Table of Contents 
Click on any of the titles to take you to the appropriate piece 

Features
Pesto is Besto 15 
By Jill Nussinow, MS, RD 

Columns 
What’s Cooking?  4
Find out what’s up with the Vegan  Culinary Experience this month.   

  Jill writes about some of her extra  delicious pesto options, from  arugula pesto to oil‐free pesto.   

Pizza without Borders 18 
By Robin Robertson   
 

Vegan Cuisine & the Law:  Mid‐year Updated of Legal  Matters Affecting Barnyard  Animals 42 
By Mindy Kursban, Esq. & Andy  Breslin 
 

Pizza doesn’t just live in Italy  anymore! Check out Robin’s  excellent recipes for her  muffaletta pizza and bahn mi  pizza.   

My Love Affair with Pizza 22 
By Madelyn Pryor 

A lot has happened in the last few  months in the legal and political  sphere for farm issues and animal  welfare and rights issues.   

  Most of us grew up eating pizza,  but as Madelyn grew up, so did  her tastes, except for one special  pizza her mom used to make.   

From the Garden:  Mastering  the Art of Grilled Pizza 46 
By Liz Lonetti 
 

Creating a Heart Healthy  Pizza 25 
By Mark Sutton 

Liz departs from the garden and  heads to her grill to show us the  secrets of a perfect grilled pizza!   

The Vegan Traveler:  Across  the USA 49 
By Chef Jason Wyrick 

  Mark shows us how to create  pizzas using healthy ingredients,  interesting combinations, and  creative techniques.   

  Chef Jason recounts his  experiences in Portland, Richmond,  Cleveland, and Sedona.   

Pizza by the Crust 29 
By Jason Wyrick 

Marketplace  10 
 

         
Pizza!

  Read about how to make classic  crusts like the traditional Napoli  crust and the Chicago Deep Dish  crust.       

Get connected and find out about  vegan friendly businesses and  organizations.    see the following page for  interviews and reviews…      

August 2012|1

 
               

Table of Contents 2 
Click on any of the titles to take you to the appropriate piece 

Features Contd.
A Slice of Advice: Vegan  Cheeses for Your Vegan  Pizza 34 
By Madelyn Pryor 
 

Reviews 
Book Review:  Practically  Raw 66 
By  Madelyn Pryor 

                 

Learn about the best tools to get  the most out of your pizza making  experience.   

  Simple, straightforward recipes  that shine either raw or cooked. 
 

Book Review:  Grilling Vegan  Style 67 
By  Jason Wyrick 

Peels & Stones: Tools of the  Trade 37 
By Jason Wyrick 
 

  Great info about grilling with  decent recipes. 
 

Learn about the best tools to get  the most out of your pizza making  experience. 
 

Book Review:  Vegan a la  Mode 69 
By Madelyn Pryor 
 

Columns Contd.
Recipe Index  76 
 

 

A cornucopia of frozen vegan  desserts. 
 

A listing of all the recipes found in  this issue, compiled with links. 
   
 

Book Review:  The Starch  Solution 70 
By Jason Wyrick 
 

Interviews 
 

Author Hannah Kaminsky 53 An inspiring and informative book 
Hannah is one of the most  creative minds currently writing  vegan cookbooks.   
         

about how to lose weight, keep it  off, and rejuvenate your health. 
 

Book Review:  Rawmazing 72
By Madelyn Pryor 

Vegan Photographer Sharon    Raw recipes everyone can bite  Lee Hart 55 
 

Sharon is a professional  photographer, educator, and now  author of the new book Sanctuary,  a beautiful collection of animals  from Sanctuaries across the U.S.         

into.   

Pizza!

August 2012|2

 
 

Table of Contents 3 
Click on any of the titles to take you to the appropriate piece 

Interviews Contd.
Vegan Bodybuilder Robert  Cheeke 59 
 

Reviews Contd.
Pizza vs. Pizza 74
By  Jason Wyrick 

Robert is one of the most  influential vegan athletes of our  time. Read about what he’s  currently up to.   

  The first cheese we’ve come across  that actually tastes like cheese. 

Super Activist Bruce  Friedrich 63 
 

               

Bruce is one of the luminaries of  the animal activist world, having  lead campaigns for PeTA and now  Farm Sanctuary and is responsible  for saving thousands of animals  around the world.         

                           

   

Pizza!  

August 2012|3

 

The Vegan Culinary Experience
                                  Pizza!     August 2012   
                          Publisher    Jason Wyrick                                  Editors     Eleanor Sampson,                                                   Madelyn Pryor             Nutrition Analyst     Eleanor Sampson                         Web Design    Jason Wyrick                            Graphics     Jason Wyrick                                   Reviewers    Madelyn Pryor                                                 Jason Wyrick        Contributing Authors    Jason Wyrick                                                 Madelyn Pryor                                                 Liz Lonetti                                                 Sharon Valencik                                                 Mark Sutton                                                 Bryanna Clark Grogan                                                 Jill Nussinow                                                 Angela Elliott                                                 Robin Robertson                                                 Amber Shea Crawley                                                 Mindy Kursban                                                 Andy Breslin                                                                   Photography Credits  

What’s Cooking?
My time in Italy taught me a true  appreciation of good pizza. Like many  people, I grew up eating frozen pizza  out of a box or when my parents  ordered take‐out from Pizza Hut.  Going to Mr. Gatti’s was an infrequent  treat. I thought those were good. I had  no idea what real pizza was. I have  since learned otherwise and I am so happy that I did. You see, pizza  is beautiful. Pizza is the nexus of rustic cooking, tradition, and  spectauclar ingredients. There is something unassuming about real  pizza, but a good pizza will knock your socks off. San Marzano  tomatoes, in‐season basil picked right from the garden, fresh  porcini, capers, olives, eggplant, squash, potatoes, spinach, white  bean spreads, olive oil and garlic. All of these can be found on  pizzas, but a good pizza only features a couple components. A good  pizza lets these ingredients speak for themselves. I was so inspired  by my pizza experience that I am even constructing a wood‐fire  pizza oven on my patio!    This issue is broken up a bit differently than our other issues. The  recipes are separated into different components, namely crusts  and sauces, and then the actual pizza recipes are simply  expressions of these components. Many of the pizza recipes will  refer to one of these parent components. You will also learn about  equipment, techniques, and get plenty reviews of vegan cheeses  and pizzas. I hope you love this issue as much as I did putting it  together.    Eat healthy, eat compassionately, and eat well!         

                  Cover Page     Jason Wyrick    
                Recipe Images     Jason Wyrick                                                 Madelyn Pryor                                                 Milan Valencik of                                                  Milan Photography                                                 Bryanna Clark Grogan                                                 Jill Nussinow                                                 Mark Sutton                                                 Liz Lonetti          Restaurant Photos      Jason Wyrick        Native Bowl Photo      Courtesy of Julie Hasson                                Tapsi       Jim Stanfield         Pizza Peels, Semolina  GNU Free Documentation                                                 License                                Mad Cow     Public Domain                    Bruce Friedrich   Courtesy of Carolyn Mullin        Symphony & Gabriel  Courtesy of Farm Sanctuary              Robert Cheeke       Courtesy of Robert Cheeke                Sharon Lee Hart   Courtesy of Sharon Lee Hart  Aries, Russell, & DeeDee Courtesy of Sharon Lee Hart                                                                                  

Pizza!  

August 2012|4

Contributors
  Jason Wyrick ‐ Chef Jason Wyrick is the Executive Chef of Devil Spice, Arizona's vegan  catering company, and the publisher of The Vegan Culinary Experience. Chef Wyrick has  been regularly featured on major television networks and in the press.  He has done  demos with several doctors, including Dr. Neal Barnard of the PCRM, Dr. John  McDougall, and Dr. Gabriel Cousens.  Chef Wyrick was also a guest instructor in the Le  Cordon Bleu program.  He has catered for PETA, Farm Sanctuary, Frank Lloyd Wright,  and Google. He is also the NY Times best‐selling co‐author of 21 Day Weightloss  Kickstart Visit Chef Jason Wyrick at www.devilspice.com and  www.veganculinaryexperience.com.  

Madelyn Pryor ‐ Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates on her blog,  http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has been making her own tasty desserts for  over 16 years, and eating dessert for longer than she cares to admit. When she isn’t in  the kitchen creating new wonders of sugary goodness, she is chasing after her bad  kitties, or reviewing products for various websites and publications. She can be  contacted at thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.     Bryanna Clark Grogan ‐ Author of 8 vegan cookbooks, Bryanna has devoted over 40  years to tasty, healthful cooking, 23 as a vegan. She was a frequent contributor and  reviewer for Vegetarian Times magazine for 5 years, and, more recently, wrote and  published a subscription cooking zine, “Vegan Feast”, for 5 years. She is moderator of the  Vegsource “New Vegetarian” forum. Bryanna has conducted cooking workshops and  classes locally (including a 5‐day Vegan Cooking Vacation on beautiful Denman Is.), and  at numerous vegetarian gatherings in North America. Bryanna’s recipes appear in the  The Veg‐Feasting Cookbook (Seattle Vegetarian Association); on Dr. Andrew Weil's  websites; in No More Bull! by Howard Lyman; and in Cooking with PETA. Bryanna also  developed the recipes for the ground‐breaking book, Dr. Neal Barnard's Program for  Reversing Diabetes.    Robin Robertson ‐ A longtime vegan, Robin Robertson has worked with food for more  than 25 years and is the author of twenty cookbooks, including Quick‐Fix Vegan, Vegan  Planet, 1,000 Vegan Recipes, Vegan Fire & Spice, and Vegan on the Cheap. A former  restaurant chef, Robin writes the Global Vegan food column for VegNews Magazine and  has written for Vegetarian Times, Cooking Light, and Natural Health, among others.  Robin lives in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. You may contact her through  her website: www.robinrobertson.com. 

 
Pizza! August 2012|5

Contributors
  Mindy Kursban, Esq. ‐ Mindy Kursban is a practicing attorney who is passionate about  animals, food, and health. She gained her experience and knowledge about vegan  cuisine and the law while working for ten years as general counsel and then executive  director of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Since leaving PCRM in  2007, Mindy has been writing and speaking to help others make the switch to a plant‐ based diet. Mindy welcomes feedback, comments, and questions at  mkursban@gmail.com.     Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen ‐ Jill is a Registered Dietitian and has a  Masters Degree in Dietetics and Nutrition from Florida International University. After  graduating, she migrated to California and began a private nutrition practice providing  individual consultations and workshops, specializing in nutrition for pregnancy, new  mothers, and children.  You can find out more about The Veggie Queen at  www.theveggiequeen.com.         Liz Lonetti ‐ As a professional urban designer, Liz Lonetti is passionate about building  community, both physically and socially.  She graduated from the U of MN with a BA in  Architecture in 1998. She also serves as the Executive Director for the Phoenix  Permaculture Guild, a non‐profit organization whose mission is to inspire sustainable  living through education, community building and creative cooperation  (www.phoenixpermaculture.org).  A long time advocate for building greener and more  inter‐connected communities, Liz volunteers her time and talent for other local green  causes.  In her spare time, Liz enjoys cooking with the veggies from her gardens, sharing  great food with friends and neighbors, learning from and teaching others.  To contact  Liz, please visit her blog site www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profile/LizDan.    Angela Elliott ‐ Angela Elliott is the author of Alive in Five, Holiday Fare with Angela, The  Simple Gourmet, and more books on the way! Angela is the inventor of Five Minute  Gourmet Meals™, Raw Nut‐Free Cuisine™, Raw Vegan Dog Cuisine™, and The  Celestialwich™, and the owner and operator of She‐Zen Cuisine. www.she‐ zencuisine.com. Angela has contributed to various publications, including Vegnews  Magazine, Vegetarian Baby and Child Magazine, and has taught gourmet classes,  holistic classes, lectured, and on occasion toured with Lou Corona, a nationally  recognized proponent of living food.    Sharon Valencik ‐ Sharon Valencik is the author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan  Desserts. She is raising two vibrant young vegan sons and rescued animals, currently a  rabbit and a dog. She comes from a lineage of artistic chef matriarchs and has been  baking since age five. She is working on her next book, World Utopia: Delicious and  Healthy International Vegan Cuisine. Please visit www.sweetutopia.com for more  information, to ask questions, or to provide feedback.   
Pizza! August 2012|6

Contributors
    Andrew Breslin ‐ Andrew Breslin is the author of Mother's Milk, the definitive account of  the vast global conspiracy orchestrated by the dairy industry, which secretly controls  humanity through mind‐controlling substances contained in cow milk. In all likelihood  this is a hilarious work of satyric fiction, but then again, you never know. He also authors  the blog Andy Rants, almost certainly the best blog that you have never read. He is an  avid book reviewer at Goodreads. He worked at Physicians Committee for Responsible  Medicine with Mindy Kursban, with whom he occasionally collaborates on projects  concerning legal issues associated with health and food. Andrew's fiction and nonfiction  have appeared in a wide variety of print and online venues, covering an even wider  variety of topics. He lives in Philadelphia with his girlfriend and cat, who are not the  same person.    Amber Shea Crawley ‐ Amber Shea Crawley is a linguist, chef, and author specializing in  healthful vegan and raw food. Known for her flexible recipes and friendly voice, she was  classically trained in the art of gourmet living cuisine at the world‐renowned Matthew  Kenney Academy, graduating in 2010 as a certified raw and vegan chef. In 2011, she  earned her Nutrition Educator certification at the Living Light Culinary Arts Institute. Her  first cookbook, Practically Raw: Flexible Raw Recipes Anyone Can Make, debuted in  March 2012. Amber blogs at AlmostVeganChef.com and can be found on Facebook and  Twitter.      Mark Sutton ‐ Mark Sutton has been the Visualizations Coordinator for two NASA Earth  Satellite Missions, an interactive multimedia consultant, organic farmer, and head  conference photographer.  He’s developed media published in several major magazines  and shown or broadcast internationally, produced DVDs and websites, edited/managed  a vegan cookbook (No More Bull! by Howard Lyman), worked with/for two Nobel Prize  winners (on Global Climate Change), and helped create UN Peace Medal Award‐winning  pre‐college curriculum.  A vegetarian for 20 years, then vegan the past 10, Mark’s the  editor of the Mad Cowboy e‐newsletter, an avid nature photographer, gardener, and  environmentalist.  Oil‐free for over 5 years and author of the 1st vegan pizza cookbook,  he can be reached at:  msutton@hearthealthypizza.com and  http://www.hearthealthypizza.com    Milan Valencik ‐ Milan Valencik is the food stylist and photographer of Sweet Utopia:  Simply Stunning Vegan Desserts. His company, Milan Photography, specializes in artistic  event photojournalism, weddings, and other types of photography. Milan is also a fine  artist and musician. Milan is originally from Czech Republic and now lives in NJ. For more  information about Milan, please visit www.milanphotography.com or  www.sweetutopia.com.       

Pizza!

August 2012|7

Contributors
Eleanor Sampson – Eleanor is an editor and nutrition analyst for The Vegan Culinary  Experience, author, and an expert vegan baker with a specialty in delicious vegan sweets  (particularly cinnamon rolls!)  You can reach Eleanor at  Eleanor@veganculinaryexperience.com.              

Pizza!

August 2012|8

About the VCE
The Vegan Culinary Experience is an educational vegan culinary  magazine designed by professional vegan chefs to help make  vegan cuisine more accessible.  Published by Chef Jason Wyrick,  the magazine utilizes the electronic format of the web to go  beyond the traditional content of a print magazine to offer  classes, podcasts, an interactive learning community, and links to  articles, recipes, and sites embedded throughout the magazine to  make retrieving information more convenient for the reader.     The VCE is also designed to bring vegan chefs, instructors,  medical professionals, authors, and businesses together with the  growing number of people interested in vegan cuisine.    Eat healthy, eat compassionately, and eat well. 

Become a Subscriber
Subscribing to the VCE is FREE!  Subscribers have access to our Learning Community, back issues, recipe  database, and extra educational materials.    Visit http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCESubscribe.htm to subscribe.   
*PRIVACY POLICY ‐ Contact information is never, ever given or sold to another individual or company 

 

Not Just a Magazine
Meal Service 
The Vegan Culinary Experience also provides weekly meals that coincide with the recipes from the magazine.   Shipping is available across the United States.  Raw, gluten‐free, and low‐fat diabetic friendly options are  available.  Visit http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCEMealService.htm for more information.   

Culinary Instruction 
Chef Jason Wyrick and many of the contributors to the magazine are available for private culinary instruction,  seminars, interviews, and other educational based activities.  For information and pricing, contact us at  http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCEContact.htm.  
 

An Educational and Inspirational Journey of Taste, Health, and Compassion 
Pizza! August 2012|9

Marketplace
Welcome to the Marketplace, our new spot for finding  vegetarian friendly companies, chefs, authors, bloggers,  cookbooks, products, and more!  One of the goals of The Vegan  Culinary Experience is to connect our readers with organizations  that provide relevant products and services for vegans, so we  hope you enjoy this new feature!      Click on the Ads – Each ad is linked to the appropriate  organization’s website.  All you need to do is click on the ad to  take you there.    Become a Marketplace Member – Become connected by joining  the Vegan Culinary Experience Marketplace.  Membership is  available to those who financially support the magazine, to  those who promote the magazine, and to those who contribute  to the magazine.  Contact Chef Jason Wyrick at  chefjason@veganculinaryexperience.com for details!                               

Current Members 
Bad Kitty Creations       GoDairyFree.org    Robin Robertson  (www.badkittybakery.blogspot.com) (www.godairyfree.org)  (www.robinrobertson.com)  Bryanna Clark Grogan     Sweet Utopia      Milan Photography  (www.milanphotography.com)  (www.bryannaclarkgrogan.com)   (www.sweetutopia.com)  Jill Nussinow, MS, RD      Amber Shea Crawley  (www.theveggiequeen.com)    (www.almostveganchef.com)     Non‐profits                          Vegan Outreach        Rational Animal      Farm Sanctuary  (www.veganoutreach.org)       (www.rational‐animal.org)     (www.farmsanctuary.com)    The Phoenix Permactulture Guild (www.phoneixpermaculture.org)   
Pizza! August 2012|10

Marketplace
                                                           

Pizza!

August 2012|11

Marketplace

                     
Pizza!

 

August 2012|12

Marketplace
                                                                                         

Pizza!

August 2012|13

Marketplace
                                                                               
Pizza! August 2012|14

Pesto is the Besto for Pizza and other Dishes
By Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, aka The Veggie Queen™

  I didn’t grow up eating pesto. I never ate pesto  until I was an adult. Mining my memories, I think  that I first had pesto at a small Italian restaurant  that my then‐boyfriend and I used to frequent  when I was in graduate school. I immediately fell in  love. What’s not to like?   Pesto is paste. Great paste at that. Most people are  not thinking “big antioxidant boost” when they  make, and eat, pesto. Yet, that’s what pesto does  for you, as well as adding lots of flavor. So, you  need to like whatever is in your pesto.  Traditional pesto is fatty, salty and flavorful and  elevates your pasta to a new level. So, as soon as I  could figure out how to make pesto, I started and I  began experimenting with various nuts, cheeses  and herbs. (That was more than 20 years ago when  I ate cheese.) I used almonds and lemon basil. I  used walnuts and cinnamon basil. I could go on but  you get the idea.  When I started teaching people how to follow an  oil‐free plant‐based diet (I have been teaching the  McDougall program for the past 10 years), I had to  change my pesto recipes to follow suit. I love pesto  on pizza because I find it much more interesting 

than tomato sauce.   Here are a few variations of my non‐traditional oil‐ free pesto and a bean and vegetable spread that  can also be used as a base for making pizza.  Additionally, any pesto can be thinned down with  broth to make a dressing for salad, pasta or grains.    I love pesto because you can easily change the  recipe to use the herbs or vegetables that you have  on hand. If you don’t like sundried tomatoes, make  only herb pesto. If you don’t like arugula, make an  all‐parsley pesto. A small food processor helps the  process a lot. If you can dream it, you can do it.  If you make more pesto than you can use, freeze it  in ice cube trays. Pop out the cubes once frozen  and put them in freezer bags that you label and  date. The summer, when the herbs are abundant,  is the best time to make pesto and it will definitely  brighten up your winter pizzas. You’ll thank  yourself later.  Recipes follow.  The Author    Jill Nussinow, aka The Veggie Queen™,  eats gluten‐free pizza. Her favorite is  made with oil‐free pesto, with lots of  vegetables including shiitake  mushrooms, olives, eggplant and  tomatoes, when they are summer ripe. 

Pizza!

August 2012|15

The Veggie Queen’s Oil-Free Pesto
Makes about 3/4 cup    It’s hard to believe that this could taste so  good but it does. You can mix it with blended  silken tofu to make a creamy pesto for pasta,  if you desire.  cloves minced garlic   cups chopped fresh basil leaves   cup chopped flat leaf parsley  tablespoons pine nuts   slice gluten‐free, white or sourdough  bread or ¼ cup dry bread crumbs   1‐2  Tbsp light miso (to taste)  ¼ to 1/3 cup water or broth  2  tablespoons nutritional yeast    In food processor, combine everything except  water or broth. Pulse till finely minced. With  machine running, slowly add water until it  reaches desired consistency.    3   3   1  2 to 3  1 

The Veggie Queen’s Simple Arugula Pesto
Makes about ½ cup    If you love arugula, you will like this, if not,  you can substitute spinach leaves for a much  milder flavor.    1 clove garlic  1 bunch (2 cups) arugula  ½ cup Italian parsley leaves  2 tablespoons olive oil  1 tablespoon miso  ¼ cup or more vegetable stock  1 tablespoon lemon juice  Freshly ground black pepper and/or  Parmesan cheese, if desired    Combine the garlic and arugula in a food  processor. Add the parsley, olive oil, miso  and vegetable stock and process until  smooth. Add the lemon juice. Add cheese, if  desired. If mixture needs more liquid, add  more stock or lemon juice, to taste. Add  freshly ground black pepper and/or vegan 

 

Roasted Red Pepper and White Bean Spread
Makes about 2 cups    This light pink spread not only looks good but tastes great. You can roast the peppers yourself when they are in  season. Use instead of tomato sauce on pizza, placing your other vegetables on top.    1 ½   cups cooked white beans, such as cannellini  ¾   cup roasted red peppers, drained if jarred or 2 roasted red peppers  1  tablespoon olive oil (optional)  1  tablespoon lemon juice  1  tablespoon fresh sage, chopped  2  teaspoons fresh thyme  ½   teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon ground black pepper    Combine beans, olive oil, lemon juice, sage, thyme and salt and pepper in food processor. Process until smooth.    

Pizza!

August 2012|16

      

SunDried Tomato Pesto (Oil-free)
Makes about ½ to ¾ cup    This is rich and has deep umami flavor from the tomatoes. A pair of scissors helps you cut the  tomatoes easily.    ½ cup diced sundried tomatoes, not in oil  ¼ cup warm water or vegetable broth  3 cloves garlic, minced  2 to 3 tablespoons nuts, your favorite, toasted  ½ teaspoon oregano leaves  1 to 2 teaspoons Bragg liquid amino acids or ½ teaspoon salt (optional)    Put the diced tomatoes in the warm water or broth and let sit for at least 30 minutes to  an hour. While you are waiting for the tomatoes, add the garlic and nuts to the small  processor. Process until they are finely chopped. Add the tomatoes when they are  rehydrated with the soaking liquid, oregano and the Bragg. Process until smooth. 
    All recipes  ©2012, Jill  Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen™  http://www.theveggiequeen.com 

       

Pizza!

August 2012|17

Pizza without Borders
by Robin Robertson
Growing up in an Italian‐American family, I literally  cut my teeth on pizza. The numerous pizzerias in  my hometown sold delicious and inexpensive New  York style pizza, so it was one of the few foods my  mother rarely made herself.  Pizza night gave mom  a rare respite from cooking and it was always a  special treat to have a steaming hot pizza  delivered.    To this day, pizza remains one of my favorite foods.  When I went vegan nearly twenty‐five years ago, it  was the only non‐vegan food I missed.  Back then,  vegan cheese wasn’t as available (or tasty) as it is  now, so I searched for other ways to enjoy the  savory pie beyond the ooze of melted cheese.      When I visited Italy, I was pleasantly surprised to  find that many of pizza toppings on restaurant  menus didn’t include any cheese at all.  Instead,  the crisp and delicious crusts were topped with a  variety of vegetable combinations, including paper‐ thin slices of tomatoes, zucchini, artichoke hearts,  onion, mushrooms, olives, and many others.  It was  in Tuscany that I enjoyed my first pizza topped with  a garlicky white bean spread, and pizza hasn’t been  the same for me since.    Once I realized that a creamy bean puree makes a  flavorful and protein‐rich foundation for other  toppings, I began experimenting with global flavors  that might translate well into tasty pizza variations.  Some of my more recent nuances include a  Manchurian Cauliflower Pizza and a Buffalo  Cauliflower Pizza – the doughy crust providing the  perfect foil for the spicy roasted cauliflower.  I’ve  also made Vegan Queso Pizza, Puttanesca Pizza,  Hummus Pizza, Cheeseburger Pizza (complete with  ketchup and pickle slices), and countless variations  on that original Tuscan White Bean Pizza.      Two of my favorite creations are inspired by my  favorite sandwiches, the luscious bahn mi of  Vietnam and the zesty muffaletta of New Orleans.   The pizzas I based on these sandwiches are  delicious examples of how pizza can truly be  enjoyed with global flavors.  I’m happy to share  these recipes with you, and I hope you’ll be  inspired to consider the ingredients and flavors of  various cultures to create your own "pizza without  borders."     * Recipes follow    The Author    Robin Robertson ‐ A longtime  vegan, Robin Robertson has  worked with food for more than  25 years and is the author of  twenty cookbooks, including  Quick‐Fix Vegan, Vegan Planet,  1,000 Vegan Recipes, Vegan Fire  & Spice, and Vegan on the  Cheap. A former restaurant chef,  Robin writes the Global Vegan food column for  VegNews Magazine and has written for Vegetarian  Times, Cooking Light, and Natural Health, among  others. Robin lives in the beautiful Shenandoah  Valley of Virginia. You may contact her through her  website: www.robinrobertson.com.         

Pizza!

August 2012|18

Muffaletta Pizza
  The olive salad that gives the classic muffaletta  sandwich its piquant character becomes the  topping for this luscious pizza that would be great  served as a main dish or cut into small pieces to  enjoy as an appetizer.  If you don’t have time to  make your own pizza dough (using the recipe  provided), ready‐to‐use pizza dough (available in  most supermarkets) gets this pizza in the oven in  minutes.  To save time, substitute 1 cup (or more)  of prepared Italian olive salad or giardiniera for the  topping ingredients, available at Italian grocers,  some supermarkets, or online.    The Dough  2 ¾ cups all‐purpose flour  2 ¼ teaspoons instant yeast   1 teaspoon salt  1 cup lukewarm water  Olive oil    The Toppings  15 oz. can chickpeas, drained and rinsed   3 cloves garlic, crushed  2 teaspoons lemon juice  1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano or ½ teaspoon  dried  2 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise   ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard  ½ teaspoon Tabasco sauce  Salt and black pepper   6 oz. jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and  sliced  ½ cup pimiento‐stuffed green olives, coarsely  chopped   1/3 cup Kalamata olives, pitted, coarsely chopped   1 small Hass avocado, peeled, pitted, and chopped   2 teaspoons capers   2 scallions, minced  2 tablespoons chopped parsley    Dough:  In a large bowl, combine the flour, yeast, and  salt.  Stir in the water until combined then use  your hands to knead it into a soft dough.   

Transfer the dough to a floured surface and  knead until it is smooth and elastic, about 10  minutes. Shape into a smooth ball and transfer  to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap  and let rise at room temperature in a warm  spot until double in size, about 1 hour.  Transfer the risen dough to a floured work  surface, punch it down and gently stretch and  lift to make a 12‐inch round crust about ¼‐inch  thick. Transfer the crust to a floured baking  sheet or pizza stone.  Use your fingertips to  form a rim around the perimeter of the crust  and let rise for 20 minutes.   Position the oven rack on the lowest level of  the oven. Preheat the oven to 425F.  

  

  

  Toppings:   In a food processor combine the chickpeas,  garlic, lemon juice, oregano, mayonnaise,  mustard, Tabasco, and salt and pepper to taste.   Process until smooth. Spread the mixture  evenly onto the pizza crust, to within ½ inch of  the edge of the perimeter. Arrange the  artichoke slices evenly on top of the pizza.   Bake on the lowest oven rack until the crust is  golden brown, about 15 minutes.       While the pizza is baking, in a bowl, combine  the green olives, kalamata olives, avocado,  capers, scallions, and parsley.  Season with salt  and pepper to taste and mix well to combine.   When the pizza comes out of the oven, top  evenly with the olive mixture and serve hot.       
August 2012|19

Pizza!

Bahn Mizza
  Like the bahn mi sandwich that inspired it, this  pizza features a variety of texture, temperatures  and flavors, from the crisp hot crust and hoisin‐ laced tofu spread, to the crunchy carrots and fresh  cilantro.  Heat‐seekers may way to add extra  sriracha and jalapeños.    The Dough  2 ¾ cups all‐purpose flour  2 ¼ teaspoons instant yeast   1 teaspoon salt  1 cup lukewarm water  Olive oil    The Toppings  1 cup finely shredded carrot  1 teaspoon natural sugar  1/8 teaspoon salt  1 tablespoon rice vinegar  2 teaspoons water  ¼ cup hoisin sauce  3 tablespoons soy sauce  3 teaspoons sriracha sauce, divided  1 pound extra‐firm tofu, drained and cut into ¼‐ inch slices  3 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise  ½ English cucumber, peeled and thinly sliced  2 tablespoons sliced pickled jalapenos  1 cup cilantro leaves (or mint or Thai basil)    Dough:   In a large bowl, combine the flour, yeast, and  salt.  Stir in the water until combined then use  your hands to knead it into a soft dough.     Transfer the dough to a floured surface and  knead until it is smooth and elastic, about 10  minutes. Shape into a smooth ball and transfer  to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap  and let rise at room temperature in a warm  spot until double in size, about 1 hour.     Transfer the risen dough to a floured work  surface, punch it down and gently stretch and  lift to make a 12‐inch round crust about ¼‐inch 

thick. Transfer the crust to a floured baking  sheet or pizza stone.  Use your fingertips to  form a rim around the perimeter of the crust  and let rise for 20 minutes.     Toppings:   In a bowl, combine the carrot, sugar, salt,  vinegar, and water. Cover and set aside for 30  minutes. Drain completely before using.     In a small bowl, combine the hoisin, soy sauce,  and 1 teaspoon of the sriracha.  Mix well. Set  aside.     Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.  Lightly oil a  baking sheet or arrange a piece of parchment  paper on it.  Arrange the tofu slices on the  prepared baking sheet. Spread the hoisin  mixture onto the tofu slices and bake for 15  minutes.  Remove from the oven and set aside.  Increase the oven temperature to 425 degrees  F.     Transfer half of the tofu to a food processor or  blender and process until smooth.  Taste and  adjust the seasonings, adding more hoisin, soy  sauce, sriracha, or a little water, if desired.      Arrange the dough onto a pizza pan, stretching  to fit.  Spread the pureed mixture evenly onto  the pizza crust, to within ½ inch of the edge of  the perimeter. Arrange the remaining tofu  slices evenly on top of the pizza.  Bake the pizza  on the bottom rack of the oven until the crust is  golden brown, 15 to 18 minutes.     

