TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. CHAPTER I............................................................................................................2 2. CHAPTER II...........................................................................................................4 3. CHAPTER III.........................................................................................................17 4. CHAPTER IV.........................................................................................................39 5. BIBLIOGRAPHY...................................................................................................44 6. APPENDIX SECTION...........................................................................................49

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CHAPTER I BACKGROUND INFORMATION/ STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM When I entered the Tuxtla language school at the Autonomous University of Chiapas my favorite part of studying English was to learn vocabulary about every thing I found interesting and useful when speaking English. However, during this long process of acquiring vocabulary or lexical items, I had to face the fact that I was unfamiliar with some words, as a result I used to avoid them because there were complicated for me. Later, with time I learned that those difficult words were called phrasal verbs or multiword verbs. In my own experience as a student and as a teacher, I have found these difficulties with phrasal verbs, not only when acquiring them, but also when teaching them. For instance, there are many classmates and colleagues that claim they have had the same problem, teaching phrasal verbs and helping their students to acquire them. In fact, Sjöholm (1995:75) states that, “…most L2 learners carefully avoid idiomatic expressions, and sound stilted in consequence. Learners tend to avoid idiomatic expressions also in cases where there exists a literal equivalent in their L1”

For all of the above reasons I believe it is important to investigate this phenomena and try to find alternatives to successfully teach phrasal verbs and help learners acquire them by using semi authentic texts in order to show them a different perspective of how to learn and how to use phrasal verbs effectively instead of avoiding them.

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RESEARCH QUESTIONS The research question addressed in this study is the following: It is possible to significantly increase the acquisition of phrasal verbs by using semi authentic texts in one group of sixth semester in the department of language at the Autonomous University of Chiapas. If so, how may this be proven? OBJECTIVES In this study, I will attempt to achieve the following objectives: General Objective • To discover whether using semi authentic texts in one group of sixth semester of the department of language at the Autonomous University of Chiapas is useful in increasing the acquisition of phrasal verbs. Specific Objectives • To explore the benefits learners of English might have when using semi authentic texts. • To analyze the repercussions of using semi authentic texts in learners’ acquisition of phrasal verbs. HYPOTHESIS The use of semi authentic texts during a 3-class trial period will be beneficial to teach phrasal verbs in English at level B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages at the Autonomous University of Chiapas in one group of sixth semester of the language department. I hope to explore how the acquisition of phrasal verbs may be achieved.
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1991. As a consequence. It is challenging for students to learn different pronunciation. Secules. Then.CHAPTER II THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK INTRODUCTION Learning a foreign language is a long process. 1992b. the use of authentic materials in teaching a foreign language. I believe that it is important and useful to investigate and provide an alternative in teaching phrasal verbs by using authentic texts in a BEd group at the language school at the Autonomous University of Chiapas. followed by the effect of Authentic Materials on EFL learners. it is extremely common that in this process students have problems in increasing the acquisition of phrasal verbs or multi-word verbs. Bernharst. grammar. According to Dong. Bacon & Finneman. Lee. ciccone. Bacon. Herron. Bragger. It is particularly useful since this kind of input offers two important characteristics: linguistic and cultural information that may not be found in pedagogical texts. there are many researchers that support the idea of using authentic input to teach a foreign language (Allen. 1995. culture. 1998. 1992). 1985. 1995. Berry. In this sense.Kyioo (2000). It is especially challenging to learn different lexical items. & Tomasello. etc. 1990. which involves many difficulties that must be faced in order to achieve learning goals. Firstly. In this chapter I will explore the literature related to this study. I will explore the authenticity in the foreign Language Classroom. Herron & Seay. to conclude this chapter I will explore the acquisition of Phrasal Verbs as well as the 4 . & Demel.

and the importance of providing learning teaching strategies associated with them. .” Another definition is provided from Harmer in Odilea (2005:2) he states that “they [written or spoken authentic texts] have been produced for native speakers. Teachers need more materials that help students to become thoughtful participants in a socially rich environment for learning and that feature everyday uses of English. since the aim of learning a language is to communicate effectively by using real language Bragger (in Dong. The Use of Authentic Materials in Teaching a Foreign Language. According to Nunan in Odilea (2005:2). In fact." According to Bacon in Dong. . .1 Authenticity in the Foreign Language Classroom. reflects real language use. and may help teachers to help students to develop appropriate learning strategies.Kyioo (2000). Young in Dong. 1.” As a consequence. As was mentioned previously.Kyioo 2000:4) states that “Everything we do with the language must be authentic" Karpova (in Odilea 2005:2). authentic materials (written or spoken) are those that have been produced for native speakers and which have not been produced for language teaching purposes. affirms “Many textbooks create a climate for socially isolated learning . “Authentic materials as those that have been produced for purposes other than language teaching. the are many reasons for authentic materials in the classroom. They provide the opportunity to exposure with cultural and linguistic realia. authentic input enriches cultural knowledge in learners’ curriculum. authentic materials offer two important characteristics in teaching a foreign language.Kyioo (2000:4) mentions that using 5 .common problems students have with them.

this language may not expose students to comprehensible input at the earliest stages of acquisition." On the other hand.Kyioo 2000:5). “argued that although authentic input may provide foreign language learners with culturally appropriate input. Omaggio (in Dong. with content that does not cause foreign language learners' culture shock or discomfort. and useful. many times teachers tend to modify the language and adapt them because students will not be able to acquire the language if they do not fully comprehend the content. Krashen’s hypothesis in Dong. embracing both the written and spoken word.ridden experiences for teachers (Ur 1984). Comprehensible input 6 . have proposed that learning with authentic input too early in foreign language acquisition could be frustrating and anxiety.” Dong.1.Kyioo (2000:4) proposes that “language is acquired through comprehensible input. Some authors claim that we need to avoid the use of these resources in the early stages of learning a foreign language. is helping to bridge the gap between classroom knowledge and a student’s capacity to participate in the real world. there are some authors that have argued that using authentic materials has its drawbacks. interesting. In other words.1 The authenticity and text difficulty Can an authentic text be simplified because of its difficulty without loosing its authenticity? Due to the fact that we cannot use authentic texts with much of real and difficult language at lower levels in ELT. For instance. The aim of using authentic texts is to expose learners to the language of the world that will help them to achieve competence in the target language.” 1. as Wilkins in Guariento and Morley (2001:347) mention: “The use of authentic texts. Vande Berg (1993). in fact.” In the following section I shall explore the use of authentic texts in EFL classroom.“authentic input is motivating.Kyioo (2000:4) also states that “Several studies.

simplify but maintaining authenticity in order to cause learner’s respose.124). we may adapt texts. "Alongside this recognition of the need to develop effective skills and strategies for the real world. it should be executed well according to Guariento and Morley (2001).2 The effect of Authentic Materials on EFL learners Guariento and Morley (2001) states that. 1. while maintaining authenticity in the sense of learner response. Freeman and Holden (1986: 67). the most important idea is to execute it well. Proponents of this view include Allwright (1979:179). making learning more 7 . According to Widdowson in Guariento and Morley (2001:348) he “… simplification can take place. Little and Singleton (1991. there are many writers who claim that using authentic materials increases motivation in learners because they find them more interesting or stimulating than artificial or non.can be defined as language that is simplified or appropriate to the language learner's capability. and the use of authentic texts is now considered to be one way of maintaining or increasing students' motivation for learning. and singleton (1989: 26).1.authentic materials. add that authentic texts bring learners closer to the target language culture. within the conventions of a given language field. To do this.” According to Peacock (1997). there has been a growing awareness of the importance of affective factors in learning. To sum up. who refer to this as the classic argument. the text has to engage the learners’ interest and impress him as being in some way relevant to his concerns” In this sense authentic texts must not have a ‘genuine look’ to be accepted by learners. Devitt. Little.

