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Paul Ryan - Trade

Paul Ryan - Trade

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TRADE

Border Regulations
Ryan Voted to Eliminate Two-Year Grace Period During Which Mexican Trucks Entering the U.S. Are Not Subject to Most U.S. Safety Regulations. In September 2004, Ryan voted for the FY 2005 Transportation and Treasury Appropriations budget. One measure in the budget eliminated “a two-year grace period during which Mexican trucks entering the United States are not subject to most U.S. safety regulations,” according to the Washington Post. The vote succeeded, 39712. [Roll Call 465, H 5025, 09/22/2004; Washington Post, 9/23/04]

Foreign Investment
Ryan Voted for Establishing the Committee on Foreign Investment. On July 11, 2007, Ryan voted for a motion to suspend the rules and agree to the Senate amendment to the bill that would establish the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States in statute, with the Treasury secretary as chairman. According to the Bangor Daily News, the “bill that reforms the review of potential foreign investments in the U.S., such as last year’s proposed takeover of several large port operations by a company owned by a foreign country. The bill requires reports to Congress, allows for a review by the director of intelligence and requires presidential review of all projects subject to extended review.” [Roll Call 614, H 556, 07/11/2007; Bangor Daily News 07/16/2007]

Fast Track
Ryan Supported Fast Track in 2001. In 2001, Ryan voted in favor of legislation to give President Bush broad authority to negotiate trade deals known as Fast Track. The bill included provisions that would require increased consultations with Congress on any proposed changes of tariffs for imports of sensitive agriculture products and on trade disparities for textile products. The bill passed 215-214 [Roll Call 481, H 3005, 12/06/2001] Ryan Voted To Grant “Fast Track Authority” To Bush Administration For Negotiated Free-Trade Agreements. According to Capital Times, “The House of Representatives passed legislation, by one vote, granting President Bush authority to negotiate trade deals independently of Congress. U.S. Rep. Tammy Baldwin, D-Madison, voted against the bill Thursday, as did all the rest of Wisconsin's Democrats in the House. Baldwin said ‘fast track authority’ is an ‘expedited procedure, wherein Congress is asked to delegate its authority to the president. My constituents have told me they don't want me to give away their voice to the president.’ The bill would require the president to submit to Congress a plan of trading policies before starting negotiations. Congress has 90 legislative days after receiving the final draft to pass or reject it… Rep. Paul Ryan, RJanesville, voted in favor of the bill, as did the other three Republicans who represent Wisconsin districts in the House. Ryan was concerned, a staff aide said, that U.S. negotiators would operate at a disadvantage if they did not have authority to negotiate without interference from Congress.” [Capital Times, 12/7/01]

Free Trade
Capital Times Editorial: Ryan Was A “Consistent Supporter Of The Corporate Free Trade Agenda.” In an editorial, Capital Times wrote: “The consistent supporters of the corporate free trade agenda in the Wisconsin delegation are House Republicans Paul Ryan, Tom Petri, Mark Green and James Sensenbrenner. The consistent supporters of the citizen-driven fair trade agenda are Democrats Russ Feingold, Tammy Baldwin, Gerald Kleczka, Tom Barrett and Dave Obey. In recent years, two Wisconsin representatives have had inconsistent records of swinging between the two camps: House Democrat Ron Kind and Senate Democrat Herb Kohl. In Saturday's vote on granting President Bush fast track authority to negotiate broad freetrade agreements involving countries of the Western Hemisphere, Kind rejected the corporate agenda. He voted ‘no’ on fast track, as did Baldwin, Kleczka, Barrett and Obey. Ryan, Petri, Green and Sensenbrenner were, as usual, wrong.” [Capital Times, 7/31/02]

Tariffs
Ryan Voted for Suspending Tariffs on Components Used by U.S. Companies to Manufacture Made-In-America Products. On July 21, 2010 Ryan voted for the motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill that would temporarily suspend or reduce duties on hundreds of specific imported goods, make several technical corrections to trade laws and streamline current customs laws. According to the Washington Post, the bill would “reduce or suspend tariffs on the import of thousands of components and raw materials used by U.S. companies to manufacture made-in-America products. The bill is designed to boost production and create jobs in industries such as automobiles, agriculture, chemicals, electronics, machine tools, pharmaceuticals and textiles.” [Roll Call 456, H 4380, 07/21/2010; Washington Post 7/25/2010]

Trade Agreements
Asia   South  Korea   Ryan Voted In Favor Of Bipartisan US-South Korea Trade Agreement. On October 12, 2011 Ryan voted in favor of a US-South Korea trade agreement, this ended a 5-year political standoff between Republicans and Democrats standoff on free trade agreements. According to the New York Times, “The approval of the deals with South Korea, Colombia and Panama is a victory for President Obama and proponents of the view that foreign trade can drive America’s economic growth in the face of rising protectionist sentiment in both political parties. They are the first trade agreements to pass Congress since Democrats broke a decade of Republican control in 2007. All three agreements cleared both chambers with overwhelming Republican support just one day after Senate Republicans prevented action on Mr. Obama’s jobs bill.” Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell said, “At long last, we are going to do something important for the country on a bipartisan basis.” [Roll Call 783, H 3080, 10/12/2011]

