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MC100 Communication Slides

MC100 Communication Slides

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Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 1-1 Ch. 2–1

1

Improving Your Business Writing
• The best business writing is
• Audience oriented • Purposeful • Economical

• To improve your writing skills, you need
• • • • Good teaching materials with excellent model documents An effective writing process A trainer (like your instructor) Practice
Ch. 2–2
2

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

The Writing Process

Stage 1: Prewriting Analyzing Anticipating Adapting

Stage 2: Writing Researching Organizing Composing

Stage 3: Revising Revising Proofreading Evaluating

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–3

3

Factors Determining Channel Selection
• Importance of message • Amount and speed of feedback required • Necessity of a permanent record • Cost of the channel • Degree of formality required
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 2–4
4

Factors Determining Channel Selection
Possible Channels:
E-mail, fax, letter, memo, report, telephone, voice mail, meeting, conversation, Web
• What channel is best to announce decreased insurance benefits for 250 employees?
E-mail or memo

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–5

5

Factors Determining Channel Selection
• What channel is best for a sales message promoting a new product to customers?
Letter

• What channel is best for responding to similar customer inquiries?
Web, letter, telephone

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–6

6

Reader Benefits
Shape your statements to involve the reader. Strive to develop the “you” attitude.
Instead of this:
We are promoting a new plan that we believe has many outstanding benefits.

Try this:
You will enjoy total peace of mind with our affordable hospitalization plan that meets all your needs.
Ch. 2–7
7

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Reader Benefits
Shape your statements to involve the reader. Strive to develop the “you” attitude.
Instead of this:
Before we can allow you to purchase items on this new account, we must wait two weeks to verify your credit.

Try this:
You may begin making purchases on your new account in two weeks.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–8

8

Reader Benefits
Shape your statements to involve the reader. Strive to develop the “you” attitude.
Instead of this:
I need your response immediately so that I can make the employee vacation schedule by next week.

Try this:
Your quick response means your vacation schedules will be ready next week.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–9

9

Conversational Language
Instead of this:
The undersigned takes pleasure in . . . .

Try this:
I’m happy to . . . .

Instead of this:
It may be of some concern to you to learn that your check has been received and your account has been credited for $250.

Try this:
We’ve credited your account for $250.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–10 10

Positive Language
Instead of this:
Employees may not use the First Street entrance during remodeling.

Try this:
Employees may use the Market Street entrance during remodeling.

Instead of this:
We cannot fill your order until we receive an exact model number.

Try this:
We can fill your order once we receive an exact model number.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–11 11

Hidden Messages
Some words and phrases convey a negative and unpleasant tone. They may imply a hidden message that the writer does not intend. Think twice before using the following negative expressions.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 2–12 12

Hidden Messages
Negative Language:
You overlooked You state that You failed to You claim that You are wrong You do not understand Your delay You forgot to Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 2–13 13

Inclusive Language

Instead of this:
Have you called a salesman? Every executive has his own office.

Try this:
Have you called a salesperson? All executives have their own offices.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–14 14

Try Your Skill
Revise this sentence to create a more conversational tone and to state your idea positively.
• The undersigned takes great pleasure in welcoming you to our staff. I’m happy to welcome you to our staff.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–15 15

Try Your Skill
Revise this sentence to create a more conversational tone and to state your idea positively.
• We cannot send your order from our warehouse until June 1. Your order will be on its way to you June 1.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–16 16

Try Your Skill
Revise this sentence to create reader benefits.
• I have 15 different financial plans to offer my investors. You have 15 different financial plans from which to choose.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–17 17

Try Your Skill
Revise this sentence to create reader benefits.
• We want all newly hired employees to use our carpooling program for at least three months. As a newly hired employee, you won’t have to drive to work for the first three months because you can carpool.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 2–18 18

Plain Language
Avoid federalese, bureaucratese, and inflated language.
Federalese: Each person to whom the request is herein addressed is henceforth solicited to submit, or to have his or her department representative submit, to the Department of Labor official described above, a comment on whether the proposed plan, in his or her considered view, meets the requirements of the 2003 law. Simple Translation: You may wish to comment on whether the proposed plan meets the requirements of the 2003 law.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 2–19 19

Familiar Words Avoid long. Use short. 2–20 20 Essentials of Business Communication. simple. difficult. Less familiar words: encounter extrapolate obligatory terminate Simple alternatives: meet project required end Ch. and unfamiliar words. and common words whenever possible. Asian Edition .

• You may encounter difficulties in terminating the contract.Try Your Skill Revise this sentence using simpler language. 2–21 21 . Essentials of Business Communication. You may meet difficulties in ending the contract. Asian Edition Ch.

we projected the budget figures for two years. • As stipulated. Essentials of Business Communication. As required.Try Your Skill Revise this sentence using simpler language. we extrapolated the budget figures for two years. Asian Edition Ch. 2–22 22 .

Try Your Skill Revise this sentence using simpler language. • Will you utilize workbooks during the obligatory training period? Will you use workbooks during the required training period? Essentials of Business Communication. 2–23 23 . Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. We expect that most of the choices will be basic enough to meet our needs.Try Your Skill Revise this sentence using simpler language. • We anticipate that a majority of the alternatives will be fundamental enough to meet our requirements. 2–24 24 .

presentations. and Web pages • Using collaborative software for team writing Essentials of Business Communication.Seven Ways Technology Can Improve Your Business Writing • • • • • • Fighting writer’s block Collecting information electronically Outlining and organizing ideas Improving correctness and precision Adding graphics for emphasis Designing and producing professional-looking documents. 2–25 25 . Asian Edition Ch.

End Essentials of Business Communication. 2–26 26 . Asian Edition Ch. 1-26 Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. 3–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication.

surveys. focus groups). magazines. Essentials of Business Communication.Formal Research Methods for Gathering Information • Search manually (books. Asian Edition Ch. • Conduct scientific experiments (measure variables using control groups). databases. 3–2 2 . • Go to the source (interviews. questionnaires. compact discs). • Access electronically (Internet. journals).

Essentials of Business Communication. • Brainstorm for ideas. 3–3 3 . • Conduct an informal survey.Informal Research Methods for Gathering Information • Look in organization files. Asian Edition Ch. • Interview the target audience. • Talk with your boss.

illustration. Detail. evidence B. Detail. illustration. illustration. evidence 2.Organize Information With an Outline Title I. 3–4 4 . Detail. Asian Edition Ch. Second subpoint 1. First major component A. illustration. First subpoint 1. evidence Essentials of Business Communication. Detail. evidence 2.

Detail. Asian Edition Ch. evidence 2. illustration. Detail. 3–5 5 . First subpoint 1.Organize Information With an Outline II. Second major component A. evidence Essentials of Business Communication. illustration.

Organize Information With an Outline Tips: • • • • Define main topic in title. Strive to make each component exclusive (no overlapping). Essentials of Business Communication. • Use details. • Don’t put a single item under a major component. Divide the topic into three to five main points. and evidence to support subpoints. Asian Edition Ch. illustrations. Break the components into subpoints. 3–6 6 .

3–7 7 . Asian Edition Ch.Organizing Business Messages Direct Strategy Main idea comes first followed by details and explanations Indirect Strategy Explanation precedes main idea Essentials of Business Communication.

Organizing Business Messages Direct Strategy Advantages: • Saves reader’s time • Sets a proper frame of mind • Prevents frustration • Appears businesslike Indirect Strategy Advantages: • Respects feelings of audience • Encourages a fair hearing • Minimizes a negative reaction Ch. Asian Edition . 3–8 8 Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Organizing Business Messages Direct Strategy Useful when: • Receiver is receptive • Receiver requires no education about topic • Message is routine Indirect Strategy Useful when: • Receiver may be upset • Receiver may be hostile • Receiver must be persuaded or educated • Message is sensitive Essentials of Business Communication. 3–9 9 .

Example: Subject Verb Employees send many e-mail messages. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 3–10 10 .Effective Sentences Complete sentences have subjects and verbs and make sense (are capable of standing alone).

Independent clauses can stand alone. Asian Edition Ch. you reveal yourself. 3–11 11 . Essentials of Business Communication. Example: Dependent Clause Independent Clause When you speak.Effective Sentences Clauses also have subjects and verbs. dependent clauses rely on independent clauses for their meaning.

3–12 12 . I work at the mall. Essentials of Business Communication.Effective Sentences Phrases are groups of related words without subjects and verbs. Example: Phrase Phrase In the afternoon. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. 3–13 13 . many candidates applied. Revision: Even though the pay was low. Fragment Even though the pay was low. Essentials of Business Communication.Effective Sentences Avoid sentence fragments. Many candidates applied.

Fused Sentences Two candidates applied only one was hired. Two candidates applied. Two candidates applied. 3–14 14 . Asian Edition Ch. Only one was hired. only one was hired. but only one was hired. Revisions: Two candidates applied.Effective Sentences Avoid run-on (fused) sentences. Essentials of Business Communication.

Revisions: Many were qualified. Comma Splice Many were qualified.Effective Sentences Avoid comma-splice sentences. Jeff was hired. Many were qualified. Jeff was hired. Jeff was hired. Essentials of Business Communication. Many were qualified. Asian Edition Ch. Jeff was hired. Many were qualified. however. 3–15 15 . but Jeff was hired.

Try Your Skill Revise the following to avoid fragments. and comma-splices. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. You can create a Web-based job portfolio. it will impress potential employers. 3–16 16 . run-on sentences. • You can create a Web-based job portfolio it will impress potential employers.

Asian Edition Ch. Send a scannable résumé when you apply for a job. 3–17 17 . Essentials of Business Communication. and comma-splices. When you apply for a job.Try Your Skill Revise the following to avoid fragments. run-on sentences. • Send a scannable résumé.

Try Your Skill Revise the following to avoid fragments. and comma-splices. • Although technical skills are important. communication skills are also in great demand. run-on sentences. Although technical skills are important. Communication skills are also in great demand. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 3–18 18 .

however many older students now seek degrees. and comma-splices. however. run-on sentences. 3–19 19 . Essentials of Business Communication. many older students now seek degrees.Try Your Skill Revise the following to avoid fragments. College used to be for young people. • College used to be for young people. Asian Edition Ch.

Emphasis Through Mechanics Underlining: Which of these methods do you prefer? Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 3–20 20 .

Essentials of Business Communication.Emphasis Through Mechanics Italics and Boldface: The use of boldface and italics captures the reader’s attention. 3–21 21 . Asian Edition Ch.

3–22 22 . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Emphasis Through Mechanics All Caps: Notice how EXPENSE-FREE stands out.

3–23 23 . Essentials of Business Communication.Emphasis Through Mechanics Dashes: Other methods–including dashes–may be used. Asian Edition Ch.

