notes” features the Corner
Store Jazz Trio accompanying Paige Hernandez,
Baye Harrell and Akua Allrich performing from
those liner notes, or printed booklets, featuring
artistic mission statements and thank-you’s (and
lyrics), that are too easily overlooked in an era of
digital downloads – except when they’re posted to
social media and generate their own publicity a la
Frank Ocean. Friday, Aug. 10, and Saturday, Aug. 11,
at 8 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St.
NE. Tickets are $15 in advance, or $20 at the door.
Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
SPECIAL AGENT GALACTICA
Local drag phenom Special Agent Galactica, a.k.a.
the “pink-haired diva,” performs a free bi-monthly
happy hour show at Black Fox Lounge, singing with
her “Very-Sexy-Cute-Boy” combo and offering some
lip-sync favorites. Galactica will also be joined by
special guests. The next show is this Friday, Aug. 10,
from 6 to 9 p.m. Black Fox Lounge, 1723 Connecticut
Ave. NW. Tickets are free. Call 202-483-1723 or visit
blackfoxlounge.com.
THE WAILERS
Yes, those Wailers, the Jamaican reggae band that
supported the late Bob Marley, having sold in excess
of 250 million albums worldwide. Sunday, Aug. 12,
at 8 p.m. The State Theatre, 220 N. Washington St.,
Falls Church. Tickets are $22 in advance, or $25 day-
of. Call 703-237-0300 or visit thestatetheatre.com.
COMEDY
ARLINGTON DRAFTHOUSE’S OPEN MIC NIGHT
Every Saturday night, the Arlington Cinema and
Drafthouse offers the chance for up to 15 budding
stand-up comics to show their skills at the venue’s
new Old Arlington Grill. Every Saturday at 10:30 p.m.
Arlington Cinema N’ Drafthouse, 2903 Columbia
Pike, Arlington. Free admission. Call 703-486-2345
or visit arlingtondrafthouse.com. l
37 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
FOR MORE
OUT ON THE TOWN
LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
38
I
T’S PROBABLY IMPOS-
sible to leave a production
of August: Osage County
without feeling a pang or
two of familial guilt. But whatever
you do, don’t let that dissuade you
from seeing it. Just think of it as
a higher-brow version of a trashy
daytime talk show, or even one
of those daytime “judge shows”
about petty family disputes. Many
people watch such shows to feel
at least a tad bit better about their
own lot in life.
And once you see Tracy Letts’s
fictitious Weston family, you just
might want to call your parents
to catch up and make sure they
know you love them. Especially
if you moved far away from home
and aren’t always the best at stay-
ing in touch.
The crux of the problem in
August: Osage County is precisely
that: Two of the three “agitat-
ed Weston sisters” have moved
far away from the family home-
stead in small-town Oklahoma.
They haven’t been seen in years
and mostly keep in touch with
their parents by sending the occa-
sional greeting card. Partly as a
result, the parents, Beverly and
Violet Weston, are now shells
of their former selves, isolated
from their children and increas-
ingly from each other. The play
is set in motion after the self-
admitted alcoholic Beverly (Stan
Shulman), a one-time celebrat-
ed poet who hasn’t published in
decades, has gone missing and is
then found dead in a nearby river
in what appears a suicide. Drown-
ing his lifetime sorrows in books
and booze just wasn’t cutting it,
apparently.
The third daughter, Ivy, has
grown so tired of her isolation as
the only one still around, she’s
ready to jump ship and move as far
away as possible – New York City
– with the first man who woos her.
So what if Little Charles Aiken
(Michael Innocenti) is a blood
relative? She’s had a hysterectomy
already, she explains – so the two
will bear no children. A disturbing
justification, to say the least.
In a season that also included
a well-received production of
Spring Awakening, the Keegan
Theatre has proven that it’s more
than capable of pulling off dra-
matic ensemble productions.