Pizza!

August 2012|20

While the pizza is baking combine the  mayonnaise and remaining sriracha in a small  bowl, adding more sriracha if desired. Set aside.  When the pizza is baked, cut it into 8 wedges,  then drizzle with the sriracha mayo.  Top with  the cucumber slices, drained carrot mixture,  jalapeño, and cilantro.  Serve immediately. 

  

     

Pizza!

August 2012|21

My Love Affair with Pizza
by Madelyn Pryor
thick, fluffy crust, lots of sauce, hamburger and  Some little girls grow up dreaming of owning a  cheese. Like many of you, I was raised on a non‐ horse, or growing more roses than they can pick. I  vegan diet. I remember my mom blowing on my  grew up dreaming of the next time my mom would  food to cool it, then my eyes rolling up as I dug in.  make pizza. There were a few mitigating factors in  It was kiddo nirvana. I loved it so much that my  this. First, I was a ‘foodie’ before I knew the word  mom made this at least once a month for me. I  for it. I was a happy, slightly gluttonous child who  knew then that pizza was awesome!   already had a pony and more flowers than I could    pick in a lifetime. But pizza, pizza was a treat.   My life gained a richness and depth when mom    Maybe a love of pizza is in our blood. My  started making calzones. Remember in Lord of the  grandfather came from Sicily. There, he was a  Rings when Pippen finds out that ale comes in  neglected orphan. He came over to our country,  pints? That was the look on my face when I found  joined the military, became a citizen and reveled in  out that pizza came in ‘portable’. I was a tomboy by  the culture of the 1950’s. In him, the gene that  nature, always out on my bike and about. A calzone  loved pizza was silent. He had traded in the  could be taken with to provide field rations for me  peasant food of his childhood for the foods he  and my other friends as we played at being GI Joes  cooked outside on the massive brick barbeque  and saving the world from Cobra. Even cool,  monster he built himself. My mother, his eldest,  calzones were bready, saucy delicious wonders. My  loves Mexican food even more than Italian food.  mom’s calzones are literally one of my happiest  She grew up in south Phoenix where her friend’s  childhood memories.   mother, Mrs. Flores taught her to cook. She raised    me with homemade  As I aged, I ate my fair  tortillas, salsas, and took  share of store pizzas. As  you move on to teen  pride in how much I loved  burritos and quesadillas.   years, most discover    the cardboard that the  I remember my first pizza  big chains deliver to  experience at five years  your house. It doesn’t  old. It was one of my  taste great, it makes  mom’s sheet pan  your face look like the  cheeseburger pizzas. To  food, and you still eat it  this day, the very thought  because your friends  of it makes my mouth  are. I was no better or  water. Baked on an 11”x17”  no worse, but yuck.   jelly pan, it was made with a    as a kid, I might have been stopping to smell the 
flowers, but I was dreaming of pizza!
Pizza! August 2012|22

Luckily, I grew up. I became vegan as a way to  excavate the healthy girl out of my chubby girl  shell. It wasn’t the smoothest of transitions. I was a  new vegan with all the fire and brimstone of a tent  revival preacher… but I was the only vegan I knew. I  had a few quickly battered vegan cookbooks that  were ok but not great. I had to learn how to eat all  over again, so I ate a lot of salads, beans, and rice. I  love that stuff still, yet it was not the same. I  needed more. I needed my pizza. I still have a  strong, happy memory of Amy’s pizza, because she  told me pizza came in ‘vegan’. I was a poor college  student, so at the time, her vegan pizza was  alluring, yet, it was more than I had to spend. Still,  it gave me an idea.  

in a place as remote as this, my mom had to  make all my pizzas, and I would not have had it  any other way 

 

That night, I made my first vegan pizza. It had  bread, sauce, and veggies. My mom was  encouraging as only mothers can be, and it was ok.  It was even pretty good. The pizza did not suffer for  the fact it was vegan, it suffered because it was not  ‘mama pizza’ and I was a new cook. With a sigh, I  decided I had to just keep going. I made pizza when  I could, growing in skill every time.    

It was graduate school that created one of my most  famous creations – the Seven Pounder. Yes, it does  have to be capitalized. In grad school, living alone  in the cold I needed to make big food that could be  eaten for a long time. The Seven Pounder was that,  a monster that gained its name when a visiting  friend weighed herself, and then while holding an  unsliced pizza. Yep, it was in fact a little over seven  pounds. I recommend that you make when you  have a party, and a back brace. I had grown in the  ‘force’ and the pizza had grown with in size and  flavor profile.     Graduate school gave me the biggest gift I have  ever received. It made me so miserable I knew that  I had to quit. Maybe it was the hours, the death  threat, or the isolation but I needed out. All I could  grasp was my ability to cook and bake. By now, I  was known not just as ‘the vegan’, but my food was  coveted by all in my department, and my friends. If  I was strong in the Force before, now I was a full on  Jedi. I made great food. I needed to make more. I  needed to get away. I met Jason, quit, and started  cooking for people full time. It was the best of all  worlds. Pizza came with me on this adventure like  the true friend it is.     Now, instead of just churning out recipes based on  what I want, I teach cooking class, write for this  wonderful magazine, work on my blog and help  convert family recipes.  Food has become my life in  a way that it is not for most other people. Over the  last three years, my ability to cook great food has  grown again. No, I am not Yoda yet. I am working  on Jedi Master status. My latest creation, Sundried  Pepperoni shows that I have grown. Instead of  panicking when I could not make it to the store to  buy some name brand product, now I make my  own seitan! How awesome is that?     Yes, my life has changed. I’ve moved from being a  kid who loved cheeseburger pizza to a vegan adult 

Pizza!

August 2012|23

who loves cruelty free cheeseburger pizza. Instead  of a stressed college student, I am a semi‐stressed  instructor. But pizza is still there, a constant in my  life. Now I have good friends, good food, and a  great life. What is more comforting than that?                             the famous cheeseburger pizza                                                             
Pizza!

The Author 
  Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates on  her blog, http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has  been making her own tasty  desserts for over 16 years, and  eating dessert for longer than she  cares to admit. When she isn’t in  the kitchen creating new wonders  of sugary goodness, she is chasing  after her bad kitties, or reviewing  products for various websites and  publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.  

 

August 2012|24

Creating a Heart Healthy Pizza
by Mark Sutton
  There are few aspects of life as emotionally  satisfying as eating a tasty pizza, unless perhaps it's  making a pizza from the bottom up and with solely  plant‐based ingredients.  Even more so, crafting  and baking your own fresh "heart healthy" pizzas at  home elevates this enjoyment to a whole new level.    Instead of using oil‐based processed cheese  substitutes in trying to duplicate the dairy‐based  toppings from the pizzas of our childhood, through  the creative use of legumes, grains, vegetables,  and/or small amounts of nuts, it's possible to  design highly nutritious flavorful "cheese‐like  sauces" that range in texture from a smooth  velvety "taste feel" to that of a slightly firm custard.    These sauces, whether used on the top or beneath  a myriad of colorful vegetable fillings, provide a  greater quality of nutritional and flavor diversity for  a truly unique, scrumptious, and healthy pizza  experience.  Blended as a thick pancake‐like batter  and augmented with fresh herbs or spices, they are  baked with the foundation crust and fillings of  choice, thereby adding little extra preparation time  in creating fully realized pizza concepts.    Be imaginative when making a pizza!  Use tomato  slices over chopped greens, shape the dough into a  rectangle, construct a lattice of topping sauce...  and above all, enjoy the process.  There is no right  or wrong in making a pizza; it's an ongoing learning  experience to be embraced and the final product  savored.    With this in mind, here are some recipes to help  guide the heart healthy pizza cook in learning this  new approach.        

PIZZA FOUNDATION RECIPES
There are many pizza dough or crust recipes  available on the Internet and in cookbooks. Here  are two: a "basic" pizza dough and a nifty gluten‐ free oat flour crust.   

BASIC PIZZA DOUGH 
INGREDIENTS:  ¾ cup warm water  1 t. sugar (or sweetener of choice)  1 T. oil (optional)  ½ t. salt (optional)  2 ¼ cups all‐purpose or bread flour  2 to 2 ¼ t. yeast (1 packet)    METHOD (Bread Machine):  1. Put in warm water 1st, optional oil, sweetener,  flours (pre‐stirred with optional salt), and yeast.  2. Select "Pizza" or "Dough" setting on the bread  machine and press "Start."    VARIATIONS:  Substitute 1 cup of the flour above with 1 cup of  cornmeal, soy flour, or semolina flour. The addition  of semolina flour makes for a slightly nuttier taste  and lighter texture.     

Pizza!

August 2012|25

NOTE:  The dough can be used after the first rise, although  2nd rise is preferred.    Granulated sugar, agave nectar, molasses, rice  syrup, barley syrup, or maple syrup can also be  used as sweeteners.    This is for 2 thin 12" crusts, 1 large thin (if  rectangular, 10" x 24"), or 1 thicker 12" crust.  About 2 lbs. of dough and 8 servings.   

9. Arrange toppings and sauce(s) on dough, bake  for 10 to 15 minutes (or until toppings are cooked).     NOTE:  Add water for kneading the dough in 1 tablespoon  increments if it is not elastic enough or too stiff.    This recipe makes a 12 to 14" pizza.   

"TOPPING SAUCE" RECIPES
Leftover sauce can be used with pasta, thinned as a  dressing for salads, or served over cooked  vegetables.   

OAT FLOUR CRUST (GLUTEN‐FREE) 
INGREDIENTS:  2 ½ cups rolled oats  1 cup warm water  2 ¼ t. yeast  1 t. sugar (or sweetener of choice)  1 T. flax seeds  2 t. dried Italian herbs  ½ t. salt (optional)     METHOD:  1. Whisk together water, yeast, and sugar in a large  mixing bowl. Cover, let rise for 10 to 12 minutes.  2. Grind flax seeds in a spice mill and mix into yeast  mixture.  3. Put oats into a blender or food processor to  make oat flour (about 2 cups worth).  4. Mix remaining ingredients together and slowing  add to the yeast mixture, stirring with a large  spoon. Gradually fold dough into a large flat ball  (the dough will be stiff).  5. Cover and let rise for 30 to 45 minutes.   6. Pre‐heat oven to 425 degrees F.  7. Shape into a ball with your hands, and press the  dough into a lightly oiled non‐stick baking pan into  the shape desired. If necessary, lightly wet your  fingers to help with the shaping process.  8. Bake in oven for 5 minutes (crust's bottom  should be starting to turn brown). 

SWEET POTATO, OATS, CARROT, AND  GREEN CHILE SAUCE 
This recipe makes a fluffy sauce. The sweet  potatoes and carrots add a nice dose of Vitamins A  & C, with oats providing even more fiber.    INGREDIENTS:  1 cup raw sweet potato (peeled, ½” dice)  ½ cup carrots (¼” dice)  2/3 cup rolled oats  4 oz. can diced green roasted chiles (undrained)  1 T. Dijon mustard (to taste)  2 T. corn starch  1 to 1 ¼ cup water (water plus leftover cooking  broth)    METHOD:  1. Cover potatoes and carrots with water in a small  pot. Bring to a boil, and let simmer for a few  minutes until “fork tender.” Remove cover, let cool.  2. Add drained vegetables and remaining  ingredients to a blender or food processor,  reserving the water.  3. Add liquid in incremental amounts, blending  carefully until a smooth thick pancake‐like batter  consistency has been achieved.  There may be a 

Pizza!

August 2012|26

need to use less or more water depending upon  how carrots and potato were prepped.    NOTE:  This recipe makes more than enough sauce for two  12″ to 14″ pizzas (around 3 ½ cups).   

processing until you have a smooth pancake‐like  batter.    NOTE:  White beans can be substituted for great northern  beans.  Adjust amount of water used if necessary.    Makes about 3 cups, sufficient for two 12" to 14"  pizzas (from 2 lbs. of dough)     

And NOW, A PIZZA RECIPE FRIENDLY FRANKFURTERS & KALE 
The "Super Vegetable" kale helps power this  "comfort" pizza.    CRUST:  Pizza dough of choice    LAYERING INGREDIENTS:  Tender raw kale or spinach leaves (rinsed, drained,  de‐stemmed and chopped)  Sliced tomatoes  Sliced onions  Sliced no/low‐fat vegan hot dogs sliced crosswise  Sweet pickle relish (optional)  Mustard of choice (use a squeeze bottle to apply)  Great Northern Beans, Millet, And Cashew Sauce    METHOD:  1. Pre‐heat oven to 425 or 450 degrees F.  (depending upon your oven).  2. Make a 1/4" layer of kale or spinach on top of  prepared and shaped dough.  3. Arrange tomato slices.  4. Put on onion slices.  5. Sprinkle with hot dog slices.  6. Dot with pickle relish  7. Apply mustard.  8. Pour on topping sauce. 

a pizza using the sweet potato, oats, & green  chile sauce 

GREAT NORTHERN BEANS, MILLET, AND  CASHEW SAUCE 
A thicker sauce texture is made using beans for  fiber, and millet for its amazing nutritional profile.    INGREDIENTS:  1 15 oz. can of great northern beans  ½ cup cooked millet  ¼ cup cashews  3 T. corn starch  ¼ t. ground black pepper  ½ t. dry mustard (or 1. T wet mustard)  ½ t. paprika  1 ¾ cup water    METHOD:  1. Rinse and drain beans (to remove salt).  2. Add great northern beans and millet to a blender  or food processor and pulse a few times.   3. Add the rest of the ingredients, then add some  of the nuts and water. Pulse a few more times,  adding the rest of the water and nuts, and 

Pizza!

August 2012|27

9. Bake pizza for 15 to 20 minutes.    VARIATIONS:  Substitute left‐over or canned chili for mustard  and/or relish.    Substitute drained, rinsed, then drained again,  sauerkraut for relish and mustard (as desired).    All recipes and photos ©2012 by Mark Sutton, from:  "Heart Healthy Pizza: Over 100 Plant‐based Recipes  for the Most Nutritious Pizza in the World."   http://www.hearthealthypizza.com    The Author    Mark Sutton has been the  Visualizations Coordinator  for two NASA Earth  Satellite Missions, an  interactive multimedia  consultant, organic  farmer,  and head conference  photographer.  He’s developed media published in  several major magazines and shown or broadcast  internationally, produced DVDs and websites,  edited/managed a vegan cookbook (No More Bull!  by Howard Lyman), worked with/for two Nobel  Prize winners (on Global Climate Change), and  helped create UN Peace Medal Award‐winning pre‐ college curriculum.  A vegetarian for 20 years, then  vegan the past 10, Mark’s the editor of the Mad  Cowboy e‐newsletter, an avid nature photographer,  gardener, and environmentalist.  Oil‐free for over 5  years and author of the 1st vegan pizza cookbook,  he can be reached at:   msutton@hearthealthypizza.com and  http://www.hearthealthypizza.com       

THE PIZZA BY LAYERS 
 

kale makes a super nutritious first layer

next are the tomatoes, onions, and veggie dog  slices 

the finished pizza, topped with northern bean,  millet, and cashew sauce and then baked 

Pizza!

August 2012|28

Pizza by the Crust
By Chef Jason Wyrick

The key to a good pizza isn’t the toppings, or even  the sauce. It’s the pizza dough! It may seem  counterintuitive. After all, we talk about toppings  and sauce when we describe a pizza, but the pizza  crust is, literally, the bulk of the pizza. In fact, I can  eat an outstanding pizza crust all by itself!     There is an entire culinary culture built around  pizza crusts. Some pizza makers from Napoli only  consider a pizza a true pizza if the crust is pliable,  rolled out with the fingers, no more than three  centimeters thick, and baked for 60 to 90 seconds.  In Roma, the pizza is thin and crisp, while in Sicily,  the pizza crust is often a sfinciune, a thick, spongy  crust similar to focaccia. Sicilians often roll their  pizza crusts, stuff them, or even place one crust on  the bottom and one on the top. No one tells a  Sicilian what to do! NYC pizza crusts chewy, but  crisp enough on the bottom that you don’t need a  second hand to support the tip, with blackened  spots from a brickfire oven and Chicago style crusts  are thick and soft with a crisp bottom and a buttery  flavor. California style pizzas, made famous by  Wolfgang Puck, are a bit puffy and very crisp with a  strong note of sourdough to them. And those are  just the main styles of pizza crust! There are a host  of variations found throughout the world. In order  to achieve sanity, I will only be covering the main  ones I wrote about above. Now, let’s talk pizza  dough.    Not surprisingly,  Napoli is also the  birthplace of  pizza itself, at  least as we know  it. To get the  best, authentic  flavor from your  crust, you need  one of these  ovens, but don’t  despair if you don’t have one. You can still make a  fine Napoli‐style pizza crust by cranking up the  temperature of your oven at home to a respectable  550 degrees F. Or, you can visit my house where I  am in the process of building my first brickfire pizza  oven! Just make sure you call first, and bring some  wine.    2 cups (250 grams by weight) of Type 00  Flour (I prefer the brand Antico Molino  Caputo)  ¾ cup + 1 tbsp. of warm water  1 tsp. of sugar  1 tsp. of salt  ¼ tsp. of yeast    Combine the ingredients and knead the  dough until it is elastic, about 6 minutes. It  should still be soft. This will allow the edges  to bloom up in the oven. Place this in a  covered bowl and allow it to rise for 2 hours.  Punch it down and press out any other air  bubbles. Form this into a ball and lightly  dust it with flour. Cover it and let it rest for  an hour. 
August 2012|29

Napoli Pizza Crust 
  Brick pizza ovens are prolific all across Campania,  the Italian province for which Napoli is the capital. 

Pizza!

  Lightly flour a working surface. Gently press  the ball flat and start stretching it out with  your fingers until you have a stretched it out  into about a 14” disc. It should be just over  1/8” thick, so a fairly thin crust. Lightly  brush the crust with olive oil.    When spreading the toppings onto it, leave  an inch clear to create a rim, which will  bubble up as the pizza cooks. In a brickfire  oven, the pizza will only take about 90  seconds to cook. In a traditional oven, turn  the oven up as high as possible (usually 550  degrees F) and cook the pizza for 5 minutes.    The combination of ingredients, proportions, and  technique creates a tender crust with a hint of  smokiness that will bubble up around the edges  and support a light sauce with a thin layer of  ingredients. The flour used in the recipe also keeps  the pizza feeling light once you eat it. For those of  you who are technically minded when it comes to  the kitchen, this is because the flour is ground very  fine and the Caputo flour only has an 11%‐12%  gluten content.   

  Combine the water, sugar, and yeast. Let it  sit for about 5 minutes. Add the oil and salt  and stir. Add the flour and stir. Knead this  for about 6 minutes, until it is no longer  sticky. Place it in a bowl, cover it, and allow  it to rise for about 2 hours.    Roll the dough out until is about ¼” thick.  Brush it with olive oil. Sauce and top the  pizza, leaving 1 ½” – 2” clean around the  edges. Bake in a brickfire pizza oven for  about 4 minutes or at 550 degrees F for 7‐8  minutes.    As you can see, this is similar to the Napoli style  pizza crust, but the crust is going to be browner  and crisper, thicker (which is required for the  prolonged heat), and it’s not quite as finicky.   

Roman Pizza Crust 
  Roman pizzas are thin, but unlike the Napoli crusts,  they are crispy with browning around the edges  and bottom. Like the Napoli pizza crusts, they  bubble up around the edges. To accomplish this,  you will need either a brickfire oven or, more  commonly, a pizza stone.     7 tbsp. of warm water  1 tsp. of sugar  ¾ tsp. of yeast  1 tbsp. + 1 tsp. of olive oil  ½ tsp. of coarse salt  1 cup + 2 tbsp. of all purpose flour 

Sicilian Sfinciuni Pizza Crust 
  Sicilian pizzas are very different from pizza in rest  of Italy. Sicilian pizzas can have thick, bready crusts,  may be rolled, or even covered with another crust  on top. Sfinciuni is a spongy crust, similar to  focaccia, and is my favorite of all the Sicilian style  pizzas I have tried. Classic toppings include onion  and tomatoes, very similar to a Greek style pizza  called ladenia. This pizza, more than any of the  other ones, is primarily about the bread. Typically,  sfinciuni is baked in a rectangular or square pan  and cut into rectangles to serve.   

Pizza!

August 2012|30

3 cups of all purpose or whole wheat pastry  flour  ¾ tsp. of salt  1 tsp. of sugar  2 tsp. of yeast  1 cup + 3 tbsp. of water  3 tbsp. of olive oil 

 
Combine the flour, salt, sugar, and yeast  together. Add the water and oil and  combine thoroughly. Knead the dough until  it no longer sticks to your hands. Lightly oil  it, place it in a bowl, and cover it. Allow the  dough to rise for 1 ½ hours. Punch it down  and allow it to rise 30 more minutes.     Lightly oil a rectangular baking dish, about  12”x8”. Spread the dough into the dish.  Typically, this pizza will bake at 400 degrees  F for 35 minutes.    Because the pan is oiled and the crust is a bit  bready, it should end up lightly fried on the  bottom. Like other breads, this is best when it  comes right out of the oven.   

NYC Pizza Crust 
  NYC pizzas are famous throughout the U.S. Chances  are, you have a pizza joint serving NYC pizzas near  you. A bit part of that experience is the crust. It’s  thicker and moister than an Italian pizza crust and  has more of a rise to it because of the extra yeast.  It also has a nice, crispy bottom to it that should  taste lightly fried. The dough rests an entire day,  giving it a slight sourdough taste. It’s great stuff  and perfect with a sweet tomato sauce!    1 ½ cups of all purpose or whole wheat  pastry flour  2/3 tsp. of salt  ¾ cup of warm water 

1 tsp. of yeast  1 tsp. of sugar  Up to ¼ cup more of flour  1 tbsp. of olive oil    Combine the flour and salt in one bowl and  the water, yeast, and sugar in another bowl.  Add the wet mixture to the dry mixture.  Lightly flour a working surface using the ¼  cup of extra flour. Knead the dough for  about 10 minutes, until it is soft, but elastic.  Form it into a ball. Oil the dough with the  olive oil, place it in a bowl, cover it, and let it  sit for one day (at least 10 hours) in the  refrigerator.    Once it has rested for at least 10 hours, take  the dough out of the refrigerator and let it  come to room temperature.     Roll the dough out to ½” thickness and tap  the edges to create a thicker, raised edge  around the pizza.    Sprinkle cornmeal or flour onto a pizza  stone, let the pizza stone get hot, top the  pizza, slide it onto the stone, and bake it at  500 degrees F for 6‐8 minutes.    Letting the moist dough rest for so long allows the  natural yeast and bacteria to begin fermenting the  dough, which is how it gets its sour taste. The long  rest time also changes the gluten structure to  create that soft, thick dough that is so much a part  of classic NYC pizzas.   

Chicago Pizza Crust 
  If you’ve ever had a Chicago deep dish pizza, it is  likely and experience you are never going to forget.  The deep dish is widely accepted to have been  created at Pizzeria Uno in Chicago by a Texan. It 

Pizza!

August 2012|31

quickly became insidiously popular, with copycat  pizza houses popping up all across the city. No  wonder. The dough is thick and lusciously soft, the  center almost melting beneath the sauce. Speaking  of sauce, one of the hallmarks of this style pizza is  that the sauce often goes on top of the other  ingredients, counterpoint to what we often see in  most other pizzas.     ½ package of yeast  ¾ cups of warm water  ½ tsp. of sugar  ¼ cup of olive oil  1 ¾ cups of all purpose or whole wheat  pastry flour  ½ cup of semolina flour  ½ tsp. of salt  ¼ cup more of all purpose of whole wheat  pastry flour  1 tbsp. of olive oil    Combine the yeast, warm water, and sugar  and allow it to sit for about 10 minutes. Add  the olive oil to the wet mix. Combine the  flours and salt and then add them to the  wet mix, making sure everything gets  thoroughly combined.    Lightly flour a working surface with the ¼  cup extra of flour. Knead the dough for  about 8 minutes, just to the point where it  stops sticking to your hands and no longer.  Form the dough into a ball, oil the dough,  place it into a bowl, cover it, and let it rise  for 1 ½ hours.    After the dough has risen, punch it down  and give it two or three more kneads.  Spread it out into your deep dish pan. The  dough should be about 1” deep. As you  press the dough into the pan, press from the  center out towards the edges so the edges 

raise about ¼” to ½” higher than the rest of  the dough.     Top the pizza and bake it on 375 degrees F  for 30 minutes.    Because there is so much oil in the crust (part of  the reason it is so soft), it is important to let the  yeast, sugar, and water sit for 10 minutes to allow  the yeast to begin developing. If you add the oil to  the water right away, it will slow down that  process.   

semolina flour 

California Pizza Crust 
  This is the crust made famous by Wolfgang Puck in  the early 1980s. It’s a touch sweeter than other  pizza crusts (chef Puck’s uses honey instead of  agave), and crisper all around, the better to hold  the myriad of ingredients found on these highly  creative pizzas. This is the place where fusion  pizzas grew up, from BBQ pizzas to grilled pizzas  with smoked asparagus. More so than any other  pizza, the California pizza crust has a strong note of  sourdough, created by letting the dough refrigerate  a day or two before using it.    1 tsp. of yeast   1 ½ tsp. of agave   ½ cup of warm water  1 ½ cups of all purpose or whole wheat  pastry flour 

Pizza!

August 2012|32

½ tsp. of salt  2 tsp. of olive oil    Combine the yeast, agave, and warm water.  In a separate bowl, combine the flour and  salt. Fold the dry mix into the wet mix ½ cup  at a time until thoroughly combined.     Do not flour your working surface. Knead  the dough for about 5‐6 minutes, until it is  elastic and no longer sticky. Form it into a  ball.     Oil the dough and cover it, allowing it to  rest for 30 minutes. Once it has sat, it needs  to be refrigerated for 1‐2 days in order to  develop its signature sourdough taste.    Roll the dough out until it is about ¼” thick.   Top the pizza and bake it on 500 degrees F  for 10 minutes.                                           

The Author  
  Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The  Vegan Culinary  Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine  with a readership of  about 30,000.  In 2001, Chef Jason reversed his diabetes  by switching to a low‐fat, vegan diet and subsequently  left his position as the Director of Marketing for an IT  company to become a chef and instructor to help others.   Since then, he has been featured by the NY Times, has  been a NY Times contributor, and has been featured in  Edible Phoenix, and the Arizona Republic, and has had  numerous local television appearances.  He has catered  for companies such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright  Foundation, and Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in  the Scottsdale Culinary Festival’s premier catering  event, and has been a guest instructor and the first  vegan instructor in the Le Cordon Bleu program at  Scottsdale Culinary Institute.  Recently, Chef Jason wrote  a national best‐selling book with Dr. Neal Barnard  entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss Kickstart.  You can find out  more about Chef Jason Wyrick at  www.veganculinaryexperience.com. 

         
 

Pizza!

August 2012|33

A Slice of Advice: Vegan  Cheeses for Your Vegan Pizza 
by Madelyn Pryor
Good pizza doesn’t necessarily require cheese, but  good cheese can make a good pizza even better, if  you pick the right one. There are a few good vegan  cheeses, but you need the right tool for the right  job. Below are a few different vegan cheeses and I  talk about how to use them and which pizzas they  work best on.    Daiya  flavor is full with some sharpness to it, so it needs  to be paired with a pizza that doesn’t have delicate  flavors.   

Dr Cow  
                        These are raw ‘cheeses’. We tried both the aged  cashew & crystal manna algae cheese and the  aged cashew cheese. Both were excellent. I love  my husband and it took everything I had not to  grab the plate with both of them on them and run  so I could eat them by myself. They are my favorite  vegan cheeses of all time for an application like  eating with crackers. However, while it would be  excellent with a raw pizza, it would not be a good  choice for your cooked pizzas, unless you wanted  to use it as a finishing cheese after the pizza came  out of the oven. If you do that, I suggest crumbling  it onto the pizza. They are on the pricy end, but  delicious and worth it for a nice occasion or fancy  party.              
August 2012|34

Daiya is one of those products that I just keep at  the house. I usually stock mozzarella, cheddar, and  even pepper jack. The mozzarella helped me make  many of my recipe contributions to this issue. The  cheddar does have a nice sharpness, and melts  decently. I most often use it to make ‘cheese’ crisps  at home, but I used it to make my ‘cheeseburger’  pizza for this issue. The pepper jack does not have  an overly peppery flavor. Some may appreciate this  fact, but it makes me a bit sad. I would like it to be  a little spicier. The mozzarella takes very similar to  the cheddar, so it has a bit more ‘kick’ than a mild  traditional mozzarella should. You can use that  information as you wish. Either it sounds great, or  it will have you running for the hills. However, if  you are starting on the path of veganism, Daiya is  an excellent cheese substitute. The best thing  Daiya has going for it is that it melts nicely. The 
Pizza!

Follow Your Heart              
        A softer vegan cheese, Follow Your Heart has been  a product I have used for six years now. It comes in  a handful of flavors, including cheddar, mozzarella,  nacho cheese, and Monterey jack. I have had all of  them, and this product also largely tastes the same.  It does melt to some degree, but not perfectly.  Since some of my friends find the taste of Daiya too  assertive, I love mixing it with equal amounts of  Follow Your Heart. It’s a great way to mellow out  the flavor of Daiya and still have a melty cheese on  your pizza. Follow Your Heart mozzarella is also the  cheese pictured on my Seven Pounder Pizza. It has  a mild flavor, a slightly soft texture, but will grate if  you do not press too hard. It is also good sliced on  crackers as part of a ‘cheese tray’ which is my  favorite use for this.     

Heidi Ho Organics 
                      I tried two flavors, the chipotle cheddar and the  smoked gouda. I had not before tried any of this  brand, and I have to say, I will not be trying  anything else from them. First, the texture is  rubbery and gelatinous at the same time. If you  have ever had really awful vegan cheese, especially  really bad homemade vegan cheese, you have had 

something very similar to this product. To make  matters even worse, there was little taste to it. The  Chipotle Cheddar has some flavor, but not the  boldness one might expect when they see  ‘chipotle’, and the Smoked Gouda did not taste  smoked at all. This had limited melting power, and I  would not recommend it for use with any pizza, or  consuming it any other way. There are better  alternatives out there.     Sheese                               For this review, I was only able to sample this  company’s famous blue ‘cheese’, but they make  many other flavors, including smoked cheddar,  medium cheddar, strong cheddar, mozzarella, and  gouda. The blue cheese was a little hard, and it  contained no blue ‘coloring’ but it had a strong,  nice blue cheese flavor. With a little bit of work it  crumbles well enough to incorporate into salad  dressings or to use on a pizza. Jason used this on  the blue cheese sausage pizza, with great results. It  won’t really melt, but I don’t want a blue cheese to  do that. Because the flavor is so pronounced, it  needs to be used sparingly or paired with other  ingredients that have very bold flavors. Everyone at  the pizza tasting party loved this one, and I almost  beat up one of my best friends for the last bit.                

