P. 1
Pennington Co. Courant, August 23, 2012

Pennington Co. Courant, August 23, 2012

|Views: 69|Likes:
Published by surfnewmedia

More info:

Published by: surfnewmedia on Aug 22, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/07/2013

pdf

text

original

$1.

00
(tax included)
Number 34
Volume 107
August 23, 2012
Alan Anderson began his formal
duties as the new Wall District
Ranger earlier this summer, but is
already well known because of
completing two previous Acting
Ranger roles in 2009 and earlier
this year.
Anderson said, “I am very much
looking forward to working with
the local community, Grassland
Visitor Center and Wall District
personnel, adjacent public land
managers, and local governments
in helping to manage this amazing
National Grassland resource.
This area is unique in the nation
for its beauty, botanical and
wildlife diversity and multiple sus-
tainable use opportunities and I
feel fortunate to be able to play a
part in helping to manage it.”
Prior to coming to Wall, Alan
spent three years as the Forest En-
gineer for the Nebraska National
Forests and Grassland in
Chadron, Nebraska and nine years
as a supervisory civil engineer for
the Black Hills National Forest.
Prior to his time with the Forest
Service, Alan worked for two years
as road construction inspector
with the South Dakota Depart-
ment of Transportation in Rapid
City and 27 years as a Commis-
sioned Officer for the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin-
istration working in marine engi-
New District Ranger is a
familiar face in a new place
neering and hydrographic survey-
ing. This work put him in, or
through, all of the states of the
United States including their
coastal waters and several Cana-
dian provinces. His last assign-
ment there was as Commanding
Officer of the NOAA Ship
RAINIER, a 231 foot survey ves-
sel, conducting hydrographic sur-
veys in the coastal water of Alaska.
Alan holds a Bachelor of Science
degree in Mechanical Engineering
from the South Dakota School of
Mines and Technology, a Master of
Science degree in Management
from the Naval Postgraduate
By Governor
Dennis Daugaard
In early August, I had an oppor-
tunity to meet with U.S. Secretary
of Defense Leon Panetta. I also
met Assistant Secretary of the Air
Force Terry Yonkers to discuss
Ellsworth Air Force Base and its
importance to our nation. Our dis-
cussion took place at a meeting of
the Association of Defense Com-
munities, where I accepted an
award on behalf of the Ellsworth
Development Authority.
Since 2009, when the state Leg-
islature established the Ellsworth
Development Authority, it has
been working hard to support
Ellsworth Air Force Base. In just
three years, the Authority has re-
duced encroachments around the
Investing in Ellsworth
base, used excess Air Force land to
develop a commercial retail area,
and donated 20 acres to the Dou-
glas School District.
In addition, this fall the Author-
ity will begin construction of a re-
gional wastewater treatment plant
to serve both Ellsworth and the
city of Box Elder. The combined
plant will save the Air Force an es-
timated $8 million. These joint ef-
forts are crucial to the long-term
viability of this important military
installation.
As we face the possibility of cuts
to the Department of Defense
budget and the potential for an-
other round of Base Realignment
and Closure, the Ellsworth Devel-
opment Authority will continue to
invest in and around Ellsworth.
by Laurie Hindman
Wall School Board held their Au-
gust meeting on Tuesday, August
14, at 8:00 p.m at the school library.
The agenda was approved for the
meeting.
Consent agenda was approved
for:
•Minutes of July 12, board meet-
ing.
•August claims.
•Approved addendum for Kent
Anderson to add Activities/Athletic
Director to his contract and to
move to lane B+25 Step 16 due to
completion of one credit.
•Approved addendum for Dave
Ermish to be removed as Activi-
ties/Athletic Director from his con-
tract and to add assistant middle
school boys basketball to his con-
tract.
•Approved resignation request
from Jackie Roseth, WASP assis-
tant, with regret.
•Approved new custodian Lon-
nie Jensen.
•Approved lane change for
Rachel McConaghy to M+30.
Superintendent/Secondary Prin-
cipal Dennis Rieckman handed out
the state report card. Elementary
Principal Chuck Sykora explained
the report card to the board. He
said, “All three levels of the Wall
School scored above the state aver-
age and exceeded the goal in every
category.” Rieckman noted the stu-
dents did very, very well.
Business Manager Niki Mohr in-
formed the board she had received
a call from an individual who
wanted to rent one of the school ve-
hicles for a personal activity. Rieck-
man said, “The school has rented
the bus to Badlands National Park
to tour their dignitaries around the
park and would like the discretion
to rent it to the park.” The board
agreed that he could continue to do
so and school vehicles will not be
rented to private individuals.
Sykora reported he is working on
the crisis plan and is waiting to
hear back from New Underwood
School in Monterey, California and
has completed the Executive Sem-
inar for Natural Resource Manage-
ment at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
When working for the Black Hills
National Forest, he was a member
of the Whispering Pines Volunteer
Fire Department near Rapid City,
and served as Fire Chief during
his final two years.
Alan and his wife Susan reside
in Rapid City. They were raised in
Sturgis and Mobridge, South
Dakota respectively. Their two
grown children, also engineers, are
working and residing in Denver,
Colorado.
and Kadoka to complete the plan.
Mohr reported the 2012 audit is
under way and should be com-
pleted by the end of the week.
Aimee Paulsen is back to work
full-time. Mohr asked the board to
approve the Special Pay Plan for
teachers which would allow them
to decide how they want to be paid
after they retire. A motion was
made and approved for the Special
Pay Plan. Mohr has received a
$6,000 bill from the county for the
pass election that was held. She
related the 2008, election cost the
school district $1,500. She will
write a letter to the county to see
if the amount can be changed. The
board agreed to not combine elec-
tions in the future.
The board approved home school
applications 19.2 and 19.3. They
also approved an open enrollment
application.
Third reading for Educating
Homeless Children policy was ap-
proved.
Rieckman passed out cross coun-
try rules and Coach Karol Patter-
son passed out the cross country
schedule. Patterson went over the
schedule with the board members.
She has three meets which won’t
interfere with school and would
like to add Spearfish to that list.
Patterson went on to say that
there are four meets during school
days but they are later in the day.
Board member Mary Williams has
an issue with the number of meets
during school time. She said,
“Meets could be hosted on a Friday
or Saturday and would like the
athletic director to look at the
cross country and track schedule.”
She noted, it is our obligation to be
conservative and let’s see if we can
squeeze down the number of meets
so we don’t have to hire a subsi-
tute. She went on to say the best
person to have in the classroom is
the teacher. Rieckman will have
the athletic director look into this
issue. The board approved the
2012 - 2013 cross country rules.
A consensus was given by the
board to allow gymnastics practice
to be held in the Wall Community
Center Grand Hall. The gymnastic
team will pay for the rent and will
be responsible for any cleanup at
the community center.
Rieckman gave an update on the
Big White School. They are wait-
ing for siding and an air condi-
tioner has been installed in the
school. New carpet has been in-
stalled in the Wall School entry
way.
Volunteer coach requirements
requires all coaches to take exams
if they participating in coaching. A
motion was made and approved to
have volunteer coaches pay for
their own classes and the school
will pay for their background
check after they have been cleared.
Rieckman added who decides who
can volunteer to coach should be
left up to the head football coach.
It’s their decision who they want
on the sideline. Board member
Todd Trask agreed and said, “The
head coach should be in charge
from the top to the bottom of the
program.” He noted, we are hard
pressed to get volunteers. A motion
was approved for the list of volun-
teer coaches.
Head Football Coach Kent An-
derson requested a cell phone to
use as athletic director. Board ap-
proved his request.
Rieckman informed the board
the projected enrollment for high
school students is 80 students. He
would like to eliminate the pop
machines at the school and power-
house. They sell out of juice and
water while the pop machine is
rarely used. They will move the
pop machine into the teachers
lounge.
A motion to enter into executive
session for the purpose of dis-
cussing personnel, according to
SDCL 1-25-2 was approved.
With no motions being made
after executive session the meeting
was adjourned.
School board reviews state
report card; staff changes
South Dakota has been a strong
partner with the U.S. Air Force for
70 years, and we are working hard
to ensure that we maintain that
partnership for years to come.
The Association of Defense Com-
munities (ADC) awarded
Ellsworth “Defense Community of
the Year” at its recent annual
meeting.
The ADC consists of 200 commu-
nities, states, and organizations
with a significant military pres-
ence. For the Ellsworth Develop-
ment Authority to receive the
ADC’s top honor is a strong en-
dorsement of South Dakota’s ef-
forts to make Ellsworth the best
possible home for the Air Force
and the brave men and women
who defend our nation.
Wall School District purchases new bus
Wall School District 51-5 purchased a new school bus for the students to be transported to their
different events through out the school year. The old school bus was sold to a school district in
the eastern part of the state. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
The 2012 Report Card, which
details student progress on South
Dakota’s state assessment, is now
available online.
There was a slight uptick in
reading and math scores on this
year’s assessment, with 75.5 per-
cent of students scoring either pro-
ficient or advanced in reading.
That was up about one-tenth of a
State Report Card now available
percentage point from last year.
The percent of students scoring
proficient or advanced in math
went from 76.5 percent a year ago
to 76.7 percent this year.
The Dakota STEP and Dakota
STEP-A were administered to
about 62,000 students in grades 3-
8 and 11 last spring. The Dakota
STEP-A is an alternate version of
the assessment for students who
have a significant cognitive dis-
ability.
South Dakota’s statewide grad-
uation rate was 83.16 percent,
down only slightly from 83.39 per-
cent last year. The graduation rate
was calculated using the federally
mandated four-year cohort model.
“This year marks a transition as
we move forward with a new ac-
countability system for South
Dakota,” said state Secretary of
Education Dr. Melody Schopp. “Be-
ginning with the 2012-13 school
year, we will be looking at school
performance in broader, more ho-
listic terms, using multiple indica-
tors to assess a school’s perform-
ance.”
The multiple indicators will still
include student achievement on
state assessments, but that meas-
ure will be balanced with other fac-
tors, according to Schopp. In the
long-term, schools will be evalu-
ated using indicators such as aca-
demic growth of students, teacher
and principal effectiveness, school
climate, and college and career
readiness at the high school level.
The 2012 Report Card, including
district- and school-level results, is
available on the Department of
Education’s web site at www.doe.
sd.gov. Follow the “Report Card”
link under “Quick Links” on the
left-hand side of the page.
On Thursday morning, August
16, 2012, the Pennington County
Dispatch Center received a report
that two hikers had fallen up to
200 feet from Sheep Mountain
Table in the South Unit of the Bad-
lands National Park.
Badlands Search and Rescue,
Pennington County Search and
Rescue, Rapid City Fire Depart-
ment and Oglala Sioux Parks and
Recreation Authority were dis-
patched and responded to the area.
Pennington County high angle res-
cue team and an Air National
Interagency effort results
in successful rescue
Guard helicopter were on standby.
Responding units discovered two
hikers stranded below the edge of
the table. Jake Williams, 24, from
Plano, Texas, and a 16 year-old
male were traveling with the
Grace Chinese Baptist Church.
The group leader had hiked this
area of the park and was familiar
with the terrain. The two men ap-
peared to have lost their footing
and slid into an area where there
was no safe means up or down the
table’s sidewall. Rescuers set up a
line to secure the hikers, and Pen-
nington County used a raising and
lowering system to successfully lift
the hikers to the top of the table.
There were no injuries.
Incident Commander and Bad-
lands Cedar Pass District Ranger,
Eric Yount stated “This was a very
successful rescue operation involv-
ing many of our Badlands part-
ners. The safety of our visitors and
rescuers is always paramount, and
this operation showcased a terrific
team effort.”
Governor Dennis Daugaard has
appointed four new members to
the South Dakota Board of
Tourism: Ivan Sorbel of Kyle,
Kristi Wagner of Whitewood, Mark
Schilling of Mitchell and Ted Hus-
tead of Wall.
Sorbel is Executive Director of
the Pine Ridge Area Chamber of
Commerce; Wagner is owner of the
Rushmore Center for Civic Leader-
ship; Schilling is Director of the
Corn Palace; Hustead is President
of Wall Drug.
“These are all quality individu-
als who have great passion for the
visitor industry,” the Governor
said. “I’m pleased that they’ve
agreed to serve in this capacity.”
Governor Daugaard has reap-
pointed Frank Smith of Gettys-
burg, James Entenman of Sioux
Falls, and Jim Schade of Volga to
the Board of Tourism.
Hustead new
member of
tourism board
Area News
Pennington
County Courant
Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman


Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Inte-
rior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-of-
State: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-
nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Pub-
lications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.
Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net

Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publica-
tions, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way re-
produced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.
South Dakota Newspaper Association
U.S.P.S 425-720
Pennington County Courant • August 23, 2012 • Page 2
Ravellette Publications is happy to receive letters concerning comments
on any news story or personal feeling on any subject. We do reserve the
right to edit any offensive material and also to edit to fill the allotted space.
Our deadline for insertion in the Thursday issue is the preceding
Monday at 4:30 p.m. We do have the right to reject any or all letters to the
Editor.
Letters intended for more than one Ravellette Publications newspaper
should be mailed or hand delivered to each individual newspaper office.
All letters must bear the original signature, address and telephone number
of the author.
POLITICAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: No political letters are to run
the two weeks prior to an election.
The "Letters¨ column is intended to offer readers the opportunity to
express their opinions. Ìt is not meant to replace advertising as a means
of reaching people.
This publication's goal is to protect the first amendment guarantee of
free speech. Your comments are welcomed and encouraged.
The Pioneer Review Pennington Co. Courant
P.O. Box 788 P.O. Box 435
Philip, SD 57567-0788 Wall, SD 57790-0435
605-859-2516 605-279-2565
The Kadoka Press The Faith Ìndependent
P.O. Box 309 P.O. Box 38
Kadoka, SD 57543-0309 Faith, SD 57626-0038
605-837-2259 605-967-2161
The Bison Courier The Murdo Coyote
P.O. Box 429 P.O. Box 465
Bison, SD 57620-0429 Murdo, SD 57559-0465
605-244-7199 605-669-2271
New Underwood Post
P.O. Box 426 · New Underwood, SD 57761-0426
605-754-6466
Bavellette Publ¡cat¡oas, Iac.
Letters Pol¡cy
1cuu:uqrcu Ccuur¸ Sícr:jj' s 1cjarr¤cur
PennIngton County's Most Wunted
lElONY AlERT
ÐAVIÐ ÐAKOTA BAIÐ
£AGI£
A IoIony Arrosf Wnrrnnf hns
boon Issuod for ÐnvId Ðnkofn
InId IngIo chnrgIng hIm wIfh
InIIuro fo !ogIsfor ns n Sox Of-
fondor.
InId IngIo Is nn IndInn mnIo,
54 yonrs of ngo, nµµroxImnfoIy
5`8¨ fnII, l84 µounds, bInck hnIr
wIfh brown oyos.
InId IngIo Is boIIovod fo bo In
or nround fho !nµId CIfy or
Howos, SÐ Arons.
If you obsorvo fhIs subjocf or
hnvo nny knowIodgo of hIs whoro-
nboufs, µIonso do nof nµµronch.
IIonso confncf fho IonnIngfon
Counfy ShorIff `s OffIco nf 605-
394-6ll?, fho !nµId CIfy IoIIco
Ðoµnrfmonf nf 605-394-4l3l or
fho nonrosf Inw onforcomonf
ngoncy If you hnvo nny Informn-
fIon whIch wouId rosuIf In fho nr-
rosf of fhIs IndIvIdunI.
Subscription Rates: Local: $35 plus tax:
Out-of-Area: $42 plus tax: Out-of-State: $42
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
Call us for your printing needs! 859-2516
Social Security News
By Kathy Petersen
Social Security
Public Affairs Specialist
August 26 is known as Women’s
Equality Day. On that date in
1920, the 19th Amendment to the
U.S. Constitution was signed, giv-
ing women the right to vote.
Social Security treats men and
women equally. Men and women
with identical earnings histories
are treated exactly the same.
However, there are things women
in particular should know about
Social Security. Although treated
equally by Social Security, there
are trends and differences in
lifestyle that can affect benefits.
For example, women tend to
care for many people: spouses,
children, and parents. Taking
time away from the workplace to
care for a newborn child or aging
parent can have an impact on
your future Social Security bene-
fits.
Also, despite significant strides
through the years, women are
more likely to earn less over a life-
time than men. Women are less
often covered by private retire-
ment plans, and they are more de-
pendent on Social Security in
their retirement years.
And, women tend to live about
five years longer than men, which
means more years depending on
Social Security and other retire-
ment income or savings.
If a woman is married to a man
who earns significantly more than
she does, it is likely she will qual-
ify for a larger benefit amount on
his record than on her own.
Want to learn more? Visit our
Women’s page at www.socialsecu-
rity.gov/women. Follow the link on
that page to our publication,
What Every Woman Should
Know. You can read it online,
print a copy, or listen to it on
audio. We provide alternate
media as well to reach as many
women as possible and to provide
the information the way you’d like
to receive it.
Learning about your future So-
cial Security benefits and how
men and women are treated just
the same in the eyes of Social Se-
curity: what better way to cele-
brate Women’s Equality Day?
Kathy Petersen is a public af-
fairs specialist for Social Security,
Denver Region. You can write her
c/o Social Security Administra-
tion, 605 Main, Suite 201, Rapid
City, SD, 57701 or via e-mail at
kathy. petersen@ssa.gov.
Social Security and Women
The state Department of Rev-
enue, Division of Motor Vehicles, is
seeking locations throughout
South Dakota to place motor vehi-
cle registration self-service termi-
nals (SSTs).
Currently, four self-service ter-
minals are available in South
Dakota. The first terminal was in-
stalled in the Public Safety Build-
ing in Pennington County in De-
cember 2010. Two terminals were
placed in Sioux Falls in 2011; lo-
cated at the Get-N-Go, located on
Arrowhead Parkway and Dawley
Farms, and the Hy-Vee Food Store,
located on 49th and Louise. An ad-
ditional terminal is available dur-
ing working hours at the Depart-
ment of Revenue Pierre Office at
445 East Capitol Avenue.
Department seeks sites to place motor
vehicle registration self-service terminals
The 24-hour SST is a fully auto-
mated motor vehicle registration
renewal station and dispenses li-
cense plate renewal tags on the
spot. A vehicle owner can navigate
through the easy touch screen
(voice assistance available) with a
valid South Dakota driver’s li-
cense; South Dakota identification
card; or if a company, the informa-
tion provided on its renewal notice.
Once the payment has been sub-
mitted and the transaction is com-
plete, the license renewal tags and
vehicle registration are dispensed
directly from the machine.
The SST allows vehicle owners
to register up to 90 days prior and
30 days after the expiration of
their current license tags. A $2
convenience fee per vehicle is as-
sessed. Vehicle owners from any
county can use the terminal with
the proper identification. Accept-
able forms of payment include
electronic check, credit cards (Mas-
terCard or Discover only), or
ATM/debit cards supported by
Pulse, Star, NYCE and Accel.
"The terminals placed in Rapid
City and Sioux Falls have been
very successful,” said Division of
Motor Vehicles Director Deb
Hillmer. “We want to offer the con-
venience of self-service terminals
throughout the state.”
The request-for-site proposal
outlines specific criteria a location
must meet to be considered an eli-
gible site. The criteria include 24/7
accessibility, an indoor or secure
vestibule with sufficient heating
and cooling, as well as providing
other equipment and electrical
needs.
The full request-for-site proposal
with detailed information and a
complete criteria list may be re-
viewed on the Division of Motor
Vehicles website accessible at
http://dor.sd.gov/
Prospective SST location
providers may make inquiries to
Division of Motor Vehicles Director
Deb Hillmer by phone at 605-773-
5747, by fax to 605-773-2549, or by
email at debra.hillmer@state.sd.us
with the subject line “RFP for SST
Site Proposal.”
Proposals must be submitted to
the Division of Motor Vehicles by
5:00 p.m. (CDT) on Friday, Sep-
tember 14, 2012.
By Walt Bones
South Dakota
Secretary of Agriculture
As I was growing up in south-
eastern South Dakota, prairie and
forest fires were not a concern.
Every once in a while, a trash fire
might get away from us or maybe
a bearing would go out on the baler
and a red-hot ball bearing would
start some grass on fire, but a cou-
ple of us with scoop shovels could
Appreciating our Wildland Fire Units
Make sure your reading counts!
The Summer Reading Program,
which began June 1st, is now
drawing to a close. Lots of people
have already won nifty prizes.
The program ends Friday Au-
gust 31st, so bring your bingo
cards to the library and get your
take care of the situation.
But in the last year and a half, I
have come to really appreciate the
tireless dedication of the men and
women that make up our Wildland
Fire Division based in the Black
Hills. As one of the seven divisions
of the South Dakota Department
of Agriculture, they cooperate with
local volunteer fire departments,
independent contractors, and the
U.S. Forest Service fire crews to
protect the lives and property of
our State’s citizens.
When the situation gets real se-
rious, they morph into one of the
33 National Type II Incident com-
mand teams with not only local,
but also, regional responsibilities.
In the past few months, they have
answered calls to Wyoming (twice)
and Colorado to help battle fires.
Their most recent assignment
was on the Rosebud Indian Reser-
vation where they coordinated 600
personnel with ground and aerial
resources to battle a fire that
burned over 43,000 acres with no
structures lost...an amazing ac-
complishment!
Last year’s tragic loss of one of
our own, and recently, the four air-
men from a crash of the North
Carolina Air National Guard C-
130 helping us fight one of our
fires, underscores the danger and
risk inherent of firefighting, re-
gardless of the location.
When our crews are not fighting
fires, they are mitigating the dan-
gers of wildland fire by thinning
and removing fuels, going to train-
ing and conducting numerous
training exercises for the volunteer
fire departments all across South
Dakota.
As of August 1, there have been
1,469 fires reported here in South
Dakota, burning over 226,000
acres, making this one of the most
active fire seasons on record. An
average year burns about 52,000
acres.
I don’t take fires for granted
anymore and with our dry weather
persisting, we are not out of the
“fire season” yet. So, the next time
you see your local public safety of-
ficials, thank them for putting
their lives on the line for you, your
family and your property.
Summer reading program at Wall
Community Library ends August 31
prizes before it is too late! Don't
forget, each bingo will get you a
cool prize and blackout will get you
a free book!
If you’ve got a beef brisket BBQ
recipe that brings raves from
friends and family, plan now to
enter the 2012 South Dakota State
Fair BBQ Beef Cook-Off. Or, if
you’re just interested in trying a
variety of barbecues, come and be
part of the public free tasting dur-
ing the event.
The contest, which includes cash
prizes and a People’s Choice
award, is Friday, August 31, at the
Horticulture Park on the South
Dakota State Fairgrounds in
Huron. Judging of entrees, includ-
ing People’s Choice, begins at 4
p.m. Prizes for the top three en-
It’s BBQ Beef cook-off
time at the fair!
trees range from $125 to $500 in
cash, plus $50 for the winner of the
People’s Choice Award. All winners
also receive a trophy.
The South Dakota Beef Industry
Council (SDBIC) is providing the
beef brisket for contestants. Appli-
cations to enter the BBQ Beef
Cook-off must be received on or be-
fore Friday, August 24, at the SD
State Fair Office. Applications are
available on the Events (Friday,
August 31) page at www.sdstate-
fair.com. Contact the fairgrounds
office at 605-353-7340 for more in-
formation.
Catfish record broken. One of the
longest standing state fish record
in South Dakota, a blue catfish
caught by Edward Elliot in 1959,
is a thing of the past.
On July 21, Steve Lemmon from
Elk Point grabbed his own place in
the record books by landing a 99
pound, four ounce blue catfish
from the Big Sioux River, edging
out the previous record by two
pounds, four ounces. With the aid
of only a rod, reel and a creek chub
for bait, Lemmon managed to
wrangle in the trophy fish from his
fishing hole in Union County.
His fish stacks up well with
those from nearby states. The Ne-
The South Dakota Brand Board
announces an increase in the
brand inspection fee to 90 cents
per head, effective September 1,
2012.
The brand inspection fee has
been 80 cents since 2007.
Higher costs of the inspection
program necessitated the larger
fee that is charged for required
ownership inspections of cattle,
horses and mules before their sale,
slaughter or removal from the
Livestock Ownership Inspection
Area west of the Missouri River.
State Brand Board Director
Larry Stearns also reminds ranch-
ers that, as of July 1, leaving the
Catch of a lifetime
braska state record blue catfish
weighed in at 100 pounds, eight
ounces, while neighboring Iowa
currently boasts a state record
blue catfish of 101 pounds.
Kansas, a state known for having
some large catfish, has a slightly
smaller state-record blue cat
weighing it at 94 pounds even.
State fishing records for South
Dakota can be viewed at
ht t p : / / g f p . s d . g o v / f i s hi ng -
boat i ng/ s t at e- f i s h- r ec or ds -
list.aspx. If you believe you have
caught a qualifying fish, the state
record fish application and guide-
lines can be found at the same
website.
Brand Board to increase
brand inspection fee
ownership inspection area without
inspection is a Class 1 misde-
meanor with a maximum penalty
of $2,000 and one year in jail.
Because the drought has
prompted earlier fall cattle sales,
Stearns says producers needing
local inspections should contact
their brand inspector as early as
possible before shipping day to
avoid delays.
For more information on the in-
spection fee or to contact an in-
spector, call the South Dakota
State Brand Board at 877-574-
0054 or visit www.sdbrandboard.
com.
Motorcycle rally law statistics
The final law enforcement sta-
tistics are in concerning the week
of the annual Sturgis Motorcycle
Rally.
Figures are compiled by the
South Dakota Highway Patrol
from four main districts, Sturgis,
Rapid City, Southern Hills and the
Badlands. The figures include up
to 6:00 a.m., Sunday, August 12.
Totals 2012 2011
DUI arrests 251 235
Drug arrests
Misdemeanor 185 149
Felony 34 43
Other felonies 2 9
Citations 1,189 1,267
Warnings 4,196 4,234
Vehicles seized 7 5
Cash seized $9,368 $1,853
Concealed weapons arrests
0 6
Accidents
Non injury 50 42
Injury 50 80
Fatal 8 4
Total fatalities 9 4
Area News
Pennington County Courant • August 23, 2012• Page 3
August 24-25-26-27:
Total Recall
(PG-13)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
August 31, September 1-2-3:
Diary of a Wimpy Kid:
Dog Days (PG)
ALL types!

Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
priate intensive treatment, aimed
at cure and not comfort, which
drags them through inordinate
suffering, and does not change the
inevitable. In all of this, some-
times people have a piece-meal,
gradual, dwindling end. We need
to do better in understanding and
accepting when it is time to quit.
Also, we all need to realize that
if we want to make it to 90, espe-
cially with the mobility we would
like up to that point, we should
take care of our bodies when we’re
young.
Like the “Wonderful One-Hoss
Shay” may you not die prema-
turely, and then one day, all fall
apart at one time.
Dr. Rick Holm wrote this Prairie
Doc Perspective for “On Call®,” a
weekly program where medical
professionals discuss health con-
cerns for the general public. “On
Call®” is produced by the Healing
Words Foundation in association
with the South Dakota State Uni-
versity Journalism Department.
“On Call®” airs Thursdays on
South Dakota Public Broadcast-
ing-Television at 7 p.m. Central, 6
p.m. Mountain. Visit us at OnCall-
Television.com.
The Prairie Doc Perspective
By Richard P. Holm MD
Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote a
poem “The Wonderful One-Hoss
Shay” that tells us about a magnif-
icent horse drawn carriage, con-
structed with all the finest of ma-
terials. The shay was so well made
that, for 100 years, not a piece of
it wore out until one day, it all fell
apart at one time, leaving the
rider sitting in a pile of dust.
What if we could all live full
healthy lives, with nothing wear-
ing out before the other, all sys-
tems go, until one day, around 90
years of age, suddenly everything
would wear out at the same time?
Actually, this is pretty close to
what often happens. If not dying
prematurely from accident, heart
attack, or cancer, most people live
to about 80 to 90, (in this part of
the country sometimes they live to
100). And then one day they come
into the hospital with pneumonia,
the heart fails, they have a stroke,
the kidneys quit, and then they
die. It all falls apart at one time.
There are important lessons
here. Many of these very old and
dying people receive in the end of
their lives fruitless and inappro-
Healthy Aging
The legend was that any human
who approached would be killed.
That legend was apparently
enough to make Captains Meri-
wether Lewis and William Clark
want to find out if it was true.
The captains, accompanied by a
contingent of nearly four dozen
men, had set off on May 14, 1804,
from Camp Dubois near St. Louis,
Mo., on their journey to the Pacific
coast and back.
As they traveled up the Missouri
River, the captains heard about a
Lewis and Clark: Investigators
cone-shaped hill about eight miles
north of what is now Vermillion.
Called Paha Wakan by the
Lakota, the American Indian
tribes in the area believed the hill
to be the home of sprits or devils.
The devils were reported to be 18-
inches high, human in form, but
with large heads and armed with
sharp arrows that could kill all
persons who attempted to ap-
proach the hill. The tribes in the
area would not go near the place.
Accompanied by 10 or 11 men
and Lewis’ Newfoundland dog,
Seaman, Lewis and Clark set out
on August 25, 1804, to hike to the
top of the hill. They lived to ex-
plore another day, as they found no
devils. What they did find was
what Clark described in his jour-
nals as a most beautiful landscape,
with numerous herds of buffalo
feeding in various directions and
the plain extending without inter-
ruption as far as eye could see.
Spirit Mound, as the hill is now
called, has been restored to native
prairie. It is one of the most signif-
icant stops on the Lewis and Clark
National Historic Trail because it
is one of the few places where his-
torians know that the explorers ac-
tually stood there.
As the expedition journeyed fur-
ther up the Missouri River, an
Arikara legend captured Clark’s
imagination. The legend was that
a man and a woman were in love,
but the girl’s parents would not let
them marry. The pair and their
dog wandered off to mourn.
All turned to stone gradually, be-
ginning at their feet. They fed on
grapes, and the woman has a
bunch of grapes yet in her hand,
Clark wrote in his journal on Octo-
ber 13, 1804.
The Arikara pay great reverence
to the stones, Clark wrote. He paid
reverence to them by naming a
creek Stone Idol Creek in their
honor.
The stones can be found on the
northeast corner of West Pollock
Resort near Pollock.
This moment in South Dakota
history is provided by the South
Dakota Historical Society Founda-
tion, the nonprofit fundraising
partner of the South Dakota State
Historical Society. The South
Dakota Cultural Heritage Center
in Pierre is an official site on the
Lewis and Clark National Historic
Trail. Find the Foundation on the
web at www.sdhsf.org.
Spirit Mound. ~Photo courtesy
of South Dakota Department of
Tourism
Stone Idols. ~Photo courtesy
of South Dakota State Historical
Society
David Koupal, a former rancher
of registered Angus cattle near
Dante, S.D., is looking for produc-
ers in western South Dakota to
join the program currently serving
about 130 farm operations mostly
East River.
The goal of the program, oper-
ated through the Mitchell Techni-
cal Institute, is to help ranchers
and farmers enhance their man-
agement skills and develop prof-
itable business models for their in-
dividual operations. Instructors
meet with producers at their farms
or ranches.
Koupal will be working out of his
new home/office in Hot Springs,
S.D., in the Black Hills.
He's been speaking at meetings
and talking with producers in the
past few weeks to find clients who
would like to enter the program.
There's been a lot of great inter-
est. I don't see any problems with
getting a lot of clients, Koupal,
who was a participant in the pro-
gram for 12 years, said.
Before when the center only had
the office in Mitchell, ranchers out
west thought it was too far away.
However, Koupal said he will be
readily available with his office in
the Hills and will be making trips
across the West River area from
Lemmon on the North Dakota bor-
der to Martin near the Nebraska
border to meet one-on-one with
producers.
I'm really excited about being
out west, he said. Nowadays
ranching is a business. You have to
make the right management deci-
sions. We offer information, but
leave it to the producers to make
the decision on what they want to
do.
Koupal said banks and the Farm
Credit Services of America are re-
ally seeing the benefit from the
program.
We look at the books, costs and
try to keep producers on task with
managing skills, he said.
At the end of the year, the in-
structors do an analysis on the op-
eration where they look at such
things as debt ratio, loan capabil-
ity and net worth.
Then when the producer has to
to go the bank, they can bring in
the forms we've worked on and say
this is what I'm doing. It makes it
a lot easier to get operating and
long-term loans, he said.
MTI President Greg Von Wold
said the program is the hidden
gem of agriculture management in
the state.
The average net cash income of
participants in the program is 35
percent higher and net cash in-
come per acre is three percent
higher than that of those South
Dakota producers not participat-
ing in the program, according to
the USDA/NASS Census, Von
Wold said.
He said the expansion to West
River is a great asset for the entire
state.
Will Walter, another instructor
in the program who works in east-
South Dakota's Center for Farm/Ranch Management
is expanding its program to West River
ern South Dakota and farms near
Fedora, said there were 100 farms
in the program last year and it has
grown to 130 this year. With the
addition of Koupal in the west and
adding more producers in other
parts of the state, the goal is to
reach about 180 to 200 farms in
the next few years.
Walter said they would also like
to add an instructor in the Pierre
area eventually to serve producers
along the Missouri River.
Walter, who covers the Madison,
Huron, Brookings and Watertown
areas, works out of the Mitchell of-
fice with two other instructors.
Chris Downs serves the south cen-
tral region of South Dakota, while
longtime instructor Roger DeR-
ouchey works with producers in
the southeastern part of the state.
Another instructor, Dawn Me-
likant, covers northeast South
Dakota and works out of Aberdeen.
The maximum enrollment per
instructor is 45 producers. This al-
lows instructors sample time to
work with producers on an individ-
ual level on a continuous basis.
Walter was also a participant in
the program for 12 years before be-
coming an instructor in September
of last year.
I enjoy helping people, he said. I
know things can get frustrating,
but I like to see people grow in
their operations and develop the
skills needed to satisfy lenders.
Koupal will work with young
producers who have no experience
in accounting or some other finan-
cial management skills and need
the Level One training to meet
Farm Service Agency (FSA) re-
quirements.
He will also work in the Level
Two phase of the course, which is
ongoing where instructors meet
with the producers, all on a confi-
dential basis, to work more in-
depth on financial, marketing and
other management skills.
The program is sponsored in
part by FCS, South Dakota Pork
Producers Council, South Dakota
Wheat Commission, South Dakota
Soybean Research and Promotion
Council, South Dakota Corn Uti-
lization Council and North Central
Farmers Elevator.
Most recently, the program has
been collaborating with SDSU Ex-
tension to bring more financial and
marketing stability to the West
River area.
Producers interested in the pro-
gram in the West River can contact
Koupal on his cellphone at 605-
299-6163 or school number at 605-
995-7193. His email address is
david.koupal@mitchelltech.edu.
Others interested in the pro-
gram can call call 1-800-684-1969
at the Mitchell institute.
80 l0lßkl߶ 8000l 8l8fll߶ 8 80080fl¢ll0ß
l0f ¶00f 00ll0¶0 8l000ßl l0l8 l8llII
¯ ¸ ¸
¸' ¸¸ ,
It's AImost Back-to-CoIIege TIme .
Are you ready Ior anotber semester oI bard work and Iun?
Use tbese beIpIuI tIps to make tbe most oI tbe comIng scbooI year, wbetber It's your IIrst or Iast!
· Don'i scIcdulc classcs lacl-io-lacl. You won'i lc rusIcd, and you'll Iavc iinc aficr class io siudy.
· Cci involvcd! If you didn'i lasi ycar, ¡lay a s¡ori, join a clul, or siari onc of your own.
· Havc fun! A lalancc lciwccn worl and ¡lay is iIc lcy io a good ycar.
· Talc lrcals wIilc siudying ÷ 10 ninuics for cvcry Iour is sufficicni. Also, siudy in iIc dayiinc as nucI as ¡ossillc.
· Malc and siicl wiiI a livallc ludgci. Don'i forgci io facior in liiilc iIings lilc CDs and Iaircuis.
· Crcaic o¡cn connunicaiion wiiI your roonnaic(s} carly on. Cci io lnow cacI oiIcr's ¡crsonal valucs, Ialiis and
cסcciaiions.
I|t ï|aattt Ktv|tw
Box ?SS - PbIIIp - (60S) SS9-2S16
I|t ïtaa|açtaa |a. |attaat
Box 43S - WaII - (60S) 2?9-2S6S
I|t Ka1aka ïttss
Box 309 - Kadoka - S3?-22S9
I|t |a|t| |a1tjta1tat
Box 3S - FaItb - (60S) 96?-2161
I|t f|saa |att|tt
Box 429 - BIson - (60S) 244-?199
I|t Mtt1a |ayatt
Box 46S - Murdo - (60S) 669-22?1
I|t Ntw 0a1ttwaa1 ïast
Box 426 - New Underwood - (60S) ?S4-6466
ßll 00ll0¶0 $008 l0 8߶
0l l0080 ß0N8¢8¢0f8.
$Z4.4Z l8K lß0l0000
The Outdoor
Campus-West
hosts Outdoor
University
Wall Eagles vs Wb¡te B¡ver T¡gers
Fr¡., Aug. 24tb · 6 p.m.
Wall Football Field
Benef¡t Bur_er Bust fOr Bart Cheney
4:3U tO ? p.m. · VaII C¡ty Iark
The South Dakota Department
of Revenue reminds all sellers of
prepaid wireless services and
telecommunication providers they
should be complying with the new
collection and remittance proce-
dures for the 911 Emergency Sur-
charge and the new Prepaid Wire-
less 911 Emergency Surcharge.
As of July 1, 2012, any seller and
wireless service provider that sells
prepaid wireless service, which in-
cludes prepaid wireless airtime
cards and prepaid wireless min-
utes and plans, is responsible for
collecting and remitting the two
percent Prepaid Wireless 911
Emergency Surcharge.
The 911 Emergency Surcharge
collected and remitted by all
telecommunications service
providers, wireless service
providers, or Interconnected Voice
over Internet Protocol Service
providers increased to $1.25 per
service-user-line, per month, effec-
tive July 1.
All sellers of prepaid wireless
services and all providers that col-
lect and remit the 911 Emergency
Surcharges are required to regis-
911 emergency surcharge collections
and remittance reminder
ter with the South Dakota Depart-
ment of Revenue, even if the seller
already has a sales tax license.
Sellers can register online in the
Business Tax section of the De-
partment’s website, http://dor.
sd.gov/ or call the Department at
(800) 829-9188.
All surcharges will be remitted
directly to the Department of Rev-
enue on a monthly basis using SD
EPath, an electronic filing system.
The first official filing date for
the surcharges is August 23, 2012.
If you are a seller or wireless
service provider and are not cur-
rently registered to collect and
remit the 911 Emergency Sur-
charges, contact the South Dakota
Department of Revenue at epath@
state.sd.us or call (800) 829-9188.
The Outdoor Campus-West in
Rapid City will be hosting its first
annual Outdoor University from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. MST, Saturday,
August 25.
The event will offer a variety of
outdoor activities that include fish-
ing, kayaking, archery, BB-gun
shooting, outdoor cooking and
much more. There will also be
Game, Fish and Parks employees,
discussing wildlife, fisheries, trap-
ping, land management and more.
The event is free and no prereg-
istration is required. All ages are
welcome to attend.
The Outdoor Campus-West is lo-
cated at 4130 Adventure Trail in
northwest Rapid City. For more in-
formation on Outdoor University,
call 605.394.2310 or e-mail
tocwest@state.sd.us.
www.ravellette
publications.com
we don’t
charge…
Obi tuaries,
engagements
and wedding
wri te-ups are
published
free of charge.
Call 279-2565
or e-mail
annc@gwtc.net.
Pennington County Courant • August 23, 2012 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Lenore Ruland reports her
granddaughter Krista Kjerstad
left on Thursday for Lincoln, Neb.,
where she will be attending the
University. School starts on Mon-
day. Krista’s plans are to be a pe-
diatrician. Good luck to her.
Cindy Ramsey Severson, Vernal,
Utah, starts a new job August 28th
in Rapid City. Steve will stay in
Utah until they sell their house.
They are planning to build a new
house in Rapid City.
Long time residents, Irene For-
tune, passed away on August 7th;
her services were held in Philip on
August 11th. We offer our sympa-
thy to the family.
Beth Ramsey of Las Vegas, will
be coming to spend a few days with
Charlene and Clayton Kjerstad.
Beth and Claude’s daughter, Katie,
is getting married in Spearfish on
Saturday, the 25th. Katie is a
lawyer in Washington, D.C., and
her fiance, Avi from Nepal, is a col-
lege professor in Rochester, N.Y.
Katie’s brother Dexter will also at-
tend the wedding, coming from
Reno, Nev. Our congratulations go
out to the “newly-weds”.
The Central States Fair in
Rapid City opened at 3 p.m. on Fri-
day, the 17th. It will be going on all
week, through next Sunday.
Senior Citizen’s potluck supper
was down in numbers again. Must
not be on people’s list to do in the
summertime. Those who were
there enjoyed Bingo after supper.
James “Jim” Gottsleben passed
away last week. He and his wife
Myrna had moved ot Philip from
the Grindstone community. His fu-
neral mass is scheduled at the Sa-
cred Heart Church in Philip on
Thursday, the 23rd. We offer our
condolences to the family.
Edith Paulsen had company for
the noon meal last Thursday. She
said it was a houseful! Those at-
tending were Delbert, Norbert and
Jane Sebade, Marsha Lytle, Ros-
alind Ham, Marilyn Ivers and
Landon Peterson.
Gerald and Esther Wolford left
Wall on Friday, the 10th, to go to
Howard to spend the night with
Amy and Terry Beers. On Satur-
day, the drove to Boyd, Minn., to
Sarah and Jason Jorgenson’s home
to help their great-granddaughter
Rachel celebrate her 7th birthday.
Grandma Diane Geigle was there
also. Wolfords went back to
Howard to stay and visit with the
Beers, coming home on Monday.
Merlin and Mary Jane Doyle
went to Rapid City on Saturday.
Jim and Steven Doyle were play-
ing in the state softball tourna-
ment so they got to watch them
play. Later they met Joe and Barb
Croell for lunch.
Lyle and Viola Williams had
company Friday and Saturday
with granddaughter Mindy
Halvorson and her two daughters,
Rylee and Syenna, of Dell Rapids.
Sunday was the day for the an-
nual Williams’ family picnic held
at Story Book Island Park in Rapid
City. Lyle and Viola, Les and Kay
were in attendance.
A lot of people are enjoying the
fresh Colorado peaches that ar-
rived last week at the school. It
was a fundraiser.
We wish to congratulate Dean
and Marcine Patterson as they cel-
ebrate 50 years of marriage with a
dance at the Community Center
on Saturday evening, the 25th.
“Break Even” is a family band pro-
viding the music.
News is scarce — No rain to re-
port. No triple digit temperatures
to report, which is a good thing!
School days are almost here.
“The point of having an open
mind, like having an open mouth,
is to close it on something solid.”
~G.K. Chesterton
returned to their rightful owners
at the end of the day and I'm sure
everyone slept well that night.
Peggy was busy the rest of the
week working and greeting the
bikers, while Larry kept busy
fighting fires and cows.
Matt and Gina Batie from Rapid
City, visited the Johnston ranch.
Jim and Myrna Smith visited at
the Johnston's, Thursday.
Tuesday, Kassandra Linn spent
a girls' day out with Becky and
Ellie Bruch and Celine and Maria
Trask to Rapid City. Peg Ireland
visited the Linn's, Tuesday. Tiff
Knuppe of New Underwood, ac-
companied Shirrise, Kassandra,
and Laken Linn to Rapid City,
Thursday, for errands and lunch.
Brian and Misty Walker and fam-
ily of Union Center, stopped in to
see Laken and visit Saturday af-
ternoon. Clyde Arneson stopped by
the Linn's for coffee, Sunday morn-
ing.
All the Trask boys, along with
Tom Bruch and Gary Deering, had
their annual brother's golf tourna-
ment Sunday at the Hart Ranch.
Gary and John Paul reportedly
came out on top and gladly took all
the money. Austin and Joe came in
second place. The girls had a day
of their own at HQ Sunday. Julie
attended the wedding of a previous
roommate in McCook, Neb. Pat at-
tended Heather Schell's wedding
in Scottsbluff, Neb. He stayed
overnight and rode home with
Larry Schell before meeting up
with the golfers.
this week’s news
Submitted by
Larry & Peggy Gravatt
News is very slim this week.
Everyone must be busy moving
cows from pasture to pasture and
trying to find some hay!
Lawrence Burke is pleased to re-
port that he is feeling much better
and that his back is on the mend.
He’s just following doctor’s orders
and taking it easy. Thursday, Terri
Ramsdall stopped by and dropped
off some greatly appreciated home
grown fruits and veggies. Lynn
Fields stopped by and dropped off
some spray supplies for the Hall
tree belt and buildings and
Lawrence rode along while Lynn
checked his cows and water. They
had a nice visit. Clyde stopped by
in the afternoon.
Freddie Ferguson had a slow
week, as he has been fighting frogs
in his throat, but starting to sound
and feel better. He did enjoy the
evening Friday at Cammack’s Ap-
preciation Supper, eating a good
steak and getting to visit with
friends and neighbors.
Mel and Dorothy Anderson at-
tended a family gathering at the
Sharon Anderson Ranch near
Eagle Butte on Sunday. Thursday,
Dorothy and Margee Willey at-
tended WTL Club at the home of
Joan Sutton in Rapid City. They of
course enjoyed lunch out, too!
Charlotte, Katie and Laura
Wilsey spent Saturday night at the
John and Jean Linn home. They
were returning from checking out
colleges in Minnesota and Eastern
South Dakota.
Shirrise Linn and her girls were
in Rapid City on Monday for ap-
pointments. Kassandra met up
with and then rode home with
RoseMary and Maria Trask. Kas-
sandra spent the night with Maria
to help her celebrate her 18th
birthday. Shirrise and Laken met
Melisa Byrne, Denise Miller, Tiff,
Connor and Cole Knuppe for
lunch. Shane, Launa and Trey
Grubl from Opal, visited the Linn’s
on Wednesday evening. The Linn
girls worked at the Central States
Fair, Thursday and Friday, before
all of the Linn’s met up with Scott,
Ashlyn and Jared Simons for a
weekend of camping. Doesn’t
sound like a new baby is slowing
them down much!
Larry and Peggy Gravatt
stopped by to see Maria Trask on
Tuesday to help her celebrate her
birthday. On Friday, Peggy and
Larry rode up with Lynn and
Sandy Fields to Cammack’s Appre-
ciation Supper and got to visit with
their “northern” neighbors. Satur-