Now with August: Osage County,
director Mark A. Rhea, Keegan’s
artistic director, has assembled
another solid cast of 13 actors. All
of them, more or less, manage to
breathe life into characters that
could easily have been played as
over-the-top caricatures. That’s
especially true of family matri-
arch Violet Weston, played by
the exceptionally great Rena
Cherry Brown. A self-confessed
pill-popping drug addict, Violet
is more monster than mother,
cutting anyone and everyone
down to size with choice barbs
attacking them at their weakest
spots – the type of larger-than-
life diva that gay men in particu-
lar adore. But Brown also reveals
Violet’s humanity, and the pain
and insecurities that have caused
her to be so easily irritable and
nasty, far more so than have
all the drugs combined. It’s an
exhausting role, but one that the
two-time Helen Hayes Award
winner handles as if it were all
just a normal day’s work.
Violet’s favorite daughter is
her oldest, Barbara Fordham,
played convincingly by Susan
Marie Rhea, the director’s wife
and also the company’s associate
artistic director. Barbara is the
most outspoken and most strong-
willed of the three girls, and the
only one capable of effectively
Once you meet the Weston family, you just might want to call
your parents to make sure they know you love them
Oklahoma aching: Osage Co. cast
AUGUST: OSAGE
COUNTY
HHHHH
To Sept. 2
Keegan Theatre
1742 Church St. NW
$35
703-892-0202
keegantheatre.com
August Sizzler
DOUG RULE STAGE
C
.

S
T
A
N
L
E
Y
AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
39
dealing with mother.
The play is chock-full of witty word-
play and sassy bon mots, most tossed
off by Violet – especially during Act 2’s
post-funeral dinner, which ends in a
breathtaking catfight between Violet and
Barbara. Letts also constructs his play
accessibly, artfully, revealing key details
and new plot twists all throughout in a
way that only the all-seeing Violet could
see coming.
Letts writes in a captivating fashion,
but he seemingly tries to throw in every
possible problem that could afflict a large
family – from favoritism to neglect, from
divorce to secret affairs, from incest to
slight pedophilia. Chances are, touching
on so many hot topics helped push him
over with the win for the Pulitzer Prize
for this play, but I think he would have
won anyway – he certainly would win
over even more theatergoers – if he had
shucked a few of the subplots and much
of the details. Instead, he should have
kept the focus on the central dysfunc-
tion at play here: As much as a family is a
random link of people “accidentally con-
nected by genetics,” as Ivy puts it, it’s also
the fundamental basis of human society.
The lesson: Call your mother and
father more often. l
METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
NIGHT
LIFE
41 METROWEEKLY.COM
LISTINGS
Destinations on page 48
THURSDAY, 08.09.12
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail
margaritas, rail drinks
and domestic beers •
$3.95 Cuervo margaritas
• Chuck Smith on piano,
7:30pm-close • $3 off
Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
$1 off regular prices •
Absolut Thursdays • $7
Absoluts • $5 Absoluts for
Shirtless, 9pm-midnight
FIREPLACE
Any Absolut or Bacardi
$4 from 10pm-Midnight •
VJ Dina
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm • “Best Of”
Contest, 11:30pm • DJ
Back2bACk
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-8pm • $15
All You Can Drink Rail
Highballs and Domestic
Drafts ($22 upgrade for a
step-up from rail), 4-8pm
• $5 Rail, $2 JR.’s drafts,
8pm to close
t
42
AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
If you want to get with this week’s Coverboy, you’d better grab some energy
drinks and your dancing shoes, because 22-year-old Sedric describes himself as a
“party animal.” Despite having a “very serious” job as a government consultant,
this Houston native loves to keep some balance in his life by cutting loose in his
free time, either by swimming for exercise or frequenting local bars for happy hour
specials. A member of the Capital Funk hip-hop team, Sedric says he could spend
his nights dancing at the club. If you’re seeking out this potential dance partner,
you’re most likely to cross paths with him at Town, Cobalt, Eighteenth Street
Lounge or Barcode.