Singapore   Ryan Supported Trade with Singapore. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of legislation to implement the United StatesSingapore Free Trade Agreement. Opponents claimed the agreement had insufficient safeguards and would cost jobs. The bill passed 272-155 [Roll Call 432, H 2739, 07/24/2003; CQ Weekly, 8/02/03; Washington Post, 7/25/03; States News Service, 7/25/03]

Taiwan   Ryan Voted to Increase U.S.-Taiwan Military Relations. Ryan voted to increase U.S.-Taiwanese military relations. The measure would require the secretary of Defense to establish direct military communication with forces in Taiwan, increase the number of Taiwanese military officials trained at U.S. military academies and require the Pentagon to issue annual reports detailing threats to Taiwan’s security. The measure does not include any authorization for sales of advanced air- and sea-based weapons to Taiwan. [Roll Call 5, H 1838, 02/01/2000]

Vietnam   Ryan Voted For Trade with Vietnam. Ryan voted against the passage of the resolution disapproving of the presidential waiver that allows U.S. trade credits and guarantees for companies that do business with Vietnam. [Roll Call 365, S 58, 08/03/1999]

Ryan Voted For Trade with Vietnam. Ryan voted against the passage of the resolution disapproving of the presidential waiver that allows U.S. trade credits and guarantees for companies that do business with Vietnam. [Roll Call 365, S 58, 08/03/1999]

Central  &  South  America   Ryan Voted to Extend Duty Free Products from Bolivia, Columbia, Ecuador and Peru. In 2007, Ryan voted in favor of legislation extending the duty-free treatment of certain products from Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru until February 2008. The legislation passed 365 – 59 [Roll Call 583, H 1830, 06/27/2007] Ryan Supported Fast Track, Andean Trade Deal. In 2002, Ryan voted in favor of legislation to renew presidential fasttrack trade negotiating authority and provide trade preferences for Andean nations. Under the bill, The Andean Trade Preference Act was extended through 2006, granting duty-free status to about 6,000 products from Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. It also extended the Generalized Systems of Preferences, which offers duty-free entry for selected good from developing countries. It would authorize additional funds for the U.S. Customs Service. It also would include provisions related to certain textile imports from the Caribbean and Africa. The bill passed 215-212. [Roll Call 370, H 3009, 07/27/2002]

Panama   Ryan Voted In Favor Of Bipartisan US-Panama Trade Agreement. On October 12, 2011 Ryan voted for passage of the US-Panama trade agreement, which ended a 5-year political standoff between Republicans and Democrats standoff on free trade agreements. According to the New York Times, “The approval of the deals with South Korea, Colombia and Panama is a victory for President Obama and proponents of the view that foreign trade can drive America’s economic growth in the face of rising protectionist sentiment in both political parties. They are the first trade agreements to pass Congress since Democrats broke a decade of Republican control in 2007. All three agreements cleared both chambers with overwhelming Republican support just one day after Senate Republicans prevented action on Mr. Obama’s jobs bill.” Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell said, “At long last, we are going to do something important for the country on a bipartisan basis.” [Roll Call 782, H 3079, 10/12/2011]

Columbia   Ryan Voted In Favor Of Bipartisan US-Columbia Trade Agreement. On October 12, 2011 Ryan voted in favor of a US-Columbia trade agreement, this ended a 5-year political standoff between Republicans and Democrats standoff on free trade agreements. According to the New York Times, “The approval of the deals with South Korea, Colombia and Panama is a victory for President Obama and proponents of the view that foreign trade can drive America’s economic growth in the face of rising protectionist sentiment in both political parties. They are the first trade agreements to pass Congress since Democrats broke a decade of Republican control in 2007. All three agreements cleared both chambers with overwhelming Republican support just one day after Senate Republicans prevented action on Mr. Obama’s jobs bill.” Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell said, “At long last, we are going to do something important for the country on a bipartisan basis.” [Roll Call 781, H 3078, 10/12/2011] Ryan Voted Against Suspending Fast Track, Delaying Columbia Trade Bill. In 2008, Ryan voted against a resolution that suspended “fast-track” requirements for consideration of HR 5724, which would implement a free trade agreement between the United States and Colombia. Adoption of the resolution (H Res 1092), indefinitely stalled further legislative action in the House on the trade pact’s implementing legislation countering President Bush’s effort to force a speedy vote on a measure opposed by many Democrats. Minority Leader Boehner, called the vote “an effort to kill the Colombia free-trade agreement.” Rep. McGovern, a member of the House Rules Committee, said the resolution was “a direct response to the arrogance of this president,” and Majority Leader Hoyer said passage of the resolution would give Congress “more time to discuss this with the administration.” Most Democrats opposed the trade agreement, saying the Colombian government had not taken sufficient steps to reduce violence against union members. Republicans countered that Colombia had worked hard to crack down on right-wing paramilitary groups blamed for much of the violence. The resolution passed, 224-195. [Roll Call 181, S 1092, 04/10/2008]