First item 2. Third item Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. Second item 3. 3–24 24 .Emphasis Through Mechanics Tabulation: Listing items vertically emphasizes them: 1.

color. lines. boxes. • Which of the above techniques are appropriate in business letters? Memos? E-mail messages? Reports? Essentials of Business Communication. columns.Emphasis Through Mechanics • Other means of achieving mechanical emphasis include the following: use of white space. and subheadings. titles. headings. Asian Edition Ch. 3–25 25 .

Essentials of Business Communication. the principal reason. or the best alternative. • Put the important idea in a simple sentence or in an independent clause. Asian Edition Ch. • Put the important idea first or last in the sentence. 3–26 26 . such as in bug-free software rather than dependable software. • Label the idea with expressions such as more importantly.Emphasis and Deemphasis Through Style • To emphasize an idea: • Use a vivid expression.

rather than specific.Emphasis and Deemphasis Through Style • To deemphasize an idea: • Use general. 3–27 27 . you will receive store credit for any returned purchases. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. rather than 125 customers complained). • Place the idea in a dependent clause connected to an independent clause containing a positive idea. Example: Although items cannot be returned for cash. words (some customers complained.

and Passive-Voice Verbs Active-voice verbs show the subject performing the action. (Active voice. Asian Edition Ch. the subject is acting) Essentials of Business Communication. Examples: Most major employers require drug testing. 3–28 28 . Smith recommended Tina for the job. the subject is acting) Dr.Active. (Active voice.

(Passive voice. (Passive voice. Smith. 3–29 29 . the subject is being acted upon. the subject is being acted upon) Essentials of Business Communication. Examples: Drug testing is required by most major employers. Passive-voice verbs require helper verbs.Active.and Passive-Voice Verbs In passive-voice sentences. the subject is being acted upon) Tina was recommended for the job by Dr. Asian Edition Ch.

Active. ). Asian Edition Ch. • Use the passive voice to break bad news (Although your lease cannot be renewed. . 3–30 30 . . Laura was honored). • Use the passive voice to emphasize an action or the recipient of the action–rather than the actor (Specialists were hired. we can offer . Essentials of Business Communication.and Passive-Voice Verbs • Use the active voice for most business writing.

The president postponed our membership meeting. • Our membership meeting was postponed by the president. 3–31 31 . Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Try Your Skill Convert the following sentence to active voice. You may have to add a subject.

3–32 32 .Try Your Skill Convert the following sentence to active voice. Asian Edition Ch. The software program Resumix sorts résumés of job candidates quickly. • The résumés of job candidates are sorted quickly by the software program Resumix. Essentials of Business Communication. You may have to add a subject.

Rachel ordered computer paper yesterday. 3–33 33 .Try Your Skill Convert the following sentence to active voice. • Computer paper was ordered yesterday. You may have to add a subject. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.

Try Your Skill Convert the following sentence to passive voice. Essentials of Business Communication. • We must delay shipment of your merchandise because of heavy demand. Your merchandise shipment must be delayed because of heavy demand. Asian Edition Ch. 3–34 34 .

Essentials of Business Communication. The computer program could not be installed. • The technician could not install the computer program.Try Your Skill Convert the following sentence to passive voice. Asian Edition Ch. 3–35 35 .

Match nouns with nouns. Essentials of Business Communication. verbs with verbs. phrases with phrases. and clauses with clauses.Developing Parallelism Parallel expression results from balanced construction. 3–36 36 . Asian Edition Ch.

3–37 37 Poor: . Asian Edition Ch.Developing Parallelism The process of writing involves organizing. (Matching endings of verbals) Essentials of Business Communication. composing. and revision. composing. and revising. Parallel: The process of writing involves organizing.

3–38 38 Poor: . and how much it costs to transport them.Developing Parallelism We are very concerned with the quality of raw materials. where they are located. and transportation costs of raw materials. Asian Edition Ch. location. (Matching nouns) Essentials of Business Communication. Parallel: We are very concerned with the quality.

Matt locates the items in the warehouse. Matt locates the items in the warehouse. Parallel: Serena takes the telephone orders. 3–39 39 Poor: . and Yolanda sends the items. and the items are sent by Yolanda. Asian Edition Ch.Developing Parallelism Serena takes the telephone orders. (Matching voices of verbs) Essentials of Business Communication.

storing. 3–40 40 . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. storage. and sharing of best practices.Try Your Skill How could parallelism be improved in the following sentence? • Our knowledge management system focuses on the collecting. Our knowledge management system focuses on the collecting. and sharing of best practices.

We are pleased to recommend Elizabeth because she is sincere. and she works with diligence. Asian Edition Ch. she is reliable.Try Your Skill How could parallelism be improved in the following sentence? • We are pleased to recommend Elizabeth because she has sincerity. and diligent. 3–41 41 . reliable. Essentials of Business Communication.

Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers For clarity. Be particularly careful to place a logical subject immediately after an introductory verbal phrase. Asian Edition Ch. modifiers must be close to the words they describe or limit. 3–42 42 . Essentials of Business Communication.

3–43 43 . Asian Edition Ch.Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers Poor: After considering the problem carefully. management suggested new procedures. Revised: After considering the problem carefully. new procedures were suggested by management. Essentials of Business Communication.

3–44 44 . Revised: Any student who is enrolled in the college has full online privileges.Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers Poor: Any student has full online privileges who is enrolled in the college. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. Revised: It’s hard to understand why employees with software problems would not go to our technical support staff.Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers Poor: It’s hard to understand why employees would not go to our technical support staff with software problems. Essentials of Business Communication. 3–45 45 .

Asian Edition Ch.Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers Poor: Using a search engine. the Web site was finally located. Essentials of Business Communication. 3–46 46 . we finally located the Web site. Revised: Using a search engine.

To be hired. two years of experience is required. Retain the introductory phrase.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to correct any misplaced modifiers. one must have two years of experience. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. 3–47 47 . • To be hired.

• Dipped in butter. you can really enjoy a fine lobster.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to correct any misplaced modifiers. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. a fine lobster can truly be enjoyed. Retain the introductory phrase. Dipped in butter. 3–48 48 .

she died in the house in which she was born. • She died in the house in which she was born at the age of 88. Asian Edition Ch.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to correct any misplaced modifiers. Essentials of Business Communication. 3–49 49 . At the age of 88.

3–50 50 . Asian Edition Ch.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to correct any misplaced modifiers. “You” is the understood subject of a command. Essentials of Business Communication. fill out this application. (Tricky!) The sentence is correct as it stands. • To receive an employment form.

Three Ways to Achieve Paragraph Coherence To help guide your reader or listener from one thought to another. Asian Edition Ch. 3–51 51 . Next month we plan to launch a promotion for our new Web site. The promotion will involve newspaper and TV campaigns. develop coherence by using one of these devices: 1. Essentials of Business Communication. Repeat a key idea or key word(s).

Essentials of Business Communication. Use a pronoun. 3–52 52 . Considerable interest is now being shown in our extended certificates of deposit. Asian Edition Ch.Three Ways to Achieve Paragraph Coherence 2. They are more profitable when left on deposit for long periods of time.

Three Ways to Achieve Paragraph Coherence 3. 3–53 53 Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition . Use an appropriate transitional expression. second meanwhile next until when. Time Association before. whenever Contrast although but however instead nevertheless on the other hand Ch. after first.

Use an appropriate transitional expression. 3–54 54 . Asian Edition Ch. Cause–Effect consequently for this reason hence therefore Additional Idea furthermore in addition likewise moreover similarly Essentials of Business Communication.Three Ways to Achieve Paragraph Coherence 3.

Asian Edition Ch. 3–55 55 . Use an appropriate transitional expression.Three Ways to Achieve Paragraph Coherence 3. Illustration in this way for example Essentials of Business Communication.

Paragraph Length Paragraphs with eight or fewer printed lines look inviting and readable. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. 3–56 56 .

• Imagine you are talking to a reader or listener. Prohibit calls. Asian Edition Ch. Organize information using an outline. Decide whether to sprint write (get your thoughts down quickly and revise later) or revise as you go. visitors. 3–57 57 . Essentials of Business Communication.Composing the First Draft • • • • • Complete all necessary research. Find a quiet place to concentrate and work. and interruptions.

End Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 3–58 58 .

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 4–1 1 .

recasting. 4–2 2 • Proofreading: Essentials of Business Communication. cutting. May involve adding. Correcting grammar. and mechanics.Revising and Proofreading • Revising: Improving content and sentence structure. spelling. Ch. Asian Edition . format. punctuation.

Instead of this: We are of the opinion that Please feel free to In addition to the above At this point in time Despite the fact that Try this: We think Please Also Now Although Ch. Asian Edition 3 . 4–3 Essentials of Business Communication.Concise Wording Revise your messages to eliminate wordiness.

4–4 4 Essentials of Business Communication. She calls meetings on a monthly basis. Students seldom receive parking tickets. Ch. She calls monthly meetings. Try this: We don’t generally cash personal checks. Students in very few instances receive parking tickets. Asian Edition .Wordy Prepositional Phrases Instead of this: We don’t as a general rule cash personal checks.

I am writing this letter to say thanks to everyone who voted. Thanks to everyone who voted. Essentials of Business Communication. Try this: All employees meet today. 4–5 5 .Long Lead-Ins Instead of this: This memo is to inform you that all employees meet today. Asian Edition Ch.

Outdated Expressions Outdated: as per your request pursuant to your request attached hereunto under separate cover Modern: at your request at your request attached separately Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 4–6 6 .

avoid excessive use of adverbs such as definitely. Instead of this: Try this: The manager is actually quite pleased with your proposal because the plan is definitely workable.Needless Adverbs To sound more credible and to streamline your writing. and so forth. Essentials of Business Communication. The manager is pleased with your proposal because the plan is workable. 4–7 7 . really. quite. Asian Edition Ch. actually.

Fillers Revise sentences to avoid fillers such as there and it when used merely to take up space. It was Lisa and Jeff who were singled out. 4–8 8 Essentials of Business Communication. Ch. Instead of this: There are two employees who should be promoted. Try this: Two employees should be promoted. Lisa and Jeff were singled out. Asian Edition .

outdated expressions. Essentials of Business Communication. We will probably finish in two weeks. and/or other forms of wordiness. 4–9 9 . Asian Edition Ch. fillers.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid a long lead-in. • This e-mail message is to inform you that in all probability we will actually finish in two weeks. wordy prepositional phrases. needless adverbs.

