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RT-flex Design Aspects

RT-flex Training
Philosophy and Design Aspects of RT-flex Technology and Differences to Conventional RTA Engines

Chapter 10
Wrtsil Land & Sea Academy Page 1 Chapter 10 2-Jul-10

RT-flex Design Aspects

History

History of
RTA
RTA introduced in 1982 Over 2800 RTA engines sold with 69401216 BHP / 51030306 kW

RT-flex
First RT-flex workshop in 1996 Start of first RT-flex engine in 2001 (6RT-flex58T-B / GYPSUM CENTENNIAL) Over 700 RT-flex engines sold with total more than 30000000 BHP (Dec. 08)

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RTX Generations

1st generation RTX-1

2nd generation RTX-2

3rd generation RTX-3

4th generation RTX-4

2008

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Characteristic Data

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Cylinder Pressures

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Power Range

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Differences RTA to RT-flex engines

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Differences to RTA engines

Wrtsil Land & Sea Academy

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Comparison Table

RTA
Developing fuel oil pressure Storing of fuel oil pressure Timing of injection Developing pressure for exhaust valve activation Storing of servo oil pressure Timing of exhaust valve activation Fuel pump actuator Electronic governor Power/speed control by One fuel pump per cylinder Fuel cam on camshaft One activating pump per cylinder Valve cam on camshaft Regulating power/speed Releasing fuel pump position to the actuator Fuel pump

RT-flex
Fuel pumps on supply unit Fuel rail WECS-9520 / ICU Servo pumps on supply unit Servo rail WECS-9520 / VCU Keeping fuel rail pressure Releasing fuel command to WECS Fuel quantity piston

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Comparison Table

RTA
Timing of starting air Reversing Alarm and monitoring system Emergency control Starting air distributor Reversing of cam External (internal: OSC-3) By mechanic shaft and cams acting on pneumatic valves of the engine control

RT-flex
WECS-9520 WECS-9520 External Backup panels deliver manoeuvring signals and fuel commands to WECS inputs, independent from the RC inputs channels WECS supplies a fuel command feedback as load signal to the RC system Functions (plus VEO) included in WECS Bus-system

Load signal

RC receives load signal from angle transmitter on intermediate shaft Functions provided in RC system Individual cables

VIT, VEC Wiring from engine to external

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Why Common-Rail

Drastic smoke reduction at part load Possibilities to reduce emissions Reduced fuel consumption at part load Lower minimum engine speed Better manoeuvrability

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Advantages of RT-flex

Wrtsil 6 RT-flex58T-B MV Gypsum Centennial Smoke measurement on combinator curve during sea trials
0.50 0.45 Filter Smoke Number [ FSN ] 0.40 0.35 0.30 ON 0.25 0.20 Smoke visibility limit 0.15 0.10 0.05 0.00 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Engine Load [% ] 70 80 90 100 Conventional low speed engine OFF Aux. Blower HFO
380 cSt 3% sulphur 0.1% ash

6RT-flex 58T-B with common rail

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Advantages of RT-flex

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IMO Nox Limits

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Engine Numbering and Designations

Turbocharger 1

Turbocharger 2

Cylinder Numbering

DRIVING END

FREE END

Thrust Bearing Pads


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Main Bearing Numbering


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Engine Numbering and Designations

FUEL SIDE

EXHAUST SIDE

Counter-clockwise Rotation

Clockwise Rotation

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