Pizza!

August 2012|35

Teese  
                Though limited in some areas of the United States,  Teese is a tasty little vegan cheese available in a  variety of flavors. I sampled nacho cheese sauce,  cheddar, and mozzarella. This little cheese comes  in tubes, but do not let the packaging put you off in  any way. This vegan cheese is delicious! The nacho  cheese is so analogous to the dairy varieties that  you could easily fool someone if you wished to do  so. The taste and texture are spot on. The cheddar  does not taste exactly like cheddar but is still very  tasty with a nice finish and a good texture. The  mozzarella is also very spot on. Jason used this on  his Pizza Margarita this issue, and it was perfect.  Even our meat eating, dairy loving friends were  fighting over the last slice. I would recommend that  you use the mozzarella on your vegan pizzas, and I  know that you would not be disappointed. This is a  cheese that can be grated, but really shows off  when it is thinly sliced and laid directly on the pizza  and it will accentuate your other high quality  ingredients. It melts and tastes great!    

creamy crumble which also lends itself to both  salad dressing and crumbling onto a pizza. It does  not melt very well, it just gets softer. You can see it  in action on my hot wing pizza in this issue.  Everyone, both vegan and omnivore liked it on that  pizza, and this is an item we purchase when we get  to the one store in our area that carries it. To use it  on a pizza, crumble it and then sprinkle it on either  before or after cooking. Before cooking will mellow  it out a little bit, but it is already pretty mellow for  a blue cheese.    The Author 
  Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates on  her blog, http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has  been making her own tasty desserts for over 16 years,  and eating dessert for longer  than she cares to admit. When  she isn’t in the kitchen creating  new wonders of sugary  goodness, she is chasing after  her bad kitties, or reviewing  products for various websites  and publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.  

       

Veg Cuisine  
                          My favorite from this line is their Soy Bleu. It does  not have a terribly pronounced musty blue cheese  flavor, but it does have a nice herbal note and a 

Pizza!

August 2012|36

Peels and Stones: Tools of the Trade
By Chef Jason Wyrick

Good pizza doesn’t require much. Just some love,  quality ingredients and a few techniques. Great  pizza, however, requires a few more helpers.     Because the stone is porous, you will want to clean  it only with a brush and some water. Do not use  soap or detergent, unless you want those flavors in  your pizza! Also, to prevent cracking, do not place a  room temperature stone directly inside a hot oven.  Allow the stone to warm up with the oven to  mitigate thermal shock and prevent fracturing. If  you don’t have a pizza stone, you can always use  a…   

The Pizza Stone 
  If you don’t own a  pizza oven (see  below), and really,  not many people do  outside of southern  Italy, a pizza stone is  a must. A pizza  stone is a porous  disc of ceramic or  clay that both crisps the bottom of the pizza and  helps cook it evenly. If you bake a pizza on a flat  piece of metal, like a baking sheet, the dough is  going to release a tiny amount of steam as it cooks,  which will get trapped between the bottom of the  pizza and the pan. Trapped steam equals soggy  crust. Because the pizza stone is porous, it absorbs  that excess moisture and allows the bottom of the  crust to dry, or crisp. Also, because stone retains  heat so well, the heat becomes evenly distributed  throughout the stone, which in turn cooks the  bottom of the pizza evenly. You want one that is at  least four inches in diameter bigger than the pizza  you want to cook. That leaves a two inch space all  around the pizza for bare stone. That space makes  handling the stone and pizza much easier to deal  with. Most stones range anywhere from $20 to  $35, depending on the size and brand.    

Holey Pizza Pan, Batman! 
  Pizza pans  attempt to  do what the  stone does  by making  the pan itself  porous,  albeit in the  largest way. Pizza pans have small holes in the  bottom to allow steam to escape the bottom of the  crust. Because this isn’t quite as even as the stone,  the crust won’t crisp perfectly, but it will be way  better than if the pizza was cooked on a simple  baking sheet. If you use one of these, make sure  you get a good, thick pan. If the pan is very thin  and made of cheap materials, it may warp when it  hits the hot oven.    

Iron Skillet 
  Aside from being able to be wielded as a weapon,  an iron skillet makes the perfect deep dish pizza  pan. It’s heavy and thick, so it will retain heat quite 

Pizza!

August 2012|37

well, ensuring that  the crust of your  pizza cooks evenly.  Most are also deep  enough that they  can handle the two  inch high deep dish pizza without spilling over and  you can serve the pizza directly in the iron skillet  for presentation. You can press the dough directly  into the skillet and even let it rise in the skillet for a  brief time if you desire. The sides of the skillet will  help you form the raised edge of the pizza as you  press the dough against them. Just make sure your  skillet is well oiled so that the dough does not stick  to it. Also, you can put these into the oven cold. It  does cause a small amount of stress to the pan, but  because it is a thick piece of iron, it is incredibly  resilient. Many people will tell you that you should  not clean them, but I am against simply leaving  dirty oil in an iron skillet and calling it “seasoned.”  Instead, wipe the pan down when you are done  using it with a little water, soap, and a rag, and  then make sure to thoroughly wipe it down with a  dry towel so it does not rust. Immediately wipe a  thin layer of oil onto it to provide a thorough layer  of protection. That oil can serve as the oil for you  pan on your next pizza endeavor.   

holds heat a bit more evenly. If you want a very  crispy crust, the metal one is a better way to go.  Both of these will need to be oiled, so if you are  going completely oil free, there are even some  silicon options out there. Silicon is naturally non‐ stick and will peel away from the pizza and reform  back to its original shape.   

Tapsi 
  Want to create the  quintessential  Greek pizza  experience? You  may want to hunt  down a tapsi, a  traditional round Greek baking pan made of metal  about 1 ½” deep with a slight inner curve. Make  sure you get a good one made of stainless steel or  cast iron instead of a cheap aluminum one. This is,  of course, a specialty item and absolutely not  necessary unless you want to go true authentic. Do  I have one? No. Do I want one? Of course I do!   

Pizza Peel 
  Aside from the pizza stone or pizza oven,  this is the next most important pizza  tool to have in your kitchen. It is  indispensible for delivering the pizza to  the oven and lifting it out while keeping  the integrity of the pizza intact and not  getting burned! A pizza peel is basically a  super‐wide spatula, wide enough to hold  an entire pizza. They come in wood,  bamboo, laminate, aluminum, or  stainless steel, with short handles for  conventional ovens and long handles for  pizza ovens. The long handle is  necessary with a true pizza oven to keep your  hands away from the intense heat of the oven. I  have a long one used for the pizza oven I am 

Rectangular Baking Dish 
 

If you want to make a rectangular pizza, and there  are several made in that fashion, almost all of  which have very thick crusts, you will want a good  13”x9”x2” glass baking dish. I prefer glass over the  sheet metal ones solely because glass generally 

Pizza!

August 2012|38

building that I somehow manage to navigate  around my kitchen, but I do not recommend doing  that. If anyone else is in the kitchen, they will need  some serious dodge skills.     Some peels purely decorative, perfect for serving a  pizza, but not something you want to jerk around  in your oven. If you don’t want it to get scraped up,  don’t use it as a true pizza peel. For practical use, I  prefer the aluminum and stainless steel versions.  They are very thin, which makes delivering the  pizza and grabbing it out of the oven very easy. The  wood ones are  naturally thick,  so they have  to taper at the  end to slide  underneath  the pizza,  making them a  bit tougher to  use.     To deliver your pizza to the oven using the peel,  sprinkle cornmeal onto the peel, then gently slide  your uncooked crust onto the peel. It is much  easier if you sauce and top the pizza after it is on  the peel. Open your oven and place the front of the  peel at the front of your pizza stone or delivery  area in your pizza oven, tilting the peel at about a  15 degree incline. Quickly jerk the peel forward and  back to get the pizza to slide off the peel onto the  cooking surface.    To retrieve your pizza using the peel, place the peel  just in front of the pizza at a very minimal incline,  almost in line with the cooking surface. Jerk the  peel forward to grab the pizza. The peel should  slide right underneath it. Lift the pizza out of the  oven and let it slide off onto your cool down  surface or cutting board.   

Corn Meal 
  Corn meal may be edible, but when it comes to  making pizzas, it is an invaluable tool. Its  coarseness keeps the pizza crust from resting  completely on the pizza peel. This allows it to easily  slide off the peel, like walking on marbles on a hard  surface, and it also allows the pizza to more easily  be lifted off the stone. Any residual cornmeal will  also crisp during cooking and help absorb excess  moisture. Make sure to get a large grain cornmeal.    

Pizza Cutter 
  The standard pizza cutter  is the pizza wheel, which  you’ve probably seen. You  roll them along the pizza  and the sharp wheel slices  it. I had mixed results with  these until I got a heavy  one. The problem with  pizza wheels is that they  drag ingredients along with them and if they are  not heavy or sharp enough, they can have trouble  slicing through the pizza. The extra weight of a  heavy one helps get the proper slice, so you don’t  have to keep running the wheel back and forth  over the pizza. Another trick to use with these is to  run the wheel under water for a few seconds to get  it wet. This keeps the ingredients from sticking as  much on the initial slice.    My favorite pizza  cutter, however, is the  rocking pizza cutter.  It’s basically a long,  curved blade with the  handle over the blade.  You place it straight  down on the pizza and  rock it back and forth. 

Pizza!

August 2012|39

The downward pressure makes for an easy cut and  it tends not to drag ingredients around as much.  Make sure to get one that is about as long as the  pizzas you typically make.   

The Pizza Oven 
 

  This is the big one, the tool of the truly dedicated  pizza aficionado. This is typically a brick outdoor  oven that holds a very high thermal mass and it can  do so for a very long time. It also happens to be  great for baking bread and for fire roasting, but its  purpose in life is to bake the best pizza in the  world. You may see some rectangular pizza ovens,  but I strongly suggest the round ones. Round pizza  ovens distribute the heat evenly throughout the  oven while the rectangular ones end up with  pockets of warm and pockets of hot and the air  doesn’t move quite right throughout the oven.  Most pizza ovens are now made with fire bricks, a  special type of brick that won’t crack under intense  heat and will refract the heat from the fire back  into the oven. These are not your typical fire bricks  that you would find in a fireplace, however. For a  pizza oven, you want to choose low‐duty firebricks  and you will most likely have to look for them at a  specialty brickyard or masonry shop. I am on the  hunt for some myself, currently. The dome of the  pizza oven is covered with insulating material to  keep the heat in, a chimney in the front of the oven  to let the smoke out (instead of out the door and 
Pizza!

into your face), and heat resistant board on the  bottom on top of which lays brick or concrete to  keep the heat from escaping from the bottom of  the oven.    So why a pizza oven? Not only does it serve as a  conversational point for a backyard party, you can  pop pizzas in and out of it and have them done in 1  ½ to 3 minutes. Because of the way they conduct  heat and the composition of the oven, they crisp  the bottom of the pizza while perfectly cooking the  ingredients on top, all within that short amount of  time. You can pop pizzas in and out quickly while  entertaining your guests at the same time and it’s  just such a fun experience!    If you plan on having someone build one for you,  you will probably pay anywhere from $2,000‐ $5,000 for one. For the industrious, however, you  can build one yourself for less than half the cost.  I’ve got the layout of my pizza oven and the first  few bricks already arranged on my patio and I can’t  wait to finish it. I planned on writing a detailed  article about how to build one, but I can’t do better  than the people at Forno Bravo. Forno Bravo has  the absolute best information on how to build your  own pizza oven and you can also order the supplies  and kit from them. Check them out at  www.fornobravo.com for guidance and inspiration.    The Author  
  Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The  Vegan Culinary  Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine  with a readership of  about 30,000.  In 2001, Chef Jason reversed his diabetes  by switching to a low‐fat, vegan diet and subsequently  left his position as the Director of Marketing for an IT 

August 2012|40

company to become a chef and instructor to help others.    Since then, he has been featured by the NY Times, has  been a NY Times contributor, and has been featured in  Edible Phoenix, and the Arizona Republic, and has had  numerous local television appearances.  He has catered  for companies such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright  Foundation, and Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in  the Scottsdale Culinary Festival’s premier catering  event, and has been a guest instructor and the first  vegan instructor in the Le Cordon Bleu program at  Scottsdale Culinary Institute.  Recently, Chef Jason wrote  a national best‐selling book with Dr. Neal Barnard  entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss Kickstart.  You can find out  more about Chef Jason Wyrick at  www.veganculinaryexperience.com. 

       

Pizza!

August 2012|41

Vegan Cuisine and the Law:
Mid-year Update of Legal Matters Affecting Barnyard Residents 
By Mindy Kursban, Esq. & Andy Breslin

1. Cage Disputes    In July 2011, the Humane Society of the United  States (HSUS) and the United Egg Producers (UEP),  reached an Agreement that formed the basis of a  proposed federal welfare standard for egg laying  hens, the Egg Products Inspection Act Amendments  of 2012.     Proponents of the Act, in addition to HSUS,  included Farm Sanctuary, Mercy for Animals, and  Compassion Over Killing. The Act would mandate  enriched cages with perches, nesting boxes, and  scratching areas that provide nearly double the  space for each hen as the current barren cramped  battery cages and egg carton labels that identify  the housing system so consumers would know if  the eggs they’re buying come from caged hens.     Some animal protection organizations took a  different stand. Nicknaming this legislation “The  Rotten Egg Bill,” a coalition of smaller groups that  include the Humane Farming Association, Friends  of Animals, and United Poultry Concerns argue that  this would create cages as the national industry  standard, denying state legislatures the ability to  enact laws to outlaw cages or otherwise regulate  egg factory conditions.    The measure was denied consideration when  initially tied to the Senate version of the 2012 Farm 
Pizza!

Bill. As of this writing, the Act is still before the  House and Senate as stand‐alone legislation  (S.3239/H.R.3798).     If cages, even so‐called enriched cages, are given  the imprimatur of acceptability from the animal  protection community, will egg‐laying hens ever be  free from cages?     2. California’s Ban on Delicacy of Despair Takes  Effect    Foie gras is made by force‐feeding corn mash to  ducks and geese using a pneumatic tube jammed  down the animal’s esophagus. The intended result  is a disease called hepatic lipidosis, causing the  birds’ livers to swell to ten times normal size.  Amazingly, some people consider a diseased  swollen liver from a horribly mistreated bird to be a  delicacy.    On July 1, 2012, after a seven‐year grace period for  diners, it is now illegal to produce and sell foie gras  in California. Chefs are looking for ways to  circumvent the law. Corporate interests filed a  lawsuit days after the ban went into effect seeking  to get the law declared invalid and prevent its  enforcement.    This is a continuing story that will hopefully end  well for the ducks and geese at the center of the 
August 2012|42

controversy.    3. Adios to Gestation Crates    Expectant pigs are continuously confined during  their pregnancies in a cage just about the size of  their bodies, essentially immobilizing them  completely for four months. As of this writing,  Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Maine,  Michigan, Ohio, Oregon and, most recently, Rhode  Island have banned them.    Forced by public pressure, many big companies  have announced they will stop buying pork from  suppliers who use gestation crates, including  McDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's, Hardees, Carl’s  Jr., Denny’s, Cracker Barrel, Safeway, Kroger,  Hormel Foods, Bon Appétit Food Services.  Smithfield Foods, the world's largest pork  producer, says it will phase out gestation crates by  2017.    4. Slime for a Change    The meat industry suffered its biggest setback this  year in March when ABC News ran a story about  what the industry prefers to call “lean finely  textured beef.” More popularly known as “pink  slime,” it’s even grosser than that name implies.  Low‐grade beef trimmings that come from the  most contaminated parts of the cow were once  used only in dog food and cooking oil. In 1991, a  company called Beef Products, Inc. (BPI), began  processing these trimmings and spraying them with  ammonia to kill pathogens such as salmonella and  E.coli. The finished product – “pink slime” – is then  added as filler to ground beef and other beef  products, making hamburgers, deli meats, beef  sticks, frozen entrees, and canned foods cheaper  and less fatty.    It’s an understatement to say the public did not 

react at all well to pink slime. School districts, fast  food restaurants, and huge grocery chains around  the country stopped buying it. Whole Foods put  signs in front of their stores announcing “No Pink  Slime since 1980.” BPI was forced to close three of  its four factories, and another beef processor filed  for bankruptcy.    5. Let US Farmers Grow Hemp   

portion of a hemp field 

Government farm policy supports the annual  harvesting of 90 million acres of corn, most of  which becomes animal feed and high fructose corn  syrup. Those same government policies make it  illegal to grow hemp.     Hemp ‐ hemp seeds, hemp protein, hemp oil, hemp  milk ‐ is a very healthy source of protein and other  nutrients. Hemp is also derived from the same  species of plant that produces marijuana, providing  the misguided justification for this ban.    Oregon Senator Ron Wyden introduced legislation  as part of the 2012 Farm Bill to allow farmers to  grow hemp. A companion House bill was previously  introduced by Texas Representative and famous  libertarian, Ron Paul.    Dr. Bronner's Magic Soap CEO, David Bronner,  locked himself in a steel cage along with a dozen  hemp plants in front of the White House to protest 

Pizza!

August 2012|43

the ban – and was forcibly removed by power‐saw‐ wielding cops.    6. Mad Cow Madness    When transmitted to humans who have eaten a  stricken cow, mad cow disease, also known as  bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), is  incurable and 100% fatal, eroding the brains of  victims as they succumb to a debilitating loss of  mental faculties, ending with death. Naturally, our  government protects its citizens  by testing the 34 million cows  slaughtered every year in the US  for BSE.    Okay, they don’t test all 34  million of them. But they test  some of them. And by “some” we  mean one tenth of one percent. 

farmed animals so they don’t succumb to  unsanitary living conditions and to promote their  growth. This has led to the creation of antibiotic  resistant “superbugs.”    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has done  nothing since 1977 when it first noted this alarming  health risk. A federal court in New York recently  issued two decisions that require the FDA to  determine whether feeding antibiotics such as  penicillin and tetracycline to healthy animals is safe  for human health. If FDA finds  that such use is not safe, as it  should, it must withdraw  approval.   The ramifications of these court  orders are profound. If the  indiscriminate use of antibiotics is  banned, animal agriculturalists  may be forced to raise animals in 

less intensively confined  That’s not a typo. It’s just insane.  mad cow disease under the microscope conditions. That’s a little good  If they were testing all 34 million  and found one positive result, this might  news for the animals right away. It also means that  reasonably be written off as an anomaly. But when  meat prices will likely rise, reducing demand and  99.9% of cows go untested, a single positive result  resulting in fewer animals raised for food overall.      should be enough to send a beef‐eater into a panic    8. Arsenic and Pink Chickens  that his brain might melt long before the colon    cancer had a chance to devour his intestinal tract.  Arsenic has been a perennial favorite of poisoners  Up until this past year, they didn’t find any, which  must have been reassuring to people who are very  for centuries. If it doesn’t just kill you right away,  bad at math.     like it’s supposed to, it may cause cancer, diabetes,    and heart disease, and has been linked to fetal  In April 2012, USDA testing found one. But finding a  developmental disorders. You might think putting  contagious disease that literally rots your brain was  arsenic in chicken feed would be such a  no cause for concern. The government assured  phenomenally asinine prospect, that nobody would  every American man, woman, and child that eating  ever need to ban it. As is often the case when you  cow flesh and drinking cow’s milk is safe. Bon  speculate about the absurdity of animal  appétit.  agriculture, you’d be dead wrong.      7. Superbugs are Superbad  Though initially used to kill internal parasites,    arsenic is now widely employed to increase chicken  Eighty percent of antibiotics are given to factory‐ weight‐gain and turn their flesh a more 

Pizza!

August 2012|44

“appetizing” pinkish color by causing chickens’  blood vessels to burst.    Maryland is now the first state in the nation to ban  arsenic in chicken feed, following in the footsteps  of Canada and the European Union. Now one state  out of fifty makes it illegal to put one of the most  toxic and well‐known poisons into chicken feed.  Progress.       9. Lunch Hour. The Movie. 

The Authors     Mindy Kursban is a  practicing attorney who is  passionate about animals,  food, and health. She gained  her experience and  knowledge about vegan  cuisine and the law while  working for ten years as  general counsel and then executive director of the  Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Since  leaving PCRM in 2007, Mindy has been writing and  speaking to help others make the switch to a plant‐ based diet. Mindy welcomes feedback, comments, and  questions at mkursban@gmail.com.     Andrew Breslin is the author  of Mother's Milk, the  definitive account of the vast  global conspiracy  orchestrated by the dairy  industry, which secretly  controls humanity through mind‐controlling substances  contained in cow milk. In all likelihood this is a hilarious  work of satyric fiction, but then again, you never know.  He also authors the blog Andy Rants, almost certainly  the best blog that you have never read. He is an avid  book reviewer at Goodreads. He worked at Physicians  Committee for Responsible Medicine with Mindy  Kursban, with whom he occasionally collaborates on  projects concerning legal issues associated with health  and food. Andrew's fiction and nonfiction have  appeared in a wide variety of print and online venues,  covering an even wider variety of topics. He lives in  Philadelphia with his girlfriend and cat, who are not the  same person. 

  Back in June, the Library of Congress was host to a  special screening of Lunch Hour, a new  documentary film that shines a national theatrical  spotlight on the troubles with the national school  lunch program.    Lunch Hour features food show host Rachel Ray,  Howard Stern co‐host Robin Quivers, Food Politics’  Marion Nestle, and PCRM’s Dr. Neal Barnard, to  highlight how a nutrition program initially intended  to feed hungry children is now one of the causes of  the childhood obesity epidemic.    The film’s writer, director, and producer, James  Costa, is vegan and a vocal advocate for veganism.   
                   
Pizza!

 

August 2012|45

Mastering the Art of Grilled Pizza
by Liz Lonnetti

workable.  Oil a baking sheet and gently stretch the  dough out over it and lightly oil the top of the  dough.   

  Summer time is a great time to fire up the grill and  keep the heat out of the house.  We love having a  party and serving pizza fresh off the grill because  they are so quick to make and taste fantastic!   Crispy crust with a smoky char and favorite  toppings are a crowd pleaser and best of all, once  the grill it hot, you can be serving your pie in less  than 10 minutes!    The grill must be preheated to 500 degrees F.  We  keep it really simple and use Trader Joe’s premade  Pizza Crust dough and skip the work it takes to  make it from scratch.  Let the dough rest at room  temperature for about 15 minutes to make it more 

    Be sure to collect and drain all the other toppings  you want to use on your pizza.  The idea is to  create a thin and crispy pizza crust, and soggy  toppings won’t help you get there!  I drain the  olives and artichoke hearts well and then spread  them on paper towels to really pull the moisture  out.  All the toppings need to be prepped ahead of  time and ready to put on the pizza quickly, trust me  you will need to work fast!  An organized work area  is a must.  Feel free to use your own recipes for the  dough and sauce, but premade works just fine.   Tomato sauce, fresh basil, an optional cheese of  your choice and you are ready to assemble.  Once the grill has reached 500 degrees, flip the  dough out onto the hot grate.  Yes, raw bare dough  directly onto the hot grate!  Remove the baking  sheet and close the top of the grill.  You don’t need 

Pizza!

August 2012|46

to oil the grate first, just boldly flip that dough out  onto the hot grill.  

Wait for about 2 minutes and check to see if the  crust has bubbled and the bottom is lightly  browned with darker grill marks and it’s time to flip  the crust. 

the grill is hot and the pizza dough is ready to be flipped onto it

  the flip    Once the crust has flipped it’s time to get those  toppings on fast.  Using a large spoon, spread a  light layer of sauce over the crust.  Fresh basil,  veggies and a cheesy substance are all scattered as  quickly as possible and the cover closed in order to  keep as much heat in the grill as possible.  It will  only take a couple more minutes to finish the pizza  if you worked fast.   
after the pizza dough has been flipped onto the grill,  before the pan is removed 

         
ready for toppings

pan removed 

 

Pizza!

August 2012|47

This is when your guests start to get very hungry,  but let it rest another minute and then slice it up  and serve to great applause!  Once you try making  pizza on the grill will wonder why you ever  bothered with your oven, it is easy, fun and  delicious!   
The Author  As a professional urban designer, Liz  Lonetti is passionate about building  community, both physically and  socially.  She graduated from the U  of MN with a BA in Architecture in  1998. She also serves as the  Executive Director for the Phoenix  Permaculture Guild, a non‐profit  organization whose mission is to  inspire sustainable living through education, community  building and creative cooperation  (www.phoenixpermaculture.org).  A long time advocate  for building greener and more inter‐connected  communities, Liz volunteers her time and talent for  other local green causes.  In her spare time, Liz enjoys  cooking with the veggies from her gardens, sharing  great food with friends and neighbors, learning from  and teaching others.  To contact Liz, please visit her blog  site www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profile/LizDan.    

topped with yummy goodness 

   

Once the toppings have heated through (don’t  expect to be able to actually ‘cook’ toppings on the  grilled pizza – precook things like onions and  mushrooms unless you like them raw) and the  bottom of the crust is browned it’s time to remove  the finished pie.  Loosen up the crust with your  spatula and then slide the original cookie sheet  underneath to lift the pizza off and remove to your  cutting board.   

Resources 
www.urbanfarm.org  www.phoenixpermaculture.org 

 

finished! 

           
Pizza! August 2012|48

Vegan Traveler: Across the U.S.A.
By Chef Jason Wyrick
 

Recently, I’ve been traveling across the U.S.  teaching cooking classes, and during my travels I’ve  had an amazing opportunity to try vegan hotspots  from one coast to the next. While a tiny amount  were not so great, many of them were fun  adventures. A few, however, stand out above the  rest. These are the places I can’t wait to go back  and visit!   

While you’re there, don’t pass up an opportunity to  get a macaroon or two. These have just the right  balance between moist and chewy and I would  make a lunch out of them if I could! Visit Native  Bowl at www.nativebowl.com. It’s easily the best  vegan meal you can get in the city.   

The Bye and Bye Vegan Bar 
  The Bye and Bye was one of the coolest  experiences I’ve had in my travels. Vegan  restaurants aren’t too difficult to find anymore, but  a vegan bar? Pure awesome. I loved that I could go  out late at night, even on a Sunday, and get a good  vegan meal. My favorite on the menu was the  meatball sub. I was hungry before the first one, and  full when I ordered the second one, but it was so  good, I had to have two. Just the right meal to  accompany a fine vegan beer. Speaking of alcohol,  they are no slouches when it comes to the good  stuff. Expect to get a strong drink when you visit  the Bye and Bye and unlike most strong drinks,  they actually taste good. Add on a comfortable 

Native Bowl Food Truck 

  I’ve been to food trucks all over the country and  Native Bowl is my favorite. Jay and Julie Hasson  serve up delicious and creative vegan bowls at the  Mississippi Marketplace in Portland, OR. At Native  Bowl, you’ve got five different bowls to choose  from. I’ve eaten there several times before and the  Mississippi bowl, with BBQ soy curls, ranch, and  crispy cole slaw was my go to meal, but I recently  tried the Alberta, a bowl with garlic tofu, hot sauce,  sesame seeds, and seaweed is now my new  favorite. The combination of salty and spicy is just  too hard to beat. I’ll admit, though, that I don’t  choose. When I was there last time, I got both! 
Pizza!

August 2012|49

patio and no‐smoking policy and you’ve got a place  I would be happy to visit several times a week.  Don’t bother visiting the website. It’s just a satellite  map of the location. You would be better off  looking it up on Yelp, VegGuide, or Happy Cow.   

Richmond, VA Vegetarian Festival 

almost like a light version of Food Network’s  “Chopped” than an Iron Chef competition. In an  Iron Chef competition, I want to see the chef’s go  to town, not be limited by a lackluster, strange  pantry. Not only that, one of the chefs wasn’t  vegan and another one wasn’t even vegetarian.  Frustrating, but in spite of that, a good festival to  spend a few hours. www.veggiefest.org.    

Rooster Cart Food Truck 
  I lucked out. I got to eat at Rooster Cart twice while  I was in Richmond. Once at the festival, but before  that at one of their regular food truck locations.  Rooster Cart is a vegan sandwich food truck. The  sandwiches are big with bold flavors and  interesting combinations. Their bahn mi was one of  the best vegan sandwiches. Just the right amount  of tang and sweetness made me willing to sit in the  rain just to munch on a bite of this treat. I also  enjoyed the Dill Presidente, which had an  interesting combination of vegan chorizo and dill  sumac sauce that I was skeptical about at first, but  won me over with the first bite. The chef, Jen, is  one of the more creative minds I’ve encountered  on the road, making soul‐satisfying, unique, vegan  sandwiches that are sure to please vegans and non‐ vegans alike. They don’t have a website, but you  can check them out on Facebook.   

  Richmond is the food festival capital of the country.  There is one going on almost every weekend, but I  lucked out because the vegetarian festival just  happened to be going on the same weekend I was  there to teach a class. The bad part? It was in the  middle of July. I live in Phoenix. I can handle lots of  heat. Couple that with extreme humidity and I’m  toast. Soggy toast, but still toast. Despite that, I  stayed around the festival for a couple hours  sampling the various offerings and watching some  of the iron chef competition. While the  competition was a disappointment (I’ll get into that  later), I got to try a few different sandwiches, a  wrap, paella, some Ethiopian food, and some of the  best vegan sweets I’ve had from Chelly’s Cakes‐n‐ Pastries (www.chellybakes.com.) Cornbread,  muffins, cupcakes, brownies, and most were much  better than the ones I’ve had at the famous vegan  bakeries. Yum! Rooster Cart and Chelly’s were  definitely the highlights of the show. Not so much  with the Iron Chef competition. The pantry was not  very well stocked and the ingredients were odd, 

                   

Pizza!

August 2012|50

The Flaming Ice Cube 

  The Flaming Ice Cube is located in Cleveland (with  another café in Boardman). It has a small diner  feel, and the menu has some diner style items, but  it’s far more diverse than it sounds. There are a  plethora of vegan sandwiches and burgers, many of  which use some sort of mock meat, but there are  also quite a few innovative salads, a few bowls, and  some nice appetizers. Like I said, a lot of these  feature mock meats, but even if that isn’t your  thing, the Flaming Ice Cube has something to offer.  They also have several organic dishes. I happened  upon it late on a Saturday night after teaching a  class and was treated to their Pesto Burger, the  Tempeh Chickenless Salad Sandwich, and  the  Sunshine Salad. All of the food was well above  what you find in most vegan diners and I would  gladly go back there again. Plus, they are open late  and the staff was super friendly.    

and I was a bit happier with the raw platter. It  came with a raw hummus that was excellent,  guacamole (a bit underseasoned), and a trio of  excellent raw crackers, all made from different nuts  and seeds, along with some fresh veggies. This  platter was deceptively filling and I ended up taking  some of the crackers back to the hotel. They were  easily the best part of the meal and I would love to  learn how to make some of them. The burrito was  comprised of a raw  wrap, a sweet  dressing, hot sauce,  quinoa, and more  guacamole. I  particularly enjoyed  the quinoa, sweet  dressing, and hot  sauce combination,  but my wife did not  care for it as much.  We also tried their  kale “nachos,” which  were excellent. They  were basically kale chips that had been dehydrated  with a coating of cheddar flavored cashew cheese.  They sell them packaged in the store as well and  we each got two bags to go. Definitely worth the  money. Of course, the chocolates were wonderful  as well, but my sweet tooth had been worn out by  this time. It’s a fun little restaurant with a laid back  Sedona feel to it. 
 