4–10 10 . Essentials of Business Communication. and/or other forms of wordiness. Asian Edition Ch. wordy prepositional phrases. outdated expressions. Many brokers are certain that these stocks are safe. needless adverbs. • There are many brokers who are quite certain that these stocks are completely safe. fillers.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid a long lead-in.

and/or other forms of wordiness. outdated expressions. Essentials of Business Communication. needless adverbs. • Pursuant to your request. there are two contracts that are attached hereto. wordy prepositional phrases. two contracts are attached. As you requested. fillers.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid a long lead-in. Asian Edition Ch. 4–11 11 .

Essentials of Business Communication. 4–12 12 . Generally. outdated expressions. • All employees are hereby informed that as a general rule computers may not be used for personal activities.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid a long lead-in. wordy prepositional phrases. employees may not use computers for personal activities. Asian Edition Ch. needless adverbs. fillers. and/or other forms of wordiness.

What words could be omitted in these expressions? advance warning close proximity exactly identical filled to capacity final outcome necessary requisite new beginning past history refer back thought and consideration Essentials of Business Communication. 4–13 13 .Redundant Words Avoid unnecessarily repetitious words. Asian Edition Ch.

Jargon Avoid technical terms and special terminology that readers would not recognize. Asian Edition Ch. 4–14 14 . Computer jargon: queue export bandwidth Alternative language: list of documents waiting to be printed transfer data from one program to another Internet capacity Is jargon ever permissible? Essentials of Business Communication.

4–15 15 .Slang Avoid slang (informal expressions with arbitrary or extravagantly changed meanings). naïve someone stupid or silly relax Essentials of Business Communication. to complain unaware. to nag. to bag on clueless turkey chill/chill out to tease. Asian Edition Ch.

Slang An example from the world of Dilbert: Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 4–16 16 .

4–17 17 . Asian Edition Ch. Finally.Clichés Avoid clichés (overused expressions). Substitute more precise words. We could go no further. you should work diligently. you should keep your nose to the grindstone. Last but not least. Essentials of Business Communication. We had reached the end of our rope.

Finally. Essentials of Business Communication. the attorney referred back to an exactly identical case. and redundancies. Asian Edition Ch.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid slang. • Last but not least. clichés. 4–18 18 . the attorney referred to an identical case.

we could have sold out before our stocks hit bottom. Asian Edition Ch. With warning. • With a little advance warning. 4–19 19 . Essentials of Business Communication. and redundancies. clichés.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid slang. we could have sold out before our stocks tanked.

Ms. demanded completion by January 1. • Ms. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. who shoots straight from the shoulder. Miller.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid slang. 4–20 20 . demanded final completion by January 1. clichés. who is straightforward. and redundancies. Miller.

What more precise verbs could replace said? Market researchers forecasted improved profits. Market researchers promised improved profits. 4–21 21 .Precise Verbs • Revise your writing to include precise verbs instead of general. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. lackluster. Market researchers predicted improved profits. all-purpose ones. Market researchers said that profits would improve.

4–22 22 . An application must be made by the job seeker. The job seeker must apply. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. The manager came to the realization that telecommuting made sense.Precise Verbs • Revise verbs that have been converted to nouns. The manager realized that telecommuting made sense.

Precise Verbs • TIP: Look for words ending in tion or ment. Asian Edition Ch. 4–23 23 . Could they be more efficiently and forcefully converted to verbs? Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. 4–24 24 . The seller promised to e-mail [telephone or fax] you.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence using more precise verbs. • The seller said he would contact you. Essentials of Business Communication.

• We must give encouragement to our team.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence centering the action in a verb. We must encourage our team. Asian Edition Ch. 4–25 25 . Essentials of Business Communication.

• Have you made an application for employment? Have you applied for employment? Essentials of Business Communication.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence centering the action in a verb. Asian Edition Ch. 4–26 26 .

Essentials of Business Communication. • A duty of the general manager is the calculation of monthly sales. 4–27 27 .Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence centering the action in a verb. Asian Edition Ch. The general manager calculates monthly sales.

• The establishment of new methods was effected by Kevin.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence centering the action in a verb. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. Kevin established new methods. 4–28 28 .

Kelly Keeler. Asian Edition Ch. production manager. An employee presented a proposal. abstract ones. 4–29 29 .Concrete Nouns Revise your writing to include specific. concrete nouns instead of general. presented a plan to stagger hours. The man asked for a raise. Essentials of Business Communication. Jeff Jones asked for a 10 percent salary increase.

The report was bad. 4–30 30 .Vivid Adjectives Revise your writing to include descriptive. allpurpose ones. painstaking. thorough. comprehensive). The report was persuasive (or detailed. dynamic adjectives instead of overworked. Asian Edition Ch. The report was good. complete. original. (Possible revisions?) Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. 4–31 31 .What to Watch for in Proofreading Spelling Grammar Punctuation Names and numbers Format Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. Read once for meaning and once for grammar/mechanics.How to Proofread Complex Documents • • • • Allow adequate time. preferably double-spaced. Be prepared to find errors. Print a copy. 4–32 32 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Reduce your reading speed.

• Spell difficult words. • Note punctuation. Asian Edition Ch. • Note capitalization. Essentials of Business Communication. 4–33 33 . • Spell names.How to Proofread Complex Documents For documents that must be perfect: • Have someone read aloud the original while someone else checks the printout.

Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication. 4–34 34 .

Essentials of Business Communication. 5–1 1 . Asian Edition Ch.

5–2 2 .Smart E-Mail Practices • Getting Started • Consider composing off line. • Type the receiver’s address correctly. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. • Avoid using a misleading subject line.

• Don’t use e-mail to avoid contact. • Don’t send anything you wouldn’t want published. • Care about correctness. Tone. 5–3 3 .Smart E-Mail Practices • Content. Correctness • Be concise. Asian Edition Ch. • Resist humor and tongue-in-cheek comments. Essentials of Business Communication. • Never respond when you’re angry.

” “FYI.” • Consider using identifying labels.” “RE.” “URGENT.” • Use capital letters only for emphasis or for titles. • Announce attachments. such as “ACTION.Smart E-Mail Practices • Netiquette • Limit any tendency to send blanket copies. Essentials of Business Communication. • Never send “spam. 5–4 4 . Asian Edition Ch.

• Don’t automatically return the sender’s message.Smart E-Mail Practices • Netiquette (continued) • Seek permission before forwarding. Essentials of Business Communication. 5–5 5 . • Scan all messages before replying to each individually. Asian Edition Ch. • Revise the subject line if the topic in a series of messages (a “thread”) changes.

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Assume that all e-mail is monitored.Smart E-Mail Practices • Personal Use • Don’t use company computers for personal matters. 5–6 6 .

• Consider cultural differences. Essentials of Business Communication.Smart E-Mail Practices • Other Smart Practices • Use design to improve readability of longer messages. 5–7 7 . • Double-check before hitting the Send button. Asian Edition Ch.

com>). Asian Edition Ch. 5–8 8 . From: Date: Subject: Essentials of Business Communication. Entered automatically Entered automatically Include meaningful topic summary.Formatting E-Mail Messages • Guide Words To: Consider keying receiver’s full name with e-mail address in angle brackets (Heather Jones<hjones@peach.

” “Dear Heather:. Heather.” or “Good morning!” • Include name in first line (“Thanks.Formatting E-Mail Messages • Salutation Options • No salutation • “Heather. .” “Hi. . for your help . Essentials of Business Communication.”). 5–9 9 . Asian Edition Ch.

• Use uppercase and lowercase letters. Asian Edition Ch.Formatting E-Mail Messages • Body • Cover just one topic. Essentials of Business Communication. 5–10 10 . • Use short line length if message might be forwarded.

Essentials of Business Communication.Formatting E-Mail Messages • Closing • Consider a complimentary closing such as “Best” or “Cheers. Asian Edition Ch.” • Include your name and identification– especially in messages to outsiders. 5–11 11 .

5–12 12 .Sample E-Mail Message Date: To: From: Subject: Matt: Two interns will work in your department from September 20 through November 30. 2004 9:05:12 AM EST Matt Ferranto <mferranto@qualcom.com> Supervising Two Assigned Interns Essentials of Business Communication. September 3. As part of their supervision. Asian Edition Ch.com> Brooke Johnson <bjohnson@qualcom. you should do the following: * Develop a work plan describing their duties.

248 if you have questions. Best. Brooke Essentials of Business Communication. * Assess their professionalism in completing assigned work. 5–13 13 . It contains forms and additional information about the two students assigned to your department. Asian Edition Ch. Call me at Ext. Please examine the packet being sent to you.Sample E-Mail Message * Supervise their work to ensure positive results.

” and “Subject. 5–14 14 .” Align all words after the colon following “Subject. • Half sheet–start on line 7.” • Top Margin • Full sheet–start on line 13.Formatting Hard-Copy Memos • Guide Words • Double-space “Date.” “To. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.” “From.

Asian Edition Ch. • Spacing • Single-space. Essentials of Business Communication. 5–15 15 .Formatting Hard-Copy Memos • Side Margins • Leave 1 to 1¼ inches.

2004 1 blank line Matt Ferranto Brooke Johnson SUBJECT: Supervising Two Assigned Interns Essentials of Business Communication. 5–16 16 . Asian Edition Ch.Sample Hard-Copy Memo line 13 DATE: TO: FROM: Qualcom Enterprises Interoffice Memo September 3.

5–17 17 . • Supervise their work to ensure positive results. you should do the following: • Develop a work plan describing their duties. Asian Edition Ch. Please examine the packet being sent to you. It contains forms and additional information about the two students assigned to your Essentials of Business Communication.Sample Hard-Copy Memo 2 blank lines Two interns will work in your department from September 20 through November 30. • Assess their professionalism in completing assigned work. As part of their supervision.

Call me at Ext. Enclosure Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 248 if you have questions. 5–18 18 .Sample Hard-Copy Memo department.

or present a closing thought. Provide background data and explain the main idea.Writing Plan for Routine Memos and E-Mail Messages • Subject line: • Opening: • Body: • Closing: Summarize memo contents. 5–19 19 Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition . State the main idea. summarize the message. Request action. Ch.

5–20 20 . Try this: Workers were nervous. stressed. and preoccupied. Essentials of Business Communication.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Parallelism Instead of this: Workers were nervous. stressed. and full of preoccupation. Asian Edition Ch.