day found them in Rapid City to
help grandson Greyson Urban cel-
ebrate his 6th birthday at Reptile
Gardens. There were two special
guests that dropped by to wish him
a happy birthday, Mikey the
Python and Fluffy the Gator. I
think all of the kids and adults en-
joyed the day. Thought they would
go fishing on Sunday, but the dam
didn’t even have a ripple in it. Will
have to find a new spot so Peggy
can use her new pink fishing pole.
Last week’s news
Submitted by Shirrise Linn
Rod, Baxter, and Skylar Anders
and Kirk Cordes traveled to Ver-
million, Wednesday, to attend the
service for Justin Lineberry who
drown in the Missouri River. Car-
olyn Anders and Twila Trask were
in Philip, Friday evening, to attend
the service for Irene Fortune.
Jim and Myrna Smith visited
Lawrence Burke one night this
week. Clyde Arneson was a coffee
visitor at Lawrence Burke's one
day this week.
Freddie Ferguson attended the
Boneita Springs annual picnic din-
ner, August 5th.
Larry Gravatt picked up grand-
daughter Sarah Erickson on Mon-
day afternoon to spend a few days.
They celebrated her fourth birth-
day and had lots of fun. On
Wednesday, Grandma and Sarah
went to Rapid City and picked up
grandson Greyson Urban and they
all went to Reptile Gardens and
Bear Country. Fun was had by all,
though I think the two of them to-
gether had a lot more energy than
Grandma! Sarah and Grey were
Elm Springs News
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
Kcn´s Kcfr|]crz!|en 8 Hcz!|n] |nr.
Serting ,ou eince 1969
Commercial & Residential Ìnstallation,
Service & Repair
Serving Wall & Surrounding Areas
0wncr Ir|r Hznscn · 505-2Î8-2881 · Wz||, 8P
Space Ior Rent
3 noniI nininun
$3.50 ¡cr wccl
2?9-2S6S
Space Ior Rent
3 noniI nininun
$3.50 ¡cr wccl
2?9-2S6S
Cedur Butte Air, 1nc.
AeriaI AppIication Service
Your IocoI
consuIfonf:
Sfocy 8ieImoier
ceII: 44I-ZZ09, home: Z79 -Z99o
SfocybieImoier.norwex.bi;
Space Ior Rent
3 noniI nininun
$3.50 ¡cr wccl
2?9-2S6S
We enjoyed the entertainment of
Slim McNaught and Kim Plender.
They did gospel music and poetry.
Rev. Ron McLaughlin from the
Free Evangelical church of Pied-
mont, held worship and commun-
ion service.
Wednesday afternoon, Echo
Ridge residents came and visited
with friends, and we also had
Bingo with Bonnie Elliott, Mar-
garet Larsen, Freddie Ferguson
and Verna Maude as our volun-
teer's.
Rev. Wes Weilman from the
Community church, held worship
service and Marti Aus led our
hymn sing.
Some of our mornings have been
cooler, so we are getting outdoors
and enjoying the fresh air.
Until next time…May God bless.
Good Samaritan Society
Guess Who’s 40???
Guess Who’s 40???
If you don’t find me on the farm & ranch, Golden West or
hunting in my camo vest; you will find me with the family
that I love best!!!!!
Happy 40th Birthday
Sweetheart and Papa!!!!
We love you bunches!!!!
Aimee, Macee & Graysen
If you see our “papa” wish him
Happy Birthday on August 27th!!
W a l l , S D
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
August 23rd: Indian Taco
August 24th: Pulled Pork
w/Grape Salad
August 27th: Reuben
w/Corn Salad
August 28th: Swiss Mushroom
Burger w/French Fries
August 29th: Chicken Enchilada
w/Tossed Salad
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
You are invited to the…
Huether Family Reunion
Sunday, September 2nd
Wall Community Center
Doors open at 9:00 a.m.
Potluck Dinner at 12 noon
FINANCIAL FOCUS
RotH IRA: FoR YouR
RetIRemeNt ... AND
BeYoND
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
If you’re somewhat familiar with
investing, you may know that the
Roth IRA is a great retirement-
savings vehicle. But are you aware
that some of its benefits can also
pay off for the next generation of
your family?
To understand why this is so, it’s
necessary to be familiar with a
Roth IRA’s features. For starters,
when you contribute to a Roth
IRA, your earnings have the poten-
tial to grow tax free, provided you
don’t start taking withdrawals
until you’re 59½ and you’ve had
your account at least five years.
The amounts you contributed
aren’t taxed when withdrawn be-
cause you’ve already paid taxes on
the money you put in. And the po-
tential for tax-free earnings can
continue even when your benefici-
aries inherit your Roth IRA,
though you’ll need to consult with
your tax advisor on this issue.
A Roth IRA also offers other fea-
tures that can help you build re-
sources for retirement while possi-
bly helping your surviving family
members. For one thing, you can
contribute to your Roth IRA for as
long as you have some earned in-
come, up to the contribution limits,
and as long as you meet certain in-
come limitations. Even if you’ve of-
ficially “retired,” you might do
some consulting or part-time work.
So you could put some of your
earnings into your Roth IRA. This
ability to keep funding your Roth
IRA virtually indefinitely can give
you more flexibility in managing
your retirement income — and, de-
pending on how you do manage
that income and what your other
objectives may be, you may also
end up with more money that
could be left to your beneficiaries.
Also, unlike a traditional IRA or
a 401(k), a Roth IRA does not re-
quire you to start taking minimum
distributions at age 70½. In fact,
you are never required to with-
draw money from your Roth IRA.
And by leaving your account intact
for as long as possible, you’ll poten-
tially have more money available
for a variety of options — one of
which may involve leaving sums to
your beneficiaries. Your non-
spouse beneficiaries must take an-
nual required minimum distribu-
tions, but they have the option to
take the distributions over their
lifetime.
Keep in mind, though, that your
Roth IRA is part of your estate for
purposes of federal estate taxes. In
2012, your estate would be subject
to these taxes if it were worth
more than $5.12 million (or less, if
you made certain gifts). In 2013,
however, this amount is scheduled
to drop to $1 million unless Con-
gress acts on this issue. (Some
states also have estate taxes that
apply at amounts less than the
federal amount.) In any case, if you
have a sizable estate, you should
consult with your tax and legal ad-
visors.
When you invest in a Roth IRA,
your goal, first and foremost, is to
help fund your retirement. In fact,
basically all your decisions regard-
ing your Roth IRA — how much to
contribute, where to invest the
money and when to begin taking
withdrawals — should be based on
your own retirement goals. How-
ever, as a side benefit to investing
in a Roth IRA, you may find that
you could help out the next gener-
ation, or two, of your family.
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • August 23, 2012 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Church
Wall Rodeo Grounds
Wednesdays, 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
New Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
By Pastor Cornelius R.
Stam
Three times in Rom. 1:14-
16, the Apostle Paul uses
the phrase “I am,” and each
one carries an important
message for every true be-
liever in Christ.
First he says in Verse 14:
“I am debtor” — debtor to all
men, to tell them about the
saving work of Christ. But
why was he indebted to peo-
ple he had never even seen?
For several reasons.
First, he had in his hand
what they needed to be
saved from the penalty and
power of sin. If I see a drunk-
ard lying across the railroad
track and I do nothing about
it, am I not a murderer if he
is killed by the train? If I see
a man drowning and I have
a life buoy in my hand but do
not throw it to him, am I not
a murderer if he goes down
for the last time? If I see mil-
lions of lost souls about me
and, knowing the message
of salvation, do not tell them,
am I not guilty if they die
without Christ?
Further, Paul felt himself a
debtor to others, because
the Christ who had died for
his sins had also died for the
sins of others. As he says in
II Cor. 5:14,15: “Christ died
for all, that they which live
should not henceforth live
unto themselves but unto
Him who died for them and
rose again.”
Finally, the Christ who had
died for Paul’s sins, had
commissioned him to tell
others of His saving grace.
Thus he says in I Cor.
9:16,17:
“Woe is unto me if I preach
not the gospel! For… a dis-
pensation of the gospel is
committed unto me.”
Paul could say further
what every true believer
should be able to say: Not, “I
am debtor, but,” but rather, “I
am debtor… So, as much as
in me is I am ready” (Rom.
1:15). He was ready to dis-
charge his debt because he
had that with which to dis-
charge it — the wonderful
“gospel of the grace of God.”
And he did indeed make this
message known to others
with all that was in him.
And now the third “I am”: “I
am debtor… so I am ready…
for I am not ashamed of the
gospel of Christ, for it is the
power of God unto salvation
to every one that believeth…
” (Ver. 16). Paul was always
proud to own Christ as the
mighty Savior from sin. Do
you know Christ as your
Savior? Do you tell others
about Him?
A CHRISTIAN OBLIGATION
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
TDM Excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
Todd Sieler
Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Stanley and Kathy McNabb,
granddaughters Amelia and Eliza
Wilson, Alto, Wyo., and Faye
Bryan joined Gary and Connie
Cawell, Lancaster, Mo., at the Red
Rock for a great visit and lunch.
Gary and Connie spent several
summers at Faye Bryan’s ranch in
the Cedar Butte area where he
trained bird dogs, they are now
spending late summer training in
the Presho area, where pheasants
are plentiful.
Friday morning, Wanda Hall’s
birthday was celebrated with
Stanley’s great blueberry pancakes
and Kathy’s coffee. Wanda’s birth-
day was the day before, she re-
ported phone calls from coast to
coast. Joining the birthday cele-
bration were Eliza and Amelia Wil-
son and Faye Bryan.
The McNabb granddaughters
will finish the week in Wasta and
return home on Saturday, the
18th. It has been fun having them
in Wasta. They’ve enjoyed riding
their grandmother’s horse, Reddie
(he is not quite big enough to accu-
mulate both girls at once), but they
seem happy to take turns and Red-
die appeared to enjoy their time
and attention, as well.
It was observed Friday that the
girls were having fun with Faye
and her “mule” named Jenny.
It is such a pleasure to have
these great kids here!
Wednesday, Faye went to Rapid
City with Sheila Drees, taking
care of errands, some fun with a
friend on a cool day and finishing
with neighbors, Margee and Lloyd
inviting themselves for a supper of
“store cooked chicken and salads”
and a bottle of wine.
Lloyd had a big day in Rapid
City also. I had a big day in Rapid
City, so these three wise ones com-
bined resources and had a great
evening!
Faye gave me a super tease
about my watering incident. All I
will say is that it involved my cat,
a kinked hose and a connection too
far away to walk to and turn off
the water coming into the hose.
Well, I unkinked the hose all right,
the cat leapt and fled and I leapt
and squealed. Faye is still laugh-
ing.
It seems that the week has been
busy. Or is it just with cooler
weather the energy level in the air
kind of puts a zing in your step!
I got the Cal-Nev-Ara bit wrong
again — had it ending in “i” not
“a”. Apologies to Dick and Gay. The
Hadlocks are excellent photogra-
phers so I would bet they have
many photos to browse through
and enjoy again the summer visits
from all the family members.
News of Marilyn Keyser from
Ruby Keyser: Marilyn has been
through an incredibly difficult se-
ries of treatments to control the
cancer found last spring. At this
time, she is doing all that she can
to regain her strength and is look-
ing forward to a trip to be with
family (the end of August) in South
Dakota. Marilyn, your courage and
determination are admirable! We
look forward to seeing you in
Wasta!
Thursday was WTL Club in
Rapid City at Joan Sutton’s home.
Dorothy Anderson kindly invited
me to ride with her and I never
pass an opportunity for a visit and
day out with these Elm Springs
friends. Present were Kellie Linn,
Jean Linn, Margaret Nachtigall,
RoseMary Trask, Myrna Smith,
Mary Cress, Joan Sutton, Dorothy
Anderson and Margee Willey.
Business was concluded and time
for treats and catching up on fam-
ily news and summer activities.
Another good day. Jean Linn con-
tinues to do well after her stroke
last spring. It was good to touch
base with these gals. A bonus —
Shirrise, Kassandra and Laken
Linn popped in for a quick hello
and while Laken was not happy,
we did get a peek at this pretty lit-
tle baby girl and recent addition
(June 30) to the family of Morris,
Shirrise and Kassandra Linn.
Friday morning, the fire alarm
at the fire hall went off and we no-
ticed smoke on the hill to the
north. After the fire trucks took off,
we drove up the Elm Springs Road
to investigate. What we saw was
the fire on the east side of the road
and a baler and several bales were
burning, and quite a large area
was scorched and blackened, on
Sundquist’s place. Had the wind
picked up or shifted the story
would have been different and
more serious. We appreciate the
fire departments for their quick re-
sponse and neighboring ranchers,
who came to help put out the fire.
Saturday, Lloyd and I went to
Silver City for the third annual
Rapid Shifter’s reunion. This club
was begun in early 50’s, with Dick
Cordes the first presentident of the
club. We’ve enjoyed this yearly get-
together and a couple nights spent
in Silver City.
Anna Lee Humphrey had guests
for the Wednesday morning cinna-
mon roll and coffee, tasty treat
time, in the friendship room at
Good Samaritan. Daughter Mari-
lyn Stover and husband Carl
couldn’t pass on that opportunity!
The Humphrey family also
planned a Saturday for Anna Lee
to be at home for a chicken dinner
with daughter Peggy and husband
Roger Gilleam from Gillette, Mar-
ilyn and Dave Stover of Owanka,
and Linda Opstedahl of Union
Center. Carl said the day was “a
very good one with fried chicken
and all the ‘fixings’ and shrimp.
Anna Lee enjoyed it so much!”
Happy Trails!
Wasta Wanderings
Dean & Marcine Patterson
Scott Patterson; Kevin & Diana Patterson
and children, Dillan & Delaney,
invite you to a
50th Wedding Anniversary
Celebration
Saturday,
August 25, 2012
Wall Community Center
Music for listening and
dancing for the public will
be provided by the
“BREAK EVEN” Band
8 p.m. to 12 a.m.
Families are invited!
Eleanor Harkin_________________________________
Eleanor Harkin, age 93, of Inte-
rior, died Wednesday, August 15,
2012, at the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital in Philip.
Eleanor Louise Vifquain was
born May 9, 1919, in Springview,
Neb., the daughter of Elmer V. and
Nellie (Kenaston) Vifquain. She
grew up on a farm near
Springview, and graduated from
Keya Paha High School in
Springview, in 1937. As a young
lady she worked in Alliance, Neb.,
as a waitress and also worked at
St. Agnes Academy.
Eleanor was united in marriage
to Burnis J. Harkin on January 21,
1942, in Alliance. They made their
home in Alliance for a short time
before moving to a dude ranch
south of Spearfish. They moved to
Rapid City for a short time before
moving back to Alliance in 1948.
They made their home in Alliance
for 10 years before moving to
Cheyenne, Wyo., in 1958, where
she worked for P.I.E. as a secretary
for two years. In June 1960, they
moved to Denver, Colo., where she
worked for a dry cleaner for three
years, and then worked for Blue
Cross & Blue Shield until retiring
in 1980. In the summer of 1980,
Eleanor and Burnis moved to Inte-
rior.
Eleanor was an avid horse-
woman and Eleanor and Burnis
rode over 800 miles during the
South Dakota Centennial Wagon
Train in 1989. They were also in-
volved in many other wagon trains
in South Dakota and Nebraska.
Her husband, Burnis, preceded
her in death on January 17, 1993.
Eleanor continued to reside in In-
terior.
Eleanor was a member of the
Holy Rosary Catholic Church, and
a former member of the Current
Events Club, both of Interior.
Survivors include seven sons,
Joe Harkin and his wife Shirley of
Vancouver, Wash., George Harkin
and his wife, Ann, of Denver, Colo.,
Victor Harkin of Denver, Bill
Harkin of Denver, Pat Harkin and
his wife, Suzanne, of Model, Colo.,
Jerry Harkin of Pueblo, Colo., and
Ricky Harkin and his wife,
Michele, of Model; two daughters,
Barbara Manley and her husband,
Larry, of Interior, and Mary Beth
Perkins and her husband, Scott, of
Interior; 23 grandchildren; 27
great-grandchildren; two great-
great-grandchildren; a brother,
Jerry Vifquain and his wife,
Louella, of Nemo; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
In addition to her husband, Bur-
nis, Eleanor was preceded in death
by her parents; one brother, Victor
Vifquain; and a sister, Elizabeth
Marshall.
Funeral services will be held at
10:00 a.m. on Thursday, August 23,
at the Interior School Gym, with
Father Leo Hausmann as cele-
brant.
Music will be provided by
Dorothy Shearer, pianist, with con-
gregational hymns.
Ushers will be Kevin Kruse,
Perry Guptill and Chuck Carlbom.
Pallbearers are Joe, George, Vic-
tor, Bill, Jerry and Rick Harkin.
Interment will be at the
Fairview Cemetery in Interior.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
James W. “Jim” Gottsleben_________________________
James W. “Jim” Gottsleben, age
83 of Philip, S.D., died Wednesday,
August 15, 2012, at the Philip
Nursing Home.
James William Gottsleben was
born April 14, 1929, to William and
Helen (Gehan) Gottsleben in
Pierre. Jim grew up ranching and
lived most of his life on the
Gottsleben Ranch, which was
homesteaded by his grandparents
in 1907.
Jim graduated from Philip High
School in May 1947 and attended
Black Hills State University that
summer. He began his teaching ca-
reer at Alfalfa Valley School, lo-
cated three miles from his home
place. He taught there two years
followed by another two years at
Enterprise School. During this
time he lived at home (due to his
mother’s death in his senior year of
high school) helping his dad farm
and ranch.
Jim married Myrna Coleman on
November 29, 1952, at Sacred
Heart Catholic Church in Philip. To
this union five children were born.
Upon his father’s death in 1956, he
purchased the homestead and sur-
rounding land. Jim also added an
insurance agency through Missouri
Valley Mutual Insurance Company
to the farming and ranching oper-
ation. He remained an insurance
agent for 54 years. In 2005, Jim
and Myrna sold the ranch to their
son, Bill. They then moved to
Philip where they have since
resided.
Jim served on the Deadman
School board and on the ASCS
Committee for several years. He
was a Farmer’s Union Cooperative
member. He belonged to Sacred
Heart Catholic Church in Philip.
Jim was awarded an Honorary
Lifetime Membership and held the
position of financial secretary for
over 50 years with the Philip
Knights of Columbus.
Throughout his life, Jim was a
hard worker – proud of his home-
steading heritage and dedicated to
the land, his family, community,
and faith. In spite of health issues,
he continued to stay strong up
through his last few years. His per-
severance was a credit to his char-
acter.
Grateful for sharing in his life
are his wife of 59 years, Myrna
Gottsleben; one son, William “Bill”
Gottsleben and his wife, Jayne, of
Philip; four daughters, Sharon
Baxter and her husband, Darwin,
of Arvada, Colo., Kathy Gottsleben
of Rapid City, Barbara Larsen and
her husband, Carl, of Caputa, and
Carolyn Brooks and her husband,
Jim, of Dupree; 13 grandchildren;
seven great-grandchildren; two sis-
ters, Mary Pekron of Philip, and
Ann Pattno and her husband, Tom,
of Hastings, Neb.
Preceding Jim in death were his
parents and a brother-in-law,
Henry “Hank” Pekron.
Mass of Christian burial will be
celebrated at 10:00 a.m. on Thurs-
day, August 23, at the Sacred Heart
Catholic Church in Philip, with Fa-
ther Kevin Achbach as celebrant.
Pall placement will be done by
Jessica Larsen, Kara Larsen,
Chana Gottsleben and Brittany
Brooks. Gift bearers are Tara and
Tyana Gottsleben. Eucharistic
ministers are Joe Gittings and
Lloyd Frein. Altar server are Alli-
son Pekron and Tristen Rush.
Ushers are Marvin Eide and
Chuck Carstensen. Pallbearers are
Zach Baxter, Tim and Dustin
Larsen, Lee Brooks, Kevin Cole-
man and Steve Pekron. Honorary
pallbearers are the Knights of
Columbus #2679 of Philip and all
relatives and friends in attendance.
Interment will be at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com
It’s A Girl!
Born: March 30, 2012 Weight: 9 lbs. 10 oz. 23”
Parents: Nick & Emie Wersal, St. Louise Park, MN
Maternal Grandparents:
Gale & Tammie Crown, Wall
Paternal Grandparents:
Greg & Barb Wersal, Eagle Lake, MN
Maternal Great-Grandparents:
Merle & Verle Crown
Matt & Patsy Bryan
Paternal
Great-Grandparents:
Rodney & Mary Wersal
Raymond & Madeline Black
M
a
e
v
e