Chocolatree  
 

The Author  
  Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The Vegan  Culinary Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine with  a readership of about  30,000.  In 2001, Chef  Jason reversed his 

Chocolatree is an organic vegan restaurant in  Sedona, AZ that is heavy on the raw side of things.  Not only do they have a café, they also sell a lot of  vegan chocolates (hence the name), many of  which, again, are raw. I was very happy to find this  place because it is the only vegan restaurant in the  area and it also happens to be good. My wife and I  split the raw platter for two and the Sedona burrito 
Pizza!

August 2012|51

diabetes by switching to a low‐fat, vegan diet and  subsequently left his position as the Director of  Marketing for an IT company to become a chef and  instructor to help others.  Since then, he has been  featured by the NY Times, has been a NY Times  contributor, and has been featured in Edible Phoenix,  and the Arizona Republic, and has had numerous local  television appearances.  He has catered for companies  such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and  Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in the Scottsdale  Culinary Festival’s premier catering event, and has been  a guest instructor and the first vegan instructor in the Le  Cordon Bleu program at Scottsdale Culinary Institute.   Recently, Chef Jason wrote a national best‐selling book  with Dr. Neal Barnard entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss  Kickstart.  You can find out more about Chef Jason  Wyrick at www.veganculinaryexperience.com.       

Pizza!

August 2012|52

An Interview with Cookbook Author Hannah Kamminsky!
   

Please tell us a bit about yourself.    Where to begin? Well, I’m 23 years old and have  just released my third cookbook, Vegan a la Mode.  I tend to find myself on the sweeter side of the  kitchen, as all of my books have featured desserts  so far. Besides that, I work part time to Health in a  Hurry in Fairfield, CT, am attending the Academy of  Art University to earn my BFA in commercial  photography, and do freelance photography on the  side. I’m the staff photographer for VegNews  magazine, and regularly contribute recipes to a  number of kosher magazines as well. Basically, if it  involves vegan food prep, writing, or photography,  I’m all over it!    What led you to become vegan and how has that  impacted your life?    I initially went vegetarian in high school, when I  suddenly found myself with many vegetarian  friends. It was only after I began to do research  about the reasons for the dietary change that I  actually understood the true underlying cruelty in  even that decision. Though it was a completely new  concept to me at that time, I went vegan within a  month of that first big adjustment, and haven’t  looked back since. It’s actually opened up my  palate immensely, because I used to be a very picky 
Pizza!

eater. Now, my philosophy is that as long as it’s  vegan, I’m willing to try anything once.    Your recipes are very creative. What gets you  excited about making a new recipe?    There are just so many possibilities when it comes  to combining flavors! I feel inspired by just about  everything, from seasonal ingredients to classic  desserts to what I have kicking around in the  pantry. Besides that, I just love being able to share  something delicious with friends and family.  There’s nothing more gratifying than making  someone else happy, and good food is a universal  mood enhancer.    What is the development  process like?    It probably looks a whole  lot like anyone else  fiddling about in the  kitchen. I scribble down  the main ingredients I  want to feature and then  start to fill in with the supporting characters. Once I  get the basic formula figured out, I write in  measurement that seem reasonable for what I  want to make, and then keep tweaking it all as I 
August 2012|53

actually start to assemble everything. Sometimes  the recipe changes radically by the time I actually  get the dish finishes, and sometimes I don’t touch  it once. Every recipe has a life of its own. Often I  have to make it two or three (or more) times to  perfect the end results, too.    What challenges have you faced as a vegan author  and how did you overcome them?    Happily, the distinction of being a vegan author  creates no greater challenges than being an  omnivorous cookbook author. Sometimes I’ll get  the usual questions about protein and vitamins, or  a skeptic who thinks that vegan food is all nuts and  berries, but if you offer a person a dessert to  sample, that tends to erase any doubts. I feel lucky  that veganism is much more accepted and  understood than ever amongst mainstream eaters.    What is your favorite, unusual ingredient that you  like to work with?    Picking a single favorite ingredient is like picking a  favorite child‐ Nearly impossible! As for unusual  finds though, I did happen to stumble upon a  package of Vegg while in London, and am kind of  having a little love affair at the moment.              What do you like to cook for yourself?     Standard meals are very simple affairs‐ I rarely  have the time to cook full recipes all in one go,  unless it’s for a photo shoot that allows me to eat  the leftovers. I like to cook components and have  them all ready to assemble at a moment’s notice.  Cooked beans, baked tofu, a wide variety of sauces,  nuts, and seeds, plus frozen rice and tons of  miscellaneous veggies are always on hand. That  means I eat lots of nutrient‐dense salads and rice  bowls on the fly. The key is to keep the savory stuff  relatively healthy, to balance out the abundance of  desserts in the kitchen.   
Pizza!

What advice can you give new vegan cookbook  authors?    My advice would be the same for any new  cookbook (or blog) author, vegan or not. Just keep  on doing what you love, and do it with passion. It’s  a tough business with tons of competition, so if you  don’t make the impact you hope for, don’t let it get  you down. As long as you’re learning, growing, and  genuinely enjoying the process, it will all be  worthwhile. It only means that your next book will  be that much better.    What's next for you?    I’m already working furiously to compile another  set of over 100 new recipes for the next cookbook!  I don’t want to give too much away yet before I  have some real results to show for it, but it involves  a whole lot of pastry. While this latest volume is  still primarily dessert‐centric, it will actually  incorporate a few savory recipes into the mix as  well.    Thanks Hannah!    Bio    Growing up as a vegan with a voracious sweet  tooth, Hannah Kaminsky had to learn to bake for  herself at a young age. Endlessly experimenting  with different recipes and creative combinations,  there is always some new dessert or treat to taste  in her busy kitchen. Developing her skills primarily  through trials for her blog,  www.bittersweetblog.com, food photography  quickly became a passion as well, and is now the  focus of her college degree.    Contact Info    You can find out more about Hannah at  http://www.bittersweetblog.com.  

August 2012|54

An Interview with Photographer Sharon Lee Hart!
   

Please tell us a bit about yourself.    I recently moved to Lexington to teach  photography at The University of Kentucky.  If I  have down time, you will find me puttering about  in my yard planting or weeding, reading, watching  Breaking Bad or something on HGTV, and hanging  out with my cats, Finnie and Maxwell. I recently  purchased a bike, so have been cruising around on  that lately.     When did you become vegan and why? What was  that process like?    I became vegetarian when I was 12 years old for  ethical reasons upon viewing animal rights material  my cousin was using for a report. I had a visceral  reaction to the photographs and stories I read,  which was enough for me to make the change. I  have always felt compassion and love for animals,  throughout my life they have been among my best  friends, so it felt pretty natural to not eat them. I  became vegan after starting this project and was  researching the treatment of farm animals and  finally visiting them at the sanctuaries sealed the  deal. I knew in my heart that it was wrong to 

exploit animals in any way and I could not ignore  that feeling. The transition was not too difficult,  with the exception of eating out in Lexington, KY  (which is not exactly a vegan mecca‐although  Louisville is slowly becoming pretty darn veg‐ friendly). This is not the worst thing in the world, as  it requires me to cook more, which I enjoy. I save  money and have become more aware of what  exactly I put into and on my body.     How did you become a photographer?    I took a class in high school and was hooked‐I  found it magical‐a combination of art, cooking, and  science. Photography has given me an excuse to  get out and about to explore what interests and  intrigues me. Without photography, I would be  more of homebody than I already am. I took time  off from school, but found photography was a  constant in my life. I ultimately got my MFA and  now enjoying teaching.  I am fascinated by  photography, which includes making my own  images, critiquing student work, and considering all  kinds of photographic imagery and the impact it  has on the world.   

Pizza!

August 2012|55

What is your book about? How did you come up  with the idea for it?    The book has  dignified black and  white photographic  portraits of the  farm animals I had  the pleasure of  meeting at the ten  US farm sanctuaries  I visited in 2009 and  2010. Each photograph is accompanied by the  animal’s name and personal story handwritten by  the folks that know them best. In addition, the  book has moving essays by Karen Davis, president  of United Poultry Concerns; Kathy Stevens, founder  of the Catskill Animal Sanctuary; and Gene Baur,  founder of Farm Sanctuary. Jeffrey Masson, who is  the author of The Pig Who Sang to the Moon: The  Emotional World of Farm Animals and The Face on  Your Plate: The Truth about Food wrote the  introduction.    I wanted to utilize my strengths and photography  seemed like the best way for me to raise  awareness about the plight of farm animals in a  positive way that allows people to actively look and  engage. Folks are disturbed by the images that  depict the cruelty and torture that occurs on  factory farms (and who can blame them, it IS  unbearably disturbing). While I think those images  are absolutely essential to help get truthful  information to the public and I strongly admire the  folks that make these difficult images (not to  mention they put me on the path to vegetarianism)  and undercover videos, I wanted to come from a  different angle and create something that people  did not want to look away from.     What challenges have you faced with the book  and how did you overcome them?    During the time I was photographing for this  project, I was working as an adjunct professor  teaching five classes between two colleges. Visiting  the sanctuaries and photographing was self funded  on that meager salary, which was a major  challenge. To deal with that, I visited sanctuaries 
Pizza!

whenever I could, mostly when they coincided with  another obligation or were located close to a friend  or family member I could stay with. I also have a  supportive family that would kick in to help me  with lodging while I was working on this project. I  feel privileged to have had the experiences I did at  the sanctuaries I visited, but I would have liked to  have the opportunity to spend more time at each  sanctuary and visit sanctuaries on the west coast.  Another issue that cropped up was deciding how to  photograph the animals. For the most part, I knew I  wanted to be able to look into their eyes and either  photograph on their level or lower. This was  especially important with the birds, as I think the  disconnect some folks have with them is that they  don’t have the opportunity to look them in the  eyes. I was certain I wanted to make traditional,  somewhat formal portraits because I felt this was  lacking. I consider the animals ambassadors for  their species and strived to capture their  personalities with respect. I made the photographs  of the animals in basically the same way I would a  person.      

             

aries

August 2012|56

What inspires you the most as an artist?    Reading, other artists, injustice, movies, animals,  love, music, recipes, smells, everyday life,  photographers, plants, activists, weather, and quiet.    How did you manage to get all the amazing  pictures in the book?   

russell

With a decent amount of waiting and patience. I  was using a clunky camera, so that slowed me  down in a good way. Some animals came right over  to nuzzled/hugged me, which was a treat, but  many times I would sit down and hang out for a  while. I put myself in whatever position I needed to  in order to engage with each animal I  photographed. It was such a reward when a shy  animal made their way over to check me out!    Now for a foodie question. What is your favorite  recipe you like to make at home?     Of course this changes all the time, but my love for  all kinds of peppers is a constant thing. Right now  my favorite things to eat are watermelon,  tomatoes from my garden, anything with peppers,  or a kale pear vanilla smoothie. Meal ‐wise I am  pretty dedicated to green beans with Thai basil,  Bhutanese pineapple rice, and red thai tofu from  Appetite For Reduction by Isa Chandra Moskowitz. I  also just made these amazing chewy lemon 
Pizza!

coconut cookies (minus the frosting as I am not big  on it) from Bryant Terry’s cookbook, The Inspired  Vegan.     What advice can you give aspiring vegan artists  and how can they merge veganism and art into a  viable product?    What a great question! I feel my answer will not be  worthy, but I will give it a shot! Try not to worry  about the end results of your art‐at least when you  are beginning a project; stay true to yourself,  beliefs, and process.  Chose subject matter you are  passionate about, whatever that might be. Edit  your work thoughtfully, often times we are not the  best editors of our own work and if this is the case,  be sure to have folks you trust to be honest assist  with editing. Allow yourself time to experiment and  fail. Ideas and success often come from that. Don’t  undervalue yourself as an artist. You need to get  paid for the important work you do. Make sure you  know your medium well and take classes and  workshops to brush up if needed. Sue Coe is an  amazing illustrator and her book, “Dead Meat”,  would not have the impact it does if it were not for  her stellar drawing skills.     Animal rights are some of the most important  issues of our time. No one wants animals to be  treated cruelly, so I think the audience for vegan  artists is limitless (not that all vegan artists will  make art that deals with vegan issues‐of course!). I  do think the pressure is on for all things vegan,  meaning for many folks it not only has to prove  itself, but be better than what already exists, but  luckily I think vegans are able to meet that  challenge head on.    What's on your plate next?    Well, I have lived in Kentucky for almost a year and  am feeling the need to take on a project about  horses and horse culture. I also make mixed media  work, so I am taking a bit of time to to explore a  few ideas that might be great or they might be  thrown in the recycling bin, but it is important to  take the time to experiment.   

August 2012|57

Thanks Sharon!    You are very welcome!    Contact / Book Info    The book can be purchased through this website:  www.farmanimalsanctuaryproject.com  The site also includes links to the sanctuaries,  additional photographs from the project, a  resource page, and contact info. 10% of the  proceeds (from books purchased through the  above site) will go the sanctuaries depicted in the  book.    Bio     Sharon Lee Hart was born in Washington, D.C. and  teaches photography at the University of Kentucky.  Hart earned her MFA from the University of North  at Chapel Hill and her BFA from Maine College of  Art. A vegetarian for over 20 years, Hart became  vegan after spending time with the amazing  animals she met while working on her farm animal  sanctuary photography project. She recently  received a grant from the Tennessee State Art  Commission and an activist award for her  “Sanctuary” project from PhotoPhilanthropy.  She  has exhibited her photographs and mixed media  works throughout the country. Her work can be  viewed by visiting  www.farmanimalsanctuaryproject.com and  www.sharonleehart.com.  

deedee

Pizza!

August 2012|58

An Interview with Super Activist Bruce Friedrich!
   

Please tell us a bit about yourself.     I worked for 15 years at PETA (most recently as VP  for policy and government affairs), for 2 years as a  public school teacher (where I was my school’s  teacher‐of‐the year my second year), and for 6  years running a shelter for homeless families and a  soup kitchen in Washington, D.C. My wife works for  PETA, fighting the good fight against torturing  animals in laboratories; she was previously a  tenured math professor in Canada and is the brains  of our operation.    What motivated you to become vegan? What kind  of change did that incur for you?    I adopted a vegan diet in 1987 after I read Diet for  a Small Planet. I considered myself to be an  environmentalist, but I’d never thought about all  the extra crops required if you feed them to  animals first, and all the extra stages of production.  I wrote about the issue at some length for Common  Dreams a few years back.        

What got you involved in pursuing animal rights?  Was it one event or a series of them?    I was running a shelter for  homeless families, had  been vegan for years at  that point for  environmental reasons,  and read Christianity & the  Rights of Animals, by the  Rev. Dr. Andrew Linzey, an  Oxford theologian and  Anglican Priest. This was  around 1992 or 1993. That  turned me on to the animal argument. Some years  later, when I was ready to stop running the shelter,  a few very good friends strongly recommended  PETA to me. PETA founder Ingrid Newkirk and I  share a fair number of personality traits—type A,  irreverent, mission‐driven. It was a great match.    What are the cornerstone philosophies for you  behind what you do?    We should cast our lot with the oppressed and  against the oppressor. That’s the central message  of Jesus, and it is how I’ve tried to live my life since 

Pizza!

August 2012|59

I first started taking my faith seriously in the mid‐ 1980s. Here’s an interview I did about it with the  San Francisco Chronicle some years back, and a  more recent piece I wrote for the Huffington Post.    What is the most moving experience you have had  in your career?    I’m deeply moved every time someone tells me  that something I’ve done has had a positive impact  on them. I suppose Peter Singer’s blurb for the  book Matt Ball and I wrote was  probably the most moving,  because Singer is such an  inspiration to me and doesn’t  offer faint praise. You can check it  out on the book’s web site; in  general, the positive response to  our book has been extremely  gratifying.    What do you do at Farm Sanctuary?    I’m in charge of our legislation and litigation work  and I work with Nick Cooney on the Compassionate  Communities Campaign. I’m also raising money to  launch a project called “Someone, Not Something,”  which will focus on letting the world know about  the behavioral, emotional, and cognitive capacities  of farm animals. Our first pass at the Web page for  it is available at  www.FarmSanctuary.org/someone. We’ll be  producing white papers, attending science  conferences, and filling gaps in the current  research—which is extraordinarily scanty, when  compared to ethological work with wild animals  and dogs. If anyone is interested in helping get the  project off the ground (i.e., funding it), please  contact me.    What do you consider the most important project  you are currently working on and how is progress  going on it?    Without a doubt, that’s the Someone Project (see  previous answer). I’m also very excited about a  video that Nick and I are working on. It will be  similar to Meet Your Meat and Farm to Fridge,  except that it also briefly tells the stories of three 
Pizza!

animals who have come to Farm Sanctuary. Video  has an amazing capacity to turn people vegetarian,  because they see what they’re supporting when  they eat meat, and they realize it’s indefensible. I  think this video will make a big impact. There are  quite a few other initiatives that I’m excited about,  but those are probably the big two.    Veganism has been a rising star the past few  years. What do you think is propelling that and  what do you think can be done to propel it even  faster?    There’s a confluence of understanding that eating  animal products is destroying our planet, harming  animals, and making people sick. Bill Clinton’s  decision to adopt a vegan diet certainly didn’t hurt.  The most important thing people can do to propel  it further is to remember that if you’re a vegan, you  are sparing dozens of animals per year; each  person you convince to do the same doubles your  lifetime positive impact—so in one interaction with  a non‐vegan, you can double your impact. That’s  some serious power, but it also means that we  should be very serious about how we behave and  represent ourselves as farm animal advocates. Our  “Compassionate Communities Campaign,” which  Nick runs, is focused on harnessing this power;  readers can sign up to learn more and get involved  at ccc.farmsanctuary.org.   

  symphony – someone, not something   Now for a food question. What do you like to  make for yourself at home?     I married the best vegan chef on the planet. Alka  and I fell in love based on mutual passions and  interests and all the indeterminable things that 
August 2012|60

 

cause two people to click, and none of that had to  do with her amazing prowess in the kitchen, but  I’ve definitely benefited from the fact that she is an  absolutely amazing chef. We love everything in  Robin Robertson’s Vegan Planet and Tal Ronnen’s  The Conscious Cook. You can check out recipes on  their Web sites; they’re all fantastic.    What is the most common question you get about  being vegan and how do you answer it?    I wear a shirt that reads, “Ask me why I’m  vegetarian,” so the most common question I get is  “Why are you a vegetarian?” (it works!). I always  try to drive the conversation to a discussion of a  very basic point: Would you slice open animals’  throats? Most people wouldn’t—they wouldn’t do  it; they don’t want to see it; they don’t even want  to think about it. So where is the basic integrity in  paying others to do this to animals? I discuss that  concept here. All the other questions people ask  are distractions; none of them offers an answer to  this very basic concept. Get your own “Ask me  why…” shirt from Animal Rights Stuff, Compassion  Over Killing, Mercy For Animals, or Farm Sanctuary;  yes, there are four different designs. I’m not aware  of another shirt that has two designs—let alone  four. That’s because it’s the Best. Shirt slogan. Ever.     A lot has been achieved recently in regards to  animal welfare. However, there is some debate in  the community about whether we should be  pursuing welfare or liberation? What is your take  on that and how do you address the other side?    I’m convinced that we should be pursuing both.  Here’s something Peter Singer and I wrote about  why the welfare campaigns are important, and  here’s a debate that I took part in last year on the  topic at the annual animal rights conference. At  Farm Sanctuary, the majority of our education and  advocacy resources go into promoting veganism,  but we also work on legislative and litigation  campaigns to try to stop the worst abuses of farm  animals.         
Pizza!

Why did you leave PETA after such a long tenure?    I loved my years at PETA and I remain a supporter  of the organization (and my wife works there!), but  my heart is with farm animals, who are the vast  majority of animals who suffer and die in the  world. I’m convinced that the biggest obstacle to  promoting plant‐based eating and securing robust  legal protection for chickens, pigs, and other farm  animals is the inability of so many people to relate  to them, and Farm Sanctuary is uniquely positioned  to change societal understanding in this area. We  tell the animals’ stories and help people to  understand that each animal is an individual—that  there is no difference between abusing and eating  a cat or a chicken, a dog or a pig. They’re all  individuals who deserve equal consideration. I’ve  been close friends and colleagues with Farm  Sanctuary founder and President Gene Baur for  more than 15 years, and I’ve always been struck by  his integrity, good humor, and clarity. And I’ve  been in awe of national shelter director Susie  Coston for more than a decade; she really is the  Jane Goodall of farm animals; her breadth and  depth of knowledge is just stunning. Now that I’m  working with them every day, I’m even more  impressed.   

  gabriel – someone, not something   What advice can you give people who want to  enter the animal rights field as a career?    We need people who want to do animal rights as a  career, of course, so if you’re looking to move from  your current career to animals rights, watch the  jobs listings of the sites for your favorite groups. If  you’re still in college or, better yet, just getting to  college, major in finance or computers or 
August 2012|61

 

something where the animal community needs  great people, but we can’t afford to compete  salary‐wise. Psychology is also a great major, since  a big part of being effective involves message‐ framing. All that said, if you have the capacity to  make a lot of money and funnel it back to the most  effective forms of activism, that might be your best  choice. Some of the people I find most inspiring are  the philanthropists who are not working in animal  rights, but they’re devoting most of their income to  promoting the initiatives that most inspire them.    What is coming up for you next?     I’m most excited about the Someone Project,  which we’ll be launching in earnest as soon as we  have funding, but I’m also excited about the new  pamphlet and video that Nick Cooney and I are  working on and about expanding the  Compassionate Communities Campaign. Also, we  worked with the Humane Society of the United  States and other groups to pass a ban on gestation  and veal crates, and tail docking, in Rhode Island  this year, and to save the foie gras ban in  California, which went into effect on July 1, after an  8 ‐year waiting period. I’m eager to expand those  efforts next year.    Thanks Bruce!    Thank you!     Contact Info    You can follow Bruce at  www.twitter.com/BruceGFriedrich and at  www.huffingtonpost.com/bruce‐friedrich.  

Pizza!

August 2012|62

An Interview with Vegan Athlete Robert Cheeke!
   

When and why did you become vegan?    I grew up on a farm and developed an appreciation  for farm animals similar to the respect and  appreciation someone might have for a dog or a  cat. Given this perspective and my closeness to  animals – raising them as pets – through my  involvement in 4‐H, it seemed fitting to stop eating  my animal friends. In the mid 90’s, as a teenager, I  no longer wanted to contribute to animal cruelty  and suffering and decided to go vegan.  I have been  vegan since December 8, 1995 (when I was 15  years old and 120 pounds – By 2003, I was up to  195 pounds and a competitive bodybuilder running  www.veganbodybuilding.com).     Was that before or after your interest in  bodybuilding and what spurred that interest on?    Growing up as a skinny kid, bodybuilding was  always intriguing and something I was interested in  from a young age. I didn’t pursue bodybuilding, or  even weight training for that matter, until about  five years after I became vegan. I quickly gained  muscle and traded my running shoes for weight  lifting gloves and became a competitive, 2‐time  champion bodybuilder.    What do you do for a living and what is your  favorite part of that?    In 2005 I joined Vega, a product line created by  fellow vegan athlete Brendan Brazier and today, 

continue to work for them. I work in sales for this  innovative plant‐based nutrition company from  Canada, focusing on outreach at vegetarian and  vegan festivals around North America.   Additionally, I run www.veganbodybuilding.com  full‐time and am actively pursuing a writing career.  Having published a best‐seller a few years ago  called “Vegan Bodybuilding & Fitness” I am  currently editing my second book. My new project  is a personal development book about finding your  passion and making it happen. The best part of my  work is that I am doing what I am passionate  about, and the amazing travels and places it takes  me to.      In what ways does being vegan affect your ability  to build muscle, maintain tone, and recover from  workouts?    From my experience as a vegan athlete the past  seventeen years, coupled with my education from  Cornell’s plant‐based nutrition certification  program, I can say with a great deal of confidence  that as opposed to a regular, meat‐centered  western diet, a plant‐based whole food diet is  optimal for providing energy, building healthy  muscle and quickly recovering from exercise. This is  because plant‐based whole foods are the original –  and healthiest – sources of vitamins, minerals,  amino acids, protein, fatty acids and other  nutritional components necessary for optimal  health. Getting nutrition from plants leads to 

Pizza!

August 2012|63

higher levels of health and avoids the negative  side‐effects that come with the consumption of  lower quality foods (animal‐based and processed  foods). There are numerous scientific studies,  including the China Study, that show correlations  between the foods we eat and numerous  preventable illnesses.  Therefore, a plant‐based  diet appears to be best for bodybuilding or any  other athletic or health‐centered pursuit.    What challenges do you face as a vegan  bodybuilder and how have you overcome them?    The only challenges that come with a vegan  bodybuilding lifestyle are defending the vegan  lifestyle among others unfamiliar with it, especially  before veganism was more mainstream and  popular as it is today. In the 90’s and early 00’s  there weren’t a whole lot of people in the  mainstream athletic sphere who were vegan and  talking about it. Now, many of the greatest athletes  in the world are vegan, including some of the  biggest names in tennis, boxing, ultimate fighting,  powerlifting, professional football and Olympics.  Veganism is coming of age before our eyes.     Have you seen any changes in attitude in the  athletics world in the past five years?    We have seen more progress in the animal rights  and vegan movements in the past five years than in  the previous 50 years combined. What we have  seen recently with some of the greatest athletes in  the world becoming vegan has been inspiring,  encouraging, and uplifting. The mindset among  typical athletes appears to be more geared towards  openness to new ideas. Veganism is one of those  ideas being explored and embraced by many.    You inspire quite a few people! What would you  say is the achievement you are most proud of?    My goal from the beginning was to save animal  lives and reduce animal suffering and cruelty. That  is still my primary objective and where my passion  largely lies today. I am proud of the number of  animals that have been saved and proud of the  friendships and relationships that have been  developed among the community members of my 
Pizza!

website. Saving lives and bringing people together  is something I am dedicated to doing for the rest of  my life.   

What do you like to eat to prepare for a  competition?    As I prepare to for competition, I ensure my diet is  entirely comprised of whole foods – no processed  foods. Foods such as yams, potatoes, oats, brown  rice, greens, and fruits make up my pre‐contest  diet. Avoiding processed foods is a great way to  reduce the consumption of sodium, fat, and refined  sugars which can have an adverse effect on  bodybuilding. Eating cleanly leads to a lean and  healthy physique.      What is your favorite dish that you prepare at  home?     In general, my favorite types of food are Indian,  Thai, Ethiopian, Mexican and Japanese.  These  types of foods include a variety of protein and  quality carbohydrates, as well as healthy fats. At  home, brown rice with beans and avocado is a  favorite meal that is also quick and easy to prepare.  I also eat fruit throughout the day. If I am feeling  more adventurous I will make an elaborate green  or fruit salad, focusing on presentation, flavor and  whole food goodness.     What advice can you give upcoming vegan body  builders?   

August 2012|64

This is an exciting time to be a vegan athlete.  Veganism is more popular than it has ever been.   The opportunities for athletes to spread the vegan  message, via their athletic platforms and  achievements, are increasing by the day. Using  athletic success to inspire others, save lives, and  contribute positive messages to the world is what I  would suggest vegan athletes do. Network with  others, write about your experiences, document  your progress and share it with audiences far and  wide. Work hard, stay grounded and always  remember why you decided to dedicate your life to  benefitting others. Let that reminder fuel your  passion.    What's on the horizon for you?    At the moment I am taking a break from  bodybuilding to pursue other interests including  working toward the completion of my next book  and focusing on meditation, introspection,  contemplation, writing and learning more about  myself. I am continuously working to discover how  I can most effectively and efficiently help others in  numerous ways and share the vegan message.    Thanks Robert!                                             
Pizza!

Bio    Robert grew up on a farm in Corvallis, OR where he  adopted a vegan lifestyle in 1995 at age 15. Today  he is a best‐selling author of the book Vegan  Bodybuilding & Fitness ‐ The Complete Guide to  Building Your Body on a Plant‐Based Diet. As a two‐ time natural bodybuilding champion Robert has  been considered one of VegNews Magazine's Most  Influential Vegan Athletes. He tours all over North  America regularly giving talks about his story  transforming from a skinny farm kid to champion  vegan bodybuilder. Currently Robert works for  Vega, a line of vegan whole‐food products, as a  representative of the pro‐vegan film Forks Over  Knives and also works full‐time running Vegan  Bodybuilding & Fitness  on www.veganbodybuilding.com, which includes  writing books, touring and maintaining the popular  website. Robert recently moved to Austin, TX and  continues to spread the vegan way of life leading  by example as an accomplished vegan athlete.    Contact Info    You can find out more about Robert at  www.veganbodybuilding.com.    

August 2012|65

 

 

Book Review: Practically Raw
Author: Amber Shea Crowley
Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor
    There are a great many reasons to pick up and  enjoy Practically Raw by Amber Shea Crawley. One  of the reasons is for the great variety of tasty  recipes. Another is the inspirational, bright and  colorful pictures. Even another reason is because  there are options in this book no matter what you  like to eat, and that is what appeals to me.     From the outset, Crawley confesses that while the  vast majority of her diet is raw, she is not 100%  raw. She embraces having flexible options, which is  what this book is based upon. If you are 100% raw,  she has you covered. I love the fact that there is a  chapter just based on kale chips. That is awesome.  There are mouth watering main dishes, many  based on international cuisine, delectable desserts  (I am so making the doughnut holes), and there is  even a raw biscuits and gravy recipe! For our 100%  raw readers, you will have many new additions to  your library of recipes.     For the rest of us, there are cooked options. No  dehydrator? No problem. If you want your flax  crackers baked, Crawley will tell you how to do  that. All recipes have both cooked and raw  directions, and take no more equipment than a  basic knife, blender, etc. You do not need a bunch  of crazy equipment and you can make these  however your taste buds hit you at the moment.     If you have someone in your family who is not raw  but trying to avoid wheat, refined sugars, etc, this 
Pizza!