* Open the front cover. and the printer area should be cleaned with a soft. 5–21 21 Essentials of Business Communication. Then you open the front cover. Try this: To clean the printer. dry cloth.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Instructions Instead of this: To clean the printer. do the following: * Disconnect the power cord. dry cloth. you should first disconnect the power cord. Asian Edition . * Clean the printer area with a soft. Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. 5–22 22 .Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Headings Instead of this: On April 3 we will be in Toledo. On May 20 we will be in Detroit. and the speaker is Erin Win. Try this: Date April 3 May 20 City Toledo Detroit Speaker Troy Lee Erin Win Essentials of Business Communication. and the speaker is Troy Lee.

customer service must be improved. Try this: Our team constantly tries to (a) achieve our goals. (b) improve customer service. and our production targets must be hit. 5–23 23 Essentials of Business Communication.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Within Sentences Instead of this: Our team constantly tries to achieve our goals. and (c) hit our production targets. Asian Edition . Ch.

and you can learn about leasing. we let you compare car prices. 5–24 24 Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition . you can do the following: • Compare car prices.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Bulleted Items Instead of this: At the AutoSelect Web site. • Research the best financing. • Learn about leasing. you can research the best financing. Try this: At the AutoSelect Web site. Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication. Try this: Vacations. Asian Edition Ch. A new vacation schedule will be available in two weeks.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Paragraph Headings Instead of this: The next topic is vacations. 5–25 25 . A new vacation schedule will be available in two weeks.

the trainer will demonstrate how to use video conferencing. how to share multiple programs. and how to maintain an Internet directory. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. In the next training session. bulleted list. 5–26 26 .Try Your Skill • Arrange the following in a concise.

Try Your Skill Improved Version: The next training session will demonstrate • Video conferencing • Sharing multiple programs • Maintaining an Internet directory Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 5–27 27 .

Last. you should be prepared to ask relevant questions.Try Your Skill • Improve the readability of the following instructions that will become part of a student employment booklet. Essentials of Business Communication. Itemizing your most strategic skills and qualifications is also important. In preparing for an employment interview. 5–28 28 . Asian Edition Ch. Giving responses in a mock interview is another good practice technique. you should begin by studying the job description.

• Prepare to ask relevant questions. Essentials of Business Communication.Try Your Skill Improved Version: You can prepare for interviews by doing the following: • Study the job description. • Itemize your most strategic skills and qualifications. Asian Edition Ch. • Practice giving responses in a mock interview. 5–29 29 .

Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication. 5–30 30 .

6–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Request a specific action with an end date. if appropriate.Writing Plan for Information Request • Opening: Ask the most important question first or express a polite command. Asian Edition . Explain the request logically and courteously. 6–2 2 • Body: • Closing: Essentials of Business Communication. and show appreciation. Ch. Ask other questions if necessary.

I’ve checked a number of places. Asian Edition Ch.Improving Openers for Routine Request Letters Weak: I’ve been given the task of locating a convention site for my company’s meeting. 6–3 3 . Essentials of Business Communication. and your hotel looks possible. Improved: Will you please answer the following questions regarding possible accommodations at the Hyatt Regency for a conference in May.

Essentials of Business Communication.Improving Openers for Routine Request Letters Weak: While reading WIRED magazine. 6–4 4 . Asian Edition Ch. I noticed an offer of a free video describing your Webbuilding software. Improved: Please send me your free video describing your Web-building software.

6–5 5 . Improved: What is the procedure for ordering a copy of a photograph to be used for training purposes? Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. and I saw a picture that we would like to use in our program.Improving Openers for Routine Request Letters Weak: I am conducting a training class for students of photography at the Lincoln Training Center.

Improved: We would appreciate receiving answers to these questions before April 4 so that we will have plenty of time to plan our conference. Essentials of Business Communication. 6–6 6 .Improving Closings for Routine Request Letters Weak: Thanks for any information you provide. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. Improved: Please send the video by August 15. 6–7 7 . Essentials of Business Communication.Improving Closings for Routine Request Letters Weak: Hoping to hear from you at your earliest convenience.

Thanks! Essentials of Business Communication. Improved: Your answer to my inquiry will help me make my printer choice.Improving Closings for Routine Request Letters Weak: Thank you for your cooperation. 6–8 8 . Asian Edition Ch.

Wilson Visual Concepts Enterprises 1901 Haumualii Highway Lihue. Wilson: Ch. HI 96817-8817 line 12 or 2 lines below letterhead Dateline Inside Address September 13.Parts of a Business Letter Letterhead Island Graphics 893 Dillingham Boulevard Honolulu. 200x 2 to 10 lines Mr. T. Asian Edition . HI 96766 1 blank line Salutation Dear Mr. M. 6–9 9 Essentials of Business Communication.

Parts of a Business Letter 1 blank line Subject Line Body SUBJECT: BLOCK LETTER STYLE 1 blank line This letter illustrates block letter style. about which you asked. 6–10 10 . The word SUBJECT is optional. All typed lines begin at the left margin. it appears two lines below the salutation. The complimentary close appears Essentials of Business Communication. whichever position is lower. Asian Edition Ch. If a subject line is included. The date is usually placed two inches from the top edge of the paper or two lines below the last line of the letterhead.

Parts of a Business Letter two lines below the end of the last paragraph. 1 blank line Complimentary Sincerely. Wong Graphics Designer 1 blank line MHW:pil Essentials of Business Communication. 6–11 11 . Close 3 blank lines Signature Block Reference Initials Mark H. Asian Edition Ch.

Tell method of payment. Express appreciation. description. and unit price. Provide quantity. order number.Writing Plan for an Order Request • Opening: • Body: Authorize purchase of items. Request shipment by a specific date. Suggest method of shipping. Asian Edition Ch. • Closing: Essentials of Business Communication. List items vertically. 6–12 12 .

Asian Edition Ch. Provide details regarding the action requested. End pleasantly with a goodwill statement.Writing Plan for Simple Claim • Opening: • Body: Describe clearly the desired action. Tell why the claim is justified. • Closing: Essentials of Business Communication. Include end dating if appropriate. 6–13 13 . Explain the nature of the claim.

Express confidence in future business dealings. Asian Edition Ch. 6–14 14 . • Body: Provide details about how you are complying with the request. Try to regain the reader’s confidence. Include resale or sales promotion if appropriate. • Closing: End positively with forward-looking thought. Essentials of Business Communication.Writing Plan for Granting Claim • Subject Line (optional): Identify previous correspondence. • Opening: Grant the request or announce an adjustment immediately.

Essentials of Business Communication. Establish your relationship with the applicant. give specific examples of skills and attributes. • Closing: Summarize applicant’s significant attributes. Draw a conclusion regarding the recommendation.Writing Plan for a Letter of Recommendation • Opening: Identify the applicant. the position. and the reason for writing. 6–15 15 . Offer an overall rating. Compare with others in field. Asian Edition Ch. • Body: Describe applicant’s job duties.

Letters of appreciation • To customers for their business • To hosts and hostesses for their hospitality • To colleagues for jobs well done • To individuals who have performed favors Essentials of Business Communication.Three Kinds of Goodwill Messages 1. Asian Edition Ch. 6–16 16 .

marriages.Three Kinds of Goodwill Messages 2. Letters of congratulation • For engagements. anniversaries. appointments • For awards • For any significant event Essentials of Business Communication. 6–17 17 . births • For promotions. Asian Edition Ch.

Three Kinds of Goodwill Messages 3. relative. or loved one Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 6–18 18 . Letters of sympathy • To console a friend.

6–19 19 . Asian Edition Ch.Goodwill Messages: Cards or Personalized Letters? Typical Greeting Card Thank-You Message It's wonderful to visit with someone as nice as you– You make your guests feel so at home by everything you do. So this just comes to thank you in a warm and special way– For your hospitality was enjoyed much more than words can say! Essentials of Business Communication.

Shelton: Thanks for inviting the other members of our business club and me to your home for dinner last Saturday. Your gracious hospitality. the delicious dinner served in a lovely setting. Asian Edition Ch.Goodwill Messages: Cards or Personalized Letters? Personalized Thank-You Letter Dear Professor and Mrs. 6–20 20 . and the lively discussion following dinner all served to create an enjoyable evening that I will long remember. The warm reception you and your wife gave us made the evening very special. Essentials of Business Communication.

Sincerely. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Goodwill Messages: Cards or Personalized Letters? Personalized Thank-You Letter We appreciate the opportunity you provided for us students to become better acquainted with each other and with you. 6–21 21 .

• Be specific. 6–22 22 .Tips for Writing Goodwill Messages The Five Ss • Be selfless. Essentials of Business Communication. Instead of generic statements (You did a good job). not the sender. Asian Edition Ch. include special details (Your marketing strategy to target key customers proved to be outstanding). Discuss the receiver.

fresh. Essentials of Business Communication. . Strive to make the message natural. Asian Edition Ch. Show your honest feelings with conversational. • Be spontaneous. and direct. 6–23 23 . ). Avoid canned phrases (If I may be of service. unpretentious language (We're all very proud of your award).Tips for Writing Goodwill Messages The Five Ss • Be sincere. please do not hesitate . . .

most goodwill messages are fairly short.Tips for Writing Goodwill Messages The Five Ss • Keep the message short. Remember that. although they may be as long as needed. Asian Edition Ch. 6–24 24 . Essentials of Business Communication.

Writing Thank-Yous Cover three points in gift thank-yous. Essentials of Business Communication. • Tell why you appreciate it. Asian Edition Ch. 6–25 25 . • Identify the gift. • Explain how you will use it.

Writing Thank-Yous Be sincere in sending thanks for a favor. simple statements. • Maintain credibility with sincere. • Avoid superlatives and gushiness. Asian Edition Ch. • Tell what the favor means to you. Essentials of Business Communication. 6–26 26 .

compliment the following: • Fine food • Charming surroundings • Warm hospitality • Excellent host and hostess • Good company Essentials of Business Communication.Writing Thank-Yous Offer praise in expressing thanks for hospitality. 6–27 27 . As appropriate. Asian Edition Ch.

• Send a brief note expressing your appreciation.Answering Congratulatory Messages Respond to congratulations. Asian Edition Ch. • Tell how good the message made you feel. 6–28 28 . Accept praise gracefully. • Don't make belittling comments (I'm not really all that good!) to reduce awkwardness or embarrassment. Essentials of Business Communication.

• For deaths. Describe positive personal characteristics (Howard was a forceful but caring leader). Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Extending Sympathy Refer to the loss or tragedy directly but sensitively. praise the deceased. • In the first sentence mention the loss and your personal reaction. 6–29 29 .

• End on a reassuring. family.Extending Sympathy • Offer assistance. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. 6–30 30 . Suggest your availability. Perhaps refer to the strength the receiver finds in friends. positive note. especially if you can do something specific. or religion. colleagues.

Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication. 6–31 31 .

7–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

• Reduce resistance with counterarguments. establish credibility. • Body • Explain logically and concisely the purpose of your request. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 7–2 2 .Writing Plan for Persuasive Request • Opening • Obtain the reader’s attention and interest.