fewer authors argue that authentic materials reduce learners’ motivation because they find them too difficult: these authors include: Williams (1983: 187. communication in an L2 just cannot happen in any meaningful way. and it is virtually impossible to learn a language without vocabulary. It then seems that students feel that they are learning the real language while they are in touch with the target language used by the community which speaks it. 1984: 26). without words to express a wider range of meanings. no matter how successfully the sound of L2 is mastered. and taking into consideration the benefits and drawbacks for using them.” 8 . speaking. reading and writing vocabularies and can improve comprehension and production in L2. Al-Jarf (2006: on line) suggests that “Vocabulary knowledge is an important element in second language (L2) acquisition. students can increase their listening. and Morrison (1989: 15). In the following section I will explore the acquisition of phrasal verbs.” Laufer (1997:140) states “… a solid vocabulary is necessary in every state of language teaching…” McCarthy (in Laufer 1997:40) states that “No matter how well the student learns grammar. After reviewing the importance of using authentic materials into the classroom.2 Learning Vocabulary Vocabulary is an important part in learning a foreign language. Swaffar (1985: 18). and Bacon and Finneman (1990: 459-60). 1. and teaching phrasal verbs. I agree that using authentic materials provides opportunities that a course book does not offer. according to Peacock (1997).enjoyable and therefore move motivating. On the other hand. By learning new words. if there are not words there is nothing to learn. King (1990: 70(. common problems students have with them. Freeman and Holden (1986: 68).

The first theory is provided by Krashen in Sjöholm (1995:24). acquisition and learning. according to Bialystok & Sharwood Smith 1985. there are some theories we need to be aware of in order to understand how language is acquired. However. who state that “The lexicon may be the most important component for learners. i. she quoted Gass and Selinker (1994:270).g.” However there are some authors who claim that in learning a foreign or a second language vocabulary is easy to learn and they do not remark the importance of learning vocabulary. He argues that the processes that produce these systems. the distinction between both are processes of degree and there are no distinction of conscious or subconscious processes. he claims that “two independent knowledge systems control second language performance. many of these theoretical constructs are not operationalizable. you will find that vocabulary is comparatively easy. and. The harder part is mastering new structures in both content and expression. Takala 1984. that learning cannot become acquisition) according to Gregg 1984.e. a contemporary researcher Laufer (1997) mentions that Learning and acquisition can be used interchangeably because it is assumed that since all learning is to some extent cognitively controlled. in spite of the fact that it is vocabulary that students fear most. In fact “Krashen's theory has been criticized for being too general and too vague. Macclaughlin 1987 in Sjöholm (1995:25) Another model is called Interlanguage.” In second and foreign language learning. operate separately.According to Laufer (1997) vocabulary is now recognized as central to any language acquisition process. the monitor theory. Criper & Howatt 1984 in Sjöholm (1995) consists in describing linguistic 9 . some of his claims cannot be tested empirically (e. Gleason in Carter (1998: 184) says suggest that “In learning a second language. Davies.

As a result. adjectives. • Grammar. and common collocations. • Orthography. They claim that to learn a word learners need to be exposed to that word from ten to twelve times. Meaning. word structure. that refers to the correct spelling of a word. if we observe carefully we can identify that those features we need to learn increase the probability of words being problematic. This hypothesis is based on the fact that words are learned gradually through repeated exposures in various discourse contexts.” Furthermore.” The last hypothesis is called the incidental vocabulary learning hypothesis provided by Nagy & Herman (1985).part of speech. “in the Interlanguage Hypothesis the learner's grammar (interlanguage) changes in response to incoming data. by a series of successive approximations. Some problems a learner might face down in learning a second language can be. and moves. as Laufer (1997) explains: • Pronounceability. According to Sjöholm (1995:26).rules that a learner has in the process at certain points during the acquisition of a language. in learning vocabulary there are some features according to Laufer (1997:141) that we need to keep in mind if we want to learn a word: form. Consequently Nagy and Herman in Coady (1997:225) argue that “teachers should promote extensive reading because it can lead to greater vocabulary growth than any program of explicit instruction alone ever could. lexical relation. syntax. since problems can arise from one or more areas. that is related to certain grammatical categories such as adverbs. etc. 10 . that is related with words phonologically difficult. closer and closer to the standard norm of the target language. verbs.

Indeed. which refers to those expressions that cannot be understood only by its separated particles.• And Idiomacity. For instance. and reprimand to tell off.g. e.” Aebersold (1997:138) In this sense. it exist a relationship between vocabulary and reading? According to Davis (in Nation and Coady 1998). Yap (in Nation and Coady 1998:98) mentions that “Causal links probably do exist between vocabulary and comprehension and that vocabulary is likely to be the predominant causal factor.1 Vocabulary Acquisition through Reading “Knowing vocabulary is important for getting meaning from a text. postpone was preferred to put off.” 11 . Some factors he found are: • Recalling word meaning • Determining meaning from context • Finding answers to explicit questions • Drawing interferences He also claims that of all these factors above.2. L2/FL readers frequently say that they need more vocabulary so that they can understand the meaning of the sentences.” 1. there are identifiable subskills that are involved in the ability of reading. the most relevant and it had the strongest effect was vocabulary. Dagut and Laufer in Laufer (1997:151) “found that Hebrew speakers showed significant preference for one-word verbs where English speakers chose the phrasal verbs.

2 The Influence of Mother Tongue on Second Language Vocabulary Acquisition When a learner acquires or learns new vocabulary a factor is presented. Smith 1982) and they refer to the fact that the reader identify the clues in the text and he or she reconstruct a mental representation of what he or she thinks the text says. people sometimes tend to think that meanings are the same in all languages. the first is the psycholinguistic guessing approach or top down was proposed by (Goodman 1976. “…Learners acquire vocabulary and spelling most efficiently by receiving comprehensible input while reading.” Nagy & Herman (1987) also claim that teachers should promote extensive reading because it can lead to greater vocabulary growth. As Lado in Swan (1997) explains. In fact according to Krashen in Nagy & Herman (1985: 225). leaving context 12 . they agree that students may get benefits by acquiring vocabulary through reading.2. we economize by using words in more that one sense. and it is better than any program of explicit instruction alone. using texts is needed. 1. On the other hand. therefore. which plays a very important role in the acquisition of that vocabulary. the influence of mother tongue on a second language vocabulary acquisition. he explains that the traditional view or bottom. in the incidental vocabulary-learning hypothesis proposed by Nagy & Herman (1985). This is how languages differ.As I mentioned in the last section. he states that “The world contains too many things for us to have one word for each.up model consists in decoding of letters into sound and ultimately meaning. Coady (in Nation and Coady 1998). in fact. points out two different approaches that a reader employs. that the differences between languages are only in the forms used of those meanings.

and those elements which are different from their native language will be much more difficult: “We assume that the student who comes in contact with a foreign language will find some feature of it quite easy and others extremely difficult. 1984. again Swan (1997) remarks that. errors will occur only by resulting from the intrinsic difficulty of what has to be learnt. Perdue. 1957 quoted in Swan (1997:160) Another factor which needs to be taken into account is language distance as well as culture distance.” Lado.g Kellerman.” He also points out that if first and second language are closely related. there tend to be close translation equivalents: this can give learners an enormous advantage. and even where vocabulary is not cognate. Kellerman and Sharwood Smith. Those elements that are similar to his native language will be simple for him. Odlin. and those elements that are different will be difficult. word forms will generally be quite different. “Related languages often share a great deal of cognate vocabulary.to disambiguate. Ringbom. if first and second 13 . Unfortunately… a word in language A may have various equivalents in language B. 1993). On the other hand.” In this sense. more information about word meaning and use also has to be acquired from scratch. is it true that the mother tongue influences second language vocabulary acquisition? Research studies have proved that “the mother tongue has a considerable influence on the way a second language is learnt and used (e. 1989. 1986. and learners will be helped by the mother tongue in certain areas. we might ask the question. Where languages have less common ground. 1987. depending on exactly what is meant. Other studies have revealed that it is possible to predict learning difficulty due to the fact that some elements that are similar to learners’ native language will be simple for them.