L
o
u
i
s
e

W
e
r
s
a
l
Pennington County Courant • August 23, 2012 • Page 6 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
FOR SALE: 250 acres of stand-
ing corn, to be baled or cut for
silage. Milesville, SD. Call 859-
2943 or 685-5157. P36-tfn
WANTED: Pasture for up to 100
cows or would like to rent grass.
Call 837-2589. K50-4tc
FOR SALE: 2006 7’x22’ 4-horse
Featherlite trailer, in excellent
condition with dual 7,000 lb.
axles. Aluminum with white
smooth skin all enclosed horse
trailer. 3x6 tack room and only
one solid stud stall divider up
front and the rest is open.
$15,995. More than $1,000
below book value. Please call
Lynette at 454-6914. PR50-3tc
FREE
TO GIVE AWAY: A sectional sofa
with a built-in sleeper and two
recliners. One recliner needs re-
upholstering and leg lift repair.
Call 859-2429 if interested. Can
be seen at 608 Sunshine Drive in
Philip. PR52-2tp
HELP WANTED
DAKOTA MILL & GRAIN is look-
ing for a Commercial Applicator
for its Murdo, SD location. Class
A CDL w/clean record. Compet-
itive wage w/benefits. Call Jack
at 381-0031 or stop in at the El-
evator and talk with Doug.
WP52-2tc
DAY CARE IN INTERIOR needs
a manager and helpers. Call
Linda Livermont, 433-5323, or
send resumé to: Box 63, Interior,
SD 57750. P37-2tp
HELP WANTED: Part-time
cashier, 2-10 shift. Friendly,
positive work environment, flex-
ible schedule. Permanent posi-
tion. Must be 21. Apply at
Kadoka Gas & Go. K37-2tc
GREGORIAN INC. in Lemmon,
SD, is seeking a full-time welder.
Excellent starting wage. Includes
benefits such as group health
and life insurance, profit shar-
ing, and paid vacation. Call 374-
3841 or 1-800-658-5534 or send
resumé to: Gregorian Inc., PO
Box 209, Lemmon, SD 57638.
Equal Opportunity Employer.
P37-2tc
PART-TIME FALL HELP
WANTED at the Wall Golf
Course. Call Stan at 381-2861.
WP51-tfn
WAITRESS NEEDED at Red
Rock Restaurant in Wall. Call
Lori at 279-2387. WP51-3tc
HELP WANTED: Cook/clean/
stock, 9-5 shift, 2-3 days a week,
some weekends, flexible sched-
ule, permanent position. Apply
at Kadoka Gas & Go. K37-2tc
GREGORIAN INC. in Lemmon,
SD, is seeking a full-time form-
ing and finisher. Excellent start-
ing wage. Includes benefits such
as group health and life insur-
ance, profit sharing, and paid
vacation. Call 374-3841 or 1-
800-658-5534 or send resumé
to: Gregorian Inc., PO Box 209,
Lemmon, SD 57638. Equal Op-
portunity Employer.
P37-2tc
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1978 Chevy Silver-
ado 4x4; 1973 Winnebago 5th
wheel – ready to roll. Call 279-
2222. PR51-2tc
FOR SALE: 60 ft. boom spray
truck. Call 685-4085, Jeremy
Noteboom. P36-2tc
FOR SALE: 1987 3/4 ton Chevy
pickup, $1100. Call 685-4085,
Jeremy Noteboom. P36-2tc
FOR SALE: 1978 1-ton Chevy
pickup, $750. Call 685-4085,
Jeremy Noteboom. P36-2tc
BUSINESS & SERVICES
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven, cell:
490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-0291.
K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
BACKHOE AND TRENCHING:
Peters Excavation, Inc. Excava-
tion work of all types. Call Brent
Peters, 837-2945 or 381-5568
(cell). K3-tfn
GRAVEL: Screened or rock. Call
O'Connell Construction Inc.,
859-2020, Philip. P51-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
FOR SALE: Pullet hens, started
laying. Call 484-5411.
PR52-2tp
LOOKING TO BUY a half or full
quarter (80 or 160 acres) of
farm/ranch land, preferably
Cheyenne river bottom with
some tillable acres, but would
consider other areas as well. If
interested, send me an email at
riave13@yahoo.com P37-1tp
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Get ready for fall hauling! 12-ply,
235/85/16R. $155 mounted
(limited quantities available).
Les’ Body Shop, 859-2744,
Philip. P27-tfn
THE WALL AFTER-SCHOOL
PROGRAM is looking for an en-
thusiastic, energetic, reliable in-
dividual to work part-time. Must
be 18 with a high school diploma.
Please contact Mandi at 279-
2156 ext. 2110 for more informa-
tion. Deadline is August 31st.
PW36-2tc
HELP WANTED: Full-time &
part-time starting August 13th at
Rock ’N Roll Lanes, Philip. Call
859-2355 for more information.
P33-tfn
GREAT SUMMER JOB! Sales ex-
perience preferred but will train.
Salary plus commission. Possibil-
ity of up to $12.00 per hour wage.
Housing is supplied in Wall. You
will make great wages, meet lots
of people and have fun. Position
available May 1, 2012. Apply at
GoldDiggers on Mt. Rushmore
Road in Rapid City or call factory
at 348-8108 or fax resumé to
348-1524. P14-tfn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Full size Yamaha
electric organ (double keyboard)
and bench. Instruction book and
sheet music included. Excellent
condition. Asking $150. 462-
6238. PR52-3tc
FOR SALE: Alto Saxophone.
Yamaha YAS 23. New pads re-
cently, great condition. Checked
over by Haggerty’s last month.
Comes with alto sax case, neck
strap, cork grease, cleaning
pieces. Call 859-3271.
PR52-2tc
FOR SALE: Maytag washing ma-
chine, very good condition, $135.
Call 279-2858. WP51-2tc
FOR SALE: Round table with (4)
chairs, dark wood stain; futon;
chest of drawers. Call 279-2222.
PR51-2tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each. Call
685-3317 or 837-2917. K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
NOTICE: There will be a Hoffman
family reunion, Sept. 8th at the
Quinn Community Center. Lunch
will be potluck. WP52-2tc
VENDORS WANTED for Philip’s
annual craft show, September
8th. Call Julie at 441-9305.
P37-3tc
REAL ESTATE
FOR RENT OR SALE: Two bed-
room home with garage, located
on Wood Ave. in Philip. Call 484-
5409. PR52-2tp
LOCATION! PRICE! Central
air/heat, country kitchen, 3 bdrm
house for sale. 2 garages, sun
porch. 700 9th St., Kadoka. 837-
1611. K35-tfn
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom + office, 1-
1/2 bath mobile home, $17,000.
Call 685-4085, Jeremy Note-
boom, Philip. P36-2tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myrtle
Ave., Philip, SD. 3 bedroom, 1-
1/2 bath. Open concept with lam-
inate hardwood floors, stainless
steel fridge and stove and
washer/dryer all included. New
roof, windows and front deck.
Large fenced-in backyard with
storage shed and covered con-
crete patio. Close to school. Call
859-2470, leave a message if no
answer. P36-4tc
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE:
1999 Redman 28’x72’ 3 bedroom,
2 bath, 150’x75’ lot, shed, double
carport, Midland. Call Paula,
441-6967. $49,500 (negotiable).
K50-4tp
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
Make an offer! 2 bedrooms, 1
bath, dining room, appliances,
fenced back yard. 859-2483 or
859-3095 or leave messge.
PR52-tfn
HOUSE FOR SALE, LOCATED
AT 607 SUNSHINE DRIVE,
PHILIP: 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2100
sq. ft. home on a large lot located
on a quiet cul-de-sac. Has at-
tached 2-car garage, storage
shed, large deck and an under-
ground sprinkler system which
operates off a private well. Con-
tact Bob Fugate, Philip, at 859-
2403 (home) or 515-1946 (cell).
P24-tfn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom apart-
ment in Philip, $275/month plus
deposit. Call 391-3992.
PR45-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need rental
assistance or not, we can house
you. Just call 1-800-481-6904 or
stop in the lobby and pick up an
application. Gateway Apartments,
Kadoka. WP32-tfn
RECREATION
FOR SALE: 2009 Polaris 500
ATV, 4WD, purchased Sept. ’09
and rode very little due to health.
Excellent shape. Call 843-2516 or
515-3150. PR52-2tc
FOR SALE: 1997 Polaris 6x6
w/plow, rebuilt engine, new
chains and sprockets, $5,600.
Call 685-4085, Jeremy Note-
boom. P36-2tc
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified ad
the first week it runs. If you see
an error, we will gladly re-run
your ad correctly. We accept re-
sponsibility for the first incor-
rect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks be
paid for when ordered. A $2.00
billing charge will be added if ad
is not paid at the time the order
is placed. All phone numbers are
with an area code of 605, un-
less otherwise indicated.
ADOPTIONS
CARING AND DEVOTED - Mar-
ried Couple will provide loving
and stable home for your new-
born baby. All expenses paid.
For information please call 1-
888-728-5746, Carolyn and
Todd.
AUCTION
VOGEL FARMS - Feed, Livestock,
and Haying Equipment Auction.
Saturday, Sept. 8, 1 pm, Onaka,
SD, www.mandrauction.com,
www.sdauctions.com, M&R Auc-
tions, Gary 605-769-1181, Lewis,
605-281-1067, Sam 605-769-
0088, Home 605-948-2333,
Kevin Vogel 605-281-0336.
CERTIFIED SEED
RESEL RANCH REGISTERED
IDEAL seed 96 germ. Overland
seed 98 germ certified. Available
immediately. Call Dale 605-204-
0217, Ryan 605-870-2515 or
Mick 605-530-1895. Permit
number 56510.
FOR SALE
DECOY BAR WEBSTER, SD
turnkey business, remodeled
sports bar, hot spot for fishermen
and hunters, busiest place in
town. Vander Linden Properties
605-380-8240
HOUSING
SEARCH STATE-WIDE apart-
ment listings, sorted by rent, lo-
cation and other options.
www. sdhousi ngsearch. com
SOUTH DAKOTA HOUSING DE-
VELOPMENT AUTHORITY.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-3697
for details.
EMPLOYMENT
PLANNING & ZONING DIREC-
TOR/Building Inspector for
HUGHES COUNTY, full time. Op-
portunity for organized, innova-
tive, dedicated, good natured and
self motivated individual to guide
county development efforts.
Salary $18.23/hr DOQ. Contact
your local Dept of Labor or Karla
Pickard, 605-773-7477, Hughes
County Courthouse. Closes Oct.
5. EOE.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMIS-
SION is taking applications for
full-time Douglas County High-
way Superintendent. Must have
valid Class A Driver’s License.
Experience in road/bridge con-
struction/maintenance pre-
ferred. For application contact:
Douglas County Auditor (605)
724-2423.
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC po-
sition located in Sioux Falls. Pre-
ventative maintenance on
trucks/trailers used to haul fuel.
Send resume: Harms Oil Com-
pany, Attention: Human Re-
sources, Box 940, Brookings SD
57006.
PIERRE AREA REFERRAL SERV-
ICE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
This full-time position is respon-
sible for the organization’s con-
sistent achievement of its mis-
sion and financial objectives. For
more details and an application:
http://www.pierreareareferral.org.
GOSS COMMUNITY WEB PRESS
operator opening in Mobridge,
SD. Live, work and play on the
largest sub-impoundment lake of
the Missouri River. Call Larry
Atkinson, 605-230-0161 or 800-
594-9418.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders
representing Golden Eagle Log
Homes, building in eastern, cen-
tral, northwestern South and
North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell,
605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
1 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PRo/Rental management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
www.freerentersguide.com
THANK YOUS
A big thank you to all my fam-
ily, friends and neighbors who
sent emails, called me on the
phone or sent a card and gift for
my birthday card shower. It was
good to hear from so many people
and I will have great memories of
this special day.
Thanks Again!
Gene Crosbie
Thanks to all for their prayers,
visits, food, cleaning, cooking and
helping with whatever tasks
needed to be done to fulfill
Arnold’s wish to stay at home.
Many thanks to the family
members and two special friends
with nursing skills who helped so
much during the last days of
Arnold’s life.
The Union Center Baptist
Church is to be thanked for pro-
viding a wonderful place for the
family to gather and share a meal
together. Thanks to the ladies
who served the delicious meal be-
fore the service.
Thanks to the CMCCC people
who set up the many tables and
chairs and handled the parking.
Also thanks to Monica and the
Bull Creek Café crew that served
a great lunch, and to all the
friends that brought desserts, as
well as to the Circuit Riders, Pas-
tor Harold Delbridge and pianist,
Sylvia Rhoden.
A very special thanks to
Berniece Arney for all you have
done for our family and we all ap-
preciate your continued support.
You are a true blessing to our
family.
Most of all, I want to thank my
family for helping get everything
organized and for really coming
together to give their Dad a mean-
ingful send-off. Thanks to Marion
and Darlene, Cliff and Judy,
Dixie and Dave, Ron and Tonya,
Stanley and Glenda, Kenny and
Cindy, Marlene and Paul, Beverly
and Wade, and Bonnie and
Steve.
Thank you, God bless all of you,
Elsie Matt
Thank you to the Philip Fire
Dept for their quick response to
our fire on our property south of
Philip. Thanks for being there
when we needed you. We appre-
ciate all you do.
Clayton & Charlene Kjerstad
Brennan & Laurie Kjerstad
f0ll·1lM0
F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed
Press Operation
seeking full-time help.
We are willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
****
CaII Don or Beau
859-2516
or pick up an appIication at
the Pioneer Review in PhiIip
CeII: 60S-441-2SS9 - Res: 60S-SS9-2S?S - Fax: 60S-SS9-32?S
S20 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 3S
PbIIIp, SD S?S6? - www.aII-starauto.net
°1 oon ]1nd
WHAT£V£R
gou're
1ooK1ng ]or!"
÷Duuíd Hu¡nctt,
Ounc¡
2DD4 Merourg Mon1ereg
Pouer S11d1ng Doors, Leo1Þer, TÞe WorKs
Pennington County Courant • August 23, 2012 • Page 7 Public Notices
Public Notice Advertising
Protects Your Right To Know.
PENNINGTON COUNTy
BOARD OF
COMMISSIONERS
MINUTES
August 7, 2012
A meeting of the Pennington County
Board of Commissioners was held on
Tuesday, August 7, 2012, in the Commis-
sioners' meeting room of the Pennington
County Courthouse. Chairperson Lyndell
Petersen called the meeting to order at
9:00 a.m. with the following Commission-
ers present: Ron Buskerud, Ken Davis,
Don Holloway and Nancy Trautman.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Trautman to continue Planning & Zoning
Item 16 H, Appeal of Conditional Use Per-
mit CU 12-17, to the next meeting at the
request of Jeff Sughrue of the Silver City
VFD. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to approve the agenda as
amended. Vote: Unanimous.
CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken by a single vote of the Board of
Commissioners. Any item may be re-
moved from the Consent Agenda for sep-
arate consideration.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to approve Consent Agenda
Items 5-7 as presented. Vote: Unani-
mous.
5. Approve the minutes of the July 17,
2012, Board of Commissioners’ meeting.
6. Approve the vouchers listed at the
end of the minutes for expenditures for in-
surance, professional services, publica-
tions, rentals, supplies, repairs, mainte-
nance, travel, conference fees, utilities,
furniture and equipment totaling
$521,943.33.
7. Accept the official returns of the or-
ganizational election of the Deer Creek
Lane Road District and issue the Order
for Organization and Incorporation effec-
tive with taxing authority for the 2012 tax
year and after.
ORDER FOR
ORGANIZATION AND
INCORPORATION
OF THE Deer Creek Lane
Road DISTRICT
PENNINGTON COUNTy,
SOUTH DAKOTA
WHEREAS, the Official Re-
turn from the organizational
election indicates the desire of
the majority of the qualified vot-
ers voting in the proposed area