Asian Edition Ch. • Make it easy to respond. Essentials of Business Communication.Writing Plan for Persuasive Request • Closing • Ask for a particular action. • Show courtesy and respect. 7–3 3 .

or brief review of action you have taken to resolve the problem. Essentials of Business Communication. statement of the problem. • Explain why the receiver is responsible. Asian Edition Ch. • Provide identifying data. point of agreement. 7–4 4 .Tips for Complaints • Begin with a compliment.

• Describe your feelings and your disappointment. 7–5 5 . • Appeal to the receiver's fairness. and desire for customer satisfaction. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. ethical and legal responsibilities.Tips for Complaints • Enclose document copies supporting your claim.

emotional. Essentials of Business Communication. • Close by telling exactly what you want done.Tips for Complaints • Avoid sounding angry. or irrational. 7–6 6 . Asian Edition Ch.

John M. Box 2051 Little Rock. 7–7 7 . and I am very upset about it. AR 72203 Dear Mr.Ineffective Persuasive Request Letter Mr. Asian Edition Ch. Watson: You have charged my wife's Visa account with erroneous "overthe-limit" charges that are quite unfair. Watson Retail Credit Department Union National Bank P. O. Essentials of Business Communication.

10 of these transactions were phoned in for approval. so we did not know that we were close to the limit.Ineffective Persuasive Request Letter How can we be charged with "over-the-limit" charges when nearly every one of the charges was approved? We don't keep a running record of our Visa account and all our credit purchases on it. However. We were charged a $10 fee for each of these 12 transactions because we exceeded our credit limit. Between August 7 and September 27 we made 12 purchases. and ALL WERE APPROVED! Why were they approved if we were over our credit limit? Obviously. 7–8 8 . we would not have continued to make purchases if we had known we were over our limit. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication.Ineffective Persuasive Request Letter It seems to me that your approval system is at fault here. Asian Edition Ch. And why aren't new cardholders informed of your rules? The charges we made exceeding the limit were clearly unintentional. 7–9 9 . Furthermore. our actions were made on the basis of misinformation and errors on the part of your credit processors. Angrily yours.

Ineffective Persuasive Request Letter Discussion: 1. Does the writer try to blame the bank for the penalty? Essentials of Business Communication. Why does the writer think that the $120 penalty is unreasonable? Does the writer offer convincing reasons? Are they logically presented? 3. Asian Edition Ch. 7–10 10 . Does the opening obtain the reader's attention in a positive manner? 2.

7–11 11 .Ineffective Persuasive Request Letter Discussion: 4. What action does the writer seek? 5. Does the letter show courtesy and respect? 7. Is that action clearly stated? 6. How would you feel if you were the receiver? Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

however. Asian Edition Ch. Watson: SUBJECT: “Over-the-Limit” Credit Card Charges Because of the wide acceptance of the Visa credit card and because of your bank's attractive interest rate. Recently. my wife and I were eager to become cardholders two years ago.Improved Persuasive Request Letter Dear Mr. Between the period of August 7 and September 27. we made 12 Essentials of Business Communication. we experienced a charge to our account that we would like to discuss with you. 7–12 12 .

7–13 13 . We assumed.Improved Persuasive Request Letter small purchases. Asian Edition Ch. Ten of these purchases were given telephone approval. we were surprised to see that we were charged $10 each for these purchases because our account was over our limit. that if our purchases received telephone approval from your credit processors. The total charge was $120. Of course. Essentials of Business Communication. When we received our last statement. we were still within our credit limit. a copy of which is enclosed. we should have been more aware of our limit and the number of charges that we were making against our account. however.

Essentials of Business Communication. Since we have never exceeded our credit limit in the past and since we had received telephone approval for most of the charges in question. and reconsider this penalty. Sincerely.Improved Persuasive Request Letter Please examine our account. Asian Edition Ch. 7–14 14 . Watson. Mr. we feel that the $120 charge should be removed.

About 15 months ago your smooth-talking salesperson seduced us into buying your Model RX copier.Good and Bad Openings for Persuasive Requests Which of the following openings are effective? 1. If you will check your records. 7–15 15 . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 2. It was installed in our Legal Department. you will undoubtedly discover that we first obtained our model RX copier 15 months ago. which has been nothing but trouble ever since.

7–16 16 . we had high expectations for its performance. 4. When we purchased our Model RX copier 15 months ago. Asian Edition Ch. We need a speaker for our graduation ceremony. and your name was suggested. 5.Good and Bad Openings for Persuasive Requests Which of the following openings are effective? 3. Would you be able to speak at our graduation ceremony on June 7? Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Good and Bad Openings for Persuasive Requests Which of the following openings are effective? 6. but would it be possible for you to speak at our graduation ceremony on June 7? 7. 7–17 17 . You were voted by our students as the speaker they would most like to hear at graduation on June 7. We realize that you are an extremely busy individual and that you must be booked up months in advance.

CA 95030 Dear Mr.Ineffective Favor Request Honorable David H. our Associated Student Organization is having a Career Awareness Day. Davis California House of Representatives Sacramento. Many of our Essentials of Business Communication. Davis: Would you be interested in speaking to the students at Foothill College? If you would be in town on April 16. Asian Edition Ch. 7–18 18 .

and its punishments. and politics. Our ASO voted you the politician they would most like to hear. education. Asian Edition Ch. We could offer you 30 minutes to impart information about politics as a career. 7–19 19 . its rewards. Our Career Awareness Day will contain information booths. students can talk about careers and learn about them at these Essentials of Business Communication.000 students (and most are registered voters in your district) will be attending this function where three major speakers have been invited. We hope to find good speakers from industry.Ineffective Favor Request 15.

Ineffective Favor Request booths. Asian Edition Ch. We'd enjoy having you and it could be good for you. Essentials of Business Communication. 7–20 20 . we can get some publicity out. Let me know by March 15 if you'd like to be one of our speakers. If you let me know early enough. too. Then the three speakers will follow these booths at 12 noon in the Campus Center. Sincerely.

7–21 21 . Asian Edition Ch. 1.Ineffective Favor Request Discuss the faults in the previous letter. Starts out directly with a question that could be answered negatively 2. Provides an easy excuse for refusal (in second sentence) 3.000 potential voters) Essentials of Business Communication. Fails to emphasize reader benefits (opportunity to influence 15.

Lacks unity in sentences and paragraphs 5. Closes without making it easy for reader to grant favor Essentials of Business Communication.Ineffective Favor Request Discuss the faults in the previous letter. 7–22 22 . Asian Edition Ch. Uses imprecise words and inappropriate syntax 7. 4. Focuses on writer's viewpoint rather than on reader's 6.

000 students attend Foothill College.Improved Favor Request Honorable David H. April 16. On Thursday. you will be able to introduce yourself to these potential voters at the Associated Student Organization's Career Awareness Day. and many are registered voters in your district. 7–23 23 . Asian Edition Ch. CA 95030 Dear Mr. On this day we plan to have three major Essentials of Business Communication. Davis California House of Representatives Sacramento. Davis: Over 15.

Improved Favor Request speakers representing industry. and politics. You were selected by our ASO as the politician they would most like to hear. please call me at 320-5832 to confirm Essentials of Business Communication. The program culminates with the major addresses given in the Campus Center at 12 noon. education. To give Foothill students an opportunity to meet you and to learn about a career in politics. Asian Edition Ch. As one of the three featured speakers. Our Career Awareness Day features information booths where students may learn more about specific careers. 7–24 24 . you would have 30 minutes to describe a career in politics and its rewards and possible drawbacks.

Cordially. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. We will need your approval by March 15 so that appropriate publicity may be prepared. 7–25 25 .Improved Favor Request this speaking engagement.

Appeal to the needs of the reader.Writing Plan for a Sales Letter • Opening • Capture the attention of the reader. Introduce the price strategically. Asian Edition . • Body • • • • Emphasize a central selling point. Ch. Create a desire for the product. 7–26 26 Essentials of Business Communication.

Writing Plan for a Sales Letter
• Closing
• Stimulate the reader to act.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–27 27

Attention-Getters for Sales Letters
1. Offer
Follow my entry instructions, and you could be the sole winner of ONE MILLION DOLLARS!

2. Product Feature
Six Omaha steak filets from fine, corn-fed beef can be yours for only $62.95.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 7–28 28

Attention-Getters for Sales Letters
3. Question
Do you yearn for an honest, fulfilling relationship?

4. Startling Statement
Drunk drivers injure or cripple more than 500,000 victims every year!

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–29 29

Attention-Getters for Sales Letters
5. Story
Tommy G. doesn't live in a neighborhood like yours. He has grown up in a neighborhood with dirty alleyways and drug dealers. If only he could go to camp, he'd see how beautiful life can be.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–30 30

Ineffective Sales Letter
Dear Camera Owner: Hi! I'm Jim Johnson and I'm asking you to continue to use Kent Color Labs for the processing of your film. We've been in business for a long time and our customers tell us they are quite satisfied with our service and the quality of our processing. We feel that you can't get better prices anywhere. We are also very proud of our guarantee. No matter what we receive from you, you

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–31 31

Ineffective Sales Letter
don't risk a cent. We offer a whole range of other services--reprints, posters, slides, disks, and much more. Furthermore, we are very careful with your film; we treat it as we treat our own. Are you tired of asking yourself, "Where should I get my film developed?" Well, Kent Color labs is the place to go. We rely on the U.S. mail for our business, and this letter is our way of asking for your business. Send us your next roll of film to be developed as soon as you finish it. Sincerely,

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–32 32

Discussion for Ineffective Sales Letter to Camera Owner
1. Does the opening grab your attention? 2. Is a central selling point developed? 3. Is the letter written from the reader's perspective? 4. Should this letter develop rational or emotional appeals?
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 7–33 33

Discussion for Ineffective Sales Letter to Camera Owner
5. Does the letter use concrete examples? 6. Does it build confidence in the product or service? 7. Does it stimulate action in the closing?