Authors:  Amber Shea Crawley  Publisher:  Vegan Heritage Press  Copyright:  2012  ISBN:  978-0-09800131-5-3  Price:  $19.95 

 

is a great book for them. Because it deals with  whole foods, seeds and grains, and has cooked  options, it would make a wonderful gift for  someone with a food allergy.     I personally am on a path of eating both raw and  cooked food at this time, and I am using Crawley’s  book to work some more raw foods into my diet.  On the chilly winter days that are coming, if I want  those options cooked, I can. I love that concept and  you will, too. Treat yourself to a copy of this  wonderful book.     Recommended.    

  The Reviewer 

  Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates on  her blog, http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has  been making her own tasty desserts for over 16 years,  and eating dessert for longer  than she cares to admit. When  she isn’t in the kitchen creating  new wonders of sugary  goodness, she is chasing after  her bad kitties, or reviewing  products for various websites  and publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.  

 

August 2012|66

   

Book Review: Grilling Vegan Style
Author: John Schlimm
Reviewer: Jason Wyrick
    Looking at other reviews of this book, I am  probably one of the few people that didn’t go crazy  over it, so this review is a bit mixed. I loved part of  it and was ambivalent about the rest.     First, let me tell you about the part that I thought  was exceptional, and that’s the non‐recipe part of  the book. A lot of cookbooks have a short overview  of the topic, maybe mentioning equipment, a few  techniques, or odd ingredients. This book goes far  beyond that and while it is by no means exhaustive  (that might make it a textbook!), it is very  extensive. There’s a section devoted to types of  grills, one on how to test for heat, another on tools  of the trade with a paragraph about each tool, how  it’s used, and why it is important, a section on  safety, a section on how different food types work  on the grill, and a long list of good ingredients to  sizzle over your outdoor fire, each with its own  paragraph on how it works and some uses for it.  That’s my kind of book and it made me excited  about reading it. Even if I didn’t use any of the  recipes in the book, it inspired me.   
Author:  Grilling Vegan Style  Publisher:  Da Capo Lifelong Books  Copyright:  2012  ISBN:  978-0-7382-1572-3  Price:  $20.00 

  That does, however, bring me to the recipes, and  here I was a bit let down. Don’t get me wrong, the  recipes are decent and solid, but when a book  claims it is “blazing new trails,” I expect something  highly creative and well thought‐out. Perhaps  grilled watermelon looks new and fresh to  someone who only thinks about grilling slabs of  eggplant or veggie burgers, but watermelon, fruit,  citrus, lettuce, and other “exotic” foods have been  visiting the grill for a long time. When I see  trailblazing, I want to see those grilled ingredients  used in intriguing ways. A lot of the recipes felt like  moderately creative or simply average recipes with  a grilled element tossed in.    Aside from that, you will find some good recipes  for marinades and sauces and there are some real  gems in the book, like The Blue Pear, a dish of  sourdough, vegan blue cheese, and fresh pears.  Tasty! That one made me want to run out and start  my grill right away.     All in all, despite what may sound like a negative  review of the recipes, the book is still solid and a  worthwhile addition just for the first chapter, and if 

Pizza!

August 2012|67

you are one of those people who is looking to  move beyond the grilled veggie burger, this book is  a great start.   
The Reviewer     Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The Vegan  Culinary Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine with  a readership of about  30,000.  In 2001, Chef Jason reversed his diabetes by  switching to a low‐fat, vegan diet and subsequently left  his position as the Director of Marketing for an IT  company to become a chef and instructor to help others.   Since then, he has been featured by the NY Times, has  been a NY Times contributor, and has been featured in  Edible Phoenix, and the Arizona Republic, and has had  numerous local television appearances.  He has catered  for companies such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright  Foundation, and Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in  the Scottsdale Culinary Festival’s premier catering  event, and has been a guest instructor and the first  vegan instructor in the Le Cordon Bleu program at  Scottsdale Culinary Institute.  Recently, Chef Jason wrote  a national best‐selling book with Dr. Neal Barnard  entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss Kickstart.  You can find out  more about Chef Jason Wyrick at  www.veganculinaryexperience.com. 

      

Pizza!

August 2012|68

 

 

Book Review: Vegan a la Mode
Author: Hannah Kaminsky
Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor
    I have a confession to make: I am jealous of  Hannah Kaminsky’s latest wonderful tome Vegan ἁ  la Mode. This book is what a frozen dessert book  should be: full of careful explanation, wonderful  photos and delightful inspiration. Oh yes, it is also  full of enough perfect recipes to not only get you  through a horrific summer of 100 degree heat, but  to delight you throughout the year.     So what can you expect when you grab Vegan ἁ la  Mode? If you are only into the classics, Hannah has  you covered. You will find a recipe for French  Vanilla that uses either whole vanilla beans or  vanilla paste? Never used whole vanilla beans  before? She is there to explain to you how to do it  easily and with grace. Do you want something  more adventurous? There is a recipe for Sesame  Halvah ice cream, based on the Middle Eastern  treat. She even molded it to resemble the original.  A more American flavor is the Bloody Mary ice  cream, complete with vodka! Talk about the  perfect brunch item for a hot summer day. But  those are just a few examples of her creativity or  what you will find inside.     Inside this book, you will also find a recipe for pup‐ sicles, a treat for your doggie friends that you can  adopt to your own tastes as well. There are treats  based on fruits and veggies, classics, bakery  inspirations, a section based on nuts and more! So  many delicious goodies!! There are also recipes for  items to share the spotlight with your ice cream, 
Pizza!

Authors:  Hannah Kaminsky  Publisher:  Skyhorse Publishing  Copyright:  2012  ISBN:  978-1-61608-724-1  Price:  $17.95 

 

like spiffy whip! I am very excited that Hannah  cracked the code to making a delicious whip,  because this will soon grace some of my  homemade pies.     If you do not already own a book on frozen  desserts get this one. If you already have a book on  vegan desserts get this one, too! There are amazing  pictures of every recipe and her flavor  combinations are amazing and inspirational! This  book will improve your life, make you smile, and  give you happy memories for summers to come.  That is a great bargain for less than $20.     Highest recommendations.   

The Reviewer 

  Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates on  her blog, http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has  been making her own tasty  desserts for over 16 years, and  eating dessert for longer than she  cares to admit. When she isn’t in  the kitchen creating new wonders  of sugary goodness, she is chasing  after her bad kitties, or reviewing  products for various websites and  publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.  

August 2012|69

 

Book Review: The Starch Solution
Authors: John McDougall, MD and Mary McDougall
Reviewer: Jason Wyrick
    This is my favorite of John McDougall’s books, and  I’ve been following him for awhile. If you are  familiar with John McDougall’s work, then you  know what this book about. A low‐fat, high‐starch  vegan diet to promote health, but even if you  already knew that and have been to every  Advanced Study Weekend of his, this book is still  an outstanding read with lots of new science‐ backed information. On top of that, the writing is  both clear and engaging and the information is  presented in a way that nearly everyone can  understand. Of course, there are plenty of tasty  recipes in the back of the book to help you along  your way!    The book is divided into three major portions. The  first is titled “Healing with Starch.” This section  talks about traditional diets and the major poisons  of animal foods. While many of us may already be  familiar with this, it’s an important topic for non‐ vegans to read. What inspired me the most about  this section, however, was the chapter on  spontaneous healing. As a former diabetic who did 
Pizza!

  Authors:  John McDougall, Mary  McDougall  Publisher:  Rodale  Copyright:  2012  ISBN:  978-1-6091-393-8  Price:  $26.99 

 

exactly that, this hit home, and the stories of other  people who did something similar with their  ailments are both inspirational and moving. The  next section is about protein, calcium, fat, and  where to obtain good sources of each. Usually  when I get a book like this, I flip through to random  pages on my first pass to see what I can find. On  every page of this book where I did that, I found  myself pulled in to the text and I spent hours  reading on what is usually only a few minutes on a  first skim.    Of course, the book would not be complete  without a recipe section to give the erstwhile  reader a strong guide on their high‐starch vegan  eating plan. The recipes do not disappoint. For  those new to the kitchen, and you will have to  learn to cook to follow doctor McDougall’s advice,  there are sections on equipment you will need,  how to stock a pantry, menu plans, methods of  food prep that go beyond just recipes, and advice  on eating out.   
August 2012|70

All in all, this is a great book and a worthwhile  addition to my collection. If you don’t have it  already, I suggest adding it to yours!   
The Reviewer     Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The Vegan  Culinary Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine with  a readership of about  30,000.  In 2001, Chef Jason reversed his diabetes by  switching to a low‐fat, vegan diet and subsequently left  his position as the Director of Marketing for an IT  company to become a chef and instructor to help others.   Since then, he has been featured by the NY Times, has  been a NY Times contributor, and has been featured in  Edible Phoenix, and the Arizona Republic, and has had  numerous local television appearances.  He has catered  for companies such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright  Foundation, and Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in  the Scottsdale Culinary Festival’s premier catering  event, and has been a guest instructor and the first  vegan instructor in the Le Cordon Bleu program at  Scottsdale Culinary Institute.  Recently, Chef Jason wrote  a national best‐selling book with Dr. Neal Barnard  entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss Kickstart.  You can find out  more about Chef Jason Wyrick at  www.veganculinaryexperience.com. 

      

Pizza!

August 2012|71

 

 

Book Review: Rawmazing
Author: Susan Powers
Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor
    Colorful, inspirational, and delightful are just a few  of the ways to describe Rawmazing, Susan Powers  raw ‘cook’book with over 130 recipes to make you  want to walk away from your stove and over to  your dehydrator. There are several things that  make this cookbook a great addition to your  cooking library. First, many of the recipes and be  created without a plethora of special kitchen  equipment. Second, there are vibrant photos of the  majority of these delights to prod you into the  kitchen, and lastly, these recipes are full of  approachable ingredients.     When I have examined other raw books in the past,  I occasionally get frustrated at the amount of  specialized equipment (and time) needed to make  the recipes. I have a professional kitchen and an  Excalibur dehydrator. If I need to invest hundreds  more in specialty items, what chance does the  average person starting out have? But this is not an  issue with Susan Powers. Some of her recipes do  require dehydration, but many others take  blending, cutting and not too much else. It is a  refreshing change of pace to be able to just go to  my home kitchen and create all the raw food I  would like from this fine book.     The photographs in this book are beautiful and  inspirational. I teach cooking classes for many  people who are new to veganism, and have barely  heard of raw foods. These beautiful photographs  do a few things. First, they highlight how simple 
Pizza!

Authors:  Susan Powers  Publisher:  Skyhorse Publishing  Copyright:  2012  ISBN:  978-1-61608-627-5  Price:  $16.95 

 

and delicious raw food can be, and how  approachable. They also give everyone the chance  to do the classic check “Did I do it even somewhat  right?” If you are someone who loves pictures with  your recipes, this one is for you.      Lastly, I love the fact that this book relies on  ingredients that can be easily obtained at most  supermarkets. I hate falling in love with a recipe  only to find out that the ingredient has to be  ordered from the internet and costs a fortune.  With simple, healthy ingredients such as nuts and  seeds, fruit and vegetables, anyone can find plenty  of raw recipes that can be created with what you  have on hand, or a very quick local supply run.     If you are already raw, this book will inspire you  with new recipes to try. If you have been flirting  with trying out more raw recipes, this book will  tempt you with its wonderful recipes. My only  complaint is not about the author, but the  publisher. There is no index of recipes, making it  very hard to find what you are looking for. This is  the only reason I gave this book 4 instead of 5  stars.     Recommended.    

     

August 2012|72

The Reviewer 
  Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates on  her blog,  http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/.  She has been making her own tasty  desserts for over 16 years, and eating  dessert for longer than she cares to  admit. When she isn’t in the kitchen  creating new wonders of sugary  goodness, she is chasing after her bad  kitties, or reviewing products for various websites and  publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.  

 

Pizza!

August 2012|73

Pizza vs. Pizza
By Chef Jason Wyrick

Five pizzas go head to head in our pizza challenge!  Who will come out on top? Read on to find out  what my friends and I thought about these boxed  pizzas and who we picked as the ultimate winner  and the clear loser.    First up in our challenge is Garlic Jim’s Gluten Free  Vegan Pizza. I had hopes for this one. It actually  looked good in the package and the crust didn’t  look off like so many other gluten‐free crusts I’ve  seen. It didn’t have that crumbly look to it and that  was important. Other than that, it looked like a  pretty standard tomato and vegan cheese pizza.  Hard to go wrong, or so I thought. Once the pizza  came out of the oven, I gave it the cursory gluten‐ free inspection. The crust looked like it held up well  and even looked like a regular pizza crust. Good  marks there. The cheese, however, had that plastic  look. Trepidation began. My crew and I took the  first bite and the frowns around the room said it  all. Plastic cheese and lifeless sauce will defeat 

even the best crust, gluten‐free or not. This pizza  went down in flames. Boring, artificial flames.    Next up was Amy’s Pizza Margherita. Pizza  Margherita is a traditional Napoli pizza meant to be  made a certain way. What I saw on the package did  not look like a pizza Margherita. There was too  much cheese and no basil showing. An imposter  and not even a good imposter, I thought! It baked  decently, so I gave it a chance. We passed it around  the room and the pizza ended up getting decent  marks. I think I had the most problem with it  because I knew what a pizza Margerita should be,  but even though Amy’s messed that part up, it still  had a good flavor and in the end, that is what is  most important. The crust was a bit bready, but the  sauce was good and the Daiya accentuated the  sauce well. This one was probably not going to be a  winner, but it was a huge improvement over Garlic  Jim’s travesty.   

Pizza!

August 2012|74

Our third pizza was Whole Foods’ Roasted  Vegetable Pizza with a whole wheat crust. This was  a little individual pizza, but right away I saw that we  were in trouble. I’ll just say this one was bland and  sweet. No, actually, I will say more. This pizza was  terrible! It’s bad bread with homogenous sweet  tomato sauce with frozen underprepared veggies.  Whole Foods should be ashamed to stock this on  the shelves. Even with a little bit of help from some  other ingredients we added, it was still terrible.  Stay away.    We could not wait to get to our next pizza, but we  needed a palate cleanser before that, so we took a  breather, had some drinks, and delved into the  Tofurky’s Pepperoni Pizza. I had tried this pizza  before, so I knew what I was in for. A pretty  standard packaged pizza, but vegan. It’s a bit spicy,  a bit sweet, and loaded with Daiya cheese. This was  one of the better pizzas of the bunch, but it  definitely looks and feels processed. Ironically, my  non‐vegan friends eschewed this pizza in favor of  the Amy’s pizzas while the vegans liked it more. It  had a bite and sharpness to it that I liked, but I did  not feel good after eating it. I gave this pizza  second place, but the rest of the group put it right  in the middle.    Our last pizza was Amy’s Spinach Pizza with Rice  Crust. Because the crust was made out of rice, it  had a crumbly texture to it. However, it was nicely  flavored, so much so that it made up for the  texture. Plus, the crust didn’t taste like rice flour.  Amy’s did an excellent job with this one. The pizza  was loaded with spinach, tomatoes, garlic, herbs,  and vegan cheese and the spinach and herbs were  well balanced. It easily had the best flavor out of all  of them and if it wasn’t for the texture, it would  have been a great boxed pizza. With the crumbly  crust, the pizza did not achieve greatness, but it did  achieve a win in our pizza challenge by a nearly  unanimous vote. 

The winner? Amy’s Spinach Pizza with Rice Crust.  The loser? The Pizza That Shall Not Be Named (aka  the Whole Foods’ Roasted Vegetable Pizza). Look  for further food challenges in our upcoming issues!    The Lead Reviewer  
  Jason Wyrick is the  executive chef and  publisher of The Vegan  Culinary Experience, an  educational vegan  culinary magazine with  a readership of about  30,000.  In 2001, Chef  Jason reversed his diabetes by switching to a low‐fat,  vegan diet and subsequently left his position as the  Director of Marketing for an IT company to become a  chef and instructor to help others.  Since then, he has  been featured by the NY Times, has been a NY Times  contributor, and has been featured in Edible Phoenix,  and the Arizona Republic, and has had numerous local  television appearances.  He has catered for companies  such as Google, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and  Farm Sanctuary, has been featured in the Scottsdale  Culinary Festival’s premier catering event, and has been  a guest instructor and the first vegan instructor in the Le  Cordon Bleu program at Scottsdale Culinary Institute.   Recently, Chef Jason wrote a national best‐selling book  with Dr. Neal Barnard entitled 21‐Day Weight Loss  Kickstart.  You can find out more about Chef Jason  Wyrick at www.veganculinaryexperience.com.   

Pizza!

August 2012|75

     

 

Recipe Index 

Click on any of the recipes in the index to take you to the relevant recipe.  Some recipes will  have large white sections after the instructional portion of them.  This is so you need only print  out the ingredient and instructional sections for ease of kitchen use.    * Theses crusts and sauces are found within other recipes.  
 

Recipe 
Pizzas  Black Garlic Porcini Pizza  Blue Cheese Sausage Pizza  Breakfast Pizza  Cheeseburger Pizza  Chicago Deep Dish Pizza  Salted Fig & Agave Pizza  Fruit & Berry Cream Pizza  Ladenia (Greek Pizza)  Hot Wing Blue Cheese Pizza  Italian Sausage Pizza  Tarragon Olive Flatbread Pizza  Onion Flower & Lion’s Mane Pizza  Pita Pizza  Pizza Bianca  Pizza Margherita  Pizza Marinara  Porcini Sundried Tomato Pizza  Potato, Chard, & Artichoke Pizza  Raw Puttanesca Pizza  Roasted Trinity Pizza  Sausage & Sage Pizza  The Seven Pounder  Three Sisters Pizza  Heirloom Tomato Olive Pizza  Tuscan White Bean & Spinach Pizza White Bean, Tomato, & Garlic Pizza White Sicilian Pizza  Muffaletta Pizza  Bahn Mi Pizza  Friendly Frankfurters & Kale Pizza    Toppings  Sundried Tomato Pepperoni  Sharp Aged Cashew Cheese  Pine Nut Parmesan         

Page
  77  80  83  86  89  93  96  98  101  104  107  110  113  116  119  122  125  128  131  133  136  139  142  146  149  152  155  19  20  27      158  161  163 

   

Recipe 
Crusts  Napoli Pizza Crust  Roman Pizza Crust  Sfinciuini  NYC Pizza Crust  Chicago Pizza Crust  California Pizza Crust  Roasted Garlic Chile Crust  Biscuit Crust*  Flatbread Crust*  Crispy Cornmeal Crust*  Sprouted Buckwheat Crust*  Mark’s Basic Pizza Dough  Gluten‐free Oat Flour Crust  Robin’s Basic Pizza Dough*  Madelyn’s Tangy Pizza Dough    Sauces  Classic San Marzano Sauce  Tuscan White Bean Sauce  Chicago Fire Roasted Sauce  Chimichurri Sauce  Amber’s Sundried Tomato Sauce  Bryanna’s White Bean Spread*  Raw Puttanesca Sauce*  Hummus*  Oil‐free Pesto  Arugula Pesto  Roasted Red Pepper & White Bean  Spread  Sundried Tomato Pesto  Sweet Potato, Oats, Carrot, &  Green Chile Sauce  Great Northern Beans, Millet, &  Cashew Sauce   

Page
  29  30  30  31  31  32  166  83  107  142  131  25  26  19  83      169  172  175  178  181  142  131  107  16  16  16    17  26    27   

 

Black Garlic Porcini Pizza
Type:   Pizza    Serves: 14” pizza  Time to Prepare: 30 minutes (includes time to soak the porcinis) + time for the crust    Ingredients  1 Napoli Crust (see page 29)  1 cup of Classic San Marzano Pizza Sauce (see page 169) ¼ cup of dried porcini, rehydrated  1 bulb of black garlic  4 slices of Teese mozarella    Instructions  Make the pizza dough.  While it is rising, make the sauce.  Rehydrate the porcini in hot water, letting them sit for 20 minutes, then remove from the water.  Remove the individual cloves of black garlic from the paper and set them aside.  Slice the Teese.  Roll out the dough until it is about 1/8” thick.  Spread the sauce on top.  Place the 4 slices of Teese on top, then the porcini, and then the black garlic.  Bake this on a pizza stone at 500 F for 3 minutes or in a pizza oven for 1 ½ minutes.                                     

         
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|77

Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Small Bowl  Small Pot  2 Mixing Bowls  Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoon  Oven  Pizza Stone  Pizza Peel    Presentation    I do the cheese in a pinwheel pattern and place it  on the pizza before I add any of the other  toppings. That way, they show up against the  whiteness of the cheese.    Time Management    While the dough rises, make the sauce and get the  porcini rehydrated. Towards the end of the rise,  start preheating your oven and get your pizza  stone ready. That way, as soon as you roll the  dough out, you can get the sauce and toppings on  the pizza and it’s ready to go in the oven.    Complementary Food and Drinks    This pizza calls for a nice glass of red wine and a salad with a fruity, vinegar note, like mixed greens  with chopped cherries and balsamic vinegar.    Where to Shop    Black garlic is not that easy to find. I usually have to get it at Whole Foods. If you can’t find it, try  soaking some roasted garlic in balsamic vinegar for a day or so to get an approximate flavor for it. The  same is true for Teese, though it seems to be getting more popular. You can also order that online, as  well. Approximate cost for the pizza is $6.00.    How It Works    The base is a classic Napoli pizza base. Thin dough with a San Marzano tomato sauce. The black garlic  adds a sweet nuttiness and tanginess to the pizza while the porcini lend an earthy depth, contrasting 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|78

nicely with every single component in the pizza, from the crust to the sauce to the Teese to the black  garlic. Like other Napoli style pizzas, good quality ingredients go a long way to making a good quality  pizza.    Chef’s Notes     This ended up being one of my favorite pizzas from this issue. It’s complex with flavors that I  particularly enjoy, from the nuttiness and tanginess of the garlic and the porcini mushrooms. I love  porcini! Ironically, the pizza was an impromptu creation. I had black garlic, but had no idea what to do  with it, some dried porcini sitting around, and leftover dough and sauce from another pizza.     Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 1022       Calories from Fat 162  Fat 18 g  Total Carbohydrates 185 g  Dietary Fiber 35 g  Sugars 9 g  Protein 30 g  Salt 1964 mg    Interesting Facts    Black garlic is made by fermenting garlic at very high temperatures.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|79

Blue Cheese Sausage Pizza
Type:   Pizza    Serves: 14” Pizza  Time to Prepare: 30 minutes + time to let the dough rise    Ingredients  1 Roman Crust (see page 30)  1 cup of Chicago Fire Roasted Tomato Sauce (see page 174)  1 Tofurky Italian sausage, sliced  ¼ cup of vegan bleu cheese, crumbled (I used Sheese brand)    Instructions  Make the pizza dough.  While it is rising, make the sauce.  Slice the Tofurky Italian sausage into ¼” thick rounds.  Crumble the vegan bleu cheese.  Roll the dough out ¼” thick.  Spread the sauce on the pizza, then the Tofurky sausage, and then the vegan bleu cheese.  Bake the pizza on a pizza stone at 500 F for 4 minutes.                                     

               
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|80

Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Pot  2 Mixing Bowls  Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoons  Pizza Stone  Pizza Peel  Oven    Presentation    Make sure everything is evenly spread around  the pizza so you get a shot of bleu cheese and  sausage in each bite.    Time Management    There isn’t a lot of time management for this  pizza. Just start making the sauce about 30  minutes before the dough is done rising and  you’ll be good to go.     Complementary Food and Drinks    This pizza should be served with a side of lime ranch dip (silken tofu, pepper, salt, lime juice, dill, and  a bit of vegan mayo). That way, you can use the rim of the pizza as a bread stick and have a dipping  sauce.    Where to Shop    The brand I used for the bleu cheese was Sheese, which I have only found at Food Fight and Whole  Foods. Sunergia also makes a vegan bleu cheese that would work well on this pizza and I have seen  that at Whole Foods and other health food/veg friendly stores. I usually get the Tofurky Italian  sausages at Trader Joe’s, since they have the best price on them. Approximate cost per pizza is $4.00.    How It Works    I much prefer using Tofurky Italian sausage instead of the other packaged vegan pepperoni. It simply  tastes better and has a better texture. The bleu cheese gives a sort of sour tang to the pizza and I  used the Chicago Fire Roasted Tomato Sauce instead of a classic pizza sauce because the heaviness of  the sausage and bleu cheese needs a sauce with a deep flavor instead of a bright flavor to carry them. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|81

 

Chef’s Notes 
   This pizza was a huge hit when I served it to my non‐vegan friends and everyone thought it would be  perfect for sports night.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 1326       Calories from Fat 342  Fat 38 g  Total Carbohydrates 182 g  Dietary Fiber 36 g  Sugars 13 g  Protein 62 g  Salt 2496 mg    Interesting Facts    The oldest mention of bleu cheese is Roquefort cheese, which was first seen in texts dating to 79 A.D.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|82

Breakfast Pizza
Type:   Pizza/Breakfast    Serves: 8 generous breakfast portions  Time to Prepare: About 45 minutes total    Ingredients  Biscuit Crust   3 cups all purpose flour   1 tablespoon baking powder   1 teaspoon baking soda   ½ teaspoon salt   ¼ cup vegan butter (I used Earth Balance)   1 cup of unsweetened vegan milk   Toppings   Tofu Scramble   16 oz. package of extra firm tofu   ¼ teaspoon black salt   ½ teaspoon turmeric   1 teaspoon oil (optional)  15 oz can of crushed tomatoes   12 oz package of vegan chorizo   Two 4 oz. cans of mild green chilies   1 to 1 ½ cups Daiya or other vegan cheese     Instructions  Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.     Make the Tofu Scramble  Prepare the tofu scramble. Heat a skillet or wok over medium heat. Drain the tofu, and crumble. Add  the black salt, turmeric, and oil if using. Cook for 10 minutes, until thoroughly warm, stirring  occasionally. Set to the side to allow cooling.      Make the Biscuit Crust  In a bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Whisk until combined. Use a  pastry cutter or fork to cut in the vegan butter. Then, add the vegan milk. Once the dough is in loose  crumbles, press into a 13X9 baking dish, lined with parchment paper.     Pizza Construction  Add the crushed tomatoes, then the vegan chorizo, the cooled tofu scramble, top it with the vegan  cheese and then the chilies. Bake at 450 degrees for 25‐30 minutes. Let cool slightly before slicing.             
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|83

Kitchen Equipment    Parchment Paper   13X9 inch Baking Dish   Bowl,   Whisk or Fork  Skillet  Stirring Spoon  Can Opener  Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoons    Presentation    Wet the knife before cutting into the pizza so the “cheese”  doesn’t stick to the knife and drag the ingredients along.    Time Management    You can use leftover tofu scramble, or make it the night  before.     Complementary Food and Drinks    This is awesome with coffee in the morning, or better yet, a few Bloody Mary’s as part of a vegan  brunch!    Where to Shop    The Daiya can be purchased at several places now. But, if you can’t find it in your hometown, go to  http://veganessentials.com/ and have some delivered! It freezes well, too.     How It Works    The spice already in the vegan chorizo along with the small amount of heat from the green chilies  gives this just a bit of heat that everyone can enjoy! There is nothing harsh about this, just comfort  and goodness.     Chef’s Notes     This is adapted from a dish my mom used to make for truck drivers that had to come through my  step‐father’s job on Christmas Eve. My mom and I would make food and bake for weeks, then deliver  a feast so that these truckers and the men who loaded the trucks would have warm, delicious, home 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|84

spun food. It created a great tradition, and now that tradition can be recreated without cruelty,  making it all the more special.     Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 460       Calories from Fat 162  Fat 18 g  Total Carbohydrates 53 g  Dietary Fiber 11 g  Sugars 2 g  Protein 21 g  Salt 796 mg    Interesting Facts    Eggs on pizza is common in Europe, particularly in Germany.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|85

Cheeseburger Pizza
Type:   Pizza    Serves: 8‐10 servings  Time to Prepare: 1 hour     Ingredients  Crust   2 ½ cups of all purpose flour   1 tablespoon baking powder   1 teaspoon baking soda   ½ teaspoon salt   ¼ cup of vegan butter (I use Earth Balance)   1 cup of vegan milk   1 tablespoon of apple cider   Toppings   1 ½ cups of tomato pizza sauce OR ketchup  ½ of a red onion, sliced   One 12 oz. package of soy crumbles  1 to 1 ½ cups of vegan ‘cheddar’ cheese, shredded   Optional Toppings  Pickles   Lettuce   Fresh tomato slices   Mustard     Instructions  Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.   In a cup, mix together the apple cider and vegan milk.   Allow this to rest at least 5 minutes.   In a bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.   Cut in the vegan butter using a fork, whisk, or electric mixer.   Add in the vegan milk mixture, and mix until the crust starts to come together, but no longer.   Line a 13 X 9 baking dish with parchment paper for easier removal, then lightly and evenly press the  crust into the dish.   Top with either the tomato sauce or the ketchup, the onions, soy crumbles, and cheese.   Bake for 25‐30 minutes.   Remove and allow to it cool slightly before slicing.                   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|86

Kitchen Equipment    Parchment Paper  Knife  Cutting Board  Bowl  Cup  Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoons  13”x19” Baking Dish    Presentation    Serve this with a side of tomatoes, pickles, and lettuce or  spinach for a fun presentation.    Time Management    Once the crust is made, it needs to quickly go in the oven  right away to make it as fluffy as possible.     Complementary Food and Drinks    This is delicious with a vegan milkshake, or a nice fresh green salad.     Where to Shop    You can get these ingredients as most grocery stores. If you don’t see soy crumbles in the refrigerated  section, check out the freezer section by the veggie patties. If worse comes to worse, you can even  chop up a veggie patty.     How It Works    The baking powder and the cider react to make the crust light and fluffy.     Chef’s Notes     My mom developed the original recipe when she was living on a ranch. She had very limited  ingredients and had to feed over a dozen people. This pizza and cheeseburgers were different enough  for people that they counted it as two different dishes, so she made options where she had few. It is  one of my favorite dishes still. Recently, I fed the vegan version to a bunch of meat eating friends and  they loved it! Make one of these for your next picnic as a novel, easy take on a classic.      
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|87

Nutrition Facts (per serving) 
  Calories 271       Calories from Fat 63  Fat 7 g  Total Carbohydrates 41 g  Dietary Fiber 7 g  Sugars 13 g  Protein 11 g  Salt 768 mg    Interesting Facts    Cheese was rarely added to burgers before the 1920s, but quickly became very fashionable, with  several restaurants and individuals across the U.S. claiming to be the inventor of the cheeseburger  during the 1930s.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|88

Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
Type:   Pizza    Serves: Makes 12” deep dish pizza  Time to Prepare:  35 minutes + 30 minutes to cook the pizza + 1 1/2 hours to rise   Ingredients  Pizza Dough  ½ package of yeast  ¾ cups of warm water  ½ tsp. of sugar  ¼ cup of olive oil  1 ¾ cups of all purpose flour  ½ cup of semolina flour  ½ tsp. of salt  The Sauce  2 cloves of garlic, minced  4 basil leaves, minced  1 tsp. of minced fresh oregano  1 tsp. of olive oil  2 ½ cups of crushed fire roasted tomatoes  ¼ tsp. of fennel seeds  ¼ tsp. of crushed red pepper  ¼ tsp. of freshly ground black pepper  ½ tsp. of salt  1 tsp. of sugar  The Toppings    ½ of a yellow onion, sliced thinly    4 cremini mushrooms, sliced    1 green bell pepper, diced   ½ cup of sliced black olives    Option: 1 Tofurky Italian sausage, sliced thinly    1 tsp. of olive oil    3 tbsp. of Pine Nut Parmesan (see page XX)    Instructions  Combine the yeast, warm water, and sugar and allow it to sit for about 10 minutes.  Add the oil to the water.  Combine the flours and salt and add them to the wet mix.  Lightly flour a working surface.  Knead the dough until it just stops sticking to your hands.  Place it in an oiled bowl, cover it, and let it rise for 1 ½ hours.  While it is rising, make the sauce.  Mince the garlic, basil, and oregano.  Over a medium heat, sauté the garlic in 1 tsp. of olive oil for about 30 seconds.  Add all the sauce ingredients to the pot and simmer over a medium‐low heat for about 10 minutes. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|89

Slice the onion and mushrooms (and optional sausage) and dice the bell pepper.   Over a medium heat, sauté the onion, mushrooms, bell pepper, and Tofurky sausage for about 5  minutes in 1 tsp. of olive oil.  Now that the dough has risen, punch it down and knead it just two or three times.  Lightly oil a deep 12” diameter pan (I prefer an iron skillet).  Spread the dough out into the pan and push it out just a bit from the center to create a rim around  the dough.  Let it rest for about 5 minutes.  Add the veggie toppings (and optional sausage) and then spread the sauce on top.  Bake this on 475 degrees for 30 minutes.  Sprinkle the Pine Nut Parmesan on top.                                     