CAFTA   Ryan Supported The Central American Free Trade Agreement. According to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, “With a showdown looming in the House over a free-trade pact with Central America, most Republicans from Wisconsin are on the fence and Democrats are united in opposition… As of Tuesday, Republican Paul Ryan of Janesville was alone among House Republicans from the state to signal a yes vote. He lauded the pact as a ‘good deal for Wisconsin workers.’ Ryan said it would level the playing field for business and farmers who export. ‘Right now, most products from Central America enter our country duty-free, but our exports to the region face high trade barriers,’ he said. The pact ‘would correct this inequity, help save American jobs, and improve labor standards in Central America through the strongest labor requirements of any trade agreement to date.’” [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 7/27/05] Ryan Supported CAFTA. In 2005, Ryan voted in favor of a bill approving the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), which would remove most of the trade barriers between the United States and Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. Opponents claimed that CAFTA weakened labor rights protection by undercutting labor standards and enforcement mechanisms. According to a Congressional Budget Office analysis, CAFTA would cost American taxpayers $50 million per year in loan forfeitures by sugar farmers and cost the U.S. $4.4 billion over ten years, primarily in lost tariffs. The bill passed 217-215. [Roll Call 443, H 3045, 07/28/2005; Economic Policy Institute, “NAFTA’s Cautionary Tale,” Issue Brief #214, 7/20/05; Associated Press, 7/21/05] Ryan Said CAFTA Was ‘Strongest Agreement To Date’ For Enforcement Of Labor Law. In a Capital Times editorial Paul Ryan wrote, “What about labor? CAFTA is the strongest agreement to date with respect to the enforcement of labor laws. It will -- and has already begun to -- improve labor standards in these countries, as well as require effective enforcement, including monetary fines.” [Capital Times, 6/16/05] Ryan: CAFTA Would Level The Playing Field For American Workers. In a Capital Times editorial Paul Ryan wrote, “It's no secret that the anti-democracy forces in Central America are fighting CAFTA to stifle fledgling democratic reforms. It would be a shame to walk away from the democracy movement in this region by defeating CAFTA. In short, by leveling the playing field for American workers and producers, we not only remove the current incentive to relocate production in the CAFTA region, we finally achieve equal treatment for our exports, raise labor standards and enforcement, and bolster the democracy movement within the Western Hemisphere. That sounds fair to me.” [Capital Times, 6/16/05] Ryan Said CAFTA Was A ‘No Brainer.’ According to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, “Janesville Republican Paul Ryan, a vocal supporter of liberalized trade, said Wednesday that the pact was a ‘no-brainer for manufacturing and agriculture.’ Ryan said it would remove trade barriers to U.S. goods in those Central American countries without giving goods from those countries any more access to the U.S. market than they already enjoy. Ryan also argued that it would encourage enforcement of labor standards in Central America.” [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 5/8/05] Peru   Ryan Voted for Trade Agreement with Peru. In 2007, Ryan voted for a trade agreement between the United States and Peru. The agreement reduced most tariffs and duties affecting trade between the two countries, increased protections for intellectual property and required Peru to take steps to strengthen its labor and environmental enforcement standards. Under the agreement, 80 percent of U.S. exports of consumer and industrial goods to Peru would enter duty-free immediately. The bill passed 285-132. [Roll Call 1060, H 3688, 11/08/2007; Congressional Quarterly] Chile   Ryan Supported Trade with Chile. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of legislation to implement the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement. The bill passed 270-156. [Roll Call 436, H 2738, 07/24/2003] Ryan Supported Fast Track, Andean Trade Deal. In 2002, Ryan voted in favor of legislation to renew presidential fasttrack trade negotiating authority and provide trade preferences for Andean nations. Under the bill, The Andean Trade Preference Act was extended through 2006, granting duty-free status to about 6,000 products from Bolivia, Colombia,

Ecuador and Peru. It also extended the Generalized Systems of Preferences, which offers duty-free entry for selected good from developing countries. It would authorize additional funds for the U.S. Customs Service. It also would include provisions related to certain textile imports from the Caribbean and Africa. The bill passed 215-212. [Roll Call 370, H 3009, 07/27/2002] Middle  East     Oman   Ryan Supported Free-Trade Pact with Oman. In 2006, Ryan voted in favor of a bill creating a free-trade pact with Oman, a country located on the southeastern end of the Arabian Peninsula. The trade agreement required market liberalization for most U.S. goods and services in Oman, and increase U.S. market access for certain Omani sectors and industries, including textiles. Bilateral trade between the US and Oman was relatively small, about $1 billion, in 2005. The bill passed 221-205. [Roll Call 392, H 5684, 07/20/2006; CQ Today, 7/20/06; Leadership Document, “Oman Trade Deal: Flawed for Workers & US National Security,” 7/20/06]

World Trade Organization
Ryan Voted Against Removing the United States from World Trade Organization. On June 9, 2005, Ryan voted against removing the USA from the World Trade Organization. According to the Washington Post, the joint resolution would “withdraw the United States from the 10-year-old World Trade Organization, which enforces trade agreements among its 148 signatory countries.” [Roll Call 239, S 27, 06/09/2005; Washington Post 06/12/2005]

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