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–34 34

Improved Sales Letter
Dear Camera Owner: Amy Evans, of Houston, Texas, recently wrote to us saying, "I just wanted to let you know that the pictures you developed for me earlier were the best pictures I have ever received. And I can't believe I received them so quickly!" If you are looking for quality film developing, speedy turnaround, and, most importantly, reliability–consider Kent Color Labs. Here's why our customers keep returning: • You get low film processing prices and excellent quality.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–35 35

Improved Sales Letter
• You get a whole range of services–reprints, enlargements, giant photo posters, wallet photos, slides, movies, discs, and more. • You get film mailing envelopes manufactured from special longfibered paper making them stronger than normal envelopes. • You get convenience–no more standing in line at the drugstore or camera store. And it's fun to receive mail! We're best known, however, for our reliability. We've been in business for more than 47 years. The minute we receive your order, it's processed! You can count on that every time.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–36 36

Improved Sales Letter
Because we're so certain that you will be pleased, we guarantee every roll of film. If you're not satisfied, simply return the whole package. We will cheerfully refund your money and send you free film and a coupon to get that film processed without charge. This is the best guarantee in the business. We want your business. Right now, finish that film in your camera. Grab a pen, fill out the enclosed mailer, and drop it in the mail. Sincerely,

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–37 37

Improved Sales Letter

P.S. If you respond within one week, we'll process your order at an additional savings of 20 percent.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–38 38

Checklist for Analyzing a Sales Letter
1. At what audience is the letter aimed? 2. Is the appeal emotional or rational? Is the appeal effective? 3. Is the opening effective? 4. What techniques capture the reader's attention?
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 7–39 39

Checklist for Analyzing a Sales Letter
5. Is a central selling point emphasized? 6. Does the letter emphasize reader benefits? 7. What are some examples of concrete language?

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–40 40

Checklist for Analyzing a Sales Letter
8. How is confidence in the product or service developed? 9. How is price introduced? 10. What action is to be taken and how is the reader motivated to take that action?

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–41 41

End

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 7–42 42

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–1

1

Resolving Business Problems
• Call the individual involved. • Describe the problem and apologize. • Explain
• Why the problem occurred • What you are doing to resolve it • How you will prevent the problem from happening again
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 8–2
2

Resolving Business Problems
• Follow up with a letter that
• Documents details discussed in the phone call • Promotes goodwill

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–3

3

Asian Edition Ch. 8–4 4 . Buffer 2.The Indirect Strategy 1. Bad News 4. Closing Essentials of Business Communication. Reasons 3.

8–5 5 . Asian Edition Ch.Possible Buffers for Opening Bad-News Messages • Best news • Appreciation • Agreement • Facts • Understanding • Apology Essentials of Business Communication.

Evaluating Buffer Statements How effective is the following opening for a letter that refuses to grant credit? 1. Asian Edition Ch. (Reveals the bad news bluntly. your application for credit has been reviewed negatively.) Essentials of Business Communication. 8–6 6 . Unfortunately.

) Essentials of Business Communication. 8–7 7 . Asian Edition Ch. (Gives the wrong impression. We are delighted to receive your application for credit.Evaluating Buffer Statements How effective is the following opening for a letter that refuses to grant credit? 2.

The recent resurgence of interest in the stock market caught many of us by surprise.Evaluating Buffer Statements How effective is the following opening for a letter that refuses to grant credit? 3. Asian Edition Ch. 8–8 8 . (Is not relevant.) Essentials of Business Communication.

Your request for a monetary contribution has been referred to me for reply.Evaluating Buffer Statements How effective is the following opening for a letter that refuses a request for a donation? 1. 8–9 9 . Asian Edition Ch. (Fails to engage the reader.) Essentials of Business Communication.

Evaluating Buffer Statements
How effective is the following opening for a letter that refuses a request for a donation?
2. We appreciate the fine work your organization is doing to provide early childhood programs that meet the needs of parents and very young children.
(Compliments the reader but doesn’t imply approval.)
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 8–10 10

Presenting the Reasons
• • • • • Be cautious in explaining. Cite reader benefits, if possible. Explain company policy, if relevant. Choose positive words. Show that the matter was treated seriously and fairly.
Ch. 8–11 11

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News
• Avoid the spotlight. Put the bad news in the middle of a paragraph halfway through the message. • Use a long sentence. Don’t put the bad news in a short, simple sentence.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–12 12

Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News
• Place the bad news in a subordinate clause.
Although we have no position for an individual with your qualifications at this time, we are pleased that you thought of us when you started your job search.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–13 13

Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News
• Use the passive voice.
Instead of this: We cannot make a contribution at this time. Try this: A contribution cannot be made at this time.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–14 14

Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News
• Be clear but not overly graphic.
Instead of this: Our investigation reveals that you owe three creditors large sums and that you were fired from your last job. Try this: Our investigation reveals that your employment status and your financial position are unstable at this time.
Ch. 8–15 15

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News
• Imply the refusal.
Instead of this: We cannot contribute to your charity this year. Try this: Although all our profits must be reinvested in our company this year, we hope to be able to support your future fund-raising activities.
Ch. 8–16 16

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News
• Suggest an alternative.
Although the cashmere sweater cannot be sold at the erroneously listed price of $18, we can allow you to purchase this $218 item for only $118.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–17 17

Using the Passive Voice
• Passive-voice verbs focus attention on actions rather than on personalities. They are useful in being tactful.
Active voice: I cannot allow you to return the DVD player because . . . . Passive voice: Return of the DVD player is not allowed because . . . .

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–18 18

Using the Passive Voice
• Passive-voice verbs focus attention on actions rather than on personalities. They are useful in being tactful.
Active voice: Ryan checked the report, but he missed the error. Passive voice: The report was checked, but the error was missed.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–19 19

Using the Passive Voice
Notice that passive-voice verb phrases always include “helper” verbs.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–20 20

Using the Passive Voice
• Examples of “helper” verbs forming passive voice:
• The report was checked. • The schedule is being revised. • Invitations were sent.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–21 21

Try Your Skill
Convert the following statement from active to passive voice.
• I am unable to make a cash contribution this year because of unusually high taxes. A cash contribution cannot be made this year because of unusally high taxes.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–22 22

Try Your Skill
Convert the following statement from active to passive voice.
• We cannot process your application this month. Your application cannot be processed this month.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–23 23

Try Your Skill
Convert the following statement from active to passive voice.
• I have examined your employment record and found that you have little cost accounting experience. Examination of your employment record has revealed that you have little cost accounting experience.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 8–24 24

Try Your Skill
Convert the following statement from active to passive voice.
• Mark made a programming error that delayed our project. A programming error was made that delayed our project.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–25 25

Closing Bad-News Messages
Avoid endings that sound canned, insincere, inappropriate, or self-serving. Try to personalize the closing with
• • • • • An alternative to the refusal Resale or sales promotion A forward look Good wishes Freebies
Ch. 8–26 26

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Writing Plan for Refusing Requests or Claims
Buffer
• Start with a neutral statement on which both reader and writer can agree, such as a compliment, an expression of appreciation, a quick review of the facts, or an apology. • Try to include a key idea or word that acts as a transition to the explanation.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 8–27 27

Writing Plan for Refusing Requests or Claims
Reasons
• Present valid reasons for the refusal, avoiding words that create a negative tone. • Include resale or sales promotion, if appropriate.

Bad News
• Soften the blow by positioning the bad news strategically, using the passive voice, accentuating the positive, or implying a refusal. • Suggest a compromise or substitute, if possible.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 8–28 28

Writing Plan for Refusing Requests or Claims Closing • Renew good feelings with a positive statement. • Avoid referring to the bad news. Essentials of Business Communication. 8–29 29 . Asian Edition Ch. • Look forward to continued business.

or some form of good news. Essentials of Business Communication.Writing Plan for Announcing Bad News to Customers and Employees Buffer • Open with a compliment. facts. Asian Edition Ch. • Include a key idea that leads from the opening to the reasons. 8–30 30 . appreciation.

8–31 31 .Writing Plan for Announcing Bad News to Customers and Employees Reasons • Explain the logic behind the bad news. • Use positive words. if possible. Bad News • Position the bad news so that it does not stand out. • Suggest a compromise or substitute. if possible. Consider implying the bad news. • Try to show reader benefits. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Writing Plan for Announcing Bad News to Customers and Employees Closing • Look forward positively. 8–32 32 . if appropriate. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. • Provide information about an alternative.

Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication. 8–33 33 .

Asian Edition Ch.Essentials of Business Communication. 9–1 1 .

Asian Edition Ch. 9–2 2 .Six Categories of Informal Reports • • • • • • Information Reports Progress Reports Justification/Recommendation Reports Feasibility Reports Minutes of Meetings Summaries Essentials of Business Communication.

9–3 3 . Asian Edition Ch. • Memo format Memo style. Useful for informal reports circulated within organizations.Report Formats • Letter format Letterhead stationery. Useful for informal reports sent to outsiders. Essentials of Business Communication.

manuscript form. • Prepared forms Standardized forms. such as expense reports. 9–4 4 . Essentials of Business Communication. Useful for routine activities. Asian Edition Ch. more formal reports.Report Formats • Report format Plain paper. Useful for longer.

9–5 5 . • Gather data. • Write first draft.General Guidelines for Writing Reports • Define project. Asian Edition Ch. • Edit and revise. • Organize data. Essentials of Business Communication.

9–6 6 . Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. and inventories. • Use surveys. • Make personal observations. • Search databases and other electronic resources.Where to Gather Data for Reports • Look in company records. questionnaires. • Conduct interviews.

Asian Edition Ch.Organizing Report Data • Indirect Strategy • Problem • Facts • Discussion • Recommendations • Direct Strategy • Problem • Recommendations • Facts • Discussion Essentials of Business Communication. 9–7 7 .

• Capitalize and underline carefully. • Use first.and second-level headings for short reports. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Keep headings short but clear.Making Effective Report Headings • Use appropriate heading levels. • Strive for parallel construction. 9–8 8 .

avoid: Inserting Hypertext Links. . Asian Edition Ch. 9–9 9 . Essentials of Business Communication.Making Effective Report Headings • Don't enclose headings in quotation marks. . These links . For example. • Don't use headings as antecedents for pronouns. .

Being Objective in Writing Reports • Present both sides of an issue. • Be sensitive and moderate in language. Essentials of Business Communication. • Cite sources carefully. 9–10 10 . Asian Edition Ch. • Separate fact from opinion.

Asian Edition Ch. • Describe credibility of data methods and sources. 9–11 11 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Identify report purpose.Information Reports Introduction • Explain why you are writing. • Provide background. • Offer a preview of the findings.

or by another method. • Group similar topics together. Asian Edition Ch. 9–12 12 .Information Reports Findings • Organize chronologically. • Use appropriate headings. Essentials of Business Communication. by importance. topically. alphabetically.

summarize findings or highlight main points.Information Reports Summary • May include or omit summary. 9–13 13 . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • If included.

• Describe work currently in progress. Asian Edition Ch. 9–14 14 . obstacles. Essentials of Business Communication. methods. • Summarize work already completed. including personnel. and attempts to remedy obstacles. • Provide background information if necessary.Progress Reports • Describe the purpose and nature of an unusual or nonroutine project.

Progress Reports • Forecast future activities in relation to the scheduled completion date. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Include recommendations and requests. 9–15 15 .