43
Photography by
Julian Vankim
For addresses, phone numbers and locations of individual clubs, bars, parties,
and special events, please refer to our Destinations on page 48.
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Shirtless Thursday •
DJ Steve Henderson in
Secrets • 9pm • Cover
21+
FRIDAY, 08.10.12
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail
margaritas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
8:30pm-12:30am
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Cover • 21+
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Active Duty Military Night
• Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • New Drink
Menu • No Cover
PHASE 1
Karaoke, 9pm • Drink
Specials • No Cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
Alchemy, 9pm • Drink
Specials • 21+ • $7 Cover
• 2-4-1 Entry bofore 10pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town
Bear Happy Hour, 6-11pm
• $3 Rail, $3 Draft, $3
Bud Bottles • Free Pizza,
7pm • Hosted by Charger
Stone • No cover before
9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
People in gear get Happy
Hour prices til midnight
• Club Bar: Atlantic
Motorcycle Coordinating
Council
FIREPLACE
DJ Keith Hoffman

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
FUEGO SALVAJE
@Cafe Asia
720 Eye St. NW
Open 10:30pm-3am •
fuegosalvaje.com
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • All-
You-Can-Drink-Smirnoff,
$16, 10-11:30pm • DIVA
Demolition Party, 10pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Josie & the PussyCats
Show, 10pm • $6 Absolut
Drinks • Cover
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close • Retro
vs. Top 40: All Janet, all
night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Della Volta • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
New Drink Menu • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-7pm • $3 drinks after
midnight • No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
For the Ladies • Doors at
9pm • 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half price burgers and
fries
TOWN
Upstairs: DJ Wess
• Downstairs: DJ
BacK2bACk • Go Go
Boys • Doors open 10pm
• Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka •
Doors open at 10pm • For
those 21 and over, $5 from
10-11pm and $10 after
11pm • For those 18-20,
$10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+
SATURDAY, 08.11.12
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Cover • 21+
t
METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
44
DC EAGLE
$2 off for Club Colors
and Club Mugs • Club
Bar: Atlantic Motorcycle
Coordinating Council
FIREPLACE
DJ Vesper • Absolut and
Bacardi (any favor), $5,
10pm-midnight
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-8pm
• Karaoke and/or live
entertainment, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm with
Beat the Clock Specials
on Rolling Rock and Rail
Vodka starting at $1 •
All-U-Can-Drink Bacardi
Buffet, $18, 10pm-11:30pm
• Bears Can Dance, 9pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
DJ Joey O, 10pm •
Karaoke, Video Bar, 10pm
• $5 Skyy Drinks
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
Zing Zang Bloody Marys,
Nellie Beer, House Rail
Drinks and Mimosas, $4,
11am-5pm • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-7pm • $3 drinks
after midnight • No Cover
OMEGA
DJ Tre • Pool Tournament
at 9pm
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
For the Ladies • Doors at
9pm • 21+

PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
TOWN
DJ Twin • $3 Drinks from
10-11pm • Drag Show at
10:30pm • Downstairs: DJ
Wess • Doors at 10pm •
$8 from 10-11pm and $12
after 11pm • 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers,
9pm • DJ Steve
Henderson in Secrets •
The Ladies of Illusion
hosted by Ella Fitzgerald,
frst show at 11pm •
DJ Spyke in Ziegfelds •
Cover 21+
SUNDAY, 08.12.12
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Animal
Kingdom Summer Pig
Pickin’ and Badge Givin’
FIREPLACE
DJ Vesper • Skyy Vodka,
$3 • $5 cover with $1 off
coupons
What’s on your
nightstand?
My iPhone charger,
a cup of water and
my glasses.
What’s in your
nightstand
drawer?
A lot of clothes.
I have too many
clothes and not a lot
of space.
Where do you keep the
condoms and lube?