to organize the Deer Creek
Lane Road District.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
ORDERED, the Pennington
County Commissioners de-
clare that the Deer Creek Lane
Road District is organized as a
governmental subdivision of
the State of South Dakota and
a public body, corporate and
political to be effective with tax-
ing authority for the 2012 tax
year and after.
BE IT FURTHER OR-
DERED, that the Deer Creek
Lane Road District be de-
scribed as follows: Lots 3-11 of
Melcor Acres subdivision,
BHM, Pennington County, SD.
Dated this 7th day of August,
2012.
/s/ Lyndell Petersen, Chairper-
son
Pennington County Board of
Commissioners
ATTEST: (SEAL)
/s/ Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
End of Consent Agenda
8. Shining Star Recognition – Katria &
Monika Hotz: Ray Bubb, Division Chief,
SD Department of Agriculture Wildland
Fire Suppression Division, presented an
award to Katria and Monika Hotz for help-
ing control a fire on Sheridan Lake Road
on July 19, 2012.
9. Presentation of a Favorable Petition
Regarding the South Rochford Road Re-
construction Project – Representative
Mike Verchio
10. Pennington County Campus Ex-
pansion Project Update – Mike Kuhl
Fy2013 PENNINGTON COUNTy
BUDGET - Commissioner Davis
A. New Employee Requests – LE,
ESCC, EM, HHS, ITS
B. Sheriff Office Employee Moves
C. Assistant to – Emergency Manage-
ment/County Fire
D. Assistant to – Extension
E. Health Care Trust Fund
F. County General Levy
G. Other Commission Requests/Con-
cerns
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to not hire any new employees
(FTEs) and cut a maximum of $600,000
out of the FY2013 budget. The motion
failed 3-2 on a roll call vote: Buskerud -
yes, Davis – yes, Holloway – no, Traut-
man - no, Petersen – no.
ITEMS FROM SHERIFF
A. Records Management System Con-
tract / Purchase: MOVED by Buskerud
and seconded by Trautman to authorize
the signing of the contract with Zuercher
Technologies for a new records manage-
ment system. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM HEALTH & HUMAN
SERVICES
A. Request by Minnehaha County to
Utilize the Pennington County Welfare
Software Program through Client Man-
ager: MOVED by Trautman and sec-
onded by Buskerud to cooperate with
Minnehaha County by providing a copy of
the Pennington County Welfare software
program and further moved that no sup-
port will be provided. Vote: Unanimous.
ITEMS FROM HIGHWAy DEPARTMENT
A. Sunset Ranch Road District Re-
quest: MOVED by Buskerud and sec-
onded by Davis that the Highway Super-
intendent and Chief Deputy State’s Attor-
ney work with Dustin Born, president of
the Sunset Ranch Road District Board of
Trustees, on an agreement and resolution
for county maintenance of a portion of
156th Avenue that borders the road dis-
trict boundary. Vote: Unanimous.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Davis to take a short break. Vote:
Unanimous. The Board recessed from
10:25 until 10:37 a.m.
PLANNING & ZONING CONSENT
AGENDA
The following items have been placed
on the Consent Agenda for action to be
taken on all items by a single vote of the
Board of Commissioners. Any item may
be removed from the Consent Agenda for
separate action.
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to approve Planning & Zoning
Consent Agenda Items A-E as presented.
Vote: Unanimous.
A The Spring Creek Watershed Man-
agement and Project Implementation
Plan: Approve the Payment Application
for Jeff Liddell, SPC2011PC63, in the
amount of $3,097.40.
B. The Spring Creek Watershed Man-
agement and Project Implementation
Plan: Authorize the Chairperson’s signa-
ture on a cost share letter to the City of
Hill City.
C. Planned Unit Development Review
/ PU 02-03: James Buchanan: To review
a Planned Unit Development to allow 29
residential lots and a day-use retreat cen-
ter in accordance with Section 213 of the
Pennington County Zoning Ordinance.
S1/2S1/2NE1/4, E1/2SE1/4,
E1/2NW1/4SE1/4, Section 8
and the S1/2SW1/4NW1/4,
SE1/4NW1/4, and the balance
of NE1/4SW1/4, W1/2SW1/4
and Lot A of the NE1/4 SW1/4,
Section 9, T1S, R6E, BHM,
Pennington County, South
Dakota.
Approve the Planning Commission rec-
ommendation to continue the review of
Planned Unit Development / PU 02-03 to
the August 21, 2012, Board of Commis-
sioners’ meeting.
D. Minor Plat / PL 12-27 and Subdivi-
sion Regulations Variance / SV 12-10:
Roger and Debbie Sieck. To combine
two lots in order to create Lot 1R of
Melchert Ranch Subdivision and to waive
platting requirements in accordance with
Sections 700.1 and 400.3 of the Pen-
nington County Subdivision Regulations.
EXISTING LEGAL: Lots 1
and 2, Melchert Ranch Subdi-
vision, Section 15, T2N, R3E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL: Lot
1R, Melchert Ranch Subdivi-
sion, Section 15, T2N, R3E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
Approve Subdivision Regulations Vari-
ance / SV 12-10 to waive topographic in-
formation to be provided at a five (5) foot
contour interval, to waive the Section Line
to be improved to Ordinance 14 Stan-
dards, to waive the dedication of an eight
(8) foot utility and minor drainage ease-
ment outside of the platted access ease-
ment on the south property line of Lot 1R,
to waive engineered road construction
plans to be provided, and to waive road
improvements to be made to Melchert
Ranch Road; and, approve Minor Plat /
PL 12-27 with the following eight (8) con-
ditions: 1. That prior to Minor Plat ap-
proval, the applicant shall improve the
Section Line Right-of-Way to Ordinance
14 Standards or else obtain an approved
Subdivision Regulations Variance waiving
this requirement; 2. That eight (8) foot
utility and minor drainage easements be
dedicated on the interior sides of all lot
lines or an approved Subdivision Regula-
tions Variance be obtained waiving this
requirement; 3. That prior to Minor Plat
approval, the applicant provide engi-
neered road construction plans for any
road improvements to be made or else a
Subdivision Regulations Variance be ob-
tained waiving this requirement; 4. That
prior to Minor Plat approval, the applicant
improve Melchert Ranch Road to Low
Density Residential Local/Collector Road
Standards, including 66 feet of right-of-
way (or easement) with a 24-foot-wide, 4-
inch-graveled driving surface, or else a
surety be posted for the road improve-
ments or an approved Subdivision Regu-
lations Variance be obtained waiving this
requirement; 5. That the Certifications
on the plat be in accordance with Section
400.3.1.n of the Pennington County Sub-
division Regulations; 6. That an ap-
proved Floodplain Development Permit
be obtained prior to any work being con-
ducted within the boundaries of the 100-
year floodplain for Rapid Creek; 7. That
the title of the plat be changed in accor-
dance with the comments received from
the Register of Deeds; 8. That at the
time of submittal for the Minor Plat, the
plat meets all the requirements of Section
400.2 of the Pennington County Subdivi-
sion Regulations, including the Plat to be
scaled at not more than one (1) inch
equals one hundred (100) feet, and topo-
graphic information be provided of the
subject property at five (5) foot contour in-
tervals or the applicant obtains an ap-
proved Subdivision Regulations Variance
waiving any of these requirements that
are not met.
E. Preliminary Plat / PL 12-13: Marv
and Chris Matkins. To create Lots 1, 2,
and 3 of Matkins Addition #9 in accor-
dance with Section 400.2 of the Penning-
ton County Subdivision Regulations.
EXISTING LEGAL: That Pt
of GL 24 Lying S Of Hwy 16
Less Lots 3,4 and 5 Of
Mewonitoc Lode Sub., Less
Lot 4 Bar Placer MS 824, Less
Lot 1R, 4, and 5 of Matkins
Addn #6 and Less Row, Sec-
tion 30, T1S, R5E, BHM, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota.
PROPOSED LEGAL: Lots
1, 2, and 3 of Matkins Addition
#9, Section 30, T1S, R5E,
BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota.
To deny without prejudice Preliminary
Plat / PL 12-13 pursuant to Planning
Commission recommendation.
End of Consent Agenda Items.
ITEMS FROM PLANNING & ZONING
F. The Spring Creek Watershed Man-
agement and Project Implementation
Plan – Advisory Group: MOVED by Hol-
loway and seconded by Trautman to post-
pone this item indefinitely. Vote: Unani-
mous.
G. Appeal of Conditional Use Permit /
CU 12-15: Kari Fruechte: To allow for a
Vacation Home Rental in a Limited Agri-
culture District in accordance with Sec-
tions 206, 319, and 510 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Lot 1, Block 3, Pactola Estates,
Section 17, T1N, R5E, BHM,
Pennington County, South
Dakota.
MOVED by Buskerud and seconded
by Trautman to uphold the Planning Com-
mission decision to deny Conditional Use
Permit / CU 12-15 without prejudice. The
motion failed 4-1 on a roll call vote:
Buskerud – yes, Davis – no, Holloway –
no, Trautman – no, Petersen – no.
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Davis to approve Conditional Use Permit
/ CU 12-15 with eight conditions recom-
mended by Planning staff, amending
Condition #8 so the CUP is reviewed in
six months instead of twelve months. The
motion carried 4-1 on a roll call vote: Pe-
tersen – yes, Trautman – yes, Holloway –
yes, Davis – yes, Buskerud – no.
1. That a minimum of three (3) off-
street parking spaces be provided and
each parking space shall not be less than
162 square feet, nor less than nine feet
(9’) by eighteen feet (18’), surfaced with
gravel, concrete or asphalt and main-
tained in a dust free manner; 2. That prior
to the approval of this Conditional Use
Permit, a Building Permit shall be ob-
tained for the deck. A penalty will be as-
sessed to the cost of the permit; 3. That
the address be properly posted on both
the residence and at the approach so it is
visible in both directions in accordance
with Pennington County’s Ordinance #20;
4. That the applicant complies with South
Dakota Administrative Rule 44:02:08,
which regulates Vacation Home Rentals;
5. That the applicant obtain all the nec-
essary permits from the State pertaining
to the use of the Vacation Home Rental;
6. That the applicant complies with the
Performance Standards outlined in Sec-
tion 319 of the Zoning Ordinance, which
regulates Vacation Home Rentals; 7.
That this Conditional Use Permit not be
valid until the applicant signs the State-
ment of Understanding, which is available
at the Planning Office; and, 8. That this
Conditional Use Permit be reviewed in six
(6) months or on a complaint basis to ver-
ify that all conditions of approval are
being met.
H. Appeal of Conditional Use Permit /
CU 12-17: ARC Business
Ventures/Penny and Jon Fosheim. To
allow for a Vacation Home Rental in a
Suburban Residential District in accor-
dance with Sections 208, 319, and 510 of
the Pennington County Zoning Ordi-
nance. (This item was continued to the
August 21, 2012, meeting during ap-
proval of the agenda)
Lots 1-3, Block 11, Silver City,
Section 31, T2N, R5E, BHM,
Pennington County, South
Dakota.
EXECUTIVE SESSION per SDCL 1-25-
2
A. Contractual/Litigation per SDCL 1-
25-2(3)
B. Personnel Issue per SDCL 1-25-
2(1):
MOVED by Davis and seconded by
Buskerud to convene in executive ses-
sion after a ten minute recess. Vote:
Unanimous. The Board remained in ex-
ecutive session from 11:55 a.m. until 1:12
p.m. MOVED by Trautman and sec-
onded by Buskerud to adjourn from exec-
utive session. Vote: Unanimous.
AUDITOR’S ACCOUNT OF THE
TREASURER
To the Pennington County Board of
Commissioners, I hereby submit the fol-
lowing report of my examination of the
cash and cash items in the hands of the
County Treasurer as of July 17, 2012:
Total balances of checking/savings ac-
counts, $29,186,471.52; Total balance of
Treasurer’s Office safe cash, $9,100.00;
Total certificates of deposit,
$2,573,891.97 Total Prime Value Invest-
ment, $2,037,599.54; Total petty cash,
$111,470.00; Total Cash Items Paid,
$5.00; Total Cash Items, $1,997.30; Total
long/short, (483.97); Total,
$33,920,051.36. Submitted by Lori Wes-
sel, Deputy Auditor.
PAyROLL
Commissioners, 9,411.50; Human Re-
sources, 4,585.67; Elections, 15,117.21;
Auditor - liens, 2,739.44; Auditor,
16,056.28; Treasurer, 47,541.87; Data
Processing - General, 41,982.77; State's
Attorney, 146,986.58; Public Defender,
93,940.19; Juvenile Diversion, 7,576.39;
Victim's Assistance, 5,203.66; Buildings
& Grounds, 102,515.32; Equalization,
65,717.78; Register of Deeds, 24,429.10;
Sheriff, 340,030.02; Service Station,
8,262.78; HIDTA Grant, 8,323.89; Jail,
472,854.66; Jail Work Program, 4,266.46;
Hill City Law, 12,430.12; Keystone Law,
5,417.29; New Underwood – Law,
4,342.23; School Liaison, 16,729.20; Wall
Law, 12,989.79; JSC Teachers,
22,501.95; Home Detention, 8,389.88;
JAIG/JSC, 10,827.87; Alcohol & Drug,
150,760.61; Friendship House,
45,414.99; Economic Assistance,
59,245.67; Mental & Alcohol-SAO,
7,775.38; Mental & Alcohol-HHS,
3,508.25; Extension, 4,280.16; Weed &
Pest, 17,991.74; Mountain Pine Beetle,
10,261.25; Planning and Zoning,
25,434.04; Water Protection, 5,849.00;
Ordinance, 3,508.25; Juvenile Services
Center, 233,474.29; Highway,
189,035.30; Fire Administration,
6,317.22; Dispatch, 168,330.18; Emer-
gency Management, 5,075.92; Emer-
gency Management, 805.28; 24-7 Pro-
gram, 19,560.47; PCCCC Building Proj-
ects, 3,519.34.
PERSONNEL
Health & Human Services: Effective
7/16/2012 - M. Semmler, $3681.61.
Auditor/Elections: Effective 7/1/2012 -
N. Teal, $14.74/hr.
State’s Attorney: Effective 7/27/2012 –
K. Groote, $4696.67.
Public Defender: Effective 8/20/2012
– S. MacNally, $4696.00.
VOUCHERS
AT&T, 12.81; AT&T Mobility, 1,113.98;
B&H Asphalt Maint, Inc, 64,544.00; BH
Power Inc, 8,921.89; Carol Butzman,
30,000.00; CBM Food Service,
33,486.30; City Of Box Elder, 261.13; City
Of Hill City, 15.50; City Of Rapid City-
Water, 2292.07; City Of Wall, 127.00; Ex-
ecutive Mgmt Finance Office, 20.00; First
Administrators, 330,338.83; First Inter-
state Bank, 6,499.65; Golden West Co,
1570.67; Kieffer Sanitation, 1836.15;
Knology, 8417.52; Montana Dakota Utili-
ties, 3,124.08; Mt Rushmore Telephone,
102.20; Qwest Communications, 4.25;
Qwest Corp, 7,836.67; Rapid Valley San-
itary District, 89.24; Red River Service
Corp, 49.48; SD Risk Pool, 967.00;
Tessiers, 42,449.98; Verizon, 6,263.16;
Walker Refuse, 107.25; Wal-Mart Com-
munity, 37.34; West River Electric,
1,328.59; Wright Express FSC, 368.58.
ADJOURN
MOVED by Holloway and seconded by
Buskerud to adjourn the meeting. Vote:
Unanimous. There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was adjourned 1:12
p.m.
Julie A. Pearson,
Auditor
Published August 23, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $156.68.
WALL CITy COUNCIL
MEETING
AUGUST 9, 2012 6:30PM
The Wall City Council met for a regular
meeting August 9, 2012 at 6:30 pm in the
Community Center meeting room.
Members Present: Dave Hahn, Mayor;
Rick Hustead, Councilman; Bill Leonard,
Councilman; Mike Anderson, Council-
man; Stan Anderson, Councilman
Others Present: Carolynn Anderson, Fi-
nance Officer; Jeff Clark, Public Works
Director; Lindsey Hildebrand,
Chamber/Assistant FO; Lt. Corey
Brubakken and Sergeant Dan Wardle,
Pennington County Sheriff; Laurie Hind-
man, Pennington Co. Courant; Pandi
Pittman; Wally Hoffman; Juanita
Schroeder; Eldon Helms; Kent Jordan;
Scott Eisenbraun, Rusty Olney, Grady
Crew
Absent: Jerry Morgan, Councilman