9–16 16 . or action concisely and with action verbs. Asian Edition Ch.Justification/Recommendation Reports • Use direct organization for nonsensitive topics and recommendations that will be agreeable to readers. • Identify the problem or the need briefly. solution. • Announce the recommendation. Essentials of Business Communication.

• Conclude with a summary specifying the recommendation and action to be taken.Justification/Recommendation Reports • Present a discussion of pros. and costs. 9–17 17 . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Explain more fully the benefits of the recommendation or steps to be taken to solve the problem. cons.

• Describe the background and problem necessitating the proposal. 9–18 18 . • Discuss the benefits of the proposal. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Announce your decision immediately.Feasibility Reports • Prepare a feasibility report when examining the practicality and advisability of following a course of action.

• Show the time frame necessary for implementation of the proposal. Essentials of Business Communication. • Calculate the costs associated with the proposal. if appropriate. 9–19 19 .Feasibility Reports • Describe the problems that may result. Asian Edition Ch.

and reports. • Describe disposition of previous minutes. Essentials of Business Communication.Meeting Minutes • Include name of the group. the time. new business. the place. the name of the meeting. announcements. 9–20 20 . • Record old business. the date. • Include the precise wording of motions. • List names of attendees and absentees. Asian Edition Ch.

• Conclude with the name and signature of the individual recording the minutes. Asian Edition Ch. 9–21 21 .Meeting Minutes • Record the vote and action taken. Essentials of Business Communication.

findings.Summaries • Compress data from a longer publication. • Highlight the research methods (if appropriate). or a book chapter. • Indicate the goal or purpose of the document being summarized. conclusions. Essentials of Business Communication. a magazine article. Asian Edition Ch. such as a business report. 9–22 22 . and recommendations.

• Organize for readability by including headings and bulleted or enumerated lists. and references.Summaries • Omit illustrations. • Include your reactions or an overall evaluation of the document if asked to do so. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. 9–23 23 . examples.

Choose an appropriate type size. 9–24 24 . don't justify right margins. Asian Edition Ch. Generally. Essentials of Business Communication. Separate paragraphs and sentences appropriately.Ten Keys to Designing Better Documents • • • • • Analyze your audience. Use a consistent type font.

Asian Edition Ch.Ten Keys to Designing Better Documents • • • • • Design readable headlines. Essentials of Business Communication. Use graphics and clip art with restraint. Avoid amateurish results. 9–25 25 . Develop expertise with your software program. Strive for an attractive page layout.

End Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 9–26 26 .

10–1 1 . Asian Edition Ch.Essentials of Business Communication.

• Background section identifies problems and goals of project. • Proposal discusses plan for solving existing problem.Organizing Proposals • Introduction must provide "hook" to capture reader's interest. Essentials of Business Communication. 10–2 2 . Asian Edition Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication. • Budget indicates project costs. 10–3 3 . Asian Edition Ch.Organizing Proposals • Staffing section describes credentials and expertise of project leaders. • Authorization asks for approval to proceed.

Researching Secondary Data • Print Resources • Books • Periodicals • Bibliographic indexes (print. 10–4 4 . and Web-based) Essentials of Business Communication. CD-ROM. Asian Edition Ch.

and journal articles • Newsletters. newspaper. business reports.Researching Secondary Data • Electronic Databases • Magazine. government data. reviews. company profiles. and directories Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 10–5 5 .

article reprints. mission statements. government information. Asian Edition Ch. 10–6 6 . press releases. scientific reports. staff directories. and employment information Essentials of Business Communication. current company news.Researching Secondary Data • The Web • Product data.

Asian Edition Ch. • Understand the AND/OR default and the significance of quotation marks. 10–7 7 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Prefer uncommon words as search terms. • Understand the importance of case sensitivity in keyword searches.How to Become a Savvy Web Researcher • Use two or three search tools. • Omit articles and prepositions.

How to Become a Savvy Web Researcher • Use wild cards (e. Asian Edition Ch. • Bookmark the best. Essentials of Business Communication. cent** will retrieve center and centre).g. • Be persistent. • Know your search tool.. use FAQs and "How to Search" sections. 10–8 8 .

West. Asian Edition Ch. etc.. North. East.) Essentials of Business Communication.Organizing Report Data • Direct strategy (main ideas first) • Indirect strategy (facts and discussion first) • Chronological sequence (historical data) • Geographical or spatial arrangement (e.g. South. 10–9 9 .

duties of CEO. duties of general manager. where. what.Organizing Report Data • Topical or functional arrangement (e.) • Compare and contrast • Journalistic pattern (who. etc. Asian Edition Ch.g. when. why. how) Essentials of Business Communication. 10–10 10 ..

Organizing Report Data • Value/size • Importance (most to least or least to most) • Simple to complex • Best case/worst case Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 10–11 11 .

Asian Edition Ch. 10–12 12 .Illustrating Report Data • Reasons for using visual aids • To clarify data • To summarize important ideas • To emphasize facts and provide focus • To add visual interest Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. maps. 10–13 13 . illustrations Essentials of Business Communication.Illustrating Report Data • Most common types of visuals aids • Tables • Charts • Graphs • Photographs.

Asian Edition Ch. 10–14 14 .Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Table To show exact figures and values Essentials of Business Communication.

10–15 15 .Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Bar Chart To compare one item with others Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Line Chart To demonstrate changes in quantitative data over time Essentials of Business Communication. 10–16 16 . Asian Edition Ch.

10–17 17 .Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Pie Chart To visualize a whole unit and the proportions of its components Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

10–18 18 . Asian Edition Ch.Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Flow Chart To display a process or procedure Essentials of Business Communication.

Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Organization Chart To define a hierarchy of elements or a set of relationships Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 10–19 19 .

10–20 20 . Asian Edition Ch.Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Photograph To achieve authenticity Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Map To spotlight a location Essentials of Business Communication. 10–21 21 .

Asian Edition Ch. 10–22 22 .Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Illustration To show an item in use Essentials of Business Communication.

10–23 23 . • Clearly identify the contents of the visual aid with a meaningful title and appropriate labels. Asian Edition Ch.Tips for Effective Use of Visual Aids • Choose an appropriate visual aid to illustrate your objective. • Refer the reader to the visual aid by discussing it in the text and mentioning its location and figure number. Essentials of Business Communication.

• Give credit to the source if appropriate. 10–24 24 .Tips for Effective Use of Visual Aids • Locate the visual aid close to its reference in the text. • Strive for vertical placement of visual aids. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Parts of a Formal Report • Prefatory Parts • • • • • Title page Letter of authorization Letter of transmittal Table of contents Executive summary. or epitome Ch. abstract. Asian Edition . 10–25 25 Essentials of Business Communication. synopsis.

conclusions. Asian Edition Ch. recommendations • Supplementary Parts • Footnotes or endnotes • Bibliography • Appendix Essentials of Business Communication. 10–26 26 .Parts of a Formal Report • Body of Report • Introduction or background • Discussion of findings • Summary.

Asian Edition Ch. 10–27 27 .End Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication. 11–1 1 . Asian Edition Ch.

• “naturally” – not “natcherly” • “accessory” – not “assessory” • “don’t you” – not “doncha” Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool • Improve your pronunciation. 11–2 2 .

Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool • Work on the quality of your voice. or negative? Essentials of Business Communication. alert. slow-witted. 11–3 3 . Asian Edition Ch. or positive? • Do you sound angry. • Do you sound friendly.

• Don’t speak too rapidly. • Speak as loudly or softly as the occasion demands. 11–4 4 . • Don’t make your listeners strain to hear you. Essentials of Business Communication.Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool • Adjust the volume of your voice and your rate of speech. Asian Edition Ch.

Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool • Use emphasis to express meaning. Essentials of Business Communication. • Use of a lower pitch and volume can make you sound professional or reasonable. Asian Edition Ch. • Stress the words that require emphasis. 11–5 5 .

11–6 6 . • Avoid negative remarks. Asian Edition Ch. • Listen and learn. • Choose appropriate workplace topics. • Give sincere and specific praise.Promoting Positive Workplace Relations • Use correct names and titles. Essentials of Business Communication.

Use “we” rather than “you. 11–7 7 . Use face-to-face communication. Focus on improvement (offer to help).Offering Constructive Criticism on the Job • • • • • • Mentally outline your conversation. Focus on the behavior. Asian Edition Ch.” Essentials of Business Communication. not the person. Be specific. avoid broad generalizations.

Asian Edition Ch. • Keep it private. 11–8 8 . sarcasm. • Avoid anger. and a raised voice. Essentials of Business Communication.Offering Constructive Criticism on the Job • Encourage two-way communication.

Acknowledge what you are hearing. ask for more information. 11–9 9 . Agree—if the comments made are fair. If necessary. Asian Edition Ch. Paraphrase what was said. Essentials of Business Communication. Determine the speaker’s intent.Responding Professionally to Workplace Criticism • • • • • • Listen without interrupting.

Asian Edition Ch.Responding Professionally to Workplace Criticism • Disagree respectfully and constructively—if you feel the comments made are unfair. • Look for a middle position. 11–10 10 . Essentials of Business Communication.

Common Conflict Response Patterns • • • • • Avoidance/withdrawal Accommodation/smoothing Compromise Competition/forcing Collaboration/problem solving Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 11–11 11 .

Show a concern for the relationship. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. Reach an agreement based on what’s fair. 2. Look for common ground. 11–12 12 . 3.Six-Step Procedure for Dealing With Conflict 1. 4. 6. Invent new problem-solving options. Understand the problem. 5. Understand the other point of view. Listen carefully.

2. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. State your affiliation. Give a brief explanation of why you are calling. 3.Making Effective Telephone Calls • Placing Calls • Plan a mini agenda. 11–13 13 . • Be cheerful and accurate. • Use a three-point introduction: 1. • Bring it to a close. State your name.

• Leave complete voice-mail messages.Making Effective Telephone Calls • Avoid telephone tag. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 11–14 14 .

• Be cautious when answering calls intended for others.Making Effective Telephone Calls • Receiving Calls • Identify yourself immediately. • Take messages carefully. Asian Edition Ch. • Be responsive and helpful. 11–15 15 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Explain when transferring calls.

Speak in low. talk later. Observe the rules for wireless-free areas. Take only urgent calls. 11–16 16 .Practicing Courteous and Responsible Cell Phone Use • • • • • Be courteous to those around you. Drive now. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. conversational tones.

Meetings • Planning a Meeting • Ask yourself whether a meeting is really necessary. Asian Edition Ch. 11–17 17 . times. and names). • Prepare an agenda (include topics. Essentials of Business Communication. • Invite only key individuals.

Essentials of Business Communication. suggest possible solutions. • Present a tentative agenda.Meetings • Conducting a Meeting • Start the meeting on time. Asian Edition Ch. 11–18 18 . • Begin with an introduction that establishes the goal and length of the meeting. • Provide the background of the problem(s).