In a shoebox, with all the free condom
packages I get from when I go out.
What are your television favorites?
I am a drama-TV junkie. Current shows I’m
in love with are Scandal, Dallas and Suits.
What was your favorite cartoon when
you were a kid?
Hey, Arnold!
What superhero would you be?
Batman.
AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
45
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • $3
Smirnoff • Trailer Park
Karaoke, 9:30pm
JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights
& $3 Skyy (all favors),
all day and night • Open
until 3am
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
New Drink Menu • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Happy Hour all night
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
MONDAY, 08.13.12
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Open Mike, 7pm-close •
Emceed by Zoe • $3 off all
Mojitos after 7:30pm
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $1 Drafts
(Bud and Bud Light)
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4pm-close •
Karaoke, 9:30pm • Bears
Do Yoga, 6:30pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition • 75 cents off
bottles and drafts
TUESDAY, 08.14.12
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour, all
night • $3 rail margaritas,
rail drinks and domestic
beers • $3.95 Cuervo
margaritas • Gordon Kent
on the Piano, 7:30pm-close
COBALT/30 DEGREES
No cover • 21+
CRAZY TUESDAYS
@V3 Majestic Lounge
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
Crazy Tuesday • Drink
Specials, 10-11pm • Show
hosted by Jocelyn Carrillo
and her stars, 12:30am •
18/21 • Cover
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $2 Rail and
Domestic, 4pm-midnight •
Free pool till 9pm
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-close • FUK!T
Packing Party, 7-9pm
(upstairs)
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Showtune Video Madness,
7:45pm-12:30am • VJ
Brian Mongeon • Best of
Hollywood and Broadway
Showtunes
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
Special Guest DJ Matt
Bailer • 2-for-1, all day
and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag BINGO hosted by
Shi-Queeta Lee, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Drinks, 4pm-close
• Bear Night • Men of
Omega, 9:30pm • $3
Drafts, $4 House Vodka •
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
WED., 08.15.12
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Happy Hour, all night •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
7:30pm-close
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $3 Rail and
Domestic, 4pm-midnight
• Wooden Nickel Night,
9pm-close • Receive a
wooden nickel for every
drink purchased
What would you serve?
We’d go out for dinner. I like anything with
pasta. That’s my favorite food.
How would you describe
your dream guy?
Handsome, genuine, honest and very
intelligent. I need someone who can keep
me captivated. But being easy on the eyes
definitely helps.
Define good in bed.
Having the ability to keep me wanting more.
Who should star in a movie
about your life?
Michael Ealy, because he’s gorgeous and
also a really great actor.
Who was your first celebrity crush?
Jennifer Lopez.
Who gets on your nerves?
People who are ungrateful and people who
don’t care about anything but themselves.
If your home was burning, what’s the
first thing you’d grab while leaving?
Nothing. Everything I have is replaceable.
Who’s your greatest influence?
All the teachers I’ve had growing up.
They’ve always noticed the great potential
in me. They’ve always pushed me to be the
best that I can be.
What’s your greatest fear?
Being 40, single and at the club on the
weekends. I hope to be married and in love
and with a family by that age.
Pick three people, living or dead,
who you think would make the most
fascinating dinner guests imaginable.
Adele, Rihanna and Beyoncé. My three
favorite females on the planet right now.
METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
46
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm • “Best Of”
Contest, 11:30pm • DJ
Back2bACk
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-8pm • $15
All You Can Drink Rail
Highballs and Domestic
Drafts ($22 upgrade for a
step-up from rail) • $3 Rail
Vodka Highballs, $2 JR.’s
drafts, 8pm to close • Top
Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Active Duty Military Night
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
• No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Karaoke with Howard,
10pm • $4 House Vodka
FIREPLACE
Hump Day • $3 Domestic
beer, all night
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close • POZ DC
Mixer, 7pm
JR.’S
Trivia with MC Jay Ray,
8pm • Followed by Pop
Trivia • Three contestants
go head-to-head • $2
JR’s Drafts & $4 Vodka
($2 with College I.D./JR’s
Team Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Shirtless Men Drink Free
House and Domestics,
10-11pm • Men of
Omega, 9:30pm • Pool
Tournament, 9pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesday DJ
Don T • 9pm • Cover 21+
THURSDAY, 08.16.12
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
Upstairs
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail
margaritas, rail drinks
and domestic beers •
$3.95 Cuervo margaritas
• Chuck Smith on piano,
7:30pm-close • $3 off
Mojitos after 7:30pm
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
$1 off regular prices •
Absolut Thursdays •
Club Bar: DC Eagle Poster
Preservation Project
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
PHASE 1
Karaoke, 9pm • Drink
Specials • No Cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
Alchemy, 9pm • Drink
Specials • 21+ • $7 Cover
• 2-4-1 Entry bofore 10pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
FRIDAY, 08.17.12
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail
margaritas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
8:30pm-12:30am
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Cover • 21+
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town
Bear Happy Hour, 6-11pm
• $3 Rail, $3 Draft, $3
Bud Bottles • Free Pizza,
7pm • Hosted by Charger
Stone • No cover before
9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
People in gear get Happy
Hour prices til midnight
• Club Bar: Carl Vogel
Outreach
FIREPLACE
DJ Keith Hoffman

What’s your biggest turn-on?
A guy with beautiful eyes. Eyes are the first
thing I look at.
What’s your biggest turn-off?
Bad breath.
What’s something you’ve always wanted
to do but haven’t yet tried?
I am a daredevil, and one thing I’ve not yet
done is gone bungee jumping.
What’s something you’ve tried that you
never want to do again?
Sushi. I do not like meat that isn’t cooked.
Boxers, briefs or other?
Boxer briefs.
Who’s your favorite musical artist?
Beyoncé. She’s the hardest-working woman
in entertainment right now.
What’s your favorite website?
Toyazworld.net.
What’s the most unusual place
you’ve had sex?
In the bathroom of my college library.
What position do you play in the big
baseball game of life?
Umpire, because I’m the one calling the
shots and whatever I say goes.
What’s your favorite retail store?
Hugh & Crye.
What’s the most you’ll spend
on a haircut?
$25.
What about on shoes?
$120.
What’s your favorite food
to splurge with?
I’m a dessert fiend. Chocolate-chip-cookie-
dough ice cream.
What’s your favorite season?
Summer, because I love wearing as little
clothing as possible.
AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
47
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
FUEGO SALVAJE
@Cafe Asia
720 Eye St. NW
Open 10:30pm-3am •
fuegosalvaje.com
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • All-
You-Can-Drink-Smirnoff,
$16, 10-11:30pm • DIVA
Demolition Party, 10pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Deep in the Game, 10pm •
$6 Absolut Drinks • Cover
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close • Retro
vs. Top 40: All Janet, all
night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Della Volta • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
New Drink Menu • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-7pm • $3 drinks after
midnight • No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
For the Ladies • Doors at
9pm • 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half price burgers and
fries
TOWN
Upstairs: DJ Wess
• Downstairs: DJ
BacK2bACk • Go Go
Boys • Doors open 10pm
• Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka •
Doors open at 10pm • For
those 21 and over, $5 from
10-11pm and $10 after
11pm • For those 18-20,
$10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+ l
What’s something
you want more of?
More meaningful
relationships when
it comes to meeting
guys.
State your life
philosophy in 10
words or less.
Work hard, but play
even harder. l
What kind of animal would you be?
A dolphin, because I grew up swimming and
I feel most at home in the water.
What kind of plant would you be?
A rose. Beautiful and genuine at first glance,
but beware of the thorns when
rubbed the wrong way.
What kind of car would you be?
A Maserati. I like to live a luxurious life.
What are you most grateful for?
My best friends. Without them, I’m nothing.
METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
48
DESTINATIONS
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
BARS & CLUBS
MARYLAND
CLUB HIPPO
1 West Eager Street
Baltimore, MD
(410) 547-0069
THE LODGE
21614 National Pike
Boonsboro, MD
(301) 591-4434
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855-N Washington, Blvd.
Laurel, MD
(301) 498-4840
VIRGINIA
FREDDIE’S
BEACH BAR
555 South 23rd Street
Crystal City, VA
(703) 685-0555
Crystal City Metro
m&w r
V3 LOUNGE
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
301-802-8878

HRC
ACTION CENTER
& STORE
1633 Connecticut Ave. NW
(202) 232-8621
Dupont Circle Metro
THE FIREPLACE
22nd & P Streets NW
(202) 293-1293
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
FUEGO SALVAJE
Cafe Asia
1720 I St. NW
www.clubfuegodc.com
m d t
GLORIOUS
HEALTH CLUB
2120 W. VA Ave. NE 20002
(202) 269-0226
m o s
GREEN LANTERN
1335 Green Court NW
(behind 1335 L St.)
(202) 347-4534
McPherson Square Metro
m l
JR.’S
1519 17th Street NW
(202) 328-0090
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
LACE
2214 Rhode Island Ave. NE
(202) 832-3888
w r d
NELLIE’S
SPORTS BAR
900 U Street NW
(202) 332-6355
U Street / Cardozo Metro
m&w r
D.C.
18th & U
DUPLEX DINER
2004 18th Street NW
(202) 265-7828
Dupont Circle Metro
r
9:30 CLUB
815 V Street NW
(202) 265-0930
U Street / Cardozo Metro
BACHELOR’S MILL
1104 8th Street SE
(202) 546-5979
Eastern Market /
Navy Yard Metro
m d
COBALT/30 DEGREES
17th & R Street NW
(202) 462-6569
Dupont Circle Metro
m d t
CREW CLUB
1321 14th Street NW
(202) 319-1333
McPherson Square Metro
m o s
DC EAGLE
639 New York Ave. NW
(202) 347-6025
Convention Center /
Gallery Place /
Chinatown Metro
m l
DELTA ELITE
3734 10th Street NE
(202) 529-0626
Brookland Metro
m d
NUMBER NINE
1435 P Street NW
Dupont Circle Metro
OMEGA
2122 P Street NW (rear)
(202) 223-4917
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
PHASE 1
525 8th Street SE
(202) 544-6831
Eastern Market Metro
w d
PHASE 1 of DUPONT
1415 22nd Street NW
(Formerly Apex)
Dupont Circle Metro
w m d
REMINGTON’S
639 Pennsylvania Ave. SE
(202) 543-3113
Eastern Market Metro
m cw d v
TOWN
2009 8th Street NW
(202) 234-TOWN
U Street/Cardozo Metro
m d v t
ZIEGFELD’S /
SECRETS
1824 Half Street SW
(202) 863-0670
Navy Yard Metro
m d v t gg
RETAIL
49 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
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scene
Nellie’s Sports Bar
Friday, July 27
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
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52 AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
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AIDS 2012 Official
Closing Party
Friday, July 27
Ziegfeld’s / Secrets
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
scene
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55 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
Ambien. While I’m
not exactly sure what
happened during that
date, I woke up in a suite
that had been prepaid for
a week. Jeremy Renner
recently found himself
in the exact opposite
situation. He was flying
from London to Los
Angeles and wanted to
make sure he slept the
whole way. He asked a
friend for a pill, which he
took as he boarded. The
flight departed and he
waited to feel drowsy, but
nothing happened. Then
he started to get a tingly
feeling in his nether region.
And, as he told Jimmy
Kimmel, “I realized very
quickly that the ‘A’ was
actually a little ‘V’ on the
pill!” At this point, Kimmel
quipped, “Somebody
gave you a Viagra instead
of Ambien? First of all,
you need a new doctor...
or new friends.” Renner
added that the in-flight
crew were aware of the
situation and asked if they
could be of any assistance.