                               
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|90

Kitchen Equipment    2 Mixing Bowls  Pot  Mortar and Pestle or Small Food Processor  Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoons  Stirring Spoon  Iron Skillet or Deep Dish Pizza Pan    Presentation    I slice and serve this directly out of the iron skillet.  Not only does it hold the pizza well, but it makes for  a nice, rustic presentation.    Time Management    Make the sauce while the dough is rising. It saves  time and also gives it time to cool down so the  dough doesn’t start instantly cooking when the  sauce goes on it.     Complementary Food and Drinks    I like serving this with a spinach salad with walnuts and some sort of dried berry or fruit.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are relatively easy to find. However, I prefer to use Muir Glen fire roasted  tomatoes. Not only are they organic, but they have the perfect flavor to go along with this pizza.  Approximate cost per pizza is $5.00.    How It Works    The crust has a high oil to flour ratio so that it stays soft and supple as it bakes. The sauce is a mix of  sweet tomato flavors and aromatic ingredients like fennel seed that bring it to life. The spices used in  the sauce are also spices used in sausage making, which is why it has that type of kick. As the pizza  bakes, the sauce and ingredients should way down the center while the unfettered sides rise up the  pan, creating that pie look indicative of Chicago deep dish.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|91

 

Chef’s Notes 
   This was a fun pizza to make. Because the sides rise up so high, you can load the center of the pizza  with sauce and ingredients and create a monster of flavor!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 1792       Calories from Fat 540  Fat 60 g  Total Carbohydrates 260 g  Dietary Fiber 41 g  Sugars 5 g  Protein 53 g  Salt 2509 mg    Interesting Facts    The Chicago deep dish pizza was created in 1943 at Pizzeria Uno, which is now a chain going strong all  across the U.S.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|92

Salted Fig & Agave Pizza
Type:   Pizza    Serves: 12” pizza  Time to Prepare: 20 minutes + time for the dough to rise    Ingredients  1 Napoli Pizza Crust  4 figs, sliced  3 tbsp. of agave (the darker, the better)  ½ tsp. of coarse, large grain, flaky sea salt (the flakiness matters in this recipe, do not substitute  regular table salt)  ½ tsp. of cracked black pepper    Instructions  Make the pizza dough and roll it out.  Slice the figs into ¼” slices.  Drizzle agave over the pizza.  Lay the figs on the pizza.  Garnish with sea salt and pepper.  Bake this on 450 degrees for 6 minutes or place it in your wood‐fire pizza oven for 1 minute.                                     

             
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|93

Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Spoon  Pizza Stone or Pizza Oven    Presentation    If you want a bit more color, you can sprinkle  some fresh cut mint on top of the pizza, but I  like to eat it just as it is.    Time Management    Once you’ve got the dough underway, this  pizza is relatively quick to assemble. Just make  sure the crust stays a bit soft, or else it starts  to override the figs.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a spicy salad of baby arugula, chiles, and a red wine dressing.    Where to Shop    Some conventional markets carry fresh figs and nice salts, but many do not. You may need to go to  Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, or a higher end market to get the best ingredients for this pizza.  Approximate cost per pizza is $3.00.    How It Works    I use a Napoli style crust with this pizza because the thinness of the crust lets the fig and agave come  to the foreground. Otherwise, the pizza starts to taste more like flavored bread. The salt gives a  salty/sweet contrast and the flakiness of it creates mini shots of salt throughout the pizza. It also  provides a more interesting texture than just plain table salt. Black pepper gives a spicy aromatic  quality that accents the pureness of the fig and the sweetness of the agave.    Chef’s Notes     This is based on an ancient Roman flatbread that was covered with honey and figs and I added that  touch of flaky salt and black pepper to create a simple pizza belied by its complex flavor.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|94

Nutrition Facts (per serving) 
  Calories 980       Calories from Fat 108  Fat 12 g  Total Carbohydrates 195 g  Dietary Fiber 24 g  Sugars 86 g  Protein 23 g  Salt 1755 mg    Interesting Facts    Figs use wasps instead of bees to pollinate.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|95

Fruit & Berry Cream Pizza
Type: Dessert      Serves: 6  Time to Prepare: 1 hour (includes time to bake and cool)    Ingredients  1 Puff Pastry sheet, defrosted overnight in refrigerator (1 sheet of a 2‐sheet package that is  1.1 lbs/17.3 oz/490 g)   Several tablespoons (about 6‐7) raspberry or other jam  Berry Cream                ¾ cup silken tofu   ½ cup powdered sugar  ½ teaspoon vanilla extract  1/3 cup fresh or frozen raspberries or other berries  Sliced fruit, berries, grapes, etc for topping the pizza    Instructions  Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.   Oil the pan.  Roll out the puff pastry.   Press evenly into bottom and sides of the pan.  Spread a 1/3 inch layer of jam on the bottom portion of the pastry.   Bake for 20‐25 minutes, or until cooked through and lightly browned.  Let cool.  While the pizza is cooking, make the cream.  Blend all the cream ingredients in a blender or food processor.   Spoon or pipe the cream onto the cooled pizza.   Top with the fruit.  Serve immediately.  Store leftover cream in a sealed container in the refrigerator. 

                       
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Sharon Valencik * www.sweetutopia.com

Pizza!

August 2012|96

Kitchen Equipment    Rolling Pin  Blender or Food Processor  Pan (pie or tart pan, 8 or 9 inches, or approximately 16x4 inch rectangle tart pan, or mini tart pans)  Pastry Bag with Tip (optional)  Mixing Bowl  Whisk or Spoon  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    Serve with a sprig of mint on the side and a few extra  slices of fruit and sprinkling of berries.    Time Management    If you don’t wait for the pastry to cool, it will melt the  cream and make the pizza soggy.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with an almond flavored coffee or a light spritzer  of lemon and agave.    Nutrition Facts (per serving) 
  Calories 389       Calories from Fat 117  Fat 13 g  Total Carbohydrates 60 g  Dietary Fiber 5 g  Sugars 37 g  Protein 8 g  Salt 140 mg    Interesting Facts    Puff pastry is created by folding dough repeatedly with tiny pockets of fat that leave lots of empty  spaces in the dough as it bakes and the fat melts. As water releases, it steams and puffs up the empty  spaces left by the fat.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Sharon Valencik * www.sweetutopia.com

Pizza!

August 2012|97

Ladenia (Greek Pizza)
Type:   Pizza    Serves: Makes a 15” x 12” pizza (about 10 servings)  Time to Prepare: 1 hour 20 minutes + 1 ½ hours to rise    Ingredients  Greek Pizza Crust  1 cup of warm water  1 ½ tsp. of active yeast  ½ cup of olive oil  4 cups of all purpose or whole wheat pastry flour (1 lb. of flour)  ¾ tsp. of salt  2 tbsp. of olive oil for the pan  Toppings  3 Vineripe or large heirloom tomatoes, seeded and diced  ½ of a red onion, sliced thinly  10 pitted kalamata olives, sliced in half  2 peperoncini, sliced  1 tsp. of dried oregano  ¾ tsp. of cracked pepper  3 tbsp. of olive oil  Option: ¼ cup of vegan feta or marinated tofu* (see below)      ¼ cup of crumbled firm tofu      Juice of 1 big lemon (about 2 tbsp.)  1/3 tsp. of salt          1 clove of minced garlic    Instructions  Combine the water, yeast, and oil.  Combine the flour and salt.  Add the flour to the water and mix until everything is thoroughly combined.  Knead the bread on a lightly floured surface until it just stops sticking (the dough should be soft and  supple and a little stick is better than a stiff dough).  Oil a pan with the remaining olive oil, making sure to get the sides, too (I used a 15” x 12” x 2” pan).  Press the dough into the pan, spreading it to all sides, until the dough is about ½” high.  Cover this and allow it to rise for about 1 ½ hours.  Gently press the dough down until it is again about ½” high.  Slice and deseed the tomatoes, then dice them and set them aside.  Slice the onion and thinly as possible, cut the olives in half, and slice the peperoncini.  Evenly spread the toppings along the pizza, leaving a ½” clean edge, then drizzle it with the 3 tbsp. of  olive oil (do not add the vegan feta until the pizza comes out of the oven).  Bake the pizza at 390 degrees F for 60 minutes.  As soon as the pizza comes out of the oven, add the tomatoes to it.  * To make the marinated tofu “feta,” crumble the tofu by hand and combine all the ingredients,  allowing it to sit for 2 hours. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|98

Kitchen Equipment    2 Mixing Bowls  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  A 15” x 12” x 2” Pan (any pan with the same approximate area will do, as long as it is a deep pan)  Knife  Cutting Board  Oven    Presentation    I prefer to use heirloom tomatoes. The taste  is usually great and the color variations make  for a spectacular looking pizza. You can also  serve it with a sprig of dried oregano for a  nice gourmet touch.    Time Management    While the dough is rising, prepare the veggies  and preheat the oven. That way the pizza is  ready to go as soon as you press down the  dough.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a side of cumin‐laced chickpeas and spinach.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly easy to find. Approximate cost per pizza is $5.00.    How It Works    This pizza should have a lightly fried taste to it, with a crispy oily outside and a soft, fluffy inside.  That’s why so much olive oil is used in the recipe. Without it, the pizza doesn’t develop the right  texture. The tomatoes are deseeded simply to keep them nice and tight on the pizza when it bakes.  The crisper the tomato, the better, for the same reason. The real key to this pizza is getting the crust  right and getting good quality tomatoes.    Chef’s Notes     This is a great pizza. I love the texture of the crust and the flavor of good quality tomatoes, but  because of the high oil content, I save making this pizza as a treat more than a staple meal. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|99

Nutrition Facts (per serving) 
  Calories 3633       Calories from Fat 1737  Fat 193 g  Total Carbohydrates 393 g  Dietary Fiber 73 g  Sugars 16 g  Protein 81 g  Salt 2288 mg    Interesting Facts    Although the pizza is spelled ladenia, it should be pronounced luh‐THEN‐ee‐ah and basically means oil  bread.  Ladenia is a traditional recipe from the island of Kimolos.     

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|100

Hot Wing Pizza
  Type:   Pizza        Serves: 14” pizza  Time to Prepare: About 4 ½ hours    Ingredients  Two 10‐12 oz. package of ‘chicken’ flavored seitan (I like the breaded ‘nugget’ kind of this   4 tablespoons vinegar   2 tablespoon vegan butter   1 cup of Louisiana style hot sauce   1 package of vegan blue cheese (I used Sunergia brand)   2 teaspoons of garlic infused olive oil   4‐5 cloves of garlic   1 NYC Pizza Crust (see recipe on page XX)  About 2 teaspoons extra hot sauce     Instructions  In a saucepan over low heat, combine the vinegar, ‘butter’ and hot sauce.   Simmer for about 5 minutes, until the butter melts and everything is combined.   Add your seitan and transfer to an oven proof dish.   I like to coat mine with parchment paper for easier clean up.   Place in the refrigerator for 3‐4 hours to marinade.   Bake on 350 for about 30 minutes.   There should be a little sauce left.   Remove from heat.   Use your crust of choice, and coat with the garlic infused oil.   Mince the garlic and sprinkle on the crust.   Prebake for 5‐10 minutes.   Add the hot wings, any remaining sauce, and sprinkle with blue ‘cheese’.   Sprinkle with additional hot sauce.   Bake for another 10 minutes on 450 degrees.   Remove from heat, cool, and cut.                              
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|101

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the butter from the sauce, and reduce the oil on the pizza to 1 teaspoon.     Kitchen Equipment    Saucepan   Pizza Pan or Stone   Baking Dish   Knife  Cutting Board   Measuring Cups and Spoons    Presentation    This pizza is going to be messy no matter how you  slice it!    Time Management    Because of the long marinade time, you can start a  homemade crust at the same time you marinade  with plenty of time for rising and kneading.     Complementary Food and Drinks    This pizza is great with beer and celery. Serve this pizza with those items to your vegan friends and  prepare to be very popular. I actually served mine with cold watermelon slices, so the cool sweetness  would balance out the fire in the pizza.     Where to Shop    Whole Foods and Vegan Essentials are the best places to purchase the vegan blue cheese (both  Sheese and Sunergia are good brands), and I get my seitan and garlic infused oil from Trader Joes. The  rest should be easily found at the supermarket.      How It Works    The fat in the vegan butter and oil mellow out some of the capsaicin of the hot sauce, creating a  smoother taste and texture.     Chef’s Notes     This recipe is amazing. I made this for our game night and two of our omnivore friends called this my 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|102

best creation to date. I only made one, but if I had made two it all would have been devoured. This is  one I will be making again and again.     Nutrition Facts (per pizza)    Calories 1139       Calories from Fat 351  Fat 39 g  Total Carbohydrates 168 g  Dietary Fiber 43 g  Sugars 5 g  Protein 229 g  Salt 6135 mg    Interesting Facts    Frank’s RedHot sauce is supposedly the sauce originally used to make Buffalo wing sauce.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|103

Italian Sausage Pizza
Type:   Pizza, Raw    Serves: 8 personal pizzas  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes + 6 hours to dehydrate the crust    Ingredients  The Crust  1 very large or 2 medium zucchini, peeled and chopped (about 3 cups)  1 small clove garlic, peeled  2 tablespoons nutritional yeast  2 tablespoons almond butter  2 tablespoons olive oil  2 teaspoons lemon juice  1 teaspoon dried basil  1 teaspoon ground oregano  1 teaspoon sea salt  1 cup oat flour  1 cup buckwheat flour  ¾ cup ground flaxseed  The Sauce  ½ cup sundried tomatoes, soaked for 30 minutes and drained  1 small ripe tomato, cored, seeded, and chopped  1 small pitted date  1 small clove garlic, peeled  1 tablespoon nutritional yeast  2 teaspoons olive oil  1 teaspoon ground oregano  ½ teaspoon fennel seeds  ½ teaspoon sea salt  ½ to ¾ cup filtered water, as needed to thin  The Sausage  1 cup dry walnuts  1 small clove garlic, peeled  2 tablespoons tamari  2 teaspoons fennel seeds  1 teaspoon dried basil  ½ teaspoon dried oregano  ½ teaspoon lemon juice  ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)  To Serve  1 cup nondairy cheese of choice, such as crumbled raw macadamia cheese or store‐bought  vegan shredded mozzarella cheese  Freshly cracked black pepper   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Amber Shea Crawley from Practically Raw: Flexible Raw Recipes Anyone Can Make
www.almostveganchef.com

Pizza!

August 2012|104

Instructions 

Making the Crust 
Combine the zucchini, garlic, nutritional yeast, almond butter, oil, lemon juice, basil, oregano, and  salt in a food processor or high speed blender and process until smooth, scraping down the sides as  necessary.    Add the flours and blend again until smooth.    Add the flax and blend until well‐incorporated.    The batter will be very thick and sticky.    Make it Raw:  In 8 portions, scoop the batter onto two Teflex‐lined dehydrator trays (4 scoops  per tray).  Using a spoon or small offset spatula (moistened with water), spread each portion  into a round crust shape about ¼ inch thick.  Dehydrate for 2 hours, until dry on top, then flip  over onto a mesh‐lined tray and peel off the Teflex sheet.  Dehydrate for 4 to 6 more hours,  until firm (though not crisp).    Make it Cooked:  Preheat the oven to 350°F and grease a baking sheet with coconut oil.  In 8  portions, scoop the batter onto the baking sheet.  Using a spoon or small offset spatula  (moistened with water), spread each portion into a round crust shape about 1/4 inch thick.   Bake for 8 minutes, then flip the crusts over with a spatula.  Bake for 7 to 8 more minutes,  until dry and lightly browned.  Let cool for at least 10 minutes before handling.   

Making the Sauce 
Combine combine all sauce ingredients, including 1/2 cup water, in a high‐speed blender and blend  to combine.    Add more water, 2 tablespoons at a time, as needed to help it blend smoothly.    Making the Sausage  Combine the walnuts and garlic in a food processor and pulse until coarsely ground.    Add all remaining sausage ingredients and pulse until well‐combined.   

Serving the Pizza 
Top each pizza crust with 3 tablespoons of the pizza sauce.    Scatter the “sausage” bits evenly across the pizzas.    Crumble or scatter 2 tablespoons of the cheese onto each pizza.    Top with freshly cracked black pepper, and serve.     Substitutions  Zucchini:  yellow squash  Almond butter:  cashew butter or coconut butter  Tomato:  1/2 small red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and chopped  Date:  1 teaspoon agave nectar, coconut nectar, or any other liquid sweetener  Tamari:  soy sauce, nama shoyu, or liquid aminos  Replace the “sausage” with your favorite pizza toppings.  Try bell pepper strips, chopped olives, sliced  mushrooms, diced red onion, fresh basil, or anything else you please. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Amber Shea Crawley from Practically Raw: Flexible Raw Recipes Anyone Can Make
www.almostveganchef.com

Pizza!

August 2012|105

Kitchen Equipment    Food Processor  Blender  Spatula  Dehydrator with Teflex Sheets or Oven and Baking Sheet  2 Mixing Bowls  Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoons    Presentation    Be gentle when you remove the pizza from the  Teflex sheets so you maintain the integrity of  the crust!    Chef’s Notes     This is my favorite way to eat raw pizza: with  impeccably seasoned tomato sauce and  flavorful nutmeat “sausage,” dotted with rich,  creamy nut cheese.  This pie also happens to be  packed with heart‐healthy lycopene (from the  sundried tomatoes) and omega‐3 fats (thanks  to the walnuts), along with a whole host of other nutrients—it’s not your average pizza, to say the  least!    Nutrition Facts (per pizza)    Calories 485       Calories from Fat 297  Fat 33 g  Total Carbohydrates 34 g  Dietary Fiber 10 g  Sugars 10 g  Protein 13 g  Salt 665 mg     

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com Recipe by Amber Shea Crawley from Practically Raw: Flexible Raw Recipes Anyone Can Make
www.almostveganchef.com

Pizza!

August 2012|106

Tarragon Olive Flatbread Pizza
Type:   Main      Serves: 16” long x 8” wide pizza  Time to Prepare: 60 minutes    Ingredients  The Crust  ¾ cup of warm water  1 tsp. of agave  1 tsp. of active yeast  1 tbsp. of olive oil  1 ½ cups of all purpose or whole wheat pastry flour  ¾ tsp. of salt  The Bean Spread  1 ½ cups of cooked chickpeas, rinsed  ¼ cup of water  ¼ cup of tahini  ¼ tsp. of salt  1/8 tsp. of cayenne pepper  1 tbsp. of lemon juice  The Toppings  16‐20 pitted Kalamata olives  1 tbsp. of fresh tarragon leaves    Instructions  Combine the water, agave, yeast, and oil.  Combine the flour and salt.  Add this to the wet mix and thoroughly combine.  Lightly oil your hands and knead the dough for about 5 minutes (it should still be soft).  Place the dough in a bowl and cover it, allowing it to rise for about 1 ½ hours.  Punch down the dough.  Roll the dough into an oblong shape ¼” thick.  Puree the garbanzo beans, water, tahini, olive oil, salt, and lemon juice until it is smooth (not all  blenders work the same, so you may have to adjust the water content to get this smooth).  Spread the blend over the rolled dough, leaving about ½” of the crust exposed along the edges.  Sprinkle the cayenne pepper over the spread.  Place the olives evenly on top of the spread.  Bake the pizza on 500 degrees F for 5 minutes.  Remove the pizza from the oven.  Sprinkle the fresh tarragon leaves over the pizza as soon as it comes out of the oven (do not use dried  tarragon).           
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|107

Kitchen Equipment    Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Blender or Food Processor  Pizza Stone  Oven  Spatula for spreading the “sauce” on the flatbread    Presentation    This looks very nice on a long, dark, wooden plank (sometimes  called a pizza piel).  Also, do not bake the tarragon on the pizza as  it will lose both its flavor and its beautiful, bright green color.   Make sure to put it on after the baking is done.    Time Management    I like to preheat the oven and make the bean spread just before  the dough is finished rising. That way, it’s ready to go as soon as I roll out the dough.    Complimentary Food and Drinks    Pair this with a cinnamon tea or Turkish coffee and a mezze platter of olives, dolmades, and chilled  eggplant.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common, though you will want to get a good quality, thick tahini to  get the best flavor.     How It Works    The bean spread is smooth enough and thick enough that it acts as a hearty, flavorful base for the  pizza, which allows the olives and tarragon to accent the pizza instead of overwhelm it.  Adding in the  olive oil and water is what creates the smoothness to the spread and the olive oil keeps it from drying  out during baking.    Chef’s Notes     The base of this is a modified hummus.  It omits the garlic and paprika and goes light on the lemon  juice so that the spread does not take over the pizza.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|108

 

Nutritional Facts (per pizza) 
  Calories 1817       Calories from Fat 657  Fat 73 g  Total Carbohydrates 217 g  Dietary Fiber 42 g  Sugars 19 g  Protein 63 g  Salt 3451 mg    Interesting Facts    Kalamata is a city in southern Greece.  Some olive groves are rumored to be over 3,000 years old.  Olive trees often displace other vegetation in the wild. 

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|109

Onion Flower & Lion’s Mane Pizza
Type:   Pizza    Serves: 14” pizza  Time to Prepare: 20 minutes + time for the dough to rise    Ingredients  1 Napoli Crust (see page 29)  1 cup of Classic San Marzano Pizza Sauce (see page 169) ½ cup of shredded Follow Your Heart or Teese mozzarella  4 lion’s mane mushrooms, sliced thickly  2 tsp. of garlic oil  Pinch of salt  1 onion flower    Instructions  Make the pizza dough.  While the dough is rising, make the sauce.  Shred the cheese and set it aside.  Slice the mushrooms into ½” pieces.  Over a medium high heat, sauté them in garlic‐infused olive oil, along with a pinch of salt, until they  are moderately browned.  Tear the tiny onion flower buds off the stem.  Roll out the dough and cover it with sauce.  Add the cheese.  Spread the lion’s mane mushrooms around the pizza and then sprinkle with the onion flower buds.  Bake this on a pizza stone at 500 degrees F  for 3 minutes or in a pizza oven for 1 1/2 minutes.                                      

   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|110

Low‐fat Version 
  Do not sauté the mushrooms. Simply slice them and place them on the pizza.    Kitchen Equipment    Sauté Pan  Grater  Knife  Cutting Board  2 Mixing Bowls  Oven  Pizza Stone  Pizza Peel    Presentation    I cut this at the table. The pizza looks so nice as is,  I like people to see it intact before it gets sliced.    Time Management    Keep an eye on this pizza. The onion flowers cook  quickly and if you leave the pizza in a few too  many minutes, the onion flowers will burn.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a side of sweet, spiced nuts. They  will balance out the unique flavor of the lion’s mane mushrooms.    Where to Shop    This pizza is admittedly a very specialized pizza due to the ingredients. I found onion flowers at a local  farmers’ market and I purchased the lion’s mane mushrooms at Whole Foods in Portland. I’ve also  seen them at Far West Fungi in San Francisco, but not many other places. If you can’t find them, don’t  worry. You can substitute a mix of oyster mushrooms (which you should also brown) and a few sliced  green olives. The flavor is not the same, but you will get the browning and texture from the  mushrooms and a sort of salty tang from the olives. Approximate cost per pizza is $6.00.    How It Works    This is a classic thin crust pizza, which I chose because it lets the toppings really shine. Same with the  tomato sauce. The sauce is light, so it allows the lion’s mane and onion flower to be the stars. The  onion flower buds have both an onion and floral taste which also takes on a nutty quality during the 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|111

brief time the pizza cooks. The best way to describe the lion’s mane mushrooms is tangy with a note  of sour. When you take a bite, the flavor explodes after a second or two. They need to be browned in  order to develop that flavor, however. Otherwise, they just taste raw and sour.     Chef’s Notes     This was another one of those pizzas that was born out of having random ingredients lying around. I  had no idea what to do with the mushrooms, but I purchased them to experiment with them and  figured this was a great way to test them out. Same with the onion flower. Fortunately, it turned out  to be a great pizza!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 986       Calories from Fat 306  Fat 34 g  Total Carbohydrates 142 g  Dietary Fiber 39 g  Sugars 9 g  Protein 28 g  Salt 1694 g    Interesting Facts    Preliminary lab tests show that lion’s mane helps lower blood lipids.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|112

Pita Pizza
Type: Quick Pizza      Serves: 1  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes    Ingredients  1 pita  6 tbsp. of hummus  4 kalamata olives, pitted and split  Sprinkle of red chile flakes    Instructions  Spread the hummus across the pita.  Cut the olives in half and scatter them across the hummus.  Sprinkle red chile flakes onto the pizza.  Bake on 350 degrees for 5 minutes.                                     

                   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|113

Low‐fat Version 
  Use a low‐fat or no‐tahini hummus.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Spoon  Pizza Stone  Oven    Presentation    Make sure the olives and chile flakes aren’t clumped  together. You can also sprinkle some fresh minced  parsley onto the finished pizza if you want a splash of  green.    Time Management    The key to this is to make sure the pita gets crisp  without burning. I usually check it after 3 minutes,  then at 4, and finally at 5 minutes.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a salad with mixed spring greens, roasted red peppers, and pine nuts.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common, though I usually get them all at Trader Joe’s. They’ve got  everything for the pizza, including whole wheat pita. Approximate cost per serving is $1.50.    How It Works    It’s hard to go wrong with hummus, olives, and dried chiles. All of those flavors complement each  other and it’s not a far leap to put them on pita bread and bake it all together. Tanginess, heat, and  saltiness, all on crispy bread.    Chef’s Notes     This recipe was born entirely out of laziness! I simply did not feel like cooking one day, but I wanted a  pizza, so I got together some of my Mediterranean ingredients and threw this together.   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|114

Nutrition Facts (per serving) 
  Calories 381       Calories from Fat 117  Fat 13 g  Total Carbohydrates 55 g  Dietary Fiber 9 g  Sugars 1 g  Protein 11 g  Salt 610 mg    Interesting Facts    The pocket in pita bread is not created by yeast, but solely by steam.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|115

Pizza Bianca with Garlic
Type:   Pizza (Roman style)    Serves: Makes a 12” pizza  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes + time to knead the dough and let it rise    Ingredients  1 Roman pizza crust (see page 30) 8 cloves of garlic, minced  2 tbsp. of olive oil  ¼ tsp. of coarse, flaky sea salt  1 tsp. of fresh thyme    Instructions  Make the pizza dough, but don’t roll it out just yet.  Mince the garlic (you can cheat and put it in a food processor and pulse it a few times).  Now roll out the pizza, about ¼” thick.  Brush the olive oil on it, leaving a small edge.  Sprinkle the garlic, salt, and thyme on the pizza.  Bake it at 500 degrees F for 5 minutes or for 2 minutes in a pizza oven.                                     

               
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|116

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the olive oil and liberally spritz the pizza with water after you have added the garlic, salt, and  thyme. This will help protect the garlic and keep the top of the pizza hydrated.    Kitchen Equipment    Mixing Bowls for the dough  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Knife and Cutting Board or a Food Processor  Pizza Stone and Oven    Presentation    You can slice this to make it easier to eat, but  I prefer to leave it as is and simply tear pieces  off to eat.    Time Management    This pizza cooks fast, so keep the oven light  on so you can make sure the garlic does not  burn. If it starts to turn a deep brown color,  get the pizza out of the oven right away  (unless you like the flavor of bitter garlic and  there is something to be said for that).     Complementary Food and Drinks    A dish of high quality, peppery olive oil for a dipping sauce, along with a side of steamed artichokes.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common. Approximate cost per pizza is $1.25.    How It Works    This is basically a flatbread recipe with garlic and salt on top. Easy enough. I chose flakey sea salt so  that there is a light crunch and shots of saltiness when you bite into the pizza.    Chef’s Notes     This is something I make when I have leftover pizza dough and I am out of toppings and sauce. It’s 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|117

quick, easy, and you can cut it up into breadsticks, too! You can also fold it over and make a great  sandwich out of it.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 443       Calories from Fat 207  Fat 23 g  Total Carbohydrates 31 g  Dietary Fiber 25 g  Sugars 5 g  Protein 28 g  Salt 1466 mg    Interesting Facts    Pizza Bianca is widely available in Rome, but make sure you get a slice that just came out of the oven.  The difference between that and one that has sat for five minutes is noticeable.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|118

Pizza Margherita
Type:   Pizza    Serves: 14” pizza  Time to Prepare: 25 minutes + 1 ½ hours for the dough to rise    Ingredients  1 Napoli Crust (see recipe on page 29)  1 cup of Classic San Marzano Sauce (see recipe on page 169)  4 slices of Teese mozzarella  4‐5 large basil leaves, sliced into ribbons    Instructions  Combine the yeast with the warm water and wait about 10 minutes.  Add the oil and stir.  Add the flour and salt and thoroughly combine.  Lightly flour a working surface and knead the dough until it no longer sticks to your hands.  Place it in a lightly oiled bowl and cover it.  Allow it to rise for 1 ½ hours.  While it is rising, make the sauce.  Combine the tomatoes, oregano, pepper, and salt in a pot and simmer it for about 10 minutes.  Set the sauce aside (if it is watery, you can mash it with a potato masher to leave some texture to it  or simply puree it).  Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.  Punch the dough down and divide it into two balls.  Roll each ball out into a 12” disc about 1/8” thick (this works best if you use your fingers to press the  crust out).  Spread the sauce over it, leaving a 1” unsauced rim.  Slice the Teese.  Stack the leaves and roll them closed.  Slice thinly along the width of the roll to create ribbons.  Add cheese and then the basil to the pizza.  Bake the pizza for about 8 minutes.                       