(All action taken in the following minutes
carried by unanimous vote unless other-
wise stated.)
Motion by Hustead, second by Dunker to
approve the agenda. Motion carried.
Lt. Corey Brubakken presented the police
report. There was increased presence
during celebration. Brubakken introduced
Sergeant, Dan Wardle and commented
that a new deputy for Wall is in training
and will hopefully be ready for duty by mid
November.
Motion by Dunker, second by Leonard to
approve new sign request by Petals and
Pots. Motion carried.
Motion by Hustead, second by M Ander-
son to approve building permit for Kim
Beers to build a garage with seven foot
(7’) variance on back lot line adjacent to
property to the South, also owned by Kim
Beers. Motion carried.
Additional building permits were reviewed
for Dorothy Fortune to add a handicap ac-
cessible deck and Red Rock Restaurant
with sidewalk maintenance.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve transfer of off-sale liquor
license from Wall Food Center to Rose-
bell Inc. Motion carried.
Motion by Leonard, second by S Ander-
son to approve rezoning the Hildebrand
property located at 104 Creighton Road
from residential to commercial. Motion
carried.
RESOLUTION 12-9
A RESOLUTION APPROVING
THE REZONING FROM RES-
IDENTIAL PROPERTY TO
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
OF LOT 3-5 OF OUTLOT 1
LESS HWY OF
PRITCHARD’S 1ST ADDN
LOCATED IN WALL SECTION
31, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH,
RANGE 16 EAST OF THE
BLACK HILLS MERIDIAN,
WALL, PENNINGTON
COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA.
WHEREAS, the plat of the
above described property has
been executed according to
statute, now therefore;
BE IT RESOLVED, that the
City Council, in and for the City
of Wall, South Dakota does
hereby approve the said rezon-
ing from Residential property to
Commercial property of Lot 3-
5 of Outlot 1 less Hwy of
Pritchard’s 1st Addn, located in
the Wall Section 31, Township
1 North, Range 16 East of the
Black Hills Meridian, Wall, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota.
The Finance Officer is author-
ized to endorse on such plat a
copy of the resolution and cer-
tify to its correctness.
Dated this 9th day of August,
2012.
CITY OF WALL,
SOUTH DAKOTA
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
ATTEST:
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
CERTIFICATE
I, Carolynn Anderson, the duly
appointed Finance Officer of
the City of Wall, South Dakota,
do hereby certify that the fore-
going is a true and correct copy
of a resolution recorded in the
Minutes of the Wall City Coun-
cil held on August 9, 2012 and
appears upon the files in my of-
fice.
Dated at Wall, South Dakota,
this 9th day of August, 2012.
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
The Echo Valley group has met with the
Planning and Zoning committee to dis-
cuss the installation of water mains that
would connect to the main line west of
Stone Drive. They would like to continue
working toward annexation and asked the
city to consider sharing the cost of the in-
stallation of an 8 inch line 50/50. Motion
by Leonard, second by S Anderson to ap-
prove continuing the Echo Valley project
as approved by engineer. Motion carried.
Clark mentioned that he would like to see
a weekly inspection by CETEC to ensure
that all proper materials are being used
and the plan is going according to plan.
Finance Officer (FO) Anderson wanted
council input on property cleanup abate-
ment. Letters have been sent to 4 sepa-
rate properties, three times and no re-
sponse or cleanup has occurred with the
deadline date having been reached. The
council requested a report of estimated
time to clean each property before they
made a decision. If the city cleans up the
properties, the owners would be billed
and fees would be added to their taxes if
they do not pay.
Wally Hoffman, president of the Eastern
Pennington County Ambulance District
voiced concerns over the proposed lease
agreement for the building and equipment
about whether there are any repairs
needed before they entered into the
agreement. Other concerns from the
EMTs included how the insurance would
be handled as the building was originally
set up to share 50/50 with the fire depart-
ment. Suggestions included keeping the
insurance under the city and bill each de-
partment accordingly. Actual usage as
well as utility usage should be adjusted
as the 50/50 may not be applicable any-
more.
The sewer issues at 215 W Fifth Street
have been resolved with the sewer main
being relined. There should not be any
more issues as no major defects were
found.
The sewer lagoon project was discussed.
Several man holes going over the hill are
in very bad condition and the engineer’s
suggestion was to include them in the
project and do the whole thing at once
with the total cost estimate at $770,000.
If the city should try to get on the state
water plan to get funding, it would require
an initial outlay of around $10,000 to gen-
erate a facility plan and then the likelihood
of receiving funds was questionable.
There is currently $225,000 in the sewer
reserve and approximately $546,000 in
the waste water money market, so fund-
ing it is not completely out of the question.
The council requested that the engineer
be present at the next meeting to give
more information.
Motion by S Anderson, second by M An-
derson to authorize opening bids for the
airport snow blower and to approve the
previous appointed committee to accept
bids. Motion carried. The cost is
$200,000 and the city’s portion is 2%. The
blower can only be used within the City
under extreme emergencies.
Budget for 2013CY was discussed. The
council accepted the Pennington County
Sheriff’s office budget request of
$103,600.00. Motion by S Anderson, sec-
ond by Hustead to approve 1st reading of
12-05, 2013 Budget with the Finance
Committee meeting prior to the Septem-
ber meeting to further refine the budget.
Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve 1st reading of ordinance
12-06, amend sign ordinance. Motion
carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by Hus-
tead to approve July 9th and 26th city
council minutes. Motion carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by S Anderson
to approve the June Ambulance minutes.
Motion carried.
Motion by S Anderson, second by M An-
derson to approve paying the 2011
budget funds for Wall Health Service that
were put in reserves and their 2012
budget funds for a total of $10,000.00.
Motion carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by M Anderson
to approve the remaining August City of
Wall bills. Motion carried.
AUGUST 9, 2012 CITy BILLS
AIR HON LTD, casters for chair carts in
CC, 96.00; SYLER ANDERS, water aer-
obics contract labor, 710.00; ASSOCI-
ATED SUPPLY CO, vacuum cart for pool,
2,506.61; BADLANDS AUTOMOTIVE,
fuel pump on white pickup, 556.47;
BANYON DATA SYSTEM, software sup-
port, 770.00; BLACK HILLS CHEMICAL,
CC paper towels-toilet paper-hand soap,
684.85; BROSZ ENGINEERING, INC,
airport engineering for building, 1,032.24;
BUTLER MACHINERY CO., Pinion seal
on loader, 824.55; CENTURY GLASS
COMPANY, new windows in Community
center, 15,872.00; CROWN OIL, gaso-
line, 1,575.20; DAKOTA BACKUP,
backup service, 167.10; DAKOTA BUSI-
NESS CENTER, copier contract for new
printer, 80.00; DAKOTA MILL & GRAIN,
spray chemical, 71.25; E-FREE BIBLE
CHURCH, CC deposit refund, 75.00; EN-
ERGY LABORATORIES, water testing,
100.00; FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, ach
fees, 12.40; FIRST INTERSTATE BANK,
sales tax, 424.28; GOLDEN WEST
TELE, CC phone, 512.60; GRIMM'S
PUMP, potable water pump repair,
156.01; LARRY GRAVATT, ambulance
district formation contract, 2,632.19;
GUNDERSON, PALMER, GOODSELL,
advice on Ambulance district issues,
2,757.50; LOY HAMM, CC deposit re-
fund, 60.00; HARVEY'S LOCK SHOP, re-
pair GH storage door & office to meeting
room door, 293.78; HAWKINS, INC, pool
water treatment, 3,825.71; HD SUPPLY
WATERWORKS, new head for T Hus-
teads meter, 80.09; THE HEALTH POOL
OF SD, Anderson's Ins, 94.00; KENS RE-
FRIGERATION, INC, reclaim AC unit at
Well #4 for disposal, 71.43; JIM KITTER-
MAN, reimbursement for insurance,
414.61; LURZ PLUMBING, sewer repair
at community center, 178.57; NORTH-
WEST PIPE FITTINGS INC, sprinkler
heads for S. Blvd, 130.36; ONE CALL
STYSTEMS, INC., locate requests, 6.66;
PENN. COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE,
3rd qrt contract service for LE, 25,017.50;
PENNINGTON CO. TREASURER, Am-
bulance district election, 1,000.00; PEN-
NINGTON COUNTY COURANT, publish-
ings, 613.17; PETTY CASH, postage-
stamps, 137.96; POSTMASTER, office
stamps, 346.00; POWER HOUSE, fuel
pump assembly for welder, 20.60; QUINN
COMMUNITY CENTER, deposit for CC
for election, 30.00; RAPID DELIVERY
INC, shipping for water samples, 64.80;
S.D. ASSN OF RURAL WATER SYSTE,
camera 4 blocks of sewer line, 550.00;
SD DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, water
testing, 620.00; SERVALL UNIFORM, CC
rugs, 53.49; SUMMIT SIGNS, replacing
street signs for west side, 523.00; TLC
ELECTRIC, INC, upgrading and repairing
the celebration panel afte, 2,611.36;
WALKER NAPA, oil, 15.96; WALKER RE-
FUSE, garbage service, 7,586.88; WALL
BADLANDS AREA CHAMBER, BBB
funds, 3,630.45; WALL BUILDING CEN-
TER, supplies, 431.29; WALL HEALTH
SERVICES, 2011 & 2012 budget funds,
10,000.00; WEST RIVER ELEC, well
pumping, 14,724.90; WEST RIVER
ELECTRIC ASSOC, INC, Main St loan,
7,500.00; WEST RIVER/LYMAN-JONES
RURAL, water purchases, 3,500.00.
TOTAL: 115,748.82
Gross Salaries – July 31, 2012:
Gross Salaries: Adm. - $5,386.16; PWD -
$9,520.08; Seasonal - $7,229.75
AFLAC, Employee Supplemental Ins.,
$357.10; HEALTH POOL, Health/Life In-
surance, $4,180.42; METLIFE, Employee
Supplemental, $25.00; SDRS, Employee
Retirement, $1,754.26; SDRS-SRP, Em-
ployee Supp Retirement plan, $150.00;
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $4,733.51.
Motion by Hustead, second by Dunker to
approve the August Fire Department bills.
Motion carried.
AUGUST 9, 2012 FIRE DEPT BILLS
ALLEGIANT EMERGENCY SERVICES,
first aid supplies, 15.00; BADLANDS AU-
TOMOTIVE, selinoid/repairs to Brush 2,
95.33; BRYAN, GARRETT, apple/Cac-
tus/Sage Creek/Pinnacles, 247.50; COR-
NER PANTRY, fuel, 455.01; CROWN
OIL, deisel fuel, 1,639.90; DE'S OIL &
PROPANE, batteries for Brush 2 & Ten-
der 2, 549.15; FIRST INTERSTATE
BANK, 3 office chairs from Office Max,
1,419.87; GOLDEN WEST TELE, phone-
internet, 131.71; GRIMMS PUMP, 2
Koshin pumps with 50/50 grant, 1,480.02;
JIM KITTERMAN, apple/Cactus/Sage
Creek/Pinnacles/Highland, 615.00; JOHN
KITTERMAN, apple/Cactus/Sage
Creek/Pinnacles/Highland, 690.00; HAR-
VEY MILLER, apple/Cactus/Sage
Creek/Pinnacles/Highland, 922.50; RED
ROCK RESTAURANT, food for pinnacle
fire, 120.00; ROSENBAUER SD LLC, re-
pair overheat valve on Engine 1, 261.24;
JOEL STEPHENS, apple/Cactus/Sage
Creek/Pinnacles, 547.50; GEORGE
MICHAELS, Sage Creek/Pinnacle/High-
land, 285.00; JERRY JOHANNASEN,
Cactus fire, 105.00; DARWIN GEIGLE,
Cactus/Pinnacles, 352.50; BUTCH KIT-
TERMAN, Cactus/Sage Creek/Pinnacles,
397.50; JEREMY HERTEL,
Pinnacle/Highland, 285.00; KIYA
RICHARDSON, Highland, 270.00; WALL
AUTO LIVERY, fuel, 121.57; WALL
BUILDING CENTER, supplies, 143.38;
WALL DRUG STORE, balls for tank at
celebration tent, 71.52; WALL FOOD
CENTER, supplies, 45.19; WALL
HEALTH SERVICES, testing for red
cards, 496.00; WEST RIVER ELEC, elec-
tricity, 178.46.
TOTAL: 11,940.85
Motion by S Anderson, second by M An-
derson to approve paying the time for wild
land fires only if documented proof is pro-
vided. Motion carried.
Motion by Dunker, second by Leonard to
approve the August Ambulance Depart-
ment bills with exception of the Black Hills
Embroidery bill for t-shirts. Motion car-
ried.
AUGUST 9, 2012 AMBULANCE BILLS
AT & T, cell phone, 46.36; CROWN OIL,
fuel, 816.00; MIKE ERZ, food reimburse-
ment, 10.08; GOLDEN WEST, phone-in-
ternet, 195.12; JERRY JOHANNSEN,
food reimbursement, 8.96; Matheson Tri-
Gas Inc, oxygen supplies, 83.26; PAHL,
MARGE, food reimbursement, 10.89;
RAPID CITY FIRE DEPT, ALS runs,
1,200.00; WALL FOOD CENTER, sup-
plies, 68.46; WEST RIVER ELEC, elec-
tricity, 158.44; WILSON, MARY KAY, food
reimbursement, 14.61.
TOTAL: 2,612.18
Gross Salaries – July 31, 2012:
Gross Salaries: $8025.23
FIRST WESTERN BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $1,455.98
Motion by Hustead, second by M Ander-
son to approve the August Library bills.
Motion carried.
AUGUST 9, 2012 LIBRARy BILLS
BADLANDS COMPUTER SERVICE,
computer service contract, $400.00;
BRUNNEMANN WENDY, supplies from
Target, $27.91; FIRST INTERSTATE
BANK, books from Amazon, $6.37;
GOLDEN WEST TELE, phone bill,
$36.77; WEST RIVER ELEC, electricity,
$55.94; WINN, JONNY C., ink cartridges
for Library reports, $31.78.
TOTAL: $558.77
Gross Salaries – July 31, 2012:
Gross Salaries: $621.00
FIRST WESTERN BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $82.58
Motion by Hustead, second by S Ander-
son to approve the August Cemetery bills.
Motion carried.
AUGUST 9, 2012 CEMETERy BILLS
CORNER PANTRY, fuel for mowers,
46.60; WEST RIVER ELEC, prepay on
electricity, 60.00.
TOTAL: 106.60
Gross Salaries – July 31, 2012:
Gross Salaries: $262.50
FIRST INTERSTATE BANK, Employee
payroll tax, $34.93
At this time the on-call schedule, compen-
satory report, Community Center report
and Wall Health Service report were re-
viewed.
FO Anderson noted the new community
center windows have been installed and
new blinds have been ordered for the
grand hall. The new Library doors have
also been installed.
The Municipal League conference in Oc-
tober will be held in Pierre, council mem-
bers wanting to attend should notify An-
derson before the September meeting.
Motion by Dunker, second by Leonard to
approve moving the October meeting to
the 9th. Motion carried.
Motion by Hustead, second by Leonard to
approve purchase of point of sale soft-
ware system for Banyon at a cost of
Continued on page 8
annc@
gwtc.net
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, AUG. 2S: SPECIAL YEAFLINC & EAFLY
SPFINC CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FEEDER CATTLE: 12 P.M. (MT}.
EARLY CONSIGNMENTS: £ST1MAT1NG 2DDD H£AD.
YEARLINGS: NI÷NO IMPLANTS
LANDERS LIVESTOCK - 300 DLK STFS .......................850-900=
FREIN - 250 DLK STFS..................................................700-800=
ROCK - 180 DLK STFS ..................................................900-950=
FAIRBANKS - 125 FANCY HOME FAISED DLK STFS;
NI ...............................................................................900-950=
ROSETH CATTLE CO - 60 DLK STFS...................................850=
EISENBRAUN - 50 DLK STFS & SPAY HFFS..................700-800=
MILLAR - 50 DLK STFS & OPEN HFFS........................900-1000=
SHEARER - 50 DLK OPEN HFFS ..........................................750=
FERGUSON - 35 DLK FALL CLVS; FS.............................500-650=
HELMS - 31 FWF STFS & OPEN HFFS........................700-1000=
JOHNSTON - 30 DLK & DWF STFS & SPAY HFFS .........700-850=
PORCH & PORCH - 25 DLK TESTED OPEN HFFS ................900=
MADER - 20 DLK OPEN HFFS .......................................850-900=
SCHOFIELD BROTHERS - 20 DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 900-950=
THOMSEN - 20 DLK & CHAF X OPEN HFFS.........................850=
WEISS - 20 DLK TESTED OPEN HFFS..................................900=
RICHARDSON - 10 FED STFS.......................................800-900=
THOMSEN - 10 DLK TESTED OPEN HFFS............................850=
JOBGEN - 10 DLK TESTED OPEN HFFS...............................850=
WEDNESDAY, NOV. ?: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 2?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS PFECONDITIONED CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS (FOUF-
WAY, PASTEUFELLA, 7-WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS}.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE
SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S: NO SALE
2DJ2 Horse So1es:
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22: DAD FIVEF FALL
EXTFAVACANZA HOFSE SALE. CO TO WWW.PHILIP
LIVESTOCK.COM TO VIEW CATALOC OF CALL PLA AT
605-859-2577.
SPRING CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, ASV÷AGE
ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED
BARBER - 100 DLK CLVS; FS...............................................500=
WELLER RANCH - 50 DLK CLVS; FS,ASV......................400-500=
BARNETT - 15 DLK CLVS.....................................................650=
BRED COWS:
JERRY NELSON - 120 FANCY HOME FAISED DLK ANC 4 TO 8
YF OLD COWS; DFED DLK & HEFF APFIL 1ST CALVINC
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH
AT tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFO.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 4: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 1S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 2S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 2: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 9: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 16: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 1?: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 30: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 3: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE &
WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
80UTh 0AK0TA ßRAN0 8ELL|NC 0N
TUE8., AUC. 28Th AT 12:00 HT:
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s
our vo1oe 1n governmen1 1o represen1 U.S.
oo111e produoers 1n 1rode morKe11ng 1ssues.
]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering
video saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD

CATTL£ R£PORT - TU£SDAY, AUGUST 2J, 2DJ2
A b1g run o] ue1gÞ-ups & o b1g run o] Þorses. Ne×1
ueeK o b1g Speo1o1 Yeor11ng So1e u11Þ 2DDD Þeod.
Co1o1og Horse So1e So1urdog, Sep1ember 22nd. TÞ1s
u111 be 1Þe 1os1 Þorse so1e o] 2DJ2, so ge1 gour Þorses
oons1gned.
11´s 11me 1o s1or1 ge111ng gour oo1ves oons1gned & 1Þe
prospeo1s ore 1Þo1 1Þe morKe1 oon be be11er 1Þon
on11o1po1ed. Co11 ong o] our ]1e1dmen.
WEIGH-UPS:
ReIndI LIvestock - Custer
6 ..........................................Dll Cows 1433=........$81.00
Robert Tbomsen - Long VaIIey
1..........................................CIar Dull 2255=......$108.50
Wayne & MIcbeaI Hamar - Long VaIIey
4 ....................................Dll Cowciics 1136=........$99.50
2 ..........................................Dll Cows 1420=........$77.00
1............................................Dll Cow 1535=........$76.00
2 ..........................................Dll Cows 1343=........$75.00
CbarIes Karp - Owanka
1 .........................................CIar Cow 1225=........$80.00
Lawrence ScboIIeId - MIdIand
1............................................Dll Dull 2100=......$107.00
Steve CuIIum - Custer
1............................................Dll Dull 1995=......$107.00
F Lee BaIdwIn - EIm SprIngs
1............................................Dll Cow 1365=........$79.50
Tom DeVrIes - MIdIand
1 ...........................................Fcd Cow 1390=........$79.00
2 ..........................................Dll Cows 1435=........$74.00
AmeIIa HurIey - PbIIIp
1..........................................CIar Dull 1800=......$102.50
Steve DaIy - MIdIand
1............................................Dll Cow 1610=........$78.50
Wayne Hamar - Long VaIIey
1............................................Dll Cow 1500=........$78.50
2 ..........................................Dll Cows 1420=........$75.50
LyIe & CIndy Long - EnnIng
1..........................................CIar Dull 2135=......$102.00
MIke LIvermont - BeIvIdere
1............................................Dll Cow 1600=........$78.00
MIckey DaIy - MIdIand
1............................................Dll Cow 1560=........$78.00
1............................................Dll Cow 1615=........$74.00
Grant Patterson - Kadoka
1............................................Dll Cow 1375=........$78.00
1 ...........................................Dwf Cow 1665=........$76.50
1 ...........................................Dwf Cow 1565=........$74.00
Tbad Stout - Kadoka
2 ..........................................Dll Cows 1313=........$78.00
1............................................Dll Cow 1235=........$76.00
Casey BrInk - UnIon Center
1............................................Dll Dull 2040=........$98.00
Terry HotcbkIss - Mud Butte
2 ..........................................Dll Cows 1385=........$77.75
Laverne Kocb - New Underwood
1..........................................FWF Cow 1460=........$77.50
BIaIne Krogman - WbIte RIver
1............................................Dll Cow 1545=........$77.00
1............................................Dll Cow 1390=........$76.00
Jobn McGrIII - QuInn
1............................................Dll Cow 1420=........$77.00
Jobn MansIIeId - MartIn
1............................................Dll Dull 2090=........$96.50
DennIs & Kay SIeIer - QuInn
1............................................Dll Dull 1960=........$96.50
Fred Karp - Owanka
1 ...........................................Fcd Cow 1635=........$76.00
Jason HamIII - MIIesvIIIe
1............................................Dll Cow 1565=........$76.00
CbIIders Rancb LLC - Edgemont
9 ..............................Dll & DWF Cows 1424=........$76.00
CIIII Krogman - WbIte RIver
1............................................Dll Cow 1415=........$76.00
PauI Harvey - InterIor
1............................................Dll Cow 1670=........$75.50
DarreII Peterson - PbIIIp
1............................................Dll Cow 1580=........$75.50
Lawrence ScboIIeId - QuInn
1............................................Dll Cow 1480=........$75.50
MerIe & LInda StIIweII - Kadoka
2..........................................CIar Dull 2055=........$96.00
1..........................................CIar Dull 2415=........$95.50
HORSES:
Under 999#.......................................10.00 - 20.00Jcwt
1000# - 1199# ..................................1S.00 - 2S.00Jcwt
1200# & over....................................20.00 - 30.00Jcwt
SaddIe Prospects ............................42S.00 - 9S0.00Jbd
Pennington County Courant • August 23, 2012 • Page 8
$1995 which includes installation. Motion
carried.
FO Anderson explained her computer
was purchased in 2005 from Golden
West and has been shutting down on a
regular basis. A quote from Golden West
for a new computer is $1092, plus $500-
$600 for the conversion. Motion to ap-
prove new computer up to $2,000 by S
Anderson, second by Dunker. Motion
carried.
Public Works Director (PWD) Clark had
three items for budget review, a V Blade
for the bobcat for a cost of $4,420 was re-
jected, a brush cutter for the bobcat at the
cost of $5,940 was rejected, and a newer
backhoe at the cost of $37,000 was dis-
cussed. The current backhoe is only used
about 20 hours a year and needs mainte-
nance. The council requested that Clark
look into the cost of repairs for the present
backhoe.
Motion by Leonard, second by M Ander-
son to raise the purchase order limit for
local purchases from $50 to $200. Motion
carried.
Mayor Hahn and the council thanked
Pete Dunker for his work and dedication
to the formation of the ambulance serv-
ice. Dunker recognized the hard work of
Carolynn Anderson and also Lindsey
Hildebrand’s contributions.
Councilman Leonard noted that a Stan-
dard Operating Procedure manual needs
to be developed for smoother interaction
between the Public Works Department
and Finance Office.
The next City Council meeting will be on
September 6th at 6:30 pm.
Meeting adjourned at 9:10 pm.
____________
David L. Hahn,
Mayor
___________________
Carolynn M. Anderson,
Finance Officer
Published August 23, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $191.69.
ADOPTION OF
PROVISIONAL BUDGET
FOR
PENNINGTON COUNTy,
SOUTH DAKOTA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: That the
Board of County Commissioners of Pen-
nington County, will meet in the Court-
house at 315 St. Joseph Street, Rapid
City SD on Tuesday, September 4, 2012
at 10 a.m. for the purpose of considering
the Provisional Budget for the year 2013
and the various items, schedules,
amounts and appropriations set forth
therein and as many days thereafter as is
deemed necessary until the final adoption
of the budget on or before September 30,
2012. At such time any interested per-
son may appear either in person or by a
representative and will be given an oppor-
tunity for a full and complete discussion
of all purposes, objectives, items, sched-
ules, appropriations, estimates, amounts
and matters set forth and contained in the
Provisional Budget.
“Pennington County fully subscribes to
the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you
desire to attend this public meeting and
are in need of accommodations, please
notify the Commissioners’ Office at (605)
394-2171 at least 24 hours prior to the
meeting so that appropriate services and
auxiliary aids are available.”
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published August 16 & 23, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $25.47.
NOTICE OF HEARING
BEFORE THE PENNINGTON
COUNTy
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Board of Commissioners
under the provisions of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance as follows:
Lin and Ann Thompson have applied for
a Setback Variance to reduce the mini-
mum required front-yard setback from 25
feet to 1 foot and to reduce the minimum
required side-yard setback from 8 feet to
3 feet for an existing carport. In addition,
the applicant is also requesting to reduce
the side yard setback from 8 feet to 6 feet
for the existing garage in a Suburban
Residential District located on Lot A of Lot
1, Block 6, Eastern Acres Subdivision,
Section 11, T1N, R8E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, 5542 Meteor
Street, in accordance with Sections 208
and 509 of the Pennington County Zoning
Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Board of Commissioners in the
County Courthouse at 10:30 a.m. on the
4th day of September 2012. At this time,
any person interested may appear and
show cause, if there be any, why such re-
quests should or should not be granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Julie A. Pearson
Pennington County Auditor
Published August 23, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $16.52.
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
JULy 19, 2012
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Office
in Murdo, SD. Chairman Joseph Hieb
called the meeting to order at 10:30 a.m.
(CT).
Roll Call was taken and Chairman
Joseph Hieb declared a quorum was
present. Directors present were: Joseph
Hieb, Casey Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl
Prokop and Lorne Smith. Also present:
Jake Fitzgerald, Manager; Kati Venard,
Sec./Bookkeeper; Dave Larson, Larson
Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to ap-
prove the agenda. Motion carried unani-
mously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the June 20, 2012, meeting were previ-
ously mailed to the Board for their review.
Motion by Director Krogman, seconded
by Director Prokop to approve the June
minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Joseph
Hieb, $56.61; Casey Krogman, $56.61;
Marion Matt, $56.61; Veryl Prokop,
$56.61; Lorne Smith, $56.61; West
River/Lyman-Jones RWS, $1,000.00;
Pennington County Courant, $28.92;
Lyman County Herald, $31.58; Murdo
Coyote, $35.38; Todd County Tribune,
$32.24; Pioneer Review, $32.17; Kadoka
Press, $37.36; United States Treasury,
$111.72. Motion by Director Smith, sec-
onded by Director Prokop to approve the
District bills. Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS
REPORT: The financial status of the Dis-
trict to date was previously sent to the
Board. A copy of the June Financial Re-
port is on file at the District office in
Murdo. Motion by Director Smith, sec-
onded by Director Krogman to approve
the June Financial Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his July report to the
Board. Motion by Director Krogman, sec-
onded by Director Prokop to approve the
Manager’s Report. Motion carried unan-
imously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
Fy 2013 BUDGET HEARING & ADOPT
2013 BUDGET & RESOLUTION: At
10:45am (CT) Chairman Joseph Hieb
read the following notice: “This is the time
and place set by published notice for
hearing statements of arguments relative
to the budget proposed by the West River
Water Development District Board. All in-
terested parties may make a statement.
Persons who have indicated they wish to
make a statement will be called in the
order in which they have signed in. After-
wards, anyone else may make a state-
ment.” Nobody from the public was pres-
ent at the budget hearing. Motion by Di-
rector Matt, seconded by Director Krog-
man to close the FY 2013 budget hearing
and adopt the 2013 Budget and Budget
Resolution. Motion carried unanimously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 10:47 A.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:
_________________
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
___________
Joseph Hieb,
Chairman
Published August 23, 2012 , at the total
approximate cost of $31.84.
Wall City Council Minutes
(cont. from previous page)
Sponsored by:
Pennington
County
Courant
& Thompson
Photographics
Royce, 3 months
son of
Thor & Jackie Roseth, Philip.
Bailey, 3 years, & Ciara, 1 year,
children of
Chad & Tacasie Cerney, Wall.
Dawson, 4 years, & Hallie, 1
year, children of
Tanner & Kim Handcock, Wall
Branden, 13 years
son of
Ronda Hamann &
Glenn Gibson, Wall
Jessica, 13 1/2 years, Tadan, 11
1/2 years, LBridger, 7 years &
Callie, 3 years, children of
Mike & Jennifer Casjens, Wall.
Tomorrow’s Leaders

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->