prefabs. Finally. a plane takes off from the airport.”. With the general increase in interest in spoken language. a Multi. 1. the way it is recalled for use.3 The study of Phrasal verbs or multiword verbs After reviewing the last section. As important as lexical items. phrasal verbs have been discovered as central also in curricula for English as a foreign language" (Cornell 1985 in Sjöholm1995:115). an adult looks like after a child)” 14 . some theories in second language acquisition and the influence of the mother tongue on second language acquisition and use. In this study I will only focus on Phrasal verbs that are essential for this study. more errors are likely to result because the role of interference will be somewhat reduced. we find words constructed by two particles called Multi-word verbs or phrasal verbs. The following section will cover some implications in teaching vocabulary. for Swan (1997:179) “The mother tongue can influence the way secondlanguage vocabulary is learnt. idioms. Although there are different kinds of multi-word items such as: Compounds. Another definition is provided by McCarthy and O’Dell (2004:4) and says that “Phrasal verbs are verbs which have a main verb and a particle which. create one meaning (e.word item is that vocabulary item which is formed by two or more words but is simply considered an orthographic unit. together. According to Moon (1997). etc. In this section I explored the importance of vocabulary in second language acquisition. it is easy to affirm that vocabulary is an important part in learning vocabulary in a foreign language. "Phrasal verbs are today recognized as an important component in the English language.d.language are unrelated. and the way learners compensate for lack of knowledge by attempting to construct complex lexical items.

. come across. Phrasal verbs may be polysemic as well. throw away. there are some words which could be immediately deduced. give up)” After these definitions and explanations it is evident that phrasal verbs cannot be understood only by their separated parts and that they are formed by a main verb + adverb or preposition.. the feature of idiomacity attempts to be the key. this is the first problem students have in acquiring phrasal verbs because many times we cannot understand a phrasal verb only by looking the main verb. get over..) and phrasal verbs that are always separated (e. On the other hand.. They may be classified into inseparable and separable phrasal verbs. For example: sit down and stand up because they preserve the meaning of the main verb..idiomatic. “…most L2 learners carefully avoid idiomatic expressions.. points out that another difficulty in learning phrasal verbs is that phrasal verbs have multiple meanings... 6) point out that “there are inseparable phrasal verbs (e.g. run into. see.. As a result. In fact..Freeman in Kubota (1997:5...through. there is another factor which contributes to the problem of learning phrasal verbs.g. Sjöholm (1995:75) States that. every learner could not immediately deduce the meaning of eat out. through) as well as separable ones (e... For instance..g.Celce-Murcia and Larsen. especially if the expression occurs without context. Furthermore. not only having both the idiomatic and non idiomatic use. As a result. get. take up. and sound stilted in consequence. Sjöholm (1995). Learners tend to avoid idiomatic expressions also in cases where there exists a literal equivalent in their L1” According to Cornell 1985 in (Sjöholm 1995). 15 . the problem with phrasal verbs is not that of characterizing them as idiomatic or non.

16 . in other words the major problem in acquiring phrasal verbs is the idiomacity. For example: Cornell in Sjöholm (1995:117) shows how idiomatic combinations put up subdivides into several different meanings: "he puts up for the night". phrasal verbs are formed of two particles and they are difficult to acquire/learn due to the fact that most of the times we cannot deduce the meaning only by the context.As can be observed it is then necessary to keep in mind that phrasal verbs (idiomatic and non idiomatic) uses may have more than one meaning. and "he put up a good fight" To sum up. "who put up to this?".

” Action research is small-scale intervention in the functioning of the real world and a close examination of the effects of such intervention. the research methodology is described as well as the target population and the sample. researchers have provided some definitions of this type of research: Elliot (in Diaz de la Garza 2006:48) defines it as “The study of a social situation with a view to improving the quality within it. and contextual action research. 1. action learning. Research approach The methodology chosen for this study is action research. emancipatory research. Some characteristics of this approach according to Burns (1999 in Diaz de la Garza 2006:49-50) are shown in the following figure: Phase Situation of 6th Ss of the Department of 17 .CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY Introduction In this section. the instruments used to collect data and the data collection procedures are also described. in this study the meaning we will be familiar with is the definition of Elliot (in Diaz de la Garza 2006:48) and it will be the essence of the approach. (Halsey in Cohen and Manion” (1994:1986) In spite of the fact that action research is known by many names such as participatory research. Furthermore. collaborative inquiry.

Four types of instruments were used: Data Collection • Pre-test evaluation to know the prior knowledge of the Ss about the phrasal verbs we chose for the study. we will attempt to address resulting issues concerning the use of semi-authentic materials as a tool to increase the acquisition of phrasal verbs. in this sense Ss should know them in order to develop their language skills. Each class was planned according to the three stages: pre-while and post. Designing suitable tasks to foster phrasal verbs acquisition After designing suitable tasks. Classes using Semi-authentic texts Post-test evaluation Post-questionnaire treatment Three: Planning Four: • • • Five: Analyzing/ Reflecting Six: Hypothesizing/ Speculating Seven: Intervening Eight: Observing Analysis of the results in order to determine the success of the semi-authentic texts as well as modifications and improvements which can be useful to the study.languages in Phrasal Verbs acquisition (After Burns 1999 in Diaz de la Garza 2006) One: Exploring Two: Identifying The use of semi-authentic texts in the Department of languages Tuxtla C-1 classroom has not been exploited. We applied the pre-test evaluation to explore if the selected students were able to use the phrasal verbs effectively. Classes using semi-authentic texts were designed for three classes. Writing this dissertation provides us with a good opportunity to share our findings and conclusions for future studies. Phrasal verbs are important vocabulary in L2. Possible tasks and suitable texts were chosen for the study. Nine: Reporting/ writing Presenting findings Figure 1 Burn’s Phases of action research in relation to this study 18 (Adapted from Burns 199. in Diaz de la Garza 2006: 49-50) . as well as to provide a sample of lesson plans for teachers who are interested in teaching phrasal verbs using semi-authentic materials.

in this case one group of the sixth semester of the language department at Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH). 2008 March 31st 2008.Therefore.test evaluation from 12:00 to 1:00 pm Figure 2 Activities during the application of instruments. The students of the group chosen for the study had the following schedule: from Mondays to Fridays 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm. The following chronogram illustrates the activities we conducted during the application of the instruments: Dates February 28th. Our study population consisted of 7/15=4. 3. 2008 March 28th . we conducted the quasi-experimental study without a control group. we conducted the study with one group. This was due to the fact that only 7 students attended all 3 sessions and took part in the pre and post evaluations. The Participants for this study were students from 6th semester of the department of Language who should be at level B1 according to the European Framework of Languages at the Language school at the Autonomous University of Chiapas. 2008 March 3th.test evaluation First class 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm Second class 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm Third class 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm Post. 19 .2 Population and Sample In this investigation we selected a group from the department of languages Tuxtla. In addition. April 2nd 2008.7 % of the group. Instruments Pre.

• school records.concept scales. • interviews. • questionnaires. they claim that “…It provides only a limited view of the complexity of human behavior and of situations in which human beings interact… The use of triangular techniques. we used these four data collection: 20 . this means.3 Data collection instrument Triangulation is essentially to ensure validity of instruments research. it is argued. • Teachers’ ratings and research assistants’ observation. will help to overcome the problem of method-boundedness” Blasé and Cohen (in Cohen and Manion 1994) have mentioned the usefulness of the following data collection instruments: • coding schedules. triangulation focuses on providing a general panorama or a deeper explanation of the richness and the complexity of human behavior using more than one standpoint. • self. • diaries.” For these authors.3. According to Cohen and Manion (1994: 233) “Triangulation may be defined as the use of two or more methods of data collection in the study of some aspect of human behavior. In this study. by making use of both quantitative and qualitative data. Advantages in using triangulation are provided by Cohen and Manion (1994: 233-234). • sociometric measures.