 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|119

Kitchen Equipment    2 Mixing Bowls  Towel  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoons  Whisk  Rolling Pin  Oven  Pot  Knife  Cutting Board  Pizza Stone    Presentation    The key is to keep the pizza looking simple, but  delicious. Long strips of Teese look much better  than shreds.    Time Management    Make sure the sauce is not hot before it goes on  the pizza. Otherwise, it will start to cook the dough  before it goes in the oven!     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve with a glass of red wine and a side of gigantes beans tossed in olive oil, salt, and dried herbs.    Where to Shop    I usually have to get Teese at Whole Foods and I prefer to get the organic basil from Trader Joe’s. San  Marzano tomatoes are typically available at specialty Italian markets or gourmet stores. Approximate  cost per serving is $2.00.    How It Works    The pizza is an exercise in simplicity, which means that the ingredients must be extraordinary. San  Marzano tomatoes are complex and sweet, making a delectable sauce on which rides the cheese and  basil. Fresh basil is a must to get the full fragrance from it. The high heat in the oven mimics the heat  from a traditional brick pizza oven, so the crust does not need to cook very long.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|120

Chef’s Notes 
   This pizza is a classic for a reason. The crust is a classic Neapolitan crust and because it is not overly  thick, it allows the other ingredients to be featured in exquisite balance.    Nutrition Facts (per pizza)    Calories 874       Calories from Fat 162  Fat 19 g  Total Carbohydrates 148 g  Dietary Fiber 28 g  Sugars 10 g  Protein 30 g  Salt 1869 mg    Interesting Facts    The pizza margherita was created by Raffaele Esposito for Queen Margherita of Savoy’s visit in 1889.  The colors of the pizza match the colors of the Italian flag.    

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|121

Pizza Marinara
Type:   Pizza    Serves: 14” pizza  Time to Prepare:  20 minutes + time for the dough to rise   Ingredients  Napoli Pizza Crust (see page 29)  Classic San Marzano Sauce (see page 169) 2 cloves of garlic, minced    Instructions  Make the dough for the pizza crust.  While it is rising, mince the garlic and make the sauce.  Use the Classic Sauce recipe, but add the minced garlic to the sauce when you add the tomatoes.  Lightly flour a surface.  Press or roll out the dough.  Spread the sauce on top, leaving a small rim.  Bake the pizza at 500 F on a pizza stone for 3 minutes or bake it in a pizza oven for 1 ½ minutes.                                       

               
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|122

Kitchen Equipment    2 Mixing Bowls  Pot  Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoons  Pizza Stone  Pizza Peel  Oven    Presentation    I don’t even slice this pizza. I just serve it as is  and tear off parts of it to eat!    Time Management    This pizza cooks fast and timing is important  when you only have crust and sauce. They  each have to be excellent to make an  excellent pizza. Turn the oven light on and  when you see the crust bubble and just start  to brown, you know you are done. Get it out  of the oven and off the pizza stone straight  away.     Complementary Food and Drinks    When I do pizza night, I make several different types of pizza. I use this one as the starter pizza.    Where to Shop    San Marzano tomatoes are typically available at higher end markets and Italian specialty markets,  though I have seen them start to crop up in more conventional stores as people get more interested  in better food. The other ingredients are easy to find. Approximate cost per pizza is $1.50.    How It Works    This pizza heavily relies on good quality ingredients. When you’ve got nothing else but crust and  tomato sauce, they each have to be good. The pizza bakes at a high heat to mimic the heat of a pizza  oven and the stone absorbs the tiny amount of moisture released by the bottom of the pizza, keeping  the crust nice and crisp.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|123

 

Chef’s Notes 
   When I first was offered a pizza with just tomato sauce on it in Italy, I was skeptical, but I quickly  changed my mind after the first bite and I have great respect for such a simple item.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 708       Calories from Fat 108  Fat 12 g  Total Carbohydrates 126 g  Dietary Fiber 22 g  Sugars 8 g  Protein 24 g  Salt 1464 mg    Interesting Facts    Pizza marinara is named so because it was sold from carts to fishermen returning from a day at sea.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|124

Porcini Sundried Tomato Pizza
Type:   Main      Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 20 minutes + time to make the dough    Ingredients  Roman Pizza Crust (see page 30)  1 cup of Classic San Marzano Sauce (see page 169) ¼ cup of dried porcinis, rehydrated  5 sundried tomatoes, sliced  ¾ cup of grated Follow Your Heart or Teese mozzarella cheese  ¼ tsp. of freshly ground pepper    Instructions  Warm the water on a medium heat in a small pot.  Add the porcinis.  While the porcinis rehydrate, spread the sauce on the crust.  Grate the cheese onto the pizza.  Slice the sundried tomatoes and sprinkle those around the pizza.  Take the rehydrated porcinis and spread those around the pizzas.  Bake the pizza at 500 F on a pizza stone for 5 minutes.  Remove the pizza from the oven and add the freshly ground black pepper.                                               
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|125

Kitchen Equipment    Grater  2 Mixing Bowls  1 Small Mixing Bowl  2 Pots  Pizza Stone  Pizza Peel  Oven    Presentation    When you spread the grated cheese on, leave some of the red sauce  showing around the edges as it makes a very nice contrast against  the Follow Your Heart cheese and the crust.  When you place the  porcinis on it, allows some of the sundried tomatoes to show  through that, as well.    Time Management    Make sure to get the porcinis in the warm water first, so you can grate the cheese and get the sauce  and sundried tomatoes ready while they rehydrate.      Complimentary Food and Drinks    This is a classy pizza, so consider serving it with a glass of red wine, like a pinot noir.  That will  complement the flavors of the tomato sauce and porcinis and will also look very nice.      Where to Shop    Dried porcinis can be found in most grocery stores, but if you have a problem finding it, look up your  local gourmet store.  They’re bound to have them.  Also, I get the sundried tomatoes that are  packaged, rather than packed in oil. The flavor is brighter, and, of course, the calorie count is less.  Approximate cost per pizza is $6.00.    How It Works    The porcini have a robust, earthy flavor that permeates the entire pizza, with an aroma that beckons  one to start eating. I particularly like how they so easily suffuse the entire pizza with their flavor  without overwhelming it. The sharpness of the sundried tomatoes provides shots of tart sweetness  that overlay the porcini.     

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|126

 

Chef’s Notes 
   If you want to add some extra flavor to this pizza, consider sautéing the rehydrated porcinis in a tbsp.  of red wine, 1 tsp. of olive oil, and 1/8 tsp. of salt.  Although it takes a bit of extra time, the flavors will  become even more intense.    Nutritional Facts (per pizza)    Calories 1232       Calories from Fat 207  Fat 23 g  Total Carbohydrates 226 g  Dietary Fiber 44 g  Sugars 14 g  Protein 32 g  Salt 2091 mg    Interesting Facts    Fully mature porcinis can way up to two pounds.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|127

Potato, Chard, & Artichoke Pizza
Type:   Pizza     Serves: Makes a 12” pizza  Time to Prepare:  25 minutes + time to let the dough rise   Ingredients  1 Napoli Pizza Crust (see page 29)  1 Yukon gold potato, sliced as thinly as possible  Water  Pinch of salt  1 small bunch of chard  2 cloves of garlic, minced  1 tbsp. of olive oil  1/8 tsp. of salt  5‐6 artichoke hearts, split in half  1 tbsp. of olive oil    Instructions  Prepare the pizza dough, but do not roll it out yet.  Slice the potato as thinly as possible.  Using a thin layer of water and a sprinkling of salt, simmer the potatoes until they are soft (this can  take 3‐5 minutes depending on how thin you sliced them).   Remove them from the pan and discard the water.  Slice the chard and mince the garlic.  Over a medium heat, sauté the chard and garlic in 1 tbsp. of olive oil with the salt until the chard is  wilted.  Split the artichoke hearts in half.  Roll out the crust.  Brush 1 tbsp. of olive oil onto the crust.  Place a layer of potatoes on the crust, remembering to keep an edge clear.  Add the chard next, followed by the artichokes.  Bake the pizza at 500 F for 5 minutes or in your pizza oven for 2 minutes.                             
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|128

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the olive oil from the recipe. You can wilt the chard using a very thin layer of water.    Kitchen Equipment    Sauté Pan  Spatula  Knife  Cutting Board  Stirring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Mixing Bowls for the pizza dough  Pizza Stone and Oven    Presentation    I always make sure to put the potatoes, then chard,  and then artichokes on the pizza. It keeps the pizza  from being buried under starchy whiteness or dark  green.    Time Management    This pizza takes an extra moment to cook in the oven  simply because it is loaded with ingredients. Make  sure you serve it as soon as it comes out of the oven,  or the moisture from the chard and potatoes will start  to make the crust damp.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a chickpea and tomato salad with a touch of olive oil, chile flakes, and lemon juice.     Where to Shop    All of these ingredients should be easily found. However, chard is one of those veggies that are  particularly important to buy organic. Also, I prefer to use jarred or frozen artichoke hearts rather  than canned ones. The canned ones taste off. Approximate cost per pizza is $4.50.    How It Works    The potatoes are simmered in a thin layer of water to just get them barely soft. You don’t want to get  them to the point where they turn into mashed potatoes or will break apart when you lift them out of 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|129

the pan. This will create a lush base for the pizza, will soften more when they cook, and almost act as  the sauce. The chard needs to be cooked before it goes onto the pizza because the pizza won’t be in  the oven long enough to properly cook it and if you’re going to sauté it, you may as well add some  garlic!     Chef’s Notes     Potato and greens pizza was a regional pizza from Cilento park in Campana, which is where I first had  it.     Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 916       Calories from Fat 216  Fat 24 g  Total Carbohydrates 148 g  Dietary Fiber 22 g  Sugars 9 g  Protein 27 g  Salt 1785 mg    Interesting Facts    Chard is very high in available iron as well as vitamins A, K, and C, making it an excellent source of  nutrients without being high calorically.    

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|130

Raw Pizza Puttanesca
Type:   Raw, Pizza    Serves: 4  Time to Prepare: 2 days to sprout the buckwheat, 15 minutes to prepare the pizza, and 12 hours to  dehydrate the crust    Ingredients  The Crust  5 ½ cups sprouted buckwheat (soak 3 cups dry buckwheat for 24 hours, sprout 24 hours)  1 date  ½ cup basil  1 cup cherry tomatoes or chopped Roma tomatoes  ¼ cup diced onion  ½ orange, juiced  2 cups ground flax seeds (about 1 ½ cups whole seeds)  1 teaspoon sea salt  1 celery stick  1 carrot  2 garlic cloves  1 tsp. of Italian seasoning    The Puttanesca Sauce  6 Roma tomatoes  ½ cup sun‐dried tomatoes, soaked until soft  2 dates, soaked until soft  Himalayan salt to taste  ¼ cup fresh basil leaves  ¼ cup fresh oregano  Pinch of cayenne  1 clove garlic  1 ½ tablespoons extra virgin cold‐pressed olive oil  1 teaspoon nutritional yeast    Instructions  Making the Crust  Mix all veggies in a food processor first, then add buckwheat 1 to 2 cups at a time.   Last slowly add ground flax ½ cup at a time.   Blend well.   With olive oil on your hands or put on latex (latex‐free) gloves and oil and press dough into a  dehydrator with the solid sheet (Teflex sheets), score into desired shape.   I like to divide them into 7x7 squares.   Dehydrate until dry on top flip over, peel off Teflex sheets and dry until hard around 12 to 24  hours.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Angela Elliot

Pizza!

August 2012|131

Making the Sauce  Place all the above ingredients in a food processor and pulse chop until all the ingredients are  chunky and well mixed.    Making the Pizza  Top pizza with mushrooms, bell pepper, onion, olives, tomatoes, and artichokes.   To make more "sautéed cooked style" toppings, place sliced veggies in a bowl, add lemon  juice, olive oil, oregano, garlic, salt, and pepper and allow them to marinate.   Place marinated veggies on a Teflex sheet until soft and "cooked" looking, remove, and top  pizza!        Kitchen Equipment    2 Glass Bowls  Dehydrator  Teflex Sheets  Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoons  Food Processor    Chef’s Notes     This wonderful pizza is not only rich in flavor, it's simple to prepare, so you can whip up a delectable  festive pizza pretty quickly with a little advance preparation and impress family and friends too. I've  been selling this amazing pizza to my clients for over 12 years and they always call for more.     Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 1022       Calories from Fat 162  Fat 18 g  Total Carbohydrates 185 g  Dietary Fiber 35 g  Sugars 9 g  Protein 30 g  Salt 1964 mg    Interesting Facts    Puttanesca means “in the style of the whore.” How it got this sordid name is up for debate, but the  sauce did originate in Naples.   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Angela Elliot

Pizza!

August 2012|132

Roasted Trinity Pizza
Type:   Pizza      Serves: makes a 14” pizza  Time to Prepare: 1 hour 30 minutes + time for the dough    Ingredients  ½ a medium‐sized eggplant, roasted (roast the entire eggplant, and then use half in another dish)  1 ½ tsp. of olive oil  1 bulb of garlic, roasted  ½ tsp. of olive oil  1 red pepper, roasted  1 cup of Classic San Marzano Sauce (see page 169) ¾ cup of grated Follow Your Heart Monterey Jack cheese  1 Chicago Deep Dish Crust (see page 31)  1 tsp. of olive oil    Instructions  Make the dough for the crust.  Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.  Rub 1 ½ tsp. of olive oil on the eggplant and cover it with tinfoil.  Cut the top of the garlic off, exposing the cloves, and drizzle ½ tsp. of olive oil over the top.  Cover it with tinfoil.  Spread a sheet of tinfoil on the middle rack of the oven.  Place the whole pepper on the top rack and the garlic and eggplant on the middle rack.  Roast the garlic for 30 minutes.  Roast the pepper until the skin blackens and blisters.  Roast the eggplant for 35 minutes.  Remove the garlic and eggplant from the oven and let them cool.  Remove the pepper from the oven and remove the skin, stem, and seeds.  Slice the pepper into 1” long strips.  Gently grab hold of the eggplant and slice it in 1” strips along the width.  Cut those strips into 1” chunks (you will have to hold the roasted eggplant gently)  Squeeze the garlic bulb gently from the bottom to pop out the garlic clove (pull back the skin on  individual cloves if necessary).  Oil and appropriately sized iron skillet with 1 tsp. of olive oil.  Place the crust in the iron skillet.  Spread the sauce on the crust, leaving about ½” of space from the sauce to the edge of the crust.  Grate the Follow Your Heart cheese onto the pizza and spread it around on the sauce evenly.  Spread the eggplant, pepper slices, and garlic cloves evenly around the pizza.  Bake this in the iron skillet on 375 degrees for 45 minutes or until the crust is golden.           
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|133

Kitchen Equipment    Iron Skillet  Oven  Measuring Cup  Tinfoil  Cutting Board  Chef’s Knife  Grater  Pizza Cutter    Presentation    This looks very nice when it is served directly in the iron skillet.  Take  the pizza cutter and separate it into 4 slices and then place the iron  skillet on a hot pad on the table.  Make sure to let the skillet cool first  so no one burns themselves.     Time Management    While this pizza does not have a lot of labor involved, it does require  a couple hours to make, so plan accordingly.  You can also store the  roasted veggies for a day in the refrigerator and then place them on the pizza.  Don’t store them for  longer, though, as they will lose their flavor.  To save some time, get the crust, sauce, and cheese  ready while the roasted veggies cool down.    Complementary Food and Drinks    This pizza goes well with an India pale ale.  You can also save some tomato sauce, add some crushed  red pepper to it, and use it for a dip for the edges of the crust.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common, so you should be able to find them at your local grocery  store.  If you don’t want to roast your own pepper, look for a jar of roasted red peppers.    How It Works    Roasting the vegetables develops the natural sugars in them, creating a small caramelization.  This  adds a nice, deep flavor to the toppings.  Oiling the iron skillet helps keep the crust from sticking to it  and adds some nice flavor.  It also works with the metal to crisp the crust.     

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|134

 

Chef’s Notes 
   You’ll have about half an eggplant left over.  Save it and make an eggplant dip out of it for another  meal!    Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)    Calories 2072       Calories from Fat 792  Fat 88 g  Total Carbohydrates 260 g  Dietary Fiber 40 g  Sugars 9 g  Protein 60 g  Salt 2367 mg    Interesting Facts    Eggplant is called such because some of the cultivars of eggplant, when it was first introduced to  Europe, resembled goose eggs. 

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|135

Soy Sausage and Sage Pizza
Type:   Pizza      Serves: 14” pizza  Time to Prepare: 20 minutes + time for the dough to rise   Ingredients  8 oz. of Gimme Lean soy sausage (½ the package)  1/ 8 tsp. of salt  2 tsp. of olive oil  10 large sage leaves  ¾ cup of Daiya white cheese  1 cup of Fire Roasted Chicago Tomato Sauce (see page 174) 1 NYC Crust (see page 31)   Instructions  Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.  Sauté the soy sausage on a medium heat with the salt and olive oil until it has browned.  Break the soy sausage apart with a wooden spoon as it sautés until you have large crumbles.  Spread the sauce on the crust, leaving about a 1” space between the sauce and the edge of the crust.  Grate the cheese evenly onto the sauce.  Mince the sage leaves.  Spread the sage leaves on top of the cheese.  Add the soy sausage crumbles onto the pizza.  Bake it at 500 degrees on a pizza stone for 8 minutes.                                           

 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|136

Kitchen Equipment  Sauté Pan  Measuring Spoon  Measuring Cup  Wooden Spoon  Pizza Stone  Pizza Cutter    Presentation    This pizza has very few ingredients, but each one has its own  distinct color, which makes this a nice looking pizza.  Place this on  the table before cutting it for the best effect.  A dark surrounding  red color, either on the plate, placemat, or tablecloth, nicely  highlights the colors of the pizza.    Time Management    Make sure to preheat the oven before you start on the soy sausage to save about five to ten minutes.   This pizza should be eaten fresh as the tomato sauce will make the thin crust damp after a day and  soggy after two days.    Complimentary Food and Drinks    This goes well with a sparkling cider as the lighter, dry taste of the cider goes nicely with the sage.    Where to Shop    If your local grocery market has a section for vegetarian products in the produce area, chances are  that they sell the GimmeLean soy sausage.  If not, try the old standby of Whole Foods.  You’ll pay  more, but you’ll also know they have it.  The same goes for the Follow Your Heart cheese.    How It Works    When they soy sausage is not sautéed, it can be too mushy.  However, browning it makes all the  difference and will turn it into something that can be eaten on its own.  The salt adds a bit of extra  flavor to it.  The green of the sage goes well with the browned aroma of the soy sausage and this  pizza uses very few ingredients in order to highlight all of the very distinct flavors in this pizza.    Chef’s Notes     I like dishes that are easy to make and this one certainly qualifies.  It doesn’t have a lot of ingredients  and requires very little prep work.  Plus, all of the ingredients are good enough that they can stand on  their own, so they don’t need a lot of other ingredients there to compete with them. 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|137

 

Nutritional Facts (per pizza) 
  Calories 1591       Calories from Fat 387  Fat 43 g  Total Carbohydrates 206 g  Dietary Fiber 41 g  Sugars 15 g  Protein 95 g  Salt 4316 mg    Interesting Facts    Most types of sage are inedible and was used as a healing herb far longer than it was used in the  kitchen. Because of this, sage was widely cultivated in the ancient Mediterranean, where it grows  easily.     

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|138

The Seven Pounder
Type:   Pizza    Serves: 16” pizza  Time to Prepare: About 3 hours     Ingredients  Pizza Crust   3 cups of all purpose flour   1 cup of tepid water   1 tablespoon or one packet of yeast   1 teaspoon sugar   ¼ cup of olive oil   ½ teaspoon salt   Toppings   2 cups of tomato pizza sauce (pick your favorite from the magazine!)   16 oz of crimini mushrooms, sliced   ½ heaping cup of sliced green olives   ½ heaping cup of sliced black olives   ½ a red onion, sliced   2 cups of shredded white vegan cheese    IMPORTANT: You need a 16” pizza pan for this recipe    Instructions  Make the Dough  Proof the yeast by adding the yeast and sugar to the tepid water.   Wait 5 minutes and the yeast should have foamed slightly.   If it did, add it to the flour, salt, and oil.   Mix and knead until smooth, plus at least 5 minutes.   Aim for ten minutes.   Cover and allow to rest at least an hour.   Once it has risen, punch it down, knead for another few minutes, then start rolling it out.   You do not need to roll it out until it is 16 inches round, but starting it helps.   Creating the Pizza  Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.   Slice the veggies.  Stretch the crust onto the 16 inch pizza pan, until it is uniform.   Place on the sauce, toppings, and cover with the vegan cheese.   Bake for 30‐40 minutes, until the crust is golden brown.   Remove, cool, and slice.    

     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|139

Kitchen Equipment    Knife,   Grater  Cutting Board  Mixing Bowl  Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoons  Rolling Pin  16” Pizza Pan  Oven    Presentation    This pizza is thick. Make sure you have a pizza roller or  large knife before slicing into it.    Time Management    To save extra time, you can use pre‐sliced mushrooms  and olives. Also, this lasts in the refrigerator for at least  a week, but it never lasts for me that long before I eat it.     Complementary Food and Drinks    I love this with some nice honeybush Rooibos iced tea, or even on days when I feel like I can spend a  few extra empty calories, a ginger beer (extra ginger, please).     Where to Shop    These items can be purchased at most grocery stores.     Chef’s Notes     I love using a blend of Follow Your Heart and Daiya for the ‘cheese’ on this. And yes, it is named the  Seven Pounder because I once made one that weighed seven pounds!     Nutrition Facts (per pizza)    Calories 1956       Calories from Fat 1044  Fat 116 g  Total Carbohydrates 381 g  Dietary Fiber 61 g  Sugars 16 g 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|140

Protein 72 g  Salt 4730 mg   

Interesting Facts 
  Yeast converts sugar into carbon dioxide and ethanol, which makes the dough rise.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|141

BRYANNA'S "THREE SISTERS" BUTTERNUT SQUASH PIZZA
Serves: Makes two 14” pizzas 
  This is quite a departure for me because I am generally very traditional in my tastes when it comes to pizza.   But, for some reason, I wanted to try a pizza made with butternut squash for a long time.   I finally hit on the  idea of the Native American "Three Sisters": corn, beans and squash. (Not only were they staple crops, but they  grew together—thus the name.)  I opted to use my simple white bean spread instead of the usual tomato  sauce, with a crispy cornmeal‐enriched crust, and a topping of orange squash roasted with onion, bell peppers,  mushrooms and rosemary.  The combination turned out to be quite luscious!    NOTE: If you have a large (14‐inch) cast iron skillet, it works as well as a pizza stone and takes half the time to  preheat.    Ingredients:  CRISPY CORNMEAL CRUST  1 ¼ cups warm water  1 tsp. dry active baking yeast  2 ½ cups unbleached white flour  1 cup yellow cornmeal  2 tsp. salt    TOPPINGS  1 recipe White Bean Spread (see recipe below)  1 ½ cups vegan mozzarella‐style cheese (or use ½  recipe Vegan "Gruyere" from my book “World Vegan  Feast”)  ½ cup soy parmesan (I like Galaxy Vegan) (or use Walnut Parmesan from my book “World Vegan Feast”)  4 cloves garlic, crushed  2 Tbs. extra‐virgin olive oil    Roasted Vegetable Mixture:  1 ½ lb. butternut squash or other "meaty" winter squash, peeled, seeded and thinly sliced  1 large onion, thinly sliced  1 large red bell pepper, seeded and thinly sliced  4 large mushrooms, sliced (any kind‐‐ chanterelles would be nice!)  1 Tbs. fresh rosemary, chopped  4 Tbs. Italian vinaigrette (no‐fat is fine)  Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste      BRYANNA’S WHITE BEAN SPREAD  1 large onion, minced  ½ cup vegan broth 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Bryanna Clark Grogan * www.bryannclarkgrogan.com

 

Pizza!

August 2012|142

2 cloves garlic, minced  1 can (15 oz.) or 1 ½ cooked white beans (white kidney, cannellini, or Great Northern), drained  3 Tbsp. white wine vinegar or fresh lemon juice  2 Tbsp. minced fresh parsley  ½ tsp. salt  ¼ tsp. EACH dried thyme and savory, or other favorite herbs  White pepper to taste      In a medium mixing bowl, or the bowl of a heavy‐duty mixer, combine the water and yeast.  Let it stand until  the yeast dissolves when stirred.  Mix the flour, cornmeal and salt together in smaller bowl.  Add this to the  yeast mixture and knead for 10 minutes, by hand or by machine.  Add a little more unbleached flour if  absolutely necessary, but add as little as possible.  (A moist dough makes better pizza.) Place the dough in a  bowl oiled with olive oil, turn it over to coat, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise at room temperature for an  hour and a half, or until doubled in size.  (A slow rise increases the flavor.)    TO RISE THE DOUGH IN THE REFRIGERATOR: make it the morning before you are going to use it.  Oil the  kneaded dough all over with olive oil and place it in a plastic bag or a bowl with room to double.  A zipper‐lock  bag works well‐‐ flatten the dough out first.  Make sure that the dough rising in a bowl is well‐oiled and well‐ covered, or it will dry out.   If you are around while it is rising, flatten the air out of the dough two or three  times during the day.  Refrigerated dough needs 2‐3 hours to come to room temperature before baking.    TO MAKE THE DOUGH IN A BREAD MACHINE: This is a great convenience and makes wonderful pizza dough.  Use cold water.  Place the ingredients in the bread container in the order that is instructed for your machine.   Select the dough cycle and let it go to work.  You can remove it from the machine after it has kneaded and rise  it in a bowl, or, if the your container is big enough for the dough to double, let it rise through the entire dough  cycle, then remove for the final rising and proceed with the recipe as instructed below.    TO MAKE THE ROASTED VEGETABLE MIXTURE: preheat the oven to 400°F.  Mix the prepared vegetables,  rosemary, salad dressing and some salt and pepper to taste in a large shallow roasting pan.  Bake for 15‐20  minutes, stirring now and then, until the squash is tender.  Remove from the oven and set aside.    TO SHAPE AND BAKE THE PIZZA: 30‐60 minutes before baking, heat your oven to 500 or up to 550 degrees F.   If you are using a pizza stone or large cast iron skillet, place it on the on the bottom rack to preheat.      DO NOT START SHAPING THE PIZZAS AND TOPPING THEM UNTIL YOU HAVE PREHEATED THE OVEN.  The  pizza dough should not rise again after you have added the toppings!          Your goal is for the dough to cook quickly, but not dry out, and you want the topping to be juicy.  (If you use a  pizza stone, be aware that toppings, sauce, and oil that may drip on the clay may be difficult to remove and  may smell up the oven next time you bake.)           Punch down the dough.  Divide the dough into two equal balls.    You can use a rolling pin if you prefer, but this makes a flatter and less chewy, less rustic‐looking crust.  I use  cooking parchment for rolling‐out and bake the pizza on the same parchment.   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Bryanna Clark Grogan * www.bryannclarkgrogan.com

Pizza!

August 2012|143

TO SHAPE WITHOUT A ROLLING PIN: on a lightly‐floured surface or piece of cooking parchment, holding your  fingers flat, press the one ball of dough out into a circle.  Drape the circle over your closed fists.  Keeping your  thumbs out of the way, move your fists up and down, gently and evenly stretching the dough to make a 14"  circle (more or less).     For the final stretching, hold the edge of the pizza and keep moving the edge of the dough around through  your fingers, letting the weight of the dough stretch it a little more, to 14" maximum, across.  ALTERNATIVELY,  you can drape the partially rolled‐out dough over the bottom of an over‐turned large round‐bottomed mixing  bowl and gently stretch it downwards until it is the right size, using the weight of the dough stretch it.  Work  slowly so that you don't tear the dough.   If it does tear, you can patch it and seal it again.  Place on a lightly‐ floured piece of baking parchment and cut around the pizza dough leaving only about 1/2‐inch all around. Tip:  The pizza does not have to be absolutely round!    IF USING A BAKING STONE OR 14‐INCH CAST IRON SKILLET, place each pizza (still on baking parchment) over  a 12‐inch baking peel, or a rimless baking sheet, or a square of stiff cardboard, or an upside‐down pizza pan.   Quickly add the Toppings and get it into the oven, use any of these options to slide the pizza off onto the hot  baking stone or cast iron skillet. Tip: I roll out and top the 2nd pizza while the first one is baking.    Otherwise, place each dough round (still on baking parchment) on a 14‐inch round pizza pan, add toppings  and bake.      TO MAKE THE BEAN SPREAD: In a nonstick skillet, sauté  the onion and garlic, using the broth a little at a time  to keep the vegetables from sticking, until they are soft and as browned as you like them (browned onions will  give the dish a rich flavor).  Add the remaining ingredients to the skillet and mash them with a potato masher.   If you're serving the spread warm, stir it around until it is quite hot, then mound into a serving bowl and serve  immediately.    TOPPING THE PIZZAS: quickly spread each pizza with half of the White Bean Spread (one at a time, unless you  have 2 stones or cast iron skillets). Top this evenly with the Roasted Vegetable Mixture, a little salt and some  freshly‐ground black pepper.  Distribute the crushed garlic evenly over the two pizzas.  Distribute the vegan  cheese over the vegetables, and then the soy or walnut "parmesan".         Drizzle each pizza with 1 Tbs. of the extra‐virgin olive oil (DO NOT OMIT THIS!  Eat fat‐free all day if you have  to, but the oil really makes the pizza wonderfully “juicy”! You are saving plenty of fat by not using fatty meat,  and the fat in olive oil is much more healthful than dairy fat.)    TO BAKE: place the pizza pans on racks in the preheated oven, OR, if using stones or cast iron skillet, slide the  pizza off the pan (still on the baking parchment), board or peel by lining up the edge of it with the back edge of  the stone or skillet, tilt it up and jerk it gently to get the back edge of the pizza onto the stone or skillet.  Then  carefully pull back until the pizza in on the stone or skillet.  Bake one pizza at a time, unless you have two  stones or skillets.         At 550 degrees F, a pizza will cook in about 8 minutes.  The bottom of the crust should be crispy and golden,  with a few scorched spots, and the top should be bubbly and slightly browned, with a nice puffy edge.  The  crust should be chewy.  Serve immediately, cutting each pizza into 6 wedges with a sharp knife, a pizza cutter,  or a pair of kitchen shears (my favorite). 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Bryanna Clark Grogan * www.bryannclarkgrogan.com

Pizza!

August 2012|144

Nutrition Facts (per slice)  
  Calories  62    Calories from Fat 3  Fat .3 g  Total Carbohydrates 13.3 g  Dietary Fiber 2.4 g  Sugars .5 g  Protein 3.4 g  Salt 149.3 mg   

Time Management 
  Components can be made a head and assembled at your convenience.   

