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Make Your Last Relapse The Last

Make Your Last Relapse The Last

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Published by info5592
You are not a statistic!

This book focuses on the positive and negative infl uences on lapse and relapse that are
within an individual’s control. It gives practical examples and information on how to make
life changes that increase the probability of leaving addiction behind. By completing the
relapse prevention planning exercises in this book, you will be working on many fronts to
put the odds in your favor. Our relapse prevention training method combines learning to
change both behavior and thinking. It is an approach that emphasizes self-management
and rejects labels like alcoholic or drug addict
You are not a statistic!

This book focuses on the positive and negative infl uences on lapse and relapse that are
within an individual’s control. It gives practical examples and information on how to make
life changes that increase the probability of leaving addiction behind. By completing the
relapse prevention planning exercises in this book, you will be working on many fronts to
put the odds in your favor. Our relapse prevention training method combines learning to
change both behavior and thinking. It is an approach that emphasizes self-management
and rejects labels like alcoholic or drug addict

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Published by: info5592 on Aug 27, 2012
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10/05/2014

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A cue is a stimulus that signals you to carry out a particular behavior.
For example, the smells from a restaurant can trigger the feeling of
hunger and signal you to get something to eat. A sudden loud noise
can cue you to seek safety and as a result you may duck your head.
Smells, sights, sounds, things, and places can all be cues that signal
you to drink or use. Remember, addiction is based on learning to react
in specifc ways to specifc cues. Your cues to drink or use drugs can be
identifed and managed to change or extinguish your response to the
cues. This means you can stop yourself from responding automatically
to a specifc set of cues.

Cues can lead to craving. Craving is a strong desire for something.
Craving is commonly used to describe the feeling experienced prior
to drinking or taking a drug and prior to beginning to look for a drink
or a drug. Craving can be made more powerful by your thoughts,
surroundings or a particular event. Your craving for a cigarette will
be felt more strongly when you enter the bar where you always
smoked; and less strongly or not at all, when you enter the kitchen of
a friend who never allowed you to smoke in their house.

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