In this pretest there were also 14 distracters that help us to corroborate the reliability of 21 . • • Classes using semi authentic texts Post-test evaluation to evaluate Ss’ knowledge of the 12 phrasal verbs after the taught classes. come down. These instruments helped us to explore if Ss knew the 12 phrasal verbs we chose for the study. These were selected because we checked the PET vocabulary list 2007 and among the vocabulary.3. break in. staying behind. we found many phrasal verbs students should know at the end of the semester. they provided us with a great deal of information for designing our activities and tasks in the three taught classes. keep on. get off. this pre-test was applied before the classes using semiauthentic texts and consisted of using 12 phrasal verbs that were chosen from the Preliminary English test (PET) 2006 target vocabulary that a student at level B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages should know. In addition we selected only inseparable phrasal verbs because we considered students might have had problems with the object in sentences and problems in conjugate them. check in. In addition.test evaluation to evaluate Ss’ prior knowledge of the 12 phrasal verbs we chose for the study. grow up. get on. In this sense. give in.• Pre.1 Pre-test Evaluation “A pretest is a test given before a topic is covered in class” according to Rough (2006: on line). go off. 3. The phrasal verbs we decided to use were: wear off. • Post treatment questionnaire. go for.

the data collection instrument. The pre-test evaluation was designed in four parts:

Part 1: Ss were instructed to match an illustration with the appropriate phrasal verb in the box. The phrasal verbs used in the task included: Get off, Check in, Break in, Come down, Check out, and Break out. The phrasal verbs in bold type were the distracters.

Part 2: Ss were instructed to complete a multiple Choice task. There were four incomplete sentences and Ss were asked to use an information gap task and choose the best phrasal verb to fill in the blank. The phrasal verbs used in this task were: Get on with, Break up, Fall down, Get back, Keep on, Stayed behind, Take off, Get down, and Give in. The phrasal verbs in bold type were the distracters.

Part 3: Ss were instructed to solve a crossword puzzle. Ss had to read the definitions of the phrasal verbs and choose the best phrasal verb from the box. The phrasal verbs employed were: Get along with, Break up, Grow up, Wear off, Give up, and Break in. The phrasal verbs in bold type were the distracters.

Part 4: There were four sentences with four underlined verbs, Ss were asked to look for the best meaning from the box, and then replace the meaning of the underlined verb and rewrite the sentence. The phrasal verbs used included: Get back, Ring off, Go off, Go for, Get away, and Look for. The phrasal verbs in bold type were the distracters. (See Appendix 1 for further information)

3.3.2 Structure Classes using Semi- authentic material
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According to our teacher training as well as prior personal experience, we decided to plan how to effectively employ the use of texts in our lessons. As a result, each class was divided into three stages: pre, while and post stages. In the pre-stage, we elicited from students vocabulary about a specific topic related to the main topic of the text (e.g. about the “I am legend” novel by Richard Matheson. First we asked “what would you do if you were the last man on the earth?”). In the while stage, the text was read by students. Then teacher asked questions related to the text in order to explore Ss knowledge, Awareness and Skills (KAS) concerning phrasal verbs. Finally, in the post stage, we cleared up doubts about meanings of different phrasal verbs contained in the text, and then students were asked to work in trios to discuss and write on a poster a different ending for the story. Finally, learners presented their work. The following figure summarizes how semi-authentic texts were used in a normal fifty minutes class.
Test Phrasal verbs Activity Pre- brainstorming of ideas and Eliciting. “I am legend” novel from Richard Matheson Break in, wear off, go off, and go for. While-reading activity skimming and scanning. Post-writing task: create an alternative ending for the text. Pre- brainstorming of ideas and Eliciting. While- reading activity skimming and scanning and predicting meanings of the phrasal verbs. Post-writing activity: fictitious story “Mexican Bob Marley”. Pre- Eliciting about past actions on vacation. While- reading activity about a letter from Nicole, skimming and scanning, predicting meaning of

“Bob Marley” and his influence on reggae music

Give in. come down, get on with, and grow up.

“ A letter from Nicole”

get off, keep on, stay behind, check in

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phrasal verbs. Post- Writing activity: answer the letter from Nicole using the four phrasal verbs. Figure 3: Texts, Phrasal Verbs and Activities Used in Each Class.

3.3.3 Post-test of phrasal verbs Dallal (2005: on line) says that “One way to analyze the data is by comparing the treatments with respect to their post-test measurements” It is then, after giving the classes to the treatment group, that a post-test will be applied to the participants in order to analyze the produced data and to develop a conclusion.

The post diagnostic evaluation was the most important element for this study. It allowed us to determine if semi-authentic texts were a suitable tool to increase the acquisition of phrasal verbs. We designed the post diagnostic evaluation to contain four different tasks, all were semi-controlled tasks.

The first task was a matching activity with four phrasal verbs with their definitions, however, this time students had to match the definition with each phrasal verb. The second task was to write a semi-controlled e-mail to an e-pal. In this part, we were able to explore how Department students were using the phrasal verbs in regard to accuracy, appropriateness, recycling and recalling. The third part was again a matching activity with four questions and four responses; in this case students had to choose the most likely response to each question. The forth part was a matching exercise with four phrasal verbs and four pictures in which students had to match the phrasal verb with the appropriate illustration.

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4 Post Questionnaire Evaluation Burns in Hernandez and Juarez (2007) states that “Questionnaires are one of the methods used in action research.In order to analyze the prior knowledge regarding phrasal verbs in the second writing task. with no mistakes. These questionnaires provided feedback to explore the benefits they had after the taught classes.3. The second part of the questionnaire consisted of four closed questions designed to find out how successful the classes were 25 . Appropriateness: the phrasal verb is suitable or correct for a particular situation or occasion. seeking responses to closed or ranked questions/ options an/ openended personal opinions. The first part consisted of five open questions to obtain students’ opinions and suggestions. judgments or beliefs” This questionnaire was designed for the participants of the group in order to explore their attitudes towards the use of semi authentic texts to increase the acquisition of phrasal verbs. (Phrasal verbs have to be used in the right context). Recalling: to bring to memory the phrasal verbs bye providing a description of each. The designed questionnaire was divided in two parts. we designed a scoring grid that illustrates the marks and the evaluation criteria employed. Questionnaires are sets of written questions focusing on a particular topic o area. score 1 point 1 point 1 point TOTAL: 3 POINTS Figure 4: Phrasal verb scoring grid 3. These questions helped us to explore how they felt in the classes and if they considered they improved their phrasal verbs vocabulary with the semi-authentic materials. Evaluation criteria Accuracy: that students use the phrasal verbs correctly.

26 .1 for the 12 items (we did not count the distracters). and finally. 3. the lowest was 1. This instrument consisted in a test divided into four parts with 12 phrasal verbs and 15 distracters.using semi. The average of the grades of the total group was 3.4 Analyzing the Pre-test Evaluation The pre-test evaluation was very important for our study because this helped us to discover if students knew the 12 phrasal verbs we had chosen for the study. while if the student had only one of these characteristics. to bring to memory the phrasal verbs by providing a description of each (recalling). In the results the highest score from the total of the students was 4. with no mistakes (accuracy). the use of phrasal verbs in the right context (appropriateness).4. Another objective for using the pre-test evaluation was that it allowed us to compare it with the post-test evaluation and in this way verify if they had effectively acquired the phrasal verbs. Students had to achieved the following three characteristics doing this test: Use the phrasal verbs correctly.authentic materials to develop learners L2 language skills.6. If a student accomplished two of the characteristics mentioned before the student received a complete mark. no value was marked.

wear off check in. keep on. Grades Porcentage % 1. Get off. 27 . grow up.6 16. 16% s S 6. give in.0 5. check in. The format and some aspects of the text were changed in order to have semi-authentic texts. 41 s % S 6 s S 7 s The pre-test evaluation was designed based on a selection of 3 different authentic texts.5% 3. 37% s S 1 17% s . grow up. 41% s S 3. keep on. wear off. The following graph illustrates the results obtained in the pre.0% 4. grow up.5% 1. check in. break in.7 37.1 41. *go for check in. grow up. wear off.1 41. stay behind. break in.7 37. wear off. stay behind.We can summarize the pre-test evaluation results with this chart: Pre-test Participants 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Phrasal verbs achieved W ear off. keep on. The semi authentic texts were chosen and modified in order to include of all the target phrasal verbs.6% 4.6% 3.test evaluation: S 7. 50 s % S 1 s S 2 s S 3 s S 4 s S s5 S 5. 3 s 7% S 4.6% 5. grow up get off. wear off. *go off check in. S 2. grow up.6% Average (grades): 3.4 The asterisk (*) in some phrasal verbs is because they are not well conjugated but they have a half value score. break in.6 16.