  Complementary Food and Drinks  
  Your favorite wine or sparkling water. 

  Where to Shop 
  Most large supermarkets have the primary ingredients.  You may have to go to a health food store for vegan  parmesan, vegan mozzarella and vegan broth cubes or powder or paste, or buy them online. 

 

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Bryanna Clark Grogan * www.bryannclarkgrogan.com

Pizza!

August 2012|145

Heirloom Tomato Olive Pizza
Type:   Pizza      Serves: makes one 14 inch pizza  Time to Prepare: about 20 minutes + time to make the crust     Ingredients    3‐4 heirloom tomatoes in various sizes   ¼ to 1/3 cup of prepared olive tapenade*   6‐8 large fresh basil leaves   8‐10 kalamata olives, pitted   8‐10 green olives stuffed with garlic   ½ of the Roasted Garlic Chile Crust recipe (half the recipe will produce one crust on page 166)    Instructions  After prebaking the crust (see Roasted Garlic Chili Crust recipe) keep the oven on 450 degrees.  Spread with the tapenade.   Slice the tomatoes about ¼ of an inch thin.   Arrange so there are different colors on each slice.   Slice the olives and sprinkle around. Chiffonade the basil and sprinkle on top.   Return to the oven and bake for ten minutes.   Remove from heat and allow the pizza to cool before slicing.        * Many purchased tapenades contain anchovies, so ALWAYS check the label. I like the green olive  tapenade from Trader Joes.                

                   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|146

Raw Version 
  Use a flax seed cracker for the crust and minced raw olives with garlic and lemon juice for the  tapenade. Do not bake, but dehydrate for 2 hours.     Kitchen Equipment    A Pizza Stone or Pizza Pan  Knife  Cutting Board  Oven    Presentation    Serve this directly on the pizza stone or pan. If you serve it  on the pan, make sure to slice it on a cutting board first  and then transfer it back to the pan so you don’t damage  your pan.    Time Management    If you are making the crust from scratch, start slicing the  tomatoes and basil while you are waiting for the crust to  rise for the second time.      Complementary Food and Drinks    Of course, a smooth red wine is always great with pizza, especially one like this that celebrates simple  flavors. A bit of fresh and spicy olive oil to drizzle on would be amazing.     Where to Shop    These ingredients can be found in most supermarkets, but the most amazing heirloom tomatoes  come from your backyard or the local farmer’s market. Approximate cost per serving is $0.75.    How It Works    The quality of the ingredients in a pizza this simple make or break it. Take the time to seek out the  best, freshest ingredients and you will be rewarded with great flavor.     Chef’s Notes     This is a simple little pizza, but it is amazing. The crust is very light because it functions like thin bread,  and the soft bite of the tomato with the tang of the olives is wonderful. I love this pizza.    
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|147

Nutrition Facts (per pizza) 
  Calories 1164       Calories from Fat 216  Fat 28 g  Total Carbohydrates 200 g  Dietary Fiber 37 g  Sugars 30 g  Protein 37 g  Salt 1595 mg    Interesting Facts    Pita and pizza are etymologically related. That’s because the idea of the pizza, bread with herbs and  cheese, was Greek in origin.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|148

Tuscan White Bean Spinach Pizza
Type:   Pizza    Serves: 14” pizza  Time to Prepare: 15 minutes + time for the dough    Ingredients  The Crust  1 Roman Crust (see page 30)  The Sauce    1 cup of Tuscan White Bean Sauce (see page 172)  The Toppings  ½ cup of oyster mushrooms  2 tsp. of olive oil  Pinch of salt  1 cup of spinach leaves  10‐12 sundried tomatoes    Instructions  Make the pizza dough.  Puree all the ingredients for the sauce.  Chop the oyster mushrooms.  Heat 2 tsp. of olive oil up to a medium high heat.  Add the mushrooms and a pinch of salt and sear them until they are heavily browned.  Lightly flour a working surface and roll out the pizza dough.  Spread the bean sauce over the pizza, leaving a rim around the edge.  Spread the spinach onto the pizza, then the seared mushrooms.  Bake the pizza on 500 F for 5 minutes.  Remove it from the oven and immediately top it with the sundried tomatoes.                                     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|149

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the olive oil and use 3 tbsp. of water instead.    Kitchen Equipment    Blender  Colander  Knife  Cutting Board  Sauté Pan  Stirring Spoon  2 Mixing Bowls  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoons  Pizza Stone  Pizza Peel  Oven    Presentation    When I make pizzas with lots of components,  I choose the layering first on what is best for  the ingredients (some ingredients need to be  covered with sauce to protect them), and  then on presentation. With this one, the  white bean spread goes on first, then the  spinach to create a green platform on which  the mushrooms and sundried tomatoes can  lay.    Time Management    Sear the mushrooms while the dough is rising  and make sure you don’t put the sundried tomatoes on the pizza until after it comes out of the oven.  They will burn at the high temperature at which this pizza cooks.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a side of grilled leeks and grilled mushrooms with garlic.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common, though you will probably get a better price on better  mushrooms at an Asian market. Approximate cost per pizza is $4.00 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|150

 

How It Works 
  Tuscan pizzas often have a white bean spread as the sauce instead of the classic tomato sauce. This  pizza in particular has quite a few components of fagioli, another classic Tuscan dish, but the  components are presented in an entirely different fashion. The beans are pureed for the sauce, the  spinach is laid on the pizza instead of being stewed with the beans, the tomatoes are sundried  tomatoes instead of tomato sauce, and seared and salted oyster mushrooms are used instead of  bacon.    Chef’s Notes     I used to make this pizza with just a white bean spread and mushrooms, but the addition of the  sundried tomatoes, spinach, and searing the mushrooms made this much better and with little extra  effort.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 1605       Calories from Fat 549  Fat 61 g  Total Carbohydrates 215 g  Dietary Fiber 39 g  Sugars 13 g  Protein 49 g  Salt 1776 mg    Interesting Facts    Cannellini bean spreads are common all throughout Tuscany as a crostini or bruschetta topper.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|151

White Bean, Tomato, & Garlic Pizza
Type: Pizza      Serves: 14” pizza  Time to Prepare: 15 minutes + time for the dough    Ingredients  1 Napoli Pizza Crust (see page 29)  ½ of a crisp tomato, diced  3 cloves of garlic, minced  ¾ tsp. of chopped fresh rosemary  ½ cup of cooked, rinsed cannellini beans  Juice of 1 lemon  2 tbsp. of olive oil  ¼ tsp. of flakey sea salt  ¼ tsp. of red chile flakes    Instructions  Make the pizza dough.  As soon as you are done making it, start working on the salad.  Dice the tomato, mince the garlic, and chop the rosemary.  Add the tomato, garlic, rosemary, lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and chile flakes to a mixing bowl, cover  it, and let it sit while the dough rises (it is best if it can sit for at least an hour).  Press or roll out the dough.  Spread the bean and tomato salad onto the pizza, leaving a 1” rim around the pizza.  Bake it at 500 F on a pizza stone for 3 minutes or in a pizza oven for 1 ½ minutes.                                     

   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|152

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the olive oil, but make sure to spritz the pizza with water before it goes in the oven to keep it  hydrated.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  3 Mixing Bowls  Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoons  Stirring Spoon  Pizza Stone  Pizza Peel  Oven    Presentation    Cut this pizza slowly or the toppings will fly everywhere!    Time Management    The longer the tomato and bean salad sits, the better it  gets as the lemon juice breaks down the ingredients and  causes the flavors to meld.     Complementary Food and Drinks    Serve this with a side of wilted greens and roasted  potatoes.    Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are fairly common. Approximate  cost per pizza is $2.75.    How It Works    It’s a fairly simple recipe. Beans and tomatoes marinated in a garlic lemon olive oil sauce. All those  flavors naturally go together, with the beans providing creamy substance, the tomatoes their fresh  sweetness, the lemon juice its zing, and the olive oil smoothes everything out.     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|153

 

Chef’s Notes 
   This is another one of those impromptu pizzas. We were getting ready for pizza night during our tour  of Southern Italy and I thought about putting together a bean and tomato salad to go alongside the  pizzas. Then I realized it would make a perfect topping!    Nutrition Facts (per pizza)    Calories 628       Calories from Fat 324  Fat 36 g  Total Carbohydrates 144 g  Dietary Fiber 28 g  Sugars 7 g  Protein 32 g  Salt 1464 mg    Interesting Facts    Rich volcanic soil in Italy is one of the main reasons Italian tomatoes have such an intense flavor.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|154

White Sicilian Garlic Pizza
Type: Pizza      Serves: 6  Time to Prepare: 20 minutes of work + 35 minutes to bake + 2 hours to rise    Ingredients  The Crust (Sfinciuni)  3 cups of all purpose flour  ¾ tsp. of salt  1 tsp. of sugar  2 tsp. of yeast  1 cup + 3 tbsp. of water  3 tbsp. of olive oil  The Toppings  8 large garlic cloves, minced  3 tbsp. of olive oil  ¼ cup of salted capers, thoroughly rinsed  2 tbsp. of crushed nori   1 tbsp. of dried oregano  1 ½ cups of shredded white Daiya cheese    Instructions  Prepping the Dough  Combine the flour, salt, sugar, and yeast together.  Add the water and oil and combine thoroughly.  Knead the dough until it no longer sticks to your hands.  Lightly oil it, place it in a bowl, and cover it.  Allow the dough to rise for 1 ½ hours.  Punch it down and allow it to rise 30 more minutes.  Lightly oil a rectangular baking dish, about 12”x8”.  Spread the dough into the dish.  Prepping the Toppings  While the dough is rising, soak the capers for 45 minutes to an hour, then rinse them.  Mince the garlic.  Take a few tears of nori and crush it into small flakes until you have about 2 tsp. worth.  Spread the olive oil over the top of the dough with you fingers.  Sprinkle garlic, capers, oregano, and crushed nori onto the dough.  Add the Daiya cheese.  Finishing the Pizza  Bake the pizza on 400 degrees for 35 minutes.  Cut the pizza into 6 rectangles.           
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|155

Low‐fat Version 
  You can omit the olive oil from the crust, but you need to replace it with a like amount of water.  Instead of using the cheese, use sliced tomatoes and make sure they cover the garlic. If they don’t,  the exposed garlic will burn.    Kitchen Equipment    Baking Dish  2 Mixing Bowls (1 for the dough and 1 to soak the cheese)  Bowl for the dough to rise  Towel or Plastic Wrap to cover the dough  Oven  Knife  Cutting Board    Presentation    Cut this into square pieces and serve immediately.    Time Management    The recipe itself doesn’t take much time to put  together, but it does require some patience to get the  best taste and texture out of it. Because the dough has  to rise and the capers have to soak, plan ahead for this  one.     Complementary Food and Drinks    The crust dominates this pizza, so it needs to be paired with something light. Try a salad of fresh  bitter greens with olives and a dressing of fresh orange juice.    Where to Shop    All the ingredients can be commonly found except for Daiya. I usually have to go to Whole Foods,  Sprouts, or other specialty market to get that. Approximate cost per serving is $1.50.    How It Works    Many authentic Sicilian pizzas use anchovies. In order to get a similar taste, we use capers for  saltiness and crushed nori for a touch of the sea. The cheese is laid on top of the other ingredients to  keep them from burning during baking.   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|156

Chef’s Notes 
   I love this style of Sicilian pizza. The crust, the sfinciuni, reminds me of focaccia and the shots of  saltiness goes incredibly well with the Daiya and the bread.     Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 473       Calories from Fat 189  Fat 21 g  Total Carbohydrates 60 g  Dietary Fiber 11 g  Sugars 2 g  Protein 11 g  Salt 841 mg    Interesting Facts    Sicilian pizzas look very different than pizzas in other parts of Italy. They can have thick crusts, may be  topped with bread crumbs, have two crusts with the ingredients between them, or even may be  rolled closed.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|157

Sundried Tomato Pepperoni
Type:   Topping, Mock Meat      Serves:  enough for 2 large pizzas  Time to Prepare: 90 minutes + 1 day to rest    Ingredients  Pepperoni  1 tablespoon pepper   2 teaspoons caraway seeds   1 tablespoon fennel seeds   1 ½ teaspoons crushed red pepper  1 teaspoon salt   ¼ cup of smoked paprika   ¼ cup of sundried tomatoes   1/3 cup of black olives chopped  1 cup of vital gluten flour    ¼ cup of garbanzo bean flour   5 tablespoons olive oil (garlic infused preferred)   ¼ cup of good quality balsamic vinegar   ¼ cup of tomato paste (about ½ a 6 oz can)   Simmering liquid   About 8 cups of vegetable broth    Instructions  Using a spice grinder or mortar and pestle, roughly grind the pepper, caraway seeds, and fennel.   In a bowl, add the vital gluten flour and garbanzo bean flour with the spices.   Whisk together.   Dice the black olives if needed and dice the sundried tomatoes as well.   You want a very, very fine dice on these.   Add those to the flour mixture and toss, along with the paprika, salt, and crushed red pepper.   Add the tomato paste, olive oil and balsamic.   Mix, then knead for 5 minutes.   Allow to rest 5 minutes then knead another 5 minutes.   Allow to rest 25 minutes and knead one final 5 minute allotment.   Heat your vegetable broth to a simmer.   Divide your dough in half.   Shape each one as you want it (round for links or more blockish for dicing) using foil.   Tuck in the ends of the foil, then submerge in the simmering liquid (be careful not to get splashed!).  Simmer for 45 minutes to 1 hour, then remove from the liquid and cool.   You will notice that a lot of the oil has simmered out of the pepperoni.   Allow to cool in the refrigerator overnight, then peel and slice the next day.           
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|158

Kitchen Equipment    Large pot, foil, knife, cutting board, measuring cups and spoons, bowl, tongs, mortar and pestle OR  spice grinder    Presentation    Not applicable.    Time Management    Plan on making this at least one day ahead, because it really does need the time to rest.     Complementary Food and Drinks    How can you not make a pepperoni pizza or calzone with this? It is also great on crackers with a nice  red wine when you have friends over, and is a great add‐in to spaghetti sauce.     Where to Shop    You can get these ingredients at most markets, but the least expensive places to get the smoked  paprika are Penzey’s www.penzeys.com or Trader Joes. Trader Joes also carries garlic infused olive  oil.     How It Works    Kneading the mixture in one direction elongates the vital wheat gluten strands which gives it a more  ‘meaty’ texture. Also, a combination of textures from the olives and sundried tomatoes makes it  similar to meat pepperoni.     Chef’s Notes     This is a delicious pepperoni that works well in many dishes. Finally, a vegan pepperoni that can be  made at home and tastes great!     Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 1494       Calories from Fat 630  Fat 70 g  Total Carbohydrates 120 g  Dietary Fiber 25 g  Sugars 36 g  Protein 96 g  Salt 3009 mg 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|159

 

Interesting Facts 
  The pepperoni most of us recognize is American in origin, rather than Italian and was first created in  the early 20th century.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|160

Sharp Aged Cashew Cheese
Type:   Cheese   Serves: Makes a fist‐sized round of cheese  Time to Prepare: 10 minutes + 2 hours to soak the cashews + 3‐6 months to age    Ingredients  2 cups of raw cashews  Water for soaking  1 tbsp. of chickpea miso  ¾ tsp. of flaky sea salt  Powder from 1 capsule of probiotics    Instructions  Cover the cashews with water and soak them for 2 hours.  Drain the water and rinse the cashews.  Puree all the ingredients together.  Form the puree into a hemisphere and loosely wrap it in plastic wrap.  Let it sit out for two days, then refrigerate it.  Keep the cheese in the refrigerator for 3‐6 months (the longer it sits, the sharper it will get).                                     

             
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|161

Kitchen Equipment    Blender  Bowl for soaking the cashews  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoons  Plastic Wrap    Time Management 
  Making aged cheese requires patience. Once you get started, however, you can have a rotating batch  of cheeses in your refrigerator. If you make one once a month, you’ll have a new one ready every  month. Keep in mind that the longer you age it, the harder it will get and the sharper it will get.    How It Works    The probiotics, particularly the acidophilus, turns the natural sugar in the cashews into lactic acid,  which gives the cheese its sour note. It also makes the cheese just a bit crumbly.    Chef’s Notes     I first saw this type of cheese when I had Dr. Cow cheese at a raw foods restaurant and I had to learn  how to make it!    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 1022       Calories from Fat 162  Fat 100 g  Total Carbohydrates 74 g  Dietary Fiber 8 g  Sugars 14 g  Protein 46 g  Salt 2517 mg    Interesting Facts    Cashews trees are evergreens.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|162

Pine Nut Parmigiano-Reggiano
Type: Cheese      Serves: Makes ¼ cup  Time to Prepare: 5 minutes    Ingredients  6 tbsp. of pine nuts  ½ tsp. of coarse, flaky sea salt  Option:  ¼ tsp. of finely ground white pepper    Instructions  Smash the pine nuts in a mortar and pestle until they are coarsely ground, but don’t mash the pine  nuts, just bash them.  Add the salt, stir, and give the pine nuts a few more smashes.  Stir one more time.  Option:  Add the white pepper with the salt.                                     

                   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|163

Kitchen Equipment 
  Mortar and Pestle  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Small Stirring Spoon    Presentation    Not applicable.                 

Time Management 
  You can store this in a sealed container for up to a week.     Complementary Food and Drinks    You can dress burgers with this, though you’ll need about a tbsp. per burger.  My favorite way to use  it is to toss fresh fries in it and serve right away.    Where to Shop    Pine nuts can be expensive, so you may need to hunt around locally to find the best price, but the  current average is about $20 per pound.    How It Works    Pine nuts crumble very well when you hit them and have a rich, slightly dry taste.  The flaky sea salt  crumbles in the mouth and gives the pine nuts the salty taste a good parmesan needs.  Don’t use  hard salt crystals.  It really does need to be flaky to get the right texture.  Also, make sure to bash the  pine nuts, but don’t mash them.  Bashing them makes them crumble while mashing them turns them  into pine nut paste.  Tasty, but not crumbly like parmesan.    Chef’s Notes     I created this recipe when I was making a raw lasagna and I wanted to top it with a nice cheese.  I had  some pine nuts sitting around, so I decided to give them a quick smash to see what happened and  they crumbled just right.  With the salt, this instantly became my favorite parmesan! 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|164

 

Nutrition Facts (per serving) 
  Calories 265       Calories from Fat 225  Fat 25 g  Total Carbohydrates 5 g  Dietary Fiber 1 g  Sugars 1 g  Protein 5 g  Salt 1161 mg    Interesting Facts    The recipe for Parmagiano‐Reggiano was created during the early Middle Ages in the Emilia region of  Italy.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|165

Roasted Garlic Chili Crust
Type:   Crust            Serves:   makes two 14 inch crusts  Time to Prepare: About 3 hours (includes time to rise and bake)    Ingredients  1 ½ tablespoons granulated sugar   1 package of yeast, or about 2 teaspoons of loose   About 1 cup of warm water   3 cups of flour   1 large teaspoon of chili flakes (or more)   ½ teaspoon salt   6‐8 cloves of garlic   ¼ cup good quality olive oil     Instructions  Roast your garlic. The best way to do this is keep your garlic in the paper, and heat a cast iron skillet  over medium heat. Place your garlic inside and allow this to sit for about 10 minutes on each side,  until the garlic paper is slightly blackened and you can smell the aroma. Then turn to a new side until  all the sides are done. Allow to cool and remove from the paper. Mince. Set to the side.     Place the yeast, water, and sugar in a glass bowl. Lightly mix with your fingers and allow to rest about  5‐10 minutes. The yeast mixture should start to bubble. If it doesn’t, you might have old yeast, so you  might want to try again. Once you know your yeast is viable, set to the side. In a large bowl, combine  the flour, salt, chili flakes, and salt. Add the olive oil and slowly add the yeast water, mixing as you go.     If you have a large stand mixer with a dough paddle, this is the time to use it. If not, you are going to  get a work out. You want the dough to stick to itself and not you. Add a few drops more of water, or  a little bit more flour until you have this consistency. Once you have it, knead the dough for at least  ten minutes.     Cover and allow the dough to rest in a warm place for about an hour. It will get big. Very big. Punch it  down after the hour and knead again for another 5‐10 minutes. Then, the magic happens.     Roll out into your desired shape. For breadsticks, I like an oblong shape that you can cut into  breadsticks. For the pizza crust, roll out into a circle, place on your pizza stone or baking sheet, and  trim or stretch to match the pan. Then, cover and wait another hour.     Finally, preheat your oven to 450 degrees. Remove your cover from your crust, and bake it for about  5 minutes. Cover with your topping and bake about 10 more minutes, or according to directions.             
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|166

Kitchen Equipment 
  Measuring Cups   Measuring Cups  Measuring Spoons  Rolling Pin  Large Bowl  Pizza Stone or Pan  Oven    Presentation    Not applicable.   

Time Management    Get your toppings ready during the second hour  of rising. That way, after you bake it for the five  minutes, you and your toppings will be ready.      Complementary Food and Drinks    When this is in breadstick form, it is a must to  have a great dripping sauce. I am addicted to  arrabiata sauce with this.     Where to Shop    These ingredients should be at any supermarket.     How It Works    Yeast eats the sugar in the warm liquid environment, reproduces, and gives off gas. The gas is  trapped by a web of gluten, which is developed through kneading. This causes the dough to rise.  Punching it down relaxes the gluten, making a softer dough.     Chef’s Notes     Warn your roommate if you are making this! When I made this for the first time after my roommate  moved in, I caught her ready to attack the rising bread with a broom. She had never seen the process  before and was terrified that it was something out of a horror movie. When I explained it was dinner,  she remained skeptical, but she was less afraid. She loved the results, however.      
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|167

Nutrition Facts (per crust)    Calories 875       Calories from Fat 207  Fat 27 g  Total Carbohydrates 142 g  Dietary Fiber 24 g  Sugars 11 g  Protein 25 g  Salt 595 mg    Interesting Facts    When you see pizza al taglio, it means pizza being sold by the slice.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Pizza!

August 2012|168

Classic San Marzano Tomato Sauce
Type:   Sauce    Serves: Makes 2 cups (usually enough for two 14” pizzas)  Time to Prepare: 12‐15 minutes    Ingredients  2 cups of crushed San Marzano tomatoes (or other tomatoes if you can’t find San Marzano)  2 tsp. of fresh oregano leaves  ¼ tsp. of freshly ground black pepper  ½ tsp. of salt    Instructions  Combine the tomatoes, oregano, pepper, and salt in a pot and simmer it for about 10 minutes.  If you can only find whole San Marzano tomatoes, smash them with a potato masher so you retain a  crushed texture.                                     

                     
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|169

Raw Version 
  Smash fresh San Marzano tomatoes and smash the herbs before adding them to the tomato sauce.  Let it sit for about 1 hour so the flavors can meld.    Kitchen Equipment    Pot  Measuring Spoons  Measuring Cup  Stirring Spoon    Presentation    Not applicable.    Time Management    Don’t overcook the sauce. Otherwise, you will lose some of the pop from the herbs and tomatoes.     Where to Shop    I usually have to go to a higher end market to get San Marzano tomatoes, but they are not nearly as  expensive as I expected. Cento brand San Marzanos are a sure bet for quality. Approximate cost for  the sauce is $2.00.    How It Works    San Marzano tomatoes are famous for a reason. They are sweet, but no overly so, and they have a  very complex and bold flavor profile. Oregano is added for some depth, but the tomatoes are the real  start of the show.    Chef’s Notes     San Marzano tomatoes turned me into a pizza sauce snob. I can definitely taste a difference when  they are not present in the sauce.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 80       Calories from Fat 0  Fat 0 g  Total Carbohydrates 17 g  Dietary Fiber 4 g  Sugars 3 g 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|170

Protein 3 g  Salt 290 mg   

Interesting Facts 
  San Marzano tomatoes, while heavily identified with Italian cuisine and pizza, originated in Peru and  were brought to Italy in the late 18th century.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|171

Tuscan White Bean Sauce
Type:   Sauce    Serves: Makes 1 cup of sauce  Time to Prepare: 5 minutes    Ingredients  2 cloves of garlic  1 cup of cooked, rinsed cannelini beans  ¼ cup of olive oil  ¼ tsp. of salt  Juice of ½ of a lemon (about 1 tbsp.)  1 tsp. of fresh thyme    Instructions  Puree all the ingredients.                                       

                   
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|172

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the olive oil.   

Raw Version 
  Use ½ cup of soaked cashews instead of beans.    Kitchen Equipment    Blender  Colander  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoons  Spatula    Presentation    Not applicable.    Time Management    This will keep in the refrigerator for about three days.     Where to Shop    I generally use the cannellini beans and Sicilian olive oil from Trader Joe’s to make this sauce.  Approximate cost is $1.75.    How It Works    Pureed beans make for a creamy pizza topping, with pungency from the garlic and lots of life from  the lemon juice.    Chef’s Notes     I had created this white bean sauce years ago for use on my pizzas before I knew it was a traditional  Tuscan sauce. It just seemed a natural pairing for pizza and mushrooms.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 622       Calories from Fat 342  Fat 38 g  Total Carbohydrates 50 g 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|173

Dietary Fiber 12 g  Sugars 2 g  Protein 20 g  Salt 600 mg   

Interesting Facts 
  This sauce is one of the traditional crostini sauces used throughout Tuscany.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|174

Chicago Fire Roasted Tomato Sauce
Type:   Sauce    Serves: Makes 2 ½ cups  Time to Prepare: 15 minutes    Ingredients  2 cloves of garlic, minced  4 basil leaves, minced  1 tsp. of minced fresh oregano  1 tsp. of olive oil  2 ½ cups of crushed fire roasted tomatoes  ¼ tsp. of fennel seeds  ¼ tsp. of crushed red pepper  ¼ tsp. of freshly ground black pepper  ½ tsp. of salt  1 tsp. of sugar    Instructions  Mince the garlic, basil, and oregano.  Over a medium heat, sauté the garlic in 1 tsp. of olive oil for about 30 seconds.  Add all the sauce ingredients to the pot and simmer over a medium‐low heat for about 10 minutes.                                     

           
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|175

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the olive oil.   

Raw Version 
  Use six Roma tomatoes and puree all the ingredients. Let this sit for about 30 minutes before using,  unless you are going to dehydrate it on something, in which case, you can use it as is.    Kitchen Equipment    Knife  Cutting Board  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon  Pot  Stirring Spoon    Presentation    Not applicable.    Time Management    You can simmer this sauce up to about 30 minutes and the flavors will keep melding, but it won’t  improve that much. After 30 minutes, the sauce will start to caramelize, even over a low heat.     Where to Shop    I typically use Muir Glen fire roasted tomatoes for this sauce. Organic and tasty! For the spices, I  typically purchase those from bulk jars since I don’t have to pay for the bottle and I can get exactly  how much I need. Approximate cost is $2.75.    How It Works    Chicago tomato sauces tend to be on the sweet side, which is why sugar is added to this recipe. The  fennel and black pepper give it a heavy aromatic quality and the chile flakes give it some heat. This  combination is very similar to what goes into a lot of sausage mixtures.    Chef’s Notes     This is a great sauce to use not only on pizza, but on any sort of pasta or even with a meatball sub.       
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|176

Nutrition Facts (per serving) 
  Calories 269       Calories from Fat 45  Fat 5 g  Total Carbohydrates 45 g  Dietary Fiber 8 g  Sugars 10 g  Protein 11 g  Salt 1170 mg    Interesting Facts    Sweet tomatoes are ideal for fire roasting since the roasting will caramelize the natural sugar in the  tomatoes.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|177

Chimichurri Sauce
Type:   Sauce    Serves: makes 1 cup  Time to Prepare: 5 minutes + 30 minutes to sit    Ingredients  3 cloves of garlic  1 cup of flat leaf parsley  ¼ cup of cilantro  1 tbsp. of fresh oregano  1 serrano chile  ¼ tsp. of salt  ½ tsp. of black pepper  ¼ cup of olive oil  3 tbsp. of red wine vinegar    Instructions  Puree all the ingredients and let it sit for at least 30 minutes before serving.                                     

                 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|178

Low‐fat Version 
  Omit the olive oil, though this will be a bit harsh.   

Raw Version 
  Use raw apple cider vinegar.    Kitchen Equipment    Blender  Measuring Cup  Measuring Spoon    Presentation    Not applicable.    Time Management    This sauce will keep for several weeks if you cover it properly. Place the chimichurri in a container and  then cover it with plastic wrap by pressing it onto the top of the sauce, not by stretching the wrap  taught across the container. This minimizes air contact and oxidization.     Where to Shop    All of these ingredients are commonly available. However, the quality of the vinegar plays a large role  in the quality of the sauce. Make sure to purchase a high quality vinegar.    How It Works    Traditionally, chimichurri just uses parsley and oregano. However, I like adding the cilantro to create  a more complex flavor in the sauce. It also gives it more of a South American flavor. The oregano  creates an herbal bass note for the sauce and everything else is there to add heat and tanginess.    Chef’s Notes     A great chimichurri sauce can go a long way! A bad one often goes the wrong way.    Nutrition Facts (per serving)    Calories 380       Calories from Fat 312  Fat 36 g  Total Carbohydrates 12 g 
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|179

Dietary Fiber 5 g  Sugars 2 g  Protein 5 g  Salt 585 mg   

Interesting Facts 
  Chimichurri may be Argentinian in origin, but it is heavily influenced by British and Spanish cuisine.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Pizza!

August 2012|180

Amber’s Sundried Tomato Pizza Sauce
Type:   Sauce    Serves: Makes 1 ½ cups of sauce  Time to Prepare: 35 minutes (includes time for the sundried tomatoes to rehydrate)    Ingredients  ½ cup sundried tomatoes, soaked for 30 minutes and drained  1 small ripe tomato, cored, seeded, and chopped  1 small pitted date  1 small clove garlic, peeled  1 tablespoon nutritional yeast  2 teaspoons olive oil  1 teaspoon ground oregano  ½ teaspoon fennel seeds  ½ teaspoon sea salt  ½ to ¾ cup filtered water, as needed to thin    Instructions  Combine all sauce ingredients, including ½ cup water, in a high‐speed blender and puree.    Add more water, 2 tablespoons at a time, as needed to help it blend smoothly.                                       

           
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Amber Shea * www.almostveganchef.com

Pizza!

August 2012|181

Kitchen Equipment 
  Blender  Measuring Spoons  Measuring Cup    Presentation    Not applicable.   

Nutrition Facts (per serving) 
  Calories 273       Calories from Fat 81  Fat 9 g  Total Carbohydrates 42 g  Dietary Fiber 7 g  Sugars 28 g  Protein 6 g  Salt 1163 mg    Interesting Facts    Lycopene is heavily prevalent in tomatoes and other red veggies and boosts the immune system by  contributing to production of natural killer cells.   

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Amber Shea * www.almostveganchef.com

Pizza!

August 2012|182

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful