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TEM 2.0 Special Educator Notes-Final.doc

TEM 2.0 Special Educator Notes-Final.doc

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11/05/2013

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TEM 2.

0 Special Educator Notes: Educators of Exceptional Children (Inclusion and SelfContained), Speech Pathologists, Hearing and Vision Impaired Educators
Observers must consider the following notes when rating educators of exceptional children. Special educators should be given credit for appropriately assisting and prompting students to demonstrate observable student actions included in TEM 2.0.

P1: Know Your Students In Order to Plan Effectively

• • •

P2: Set ThroughCourse and End-of-Course Goals

• • •

P3: Create or Adapt Standardsbased Instruction Plans and Assessments Guided by Pacing and Content from Instructional Maps T1: Engage Students In ObjectiveDriven Lessons Based On Content Standards

Student information can be shared with School Health Services and related services staff. Special educator should share students’ IEP information with content area teachers, school support staff, and related staff. Timely revision and completion of IEP and eligibility information with the use of data should drive routine planning. In self-contained and resource settings, teachers should receive credit for aligning specialized instruction to students’ IEP goals or individual needs and to appropriate grade-level standards. Special education teachers plan for unique and specific learning goals in order for students to acquire concepts. Special educator and general education teacher may collaboratively plan student work that is used as evidence for the Alternative Performancebased Assessment. Goal notes and progress-tracking measures should appear in a variety of ways in a special educator’s instructional plans. Some teachers may plan to use index cards to take +/- data, while others may plan to use data sheets with goals listed on them. During group work, a teacher could plan to use note cards listing specific goals for each student, whereas other teachers may lead instruction while their staff members track goals. For higher functioning students, teachers may plan to use work samples to serve as effective progress-tracking measures.

• •

T2: Explain Content Clearly And Accurately T3: Engage Student At All Levels In Appropriately Challenging

Some students with disabilities may be unable to explain what they are learning or why it is important. In these cases, teachers should receive credit for verbally and visually reinforcing the objective with developmentally appropriate language and images. Teachers should, when possible, develop appropriate communication systems to facilitate student responses. In self-contained and resource settings, it is appropriate for the lesson’s academic objective to be accompanied by a behavioral, communication, or functional life skills objective. Special educator’s use of academic language should be appropriate to the level of the students; however, the content should be appropriate to the grade level. Appropriate strategies to help students understand content include, but are not limited to, offering dual texts, modifications, differentiation and scaffolding. In specialized education settings, the observer should look for evidence that the teacher has made the grade level content accessible by implementing specific accommodations or modifications that are tailored to individual students’ needs and appropriate to the lesson. Examples of specific students’ needs that may require accommodations include:

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TEM 2.0 Special Educator Notes: Educators of Exceptional Children (Inclusion and SelfContained), Speech Pathologists, Hearing and Vision Impaired Educators
Observers must consider the following notes when rating educators of exceptional children. Special educators should be given credit for appropriately assisting and prompting students to demonstrate observable student actions included in TEM 2.0.

Work

T4: Provide Students Multiple Ways to Engage with Content

auditory processing, visual processing, word retrieval, expressive language, or attention. A special education teacher may work with a group of high school students on specific vocational skills, while other students are working on developing early reading skills and other students work on sorting and identifying pictures of common items all in the same lesson. Teachers should receive credit for providing students with ways of engaging with content that target different learning modalities (auditory, visual, kinesthetic/tactile) or multiple intelligences (spatial, linguistic, logical-mathematical, kinesthetic, musical, interpersonal, intrapersonal, naturalistic), or for using other effective teaching strategies. In cases of severely disabled students, teachers may use assistive technology and text (braille, amplifiers, large print text, picture cards, and/or iPads to engage students in content. A teacher can also be given credit for giving students multiple ways of engaging with content even when all of the ways target the same modality or intelligence. For example, a teacher may show a short video clip, and then use a graphic organizer. Though both of these target the visual learning modality, they provide students with different ways of engaging with the same content and should be credited as such. As another example, a special educator teaching geometry might show students images of real-life examples of different three-dimensional shapes and use a graphic organizer to help students more efficiently use steps to find the areas and volumes of these shapes. Though both of these target the visual learning modality, they provide students with different ways of engaging with the same content and should be credited as such. For a teacher to receive credit for providing students a way of engaging with content, students must be engaged in that part of the lesson. For example, a teacher should not receive credit for providing a way of engaging with content if the teacher shows a visual illustration but most students are not paying attention, or if the teacher asks students to model parallel and perpendicular lines with their arms but most students do not participate. In specialized education settings with students with disabilities, a teacher should receive credit for asking questions at a level of Bloom’s taxonomy that is appropriately challenging for students, even if the questions are not at the highest level. It is especially important to provide special education students with ample wait time to gauge their understanding and to teach students strategies for responding to more challenging questions explicitly.

T5: Use Strategies that Develop Higher-Level Thinking Skills T6: Check For Understanding and Respond Appropriately during the Lesson

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TEM 2.0 Special Educator Notes: Educators of Exceptional Children (Inclusion and SelfContained), Speech Pathologists, Hearing and Vision Impaired Educators
Observers must consider the following notes when rating educators of exceptional children. Special educators should be given credit for appropriately assisting and prompting students to demonstrate observable student actions included in TEM 2.0.

T7: Maximize Instructional Time

The pace of the lesson will vary depending on factors such as the objective being taught and student readiness. The special education teacher should receive credit if the pace is appropriately responsive to students’ needs and if students are engaged in meaningful work, even if the pace may not be considered “rapid” in a general education context. If an observation is underway and a student crisis interrupts instruction, the special education teacher should not be penalized if s/he responds in a way that is appropriate and that causes minimal disruption for the rest of the class. In specialized education settings where there is only one student present during the observation, the observer should disregard references to peer interaction and assess the special education teacher on the other components of this standard. If there are one or more instances of disrespect by the special education teacher toward students, the special education teacher should be scored a Level 1 for this standard. Brief interruptions due to student excitement (for example, when a student accidentally shouts out an answer because s/he is excited to respond to the question) should not be counted against a teacher unless they occur constantly and significantly interfere with the lesson or with the ability of other students to respond. If a teacher’s assistant is disrespectful to students, it is the special educator’s responsibility to redirect the assistant. The special educator is ultimately responsible for his or her class. In classrooms with behaviorally challenged students, routines and procedures may include specific behavioral systems to promote engagement and support students in managing inappropriate behaviors. These systems may provide students with time for reflection and opportunities to respond to positive reinforcements. Students determining the reliability and relevance of resources may not always apply to some students with disabilities based on the severity of the disability.

CLE 1: Build A Respectful, LearningFocused Classroom Community

• •

CLE 2:

CLE 3: Use Classroom Space And Resources To Support Instruction CLE 4: Manages Student Behavior

• •

If an observation is underway and a student crisis interrupts instruction, the teacher should not be penalized if s/he responds in a way that is appropriate and that causes minimal disruption for the rest of the class. In classrooms with behaviorally challenged students, routines and procedures may include specific behavioral systems to promote engagement and support students in managing inappropriate behaviors. These systems may provide students with time for reflection and

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TEM 2.0 Special Educator Notes: Educators of Exceptional Children (Inclusion and SelfContained), Speech Pathologists, Hearing and Vision Impaired Educators
Observers must consider the following notes when rating educators of exceptional children. Special educators should be given credit for appropriately assisting and prompting students to demonstrate observable student actions included in TEM 2.0.

opportunities to respond to positive reinforcements. Observers may find students playing freely at times and not addressing learning goals, having earned breaks or rewards. If a teacher has a system in place under which students can earn short reward periods like these, the teacher should not be penalized. However, students should never spend most of an observation playing freely without working toward learning goals. Special education teacher and general education teacher collaboratively monitor students’ Alternative Performance-based Assessment; however, final signature and submission are the responsibility of the teacher of record.

Reflect And Adjust 1: Monitor Progress Relative To ThroughCourse and End Of Course Goals RA2: Use Student Data to Inform and Modify Instructional Practice

Special education teacher re-teaches, modifies long-term plans, and modifies practice, as appropriate, based on student needs and data results.

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