In the second session we presented the text “Bob Marley” and his influence on reggae music. The while activity was a scanning and skimming activity. grow up). The different data collection instruments that we used to collect data were also explored. To consolidate the acquisition of four phrasal verbs (break in. In this chapter the Research approach was discussed together with the population sample. The main topic was Bob Marley to foster learners’ KAS about the acquisition of four phrasal verbs. The text about Bob Marley was presented to students. they were instructed to write a 80 word text about “a Mexican Bob Marley” using the phrasal 28 . In the following section of this study we shall explore the results. Finally. the text “I am legend” by Richard Matheson was read. In the while stage students were asked to answer some questions about the text. we considered was an attractive ice-breaker to allow students to activate schemata and make predicting about the topic and the phrasal verbs included in the text. they were asked some questions about the text in order to assure if students had understood the text.We followed two criteria for selecting the texts: • The readability of the text according to the level of the students • Interesting significant topics to engage learners. 3. wear off. Students were also asked to predict the meaning of the phrasal verbs (give in. students were asked to discuss and write in a poster with an alternative ending for the text using de phrasal verbs in context. The format used in the pre-stage was eliciting with a question “What would you do if you were the last man on earth?” Through the use of pictures of the movie I am legend. and go for). come down. go off.5 Analyzing Structured Semi-Authentic Material Classes In the first session. get on with.

The data obtained from the first post evaluation activity is summarized in the following figure: Phrasal verbs Wear off.6 Analyzing Post Evaluation Results. The following figure illustrates the results obtained in the second task of the post 29 . Students also scanned the text and answered some questions. pick on Common mistakes Students had problems with the phrasal verb wear off (E. In the third session we elicited with the question “What did you do on your last vacation?” and brainstormed ideas about vacations on the board. go off.verbs previously taught. The results we observed indicate that most learners were able to recall most of the phrasal verbs but most of them failed to successfully use the new vocabulary appropriately. Finally. they confused the meaning of wear off with “prepare or remove” instead of disappear) Figure 5 Results obtained in the first post evaluation activity. go for. In this section we asked students to infer the meaning of the four phrasal verbs. we instructed students to answer the letter from Nicole using the four phrasal verbs 3. The while activity was skimming the letter from Nicole who sent a letter to her parents. in a real context (See Appendix 9 post evaluation Sample).g.

keep on. From a total of 12 phrasal verbs obtained in the following scores: Percentage of correct responses (%) Participants 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Phrasal verbs achieved Get on. However. get back Get back Marks achieved 3 1 None None 75 25 0 0 75 25 0 Get on. keep on. Students were able to recall some meanings of the phrasal verbs because they remembered them from the texts we presented in our classes. and three students obtained two scores 2/4= 50%. keep on. stay behind Get back 3 1 None Figure 6 Results obtained in the second task of the post evaluation. From a total of four items and four answers. few students were able to recall them in the context in which they were used. four participants obtained perfect scores. stay behind. they still had some problems in conjugation and some problems in accuracy. and get back).evaluation. In the third activity students were asked to match a question on the left with the most likely response on the right. We can observe that some texts were accurate since students used the phrasal verbs in the correct context. In the last activity students we instructed to match an illustration with the appropriate phrasal verb. In the second post evaluation activity students were instructed to write an e-mail using four phrasal verbs (get on. The following figure illustrates the results obtained: Percentage of correct responses 30 . Nevertheless.

other comments were that texts were confusing or texts had any interesting thing. look up. hang up Break in. hang up Break in. We can conclude that semiauthentic might engage students since most students replied that they felt comfortable and it helped them to enrich their vocabulary. Come down. The second question was related to the texts we used. come down. hang up Break in. Come down. Come down. Come down. hang up Scores achieved 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 (%) 100% 50% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Figure 7 Results of the third post evaluation activity 3. come down Break in. look up. hang up Break in. look up.Participants 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Phrasal verbs achieved Break in. hang up Break in. Come down. They commented that texts used in 31 . or even something new. if the semi authentic texts were positive or not in the English class for the students. look up.7 Analyzing the Post-Questionnaire Treatment In the first part of post-treatment opened questionnaire we identified the following responses provided by the participants: In question number one. Look up. look up. participants shared reactions towards the texts presented in class such as: the texts were pleasant or good.

• Use semi authentic texts to improve students’ interest in the class. • Use more dynamic activities. We were pleasantly surprised to discover that most participants showed empathy with the classes. Participants answered positively because the phrasal verbs presented were unknown for most/all students and they believed it is important to know them because they are presented in normal everyday life conversation by native speakers. some students commented that the use of these texts will help them to practice for their final exam.classes were very positive because they felt they had increased their vocabulary and the texts were motivating. In addition. • To slow down the pace in order to ensure understanding. • Present at least one phrasal verbs lesson a week. Participants provided the following comments or suggestions for future use of semiauthentic material tasks: • Provide more examples. we explored if students considered that they had learned new vocabulary during the classes with the semi-authentic material we had presented. For the third question. • Be concrete with the meaning of phrasal verbs. The results obtained from the second part of the post questionnaire are 32 .

¿Piensas que los textos te ayudaron a 100% answered that the texts helped them aprender algo? learn something. (For further information see appendix 10) 3.8 Findings The results obtained in this study lead us to believe that using semi-authentic material in 33 .2% answered that they did not see any difference between the texts in typical English books and the semi authentic texts we presented in classroom. Figure 8 Results obtained from the second part of the questionnaire treatment.8 % enjoyed the classes more with semi authentic materials.summarized in the following figure: Questions Results 1. ¿Sentiste algo diferente al leer los textos presentados en las clases a diferencia de los textos presentados en los libros de texto de inglés? 57. 3. ¿Te sentiste más cómodo hablando 57. ¿Disfrutaste de los textos presentados en 57. 4.8% answered that they felt uncomfortable with the semi authentic texts that we presented. And 14. 2. 42. 42. 14.2 % answered that they saw a smaller difference between the texts in typical English books and the semi authentic texts we presented in classroom.1 % answered that they saw a difference between the texts in typical English books and the semi authentic texts we presented in classroom.1 % answered that they enjoyed both clases más que los textos presentados en types of classes: with semi authentic texts los libros de inglés? and without semi authentic texts.1% answered that they felt more inglés cuando se discutían los textos más comfortable when they discussed the texts que en otras actividades en el salón? than using other activities in the classroom.

In addition we noticed that the semi-authentic material was helpful in learning target vocabulary if selected carefully. we were able to notice that asking learners to memorize lists with a great amount of phrasal verbs is not helpful to enhance and consolidate their learning. the information obtained through the post questionnaires evaluation applied to 6th semester students demonstrated that using semi-authentic material had been motivating and interesting for most learners. We selected the semi-authentic material and designed different tasks which proved to help students to acquire the target phrasal verbs. 34 . These results gave us a starting-point in order to plan our classes. we are aware students did not effectively used phrasal verbs in the correct context.foreign language learning could be a useful tool to help increase the acquisition of phrasal verbs. using semi-authentic material welcome break from classroom routine. That is the reason why we believe that it is important to raise awareness for ELT teachers concerning the importance that semi-authentic material may have as a pedagogical tool in learning phrasal verbs and target vocabulary. Finally. It is worth mentioning that as was previously stated. However. In the analysis of the pre-diagnostic evaluation we were able to determine that students had limited prior knowledge of phrasal verbs because their teacher had previously taught them in the class. Another important finding that we noticed was that when students had a hectic schedule.