Flight attendants can be
very accommodating,
something I know first
hand — literally....
A DIFFERENT PILL...
Silicon Valley software
engineer William McKee
had it all: a wife, a son, a
great career. But he had
one problem — he was
losing his hair. He decided
to take generic Propecia
to help with his hair loss,
and now reports that the
drug has turned him into a
woman! After nine months
on the pill, McKee claims,
“My rock-hard chest from
the gym began to soften
reaching the point where
I had noticeable ‘breasts’
even under my clothing.”
But the transformation
didn’t stop there. He
claims his shoulders began
to slope while his hips
loosened and widened.
However, he did not notice
any significant hair growth
- at least not on his head.
McKee, who says he never
previously had sexual
interest in men, is now
only attracted to men. He’s
separated from his wife,
dresses as a woman, plans
to get breast implants, and
goes by the name Mandi.
Call me crazy, but it sounds
like a happy ending to
me....
HEDWIG 2... Some
intentional transformations
don’t go as planned. For
instance, there’s Hedwig
and the Angry Inch, which
chronicles the story of
Hansel, an East German
boy who falls in love with
an American soldier. In
order to marry, Hansel gets
a sex-change operation,
which alas goes awry and
leaves Hedwig/Hansel with
basically an inoperable
vagina. Obviously this was
not a musical composed for
Ethel Merman! The show,
written by John Cameron
Mitchell with music and
lyrics by Stephen Trask,
went on to become a cult
hit and was later made
into a film. Mitchell has
revealed that he is working
on a sequel to the material
which he will try out during
the Afterglow Festival at
the Crown & Anchor in
Provincetown on Sept. 16.
Mitchell will once again
play Hedwig....
What if you woke up in
a world where being gay
was considered normal
and being heterosexual
was considered deviant?
That’s the premise of
Love Is All You Need?, an
independent film which will
begin shooting this fall. In
final negotiations for the
lead is Kellan Lutz, who
would play a quarterback
with a secret.... he’s
straight! He has to hide
his heterosexuality from
the world or else face
discrimination. I believe
the original script was less
inventive and was simply
called The Ryan Seacrest
Story....
METHOD MADNESS...
Many of you fell in love
with actor Kevin Zegers
when he appeared as
the son in Transamerica.
Did you know that he’s a
Method actor? To prepare
for the role of a hustler, he
went to a neighborhood
frequented by rent boys
and negotiated a “date.”
The man in question
offered $200, Kevin wanted
$500, they settled on $350.
At that point, Zegers felt his
education was complete,
went to freshen up in the
bathroom, and bolted.
Alas, another missed
opportunity. Anyway, he’ll
once again be playing gay
in The Mortal Instruments:
City of Bones, the first in
yet another trilogy of films
based on books. Zegers’s
character is the gay brother
of the female lead. They
don’t get along because
the man he loves is in love
with her. And he probably
doesn’t have $500....
FURRED... There are
some people who use
nudity solely to get a bit
of attention — like Austin
Armacost, who was
constantly naked on The
A-List: New York. When
we last saw Armacost, he
got some test shots done
in order to rekindle his
modeling career. That was
when he discovered that
his increased avoirdupois
had not only added
attention to his asset, but
also to his waist...and, as
we all know, the camera
adds 5 pounds (which
means Armacost was shot
by more cameras than the
JFK assassination). What
to do, what to do? Why,
OLYMPIC MISHAP... Am I
the only one who doesn’t
have Olympic fever? Since
I’m in the midst of my
world tour, I simply can’t
justify staying inside to
watch TV... even for hot
guys in Lycra. But I have
found it in my heart to
catch up with some of
the highlights each night
before bed — which
has contributed to even
more dreams about Ryan
Lochte than usual. One
of my favorite clips was
when Ryan’s mom told
Matt Lauer that her little
boy doesn’t have time for
a relationship. “He goes
out on one-night stands,”
says Mrs. Lochte proudly.