♦ Semi-authentic materials and tasks which are carefully selected are helpful to students to acquire the target language phrasal verbs. A clear example was the class with a text of Bob Marley because students did know like reggae. ♦ Semi-authentic materials can be used as another tool to teach phrasal verbs. we will explore the issues we dealt with when using semi-authentic material in the classroom. semi-authentic material was a welcome break from classroom routine. in the first we explore the achievements of this action research study. SUCCESS 35 .8. requires time because it is difficult to find texts that contain the target phrasal verbs. texts do not always like to all students. Drawbacks ♦ It is not always easy to find suitable choices (semi-authentic material). 3. there is not an exact equivalent in L1. teachers must be very careful when selecting material suitable for the students’ level. 1 Exploring Success and Failure in Using Semi-authentic material in the Classroom. ♦ Phrasal verbs might have different meanings according to the context. we explore the failures we encountered. ♦ Texts were useful for learners to learn about the target culture. the information is presented in two parts. As a result. ♦ Elaborating lesson plans with semiauthentic material. ♦ When students had a heavy schedule. In addition. as a consequence. in the second part. In the following section of the study. Figure 9 Findings: Advantages and Drawbacks for Using Semi-authentic material.The following information summarizes the findings concerning this study: Advantages ♦ Semi-authentic resources are flexible and useful for teaching vocabulary and phrasal verbs.

Students 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Average Pre.2 5.1 4.diagnostic Evaluation Grades 1.1 6. which indicate that semi-authentic material.6 8.2 6. Semi-authentic material was a motivating way to introduce phrasal verbs to students and the activities designed were helpful for our teaching development.7 1. FAILURES 1. Most students demonstrated improvement in vocabulary acquisition when compared with the diagnostic test results and the post evaluation results.4 Post. We realized that using semi-authentic material could be time consuming and may run the risk of being over used or texts may not be interest for students. 2.0 6.0 4. It was difficult to find material that contained the amount of phrasal verbs we wanted to teach. were useful for recalling phrasal verbs.6 3.1.6 5.1 3. This is very challenging for most busy teachers.7 3.Diagnostic Evaluation Grades 5.8 6. 36 . We conclude that semi-authentic material was a helpful resource to help the increase knowledge of phrasal verbs in a group of sixth semester language department students as can be observed in the following figure that compares the pre-diagnostic evaluation with the post diagnostic evaluation. 2.8 6.38 Figure 10 Comparison Grid between Pre and Post Diagnostic Evaluation.

wear off and *go off. break in. break in. grow up. give in. go for. grow up. break in and come down. give in. keep on. keep on. stay behind. 50% 83% 3 Check in. Phrasal Verbs Achieved 58% 2 Get off. check in. Go for. check in. break in and come down. go off. get off. grow up. get off. break in and come down. Check in. go off. go off. get off. 50% 75% 4 Get off. check in. Figure 11: Comparison Grid with Phrasal Verbs of the Pre-Diagnostic and Post Evaluation Treatment. keep on. Wear off. 37 . grow up. grow up. keep on. get off. go off. break in and come down. grow up. get on. Check in. break in and come down. give in. go off. get off. give in. grow up.In the following grid we compare the pre-diagnostic evaluation with the post evaluation treatment. The results are noteworthy and provide that semi-authentic material was indeed a useful tool to increase the acquisition of phrasal verbs. break in. break in and come down Wear off. stay behind. and wear off. grow up and wear off. give in. Ss 1 Pre-diagnostic Evaluation Wear off. give in. grow up. Go for. Wear off. go off. give in. wear off and *go for 50% 58% 5 37% 58% 6 37% 75% 7 Check in. Phrasal Verbs Post-Evaluation Achieved 16% Go off. break in and come down. get on. grow up and wear off. keep on. go for. grow up. give in. 16% 66% The asterisk (*) of some phrasal verbs is because they are not well conjugated. check in. go for. stay behind. check in. grow up. Go for.

10 0% 9% 0 8% 0 7% 0 6% 0 5% 0 4% 0 3% 0 2% 0 1% 0 0 % P re-dia nosticE a tion g v lua P eva tion ost lua S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 s s s s s s s Column graph Comparison of the results obtained in the Pre-Diagnostic and Post Evaluation Treatment. 38 . As we can observe. Summary In this chapter we have explored the concept of action research as well as the data collection instruments employed in the study to obtain data from participants. students showed signals of improvement in acquiring the phrasal verbs. Finally. We specified and analyzed the results of the evaluation instruments employed and shared our findings. Future implications and final conclusions will be explored in the following chapter. we discussed the success and failures of this study throughout the treatment process.The following graph illustrates a comparison of the results obtained in the pre and post evaluation treatment.

CHAPTER IV FINAL CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FUTURE In Chapter One. In Chapter Three. 39 . how semi authentic texts can be exploited in the EFL classroom for teaching target vocabulary specifically phrasal verbs. According to the quantitative results we obtained. the majority of the students that formed part of this study reported that semi authentic texts were motivating for them as well as a little interesting. we will explore the implications of this study together with our personal reflections about what we have learnt from this experience and how other ELT teacher may benefit from our experience. In the Chapter Two. but we cannot assure that it helped to increase the acquisition of phrasal verbs because of the semi authentic texts we use. the results obtained in this study are useful for further studies in this area. In addition. Afterwards we discussed and analyzed the information we obtained from the instruments applied during the three sessions. 4. In this Chapter.1 Conclusion The objective of this study was to demonstrate if the use of semi authentic texts would help students of the sixth semester of the language department at the Autonomous University of Chiapas to increase the acquisition of twelve phrasal verbs. we explored our personal interest concerning how semi-authentic material can be used in EFL classrooms to increase the acquisitions of phrasal verbs. we explained the different instruments that we employed to gather data from students in the sixth semester of language department. This may help trainees or even teachers who want to investigate. we discussed the theoretical background that supports this study.

Classes using semi authentic texts are considerable a valuable teaching approach for phrasal verb acquisition. 4.2 Implications for Foreign Language Teachers After the results we obtained and the conclusion of this study. Although we could not determine if semi authentic texts helped students to increase the acquisition of phrasal verbs. we can affirm that the use of semi authentic texts can be a useful tool in foreign language classroom. an opportunity to let students learn the meaning of a phrasal verb in context is presented. in this sense. students will acquire better a phrasal verb. the results can demonstrate that there are some advantages for using this type of texts in order to activate students’ interest in learning phrasal verbs. in this study we found that: The use of semi authentic materials can be a break for the routine. In this case. We are aware that the use of semi authentic texts can complement the use of an EFL course book and they can replace those extensive lists of phrasal verbs teachers use to give their students. Furthermore. Semi authentic texts have to be interesting to learners or they probably will go off task. the data we obtained shows that they improved their knowledge of those of phrasal verbs. 40 .To conclude. and according to our experiences as students and teachers of English usually are ineffective.

In addition. in this case of phrasal verbs is not successful because we tend to forget them if we do not use them.2 Implications for Foreign Language Teachers The results of the study reported that the use of semi authentic texts could influence in foreign language classroom practice. Finally. We have found in our personal experience as students and as teachers that memorizing lists of vocabulary. in this case at the language department at Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH) and the teachers who use them can complement their classes teaching those phrasal verbs that students should know according to the level B1 according to the European Framework of Languages. Results demonstrated an advantage in memory recall when using semi authentic materials. Two examples of semi authentic texts is provided in appendix) 41 . the findings indicated that semi authentic materials can be a break for the routine as well as activate students’ interest in learning phrasal verbs. After conducting this investigation we realized that different semi authentic texts and tasks employed during this process can be shared with colleagues. in this way permitting students to have a significant learning. using semi authentic texts allows students to learn phrasal verbs in a real context.4. We can assure that the use of semi authentic texts in an EFL classroom practice can complement the use of an ELT course book and can replace those extensive lists of phrasal verbs that many teachers give their students to memorize.

insights. 42 . The process we went through during the three classes using semi authentic texts was interesting because we discovered that using semi authentic texts is laborious. After conducted this investigation we realized that to be effective in teaching vocabulary. feedback. it involves selecting the texts and modifies the text to include all the target phrasal verbs. we decided to use 12 phrasal verbs according to the PET vocabulary list and we selected only separable phrasal verbs because students might have had problems in conjugating the phrasal verbs. In addition. success and failure. and not random. First of all we faced the problem in selecting the phrasal verbs according to the level of the target population. feedback. Pair work provides us with the opportunity to share suggestions. conscious. We need to select the phrasal verbs according to certain criteria and be careful with the types of phrasal verbs because students can get confused and get frustrated when using the phrasal verbs.REFLECTIVE EPILOGUE It is important to mention that action research has been beneficial in our professional development as students and future teachers as well as how pair work has been helpful to be successful conducting investigation like this. in this case phrasal verbs must be systematic. Then it involves lesson planning. because we had to design activities that could take place according to the text. At the same time pair works is a good teaching strategy to promote learning trough the resolution of conflict and controversy.

At the end of the treatment we found that lack of participation in some activities was because the students had different tastes in topics. According to our experience during the semi authentic texts treatment applied in students of sixth semester at the language department at Autonomous University of Chiapas we were able to answer to our research questions: there were signals of improvement in the acquisition of phrasal verbs trough the use of semi authentic texts trough the three different classes. we found that this investigation helped us to practice the theory we learned in the LEI program. for example there were people who did not liked reggae and the text was about Bob Marley. 43 . To conclude. In this sense we can assure that this study was beneficial for applying all what we learnt during our four years of studies in the LEI program.

A Qualitative Approach to the authenticity in the foreign Language Classroom: A study of university Students Learning English in Korea. Clandfield. Accessed. and McCarthy.Kyioo. (2000). Vocabulary and Language Teaching.pdf 3. Cohen. 4. (1998). Dong. L. From Reader to Reading Teacher: Issues and Strategies for Second Language Classrooms. 2007. K. R. Teaching phrasal verbs using a literary text. 5. (1995). M. USA and Canada. Texas Papers in Foreign Language Education. 5. 8. 2007: http://www. (1997). An Introduction to Action Research. Carter.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019 b/80/30/b3/42. London 7.BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. and Manion.eric. (2003). Gabel. England: Longman. England: Cambridge University Pres. 189-205. (1994). november. Available from: 44 . (1998). Macmillan 6. 2. Carter. L. R. Accessed November. D. L. Al-Jarf R. Aebersold. J. (2006).ed. Making connections in vocabulary instruction. Research Methods in Education. Vocabulary applied linguistic perspectives.

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CHRONOGRAM (August 2007.August 2008) MONTHS January February March May October August September November April June July ACTIVITIES Topic Problem Description Objective/ Hypothesis Bibliography Selection Methodology Theoretical Frame Application of the Instrument Application of the methodology Analysis Results Elaboration of the research Report Implications for future investigations 1  2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11              49 August 12  .

APPENDIX SECTION 50 .

Note: Some phrasal verbs are conjugated. Break up 51 .-___________________ 2.Appendix 1 UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE CHIAPAS ESCUELA DE LENGUAS TUXTLA ENGLISH VI Pre. a. Part 1.___________________ 4. 1.Multiple Choice Complete each of the following sentences with the appropriate phrasal verb. Get on with c. Please answer as much as you can and try not to leave gaps because it will be very important when the data collection takes place. Instructions: As a part of an investigation about phrasal verbs this test is presented in four parts._______________________ Part 2.test designed by: Hugo Santos S. Checked in b.Match the picture with the appropriate phrasal verb in the box Get off Check in Break in Come down Check out Break out 1. She ________ her work.-_____________________ 3.

Give in Part 3 Crossword.2. Fell down b. Stayed behind c. He _________talking a. Fall down c. Kept on 3. 3 To become older or an adult 52 . Get along with Break in Break up Break in Grow up Wear off Give up ACROSS 4 When a feeling or the effect of something gradually disappears. She __________ after the lesson to speak to the teacher. DOWN 1 When two or more people like each other and are friendly to each other. I ________. 2 When people stop having a relationship or stop working together. who was the actress? a. Break up b. Took off 4.Answer the crossword puzzle with the correct phrasal verb. Got back c. a. Get down b. .

Replace the meaning Match the underlined verbs in these sentences with phrasal verbs made using the verbs from the boxes below and rewrite the sentences. Get back Ring off Go off Go for Get away Look for 1.Part 4. The dog reached the man ___________________________________ Thanks for your cooperation! 53 . She'd put the phone down before I could say goodbye ___________________________________ 3. Suddenly the lights stopped working ___________________________________ 4. When did you return from New York? ___________________________________ 2. Note: Some phrasal verbs need to be conjugated.

and stringing and hanging garlic. and take him for public execution. Suspicious that she is infected. Neville finds an apparently uninfected woman named Ruth. as The Omega Man in 1971. One day a dog appears in the neighborhood. Neville spends weeks trying to win its trust and domesticate it. He becomes a legend as the vampires once were.Appendix 2 I Am Legend From Wikipedia. it dies from the infection a week later. her people are infected but have discovered a way to hold the disease. and popularized the fictional concept of a worldwide apocalypse due to a disease. leaving a note. her infection is revealed. Robert Neville. This novel has influenced the modern vampire genre as well as the zombie genre. Neville takes the pills and as he dies he reflects on how the new society regards him as a monster. When Neville performs a blood test on her. boarding up windows to prevent vampires from breaking into the house. hunters from the new society capture Neville. She warns him to leave before they come to destroy him. Ruth knocks him out and suddenly she goes off. Neville follows her and after a struggle takes her back to his house. He spends every day repairing his house.org/wiki/I_Am_Legend UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE CHIAPAS ESCUELA DE LENGUAS TUXTLA SIXTH SEMESTER Activity designed by: Hugo Santos S. Ruth provides him with pills so that he will feel no pain. explaining that she is a spy from a primitive new society. However he eventually wins it over. Appendix 3 Source: http://en. Months later. she runs away. the free encyclopedia I Am Legend is a 1954 science fiction novel by Richard Matheson about the last man alive in a future Los Angeles. The story takes place between January 1976 and January 1979 in Los Angeles. Is considered as "the first modern vampire novel”. the protagonist. Neville decides to stay. is apparently the only survivor of an apocalypse caused by bacteria. 54 . but the dog tries to go for Neville many times. California. the symptoms of which are similar to vampirism and which do not wear off with any antidote.wikipedia. and again in 2007 as I Am Legend. Neville questions her. Finally. Before he can be executed. The novel was a success and was adapted to film as The Last Man on Earth in 1964.

Neville finds a dog. d. In what year the novel was adapted to a first film? b. Robert Neville died. In what order is presented the information in the reading: a. c. 2) Scan the text and Answer the following questions a. b. Neville finds a dog. He spends every day repairing his house. Robert Neville died. Robert Neville died. a.1) Skim the text and underline the correct answer: 1. d. He spends every day repairing his house. 3. c. c. California. b. He spends every day repairing his house. a. The novel I am legend was considered as the first: c. Neville finds a dog. He spends every day repairing his house. e. c. d. The story takes place between what year and what year? 55 . What did Robert Neville do every day? Look for an antidote and try to domesticate the dog Repair his house and board up the windows Test blood and try to find vampires Hang garlic and look for an antidote What happened with Robert Neville at the end of the story? Robert Neville found an antidote Robert Neville lived for a long time Robert Neville died Robert Neville got married with Ruth The main idea of the text is: Robert Neville fought against the vampires in order to survive Robert Neville reflected on how the new society regards him as a monster Robert Neville is the protagonist of this novel Richard Matheson wrote a novel called “I am legend” the story is about the last man alive in a future Los angeles. He spends every day repairing his house. 2. Robert Neville died. d. a. Ruth was a _______ from a primitive new society. b. 4. b.

go off. the title in bold. Make students predict what the text is about according to the external text features: the picture. the subtitle. T gives Ss the reading and tell them to skim the text After reading the text. They present their work.UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE CHIAPAS ESCUELA DE LENGUAS TUXTLA SIXTH SEMESTER Lesson Plan by: Hugo Santos Appendix 4 Level: Lower Intermediate Time: 50 Aims: Students will learn about “I am legend” novel from Richard Matheson and the final product of the class will be that they will be familiar with four phrasal verbs: break in. T gives a handout (skim and scan) and then T checks the answers In trios discuss and write in bond paper a different ending for the story. wear off. Finally. 56 . and go for in order to use them. Lesson plan Stage Warm up Time 3’ Procedure T will elicit with this question What would you do if you were the last man on the Earth? And write and idea map on the board. T will ask Ss Who was Ruth? Who was Robert Neville? While stage 8’ 8’ Post-stage 14’ After that. Stick a picture of the movie “I am legend” What do you know about the movie? What do you know about the novel? What is the movie about? T shows 4 phrasal verbs they might not know Pre-listening 4’ 8’ 3’ T gives Ss the reading and tells them not to read yet. the type of the text.

the Wailers reunited and recorded with little success. Now called Bob Marley and the Wailers. and Africa. was canceled when Marley fell down while jogging in New York’s Central Park. and liver cancer. Marley formed the Wailers.. Source: http://www. who had released “Judge Not” in England in 1963 in 1972. Marley left his home in Kingston at age 14. In 1963.S. Marley got on with Chris Blackwell. Marley was a pioneer not only because he brought reggae to the world. In Jamaica the Wailers reached unprecedented levels of popularity and influence. but because his passionate.rollingstone. Scandinavia.Appendix 5 Bob Marley Very popular in their native Jamaica. rebellion. Doctors discovered that he had developed brain. lung. Bob Marley's songs of determination. where Bob Marley grew up and was considered as a national hero. He gave in eight months later.K. socially observant music has become a precedent against which all reggae will forever be measured. the Wailers were also reggae music's most effective international emissaries. Africa. and faith found an audience all over the world. The band broke up in 1966. the Wailers devoted themselves to the religious sect of Rastafari. building especially strong followings in the U. During this period. but upon Marley’s return to Jamaica. Blackwell signed the Wailers to Island Records and advanced them the money to record their music in Jamaica. and the Americas.com/artists/bobmarley 57 . A 1980 tour of the U. The reggae music legend finally came down in 1980. they toured Europe. with the guidance of Jamaican pop veteran Joe Higgs.

Appendix 6 UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE CHIAPAS ESCUELA DE LENGUAS TUXTLA SIXTH SEMESTER Activity designed by: Hugo Santos S.html 58 . Do you like reggae? 2. Have you heard of Bob Marley? 4. What do you think? 9. What do you know of Rastafarianism? 7. What other reggae songs / artists do you know / like? 6. What do you think? 9. Have you heard of Bob Marley? 4. What Bob Marley songs do you know / like? 5.com/0502/06. When did you first hear reggae? 3. What do you know of Rastafarianism? 7. Would you like to go to Bob Marley’s country of birth .Jamaica? 8. When did you first hear reggae? 3. Would you like to have your hair in dreadlocks? Source: http://www. What Bob Marley songs do you know / like? 5.breakingnewsenglish. Do you like reggae? 2. What other reggae songs / artists do you know / like? 6. Rastafarians believe marijuana was given to us by God to be enjoyed. Would you like to have your hair in dreadlocks? ___________________________________________________________ UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE CHIAPAS ESCUELA DE LENGUAS TUXTLA SIXTH SEMESTER Activity designed by: Hugo Santos S. Rastafarians believe marijuana was given to us by God to be enjoyed. DISCUSSION: Discuss the following questions (8 minutes): 1. Would you like to go to Bob Marley’s country of birth .Jamaica? 8. DISCUSSION: Discuss the following questions (8 minutes): 1.bob_marley_birthday.

his name.Appendix 7 UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE CHIAPAS ESCUELA DE LENGUAS TUXTLA SIXTH SEMESTER Lesson Plan by: Hugo Santos Level: Lower Intermediate Time: 50 Aims: Students will learn about “Bob Marley” and his influenced in reggae music the final product of the class will be that they will be familiar with four phrasal verbs: give income down-get on with. Lesson plan Stage Warm up Time 5’ Procedure T will play music from Bob Marley and will ask Ss if they know him. Ej Bobby Martín and the name of the band Appendix 8 “Los guailers”. T will write on the board all the ideas they have and everything they know about him and his songs. In pairs discuss about these questions(Bob Marley pre- Pre-listening 8’ reading) check the answers 5’ While stage 2’ T tells Ss that they have to underline the four phrasal verbs: give in.come down-get on with. write 3 paragraphs.grow up in order to use them. Ss read the text After reading the text. the name of the band.grow up and try to guess the meaning. T will ask Ss Who was Bob Marley? How old was he when he left his home? What is the name of the band Marley formed? What disease provoked Marley’s dead? 4’ Post-stage 15’ mins T asks Ss if they guessed the meaning of the four phrasal verbs and writes the definition of those phrasal verbs on the whiteboard. 8/05/2007 59 8’ 4’ . Ss write “A Mexican Bob Marley” how would be his history.

I could hear people talking inside. when the American guy reappeared with the half-asleep manager. I keep on thinking that it’s just stressful because it’s the first week of class. I checked in by showing him a page I printed from the Internet confirming my reservation. He went to look for the manager and left me in the kitchen talking to a Mexican guy who didn’t believe I spoke Spanish. But there are one or two who are driving me crazy. so when I got off the bus. but it just keeps on getting worse! Then there’s the added stress of working with eight other girls! Don’t get me wrong. but the manager was asleep. I asked if he had change and showed him I had a 20 dollar bill. but it did confirm the price. extending the class into our lunch break instead of just staying behind after class to talk to the instructor. When I got to the hotel. but no one would open the door. it’s really hard! Anyway. He just told me to pay him the next day when I checked out. Appendix 9 UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE CHIAPAS ESCUELA DE LENGUAS TUXTLA 60 . I just kept on ringing the door bell. Anyway. Since I didn’t have anywhere to go. my trip was quite an adventure! I got into Cancun really late at night. They always ask stupid questions. He seemed to have no idea what it was. I get along really well with most of them. I just got a taxi instead of trying to walk.Hi mom! How is everything? Do you and Dab miss me a lot already? I miss you guys a ton! I’m doing Ok. an American guy in his fifties opened the door. He asked me for 50 pesos or 5 dollars. He explained that he had been told not to answer the door. I try to just ignore them. but the CELTA course has been really stressful. Eventually. who insisted on speaking to me in horrible English. but I’m telling you.

Algún comentario o sugerencia de las actividades realizadas en el salón de clases para un futuro? 61 . 1. Piensas que las clases con los textos presentados fueron positivos para la clase de inglés? 3. Cual fue tu reacción a los textos presentados en las clases de Ingles? 2. Consideras que aprendiste nuevo vocabulario durante las clases con los textos presentados? 4. Tu respuesta es confidencial y no afectara tus calificaciones de la materia de inglés. Piensas que el uso de los textos similares a los presentados en las clases influyeron en tu aprendizaje? 5.ENGLISH VI Cuestionario Nombre: _____________________________________________________________________ Instrucciones: Contesta las siguientes preguntas.

Sentiste algo diferente al leer los textos presentados en las clases a diferencia de los textos encontrados en los libros de Inglés? MAS MENOS IGUAL 62 .1. Te sentiste más cómodo hablando inglés cuando se discutían los textos más que en otras actividades en el salón de clases? YES NO 4. Piensas que los textos te ayudaron a aprender algo? YES NO 3. Disfrutaste los textos presentados en clases mas que los textos presentados en los libros de Inglés? MAS MENOS IGUAL 2.

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