Within a day, mom tried
to clarify the situation: “All
I wanted to say is that
he’s so sensitive about
not wanting to hurt a girl
dating, so he just goes
and dates and takes out a
girl for maybe one or two
dates and doesn’t have a
relationship because he
doesn’t have time and it’s
not fair to the women.”
I’m not sure if she
helped calling her son a
whore. Ryan tried to clear
everything up by saying,
“I knew how the media
was going to take it, and I
knew what my mom really
meant. She is so oblivious
to everything.” Well, that
clears it up. And it also
shows us the difference
between Lochte and
Michael Phelps. Ryan
may be mega hot, but
Mikey would never throw
the Widow Phelps under
the bus....
THE WRONG PILL... We
globetrotters have various
issues that don’t plague
the average person. I
remember once rushing
off a plane for a much-
anticipated date, and
taking a decongestant... or
so I thought. Apparently,
I mistakenly took an
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AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
57 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 9, 2012
shoot an advertisement for PETA
imploring people not to wear fur. Did
PETA implore him to do this ad? I’m
not sure if PETA even knew who he
was. The ad shows him on a catwalk
au naturel, turning his moneymaker
towards the camera, and holding a
sign that says, “Turn Your Back On
Fur.” The rather sparsely populated
audience includes gossip columnist
Michael Musto (who refuses to look
down) and some other guy who looks
at Austin’s crotch in horror. Since a
picture is worth a thousand words, I’ll
stop writing and simply direct you to
check out billymasters.com.
When Kevin Zegers can be had
for $350, it’s definitely time to end
yet another column. Thankfully, it’ll
cost you much less to see every inch
of him on billymasters.com, the site
that shares Ryan Lochte’s “hit-it-and-
quit-it” philosophy (except Big Mama
Masters would never say that on TV).
If you’ve got a question you’d like me
to tackle, just send it along to Billy@
billymasters.com and I promise to get
back to you before I take an Ambien/
Viagra cocktail (which sounds like it
would go nicely with tequila — but
what doesn’t?).... l
She’s such a nightmare. Sorry, her career is over.
Her tour has been a disaster and it couldn’t happen to a
bigger c***.”
— In an Australian television interview, ELTON JOHN tosses out a blast at Madonna, who is currently on her MDNA world tour.
John also said, “[S]he looks like a fucking fairground stripper. She’s been so horrible to Gaga,”
in reference to his presumably preferred diva.
(Sunday Night Australia)
To say her tour is a disaster is just silly. She is selling out arenas, singing new material and a few classic hits.
He will be singing the same old songs until he dies.”
— An unnamed “friend” of Madonna fires back at the Rocket Man.
(Marie Claire U.K.)
I hope the media and the press catches on to that because
it’s time to move out of 1992.”
— MATT BOMER, star of TV’s White Collar and the movie Magic Mike, responds to critics who have voiced “concerns” that he
couldn’t play straight in the movie adaptation of the novel, Fifty Shades of Grey. Bomer, who is openly gay, is considered
a fan favorite choice to play lead character Christian Grey.
(E! News)
It’s really important to show the gaming community how much of a large segment there is.
People don’t realize how many non-traditional
gamers there are,
because they don’t make themselves as loud as other people in the community.
— MATT CONN explains the thinking behind Gaymercon, the first-ever LGBT gaming convention,
to be held next year in San Francisco.
(Forbes)
I’m glad people online aren’t tolerant of gay gamers.
You DESERVE to be ostracized if you feel the need to tell
people your SEXUAL PREFERENCE
while playing VIDEO GAMES.
— A YouTube commenter on a video created in support of Gaymercon by video game voice actor
John Lowry of Team Fortress 2.
(Forbes)
58







AUGUST 9, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM

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