Meetings • Establish ground rules. who will take minutes. Asian Edition Ch. summarize and ask for confirmation. Essentials of Business Communication. and a recorder. • When the group reaches consensus. 11–19 19 . but avoid digressions. • Appoint a secretary. who will track ideas on a flipchart. • Encourage participation by all.

Meetings • Concluding a Meeting and Following Up • End the meeting on time. 11–20 20 . • Summarize the results achieved. • Distribute minutes of the meeting a few days later. • Remind group members of their follow-up assignments. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

End Essentials of Business Communication. 11–21 21 . Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. 12–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. remember. • Decide what you want your audience to believe. • Aim all parts of your talk toward your purpose.Preparing an Oral Presentation • Identify your purpose. or do when you finish. 12–2 2 .

question. quotation. 12–3 3 . startling fact. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. knowledge. or qualifications. • Introduce your topic. • Get the audience involved. or self-effacing story. relevant problem. expertise. • Capture attention by opening with a promise. • Preview the main points. story.Preparing an Oral Presentation • Organize the introduction. • Establish your credibility by identifying your position.

• Arrange the points logically: chronologically. for example. Use "bridge" statements between major points. etc.Preparing an Oral Presentation • Organize the body of your presentation. Asian Edition Ch. by comparison and contrast. 12–4 4 . • Prepare transitions. Streamline your topic and summarize its principal parts. (I've just discussed three reasons for X.) Use verbal signposts: however. Essentials of Business Communication. now I want to move to Y. or by some other strategy. • Develop two to four main points. from most important to least.

• Provide a final focus. 12–5 5 . Asian Edition Ch. • Organize the conclusion. or what you want them to do. Be prepared with more information and visuals if needed. • Review your main points. Tell how listeners can use this information.Preparing an Oral Presentation • Organize the body of your presentation. why you have spoken. • Have extra material ready. Essentials of Business Communication.

Precede or follow with story. Asian Edition Ch. Story Prove point Illustrate Essentials of Business Communication. 12–6 6 .Types of Verbal Support Type Example Use Illustrate Clarify Add interest Comments Usually best in groups of two or three. Control length. Adapt to audience. Must support thesis.

Asian Edition Ch. Follow up with restatement or explanation. Link familiar with unfamiliar. 12–7 7 . May paraphrase or read verbatim. Be sure comparison or analogy is valid.Types of Verbal Support Type Quotation Use Prove point Add credibility Add interest Comments Cite source. Comparison Improve understanding Add figurative interest Essentials of Business Communication.

handouts. round off. 12–8 8 . Asian Edition Ch.Types of Verbal Support Type Statistics Use Prove point Add credibility Comments Link to audience needs. Use sparingly. Support with visuals. Essentials of Business Communication.

describe a problem. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. you will .Nine Techniques for Getting Your Audience’s Attention • A Promise • “By the end of my talk. . 12–9 9 . . • Eye contact • Command attention by making eye contact with as many people as possible. .” • Drama • Tell a moving story.

Asian Edition Ch. Move toward the audience. 12–10 10 . • A question • Ask for a show of hands. Use a rhetorical question. Essentials of Business Communication. • A demonstration • Include a member of the audience.Nine Techniques for Getting Your Audience’s Attention • Movement • Leave the lectern area.

• Visuals • Use graphics and other visual aids. 12–11 11 . gimmicks • Award prizes to volunteer participants. pass out samples. Asian Edition Ch. • Appeal to the audience’s selfinterest • Audience members want to know.Nine Techniques for Getting Your Audience’s Attention • Samples. “What's in it for me?” Essentials of Business Communication.

imagine a house with two rooms upstairs and two downstairs. • Metaphor (an implied. Asian Edition Ch.Maintaining Rapport • Use imagery. Essentials of Business Communication. 12–12 12 . • Analogy (a comparison of something familiar with something unfamiliar) • Example: To understand how the heart is divided. nonliteral comparison) • Example: The old office building became a money pit. • Simile (a comparison that includes the words like or as) • Example: His mind works like a computer.

Animate your body. 12–13 13 Essentials of Business Communication. Vary your facial expression.and best-case scenarios • Send positive. Ch. nonverbal messages.Maintaining Rapport • Use other interest-building devices. • • • • Get out from behind the podium. “Punctuate” your words. • Personal anecdotes • Personalized statistics • Worst. Asian Edition .

Asian Edition Ch. 12–14 14 .Stage Fright Symptoms • • • • • • • Stomach butterflies Pounding heart Shortage of breath Sweaty palms Dry throat Unsteady voice Trembling hands • Wobbly knees • Tied tongue Essentials of Business Communication.

12–15 15 . • • • • Essentials of Business Communication. Prepare 150 percent. • Shift the focus from yourself to your visual aids. Convert your fear into anticipation and enthusiasm. Asian Edition Ch. Use positive self-talk. relevant topic.How to Overcome Stage Fright Select a familiar.

Asian Edition Ch.How to Overcome Stage Fright • Give yourself permission to make an occasional mistake. keep going. Don't apologize. 12–16 16 . • Ignore stumbles. Get them involved. • Make your listeners your partners. take some deep breaths. Essentials of Business Communication. • Just before you begin to talk.

12–17 17 . Asian Edition Ch.Presentation Enhancers Medium Overhead projector Flipchart Cost Low Size of Audience 2 to 200 Level of Formality Formal or informal Informal Informal Low 2 to 200 2 to 200 Write-and-wipe Medium board Slide projector Medium 2 to 500 Formal Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Presentation Enhancers Medium Cost Size of Audience 2 to 100 Level of Formality Formal or informal Formal or informal Formal or informal Video monitor Medium Computer slides Handouts Low 2 to 200 Varies Unlimited Essentials of Business Communication. 12–18 18 .

• Consider cost. Essentials of Business Communication. • Consider the size of the audience and the degree of formality desired.Designing and Using Graphics • Select the medium carefully. and potential effectiveness. ease of preparation. 12–19 19 . Asian Edition Ch.

• Focus on major concepts only. • Keep all visuals simple. Showing too many graphics reduces their effectiveness. Asian Edition Ch. • Avoid overkill. Essentials of Business Communication.Designing and Using Graphics • Highlight main ideas. 12–20 20 .

Essentials of Business Communication. • Position the screen high enough to be seen. 12–21 21 . • Give the audience a moment to study a visual before discussing it. • Paraphrase its verbal message. Asian Edition Ch. • Enhance comprehension. • Be sure all audience members can see.Designing and Using Graphics • Ensure visibility. • Use large type for transparencies and slides. don't read it.

• Rehearse your talk.Designing and Using Graphics • Practice using your visual aids. 12–22 22 . Asian Edition Ch. • Talk to your audience and not to the visual aid. perfecting your handling of the visual aids. Essentials of Business Communication.

Relying on only one or two illustrations to make your points. 12–23 23 . Asian Edition Ch. • Not answering the audience's most pressing question: “What's in it for me?” Essentials of Business Communication. • Being dull.Eight Serious Presentation Blunders • Getting distracted just before you speak. • Not repeating your main point often enough.

12–24 24 . • Answering hypothetical questions after your presentation. • Neglecting to time your presentation and practice it “out loud.” • Forgetting to check your visual aids for readability.Eight Serious Presentation Blunders • Failing to use signal phrases to focus on main points. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication. 12–25 25 .

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 13–1 1 .

Asian Edition Ch. The average employee will have worked at how many jobs over the course of a career? 1 to 3 4 to 7 8 to 11 12 to 15 Essentials of Business Communication. 13–2 2 .Test Your Employment Savvy 1.

The average employee will have worked at how many jobs over the course of a career? 1 to 3 4 to 7 8 to 11 12 to 15 Essentials of Business Communication. 13–3 3 .Test Your Employment Savvy 1. Asian Edition Ch.

13–4 4 . Asian Edition Ch. True False Essentials of Business Communication.Test Your Employment Savvy 2. Having your job terminated ranks in the top ten of life’s most severe crises.

Asian Edition Ch. True False Essentials of Business Communication. Having your job terminated ranks in the top ten of life’s most severe crises.Test Your Employment Savvy 2. 13–5 5 .

What format do recruiters generally prefer? Chronological (arranged around dates) Functional (arranged around skills) Combination Essentials of Business Communication. 13–6 6 .Test Your Employment Savvy 3. You are putting together a résumé. Asian Edition Ch.

13–7 7 . Asian Edition Ch.Test Your Employment Savvy 3. You are putting together a résumé. What format do recruiters generally prefer? Chronological (arranged around dates) Functional (arranged around skills) Combination Essentials of Business Communication.

13–8 8 .Test Your Employment Savvy 4. Many experts in the field of recruiting think that the surest way for a college graduate to find a job today is by Searching the Internet Sending out hundreds of résumés Networking Reading the classified ads Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Test Your Employment Savvy 4. Many experts in the field of recruiting think that the surest way for a college graduate to find a job today is by Searching the Internet Sending out hundreds of résumés Networking Reading the classified ads Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 13–9 9 .

Asian Edition . What percentage of available opportunities can you find in those ads? 10 to 19 percent 20 to 29 percent 30 to 49 percent 50 percent or more Ch.Test Your Employment Savvy 5. 13–10 10 Essentials of Business Communication. You begin your job search the way most people do by looking through the newspaper ads.

Test Your Employment Savvy 5. What percentage of available opportunities can you find in those ads? 10 to 19 percent 20 to 29 percent 30 to 49 percent 50 percent or more Ch. 13–11 11 Essentials of Business Communication. You begin your job search the way most people do by looking through the newspaper ads. Asian Edition .

friends. 13–12 12 .Test Your Employment Savvy 6. Who should be on your list of people to contact? Potential employers and professional organizations Family members. neighbors. Asian Edition Ch. other service providers All of the above Essentials of Business Communication. associates School alumni and former instructors Your dentist. your doctor. You’ve heard that “networking” is a good way to find a job.

You’ve heard that “networking” is a good way to find a job. Asian Edition Ch. Who should be on your list of people to contact? Potential employers and professional organizations Family members. 13–13 13 . neighbors. your doctor.Test Your Employment Savvy 6. associates School alumni and former instructors Your dentist. All of the above Essentials of Business Communication. friends. other service providers.

What percentage of companies will require pre-employment drug testing? About 20 percent About 40 percent About 60 percent About 80 percent Essentials of Business Communication. You’re now a serious candidate for a job. Asian Edition Ch. 13–14 14 .Test Your Employment Savvy 7.

13–15 15 . Asian Edition Ch. You’re now a serious candidate for a job. What percentage of companies will require pre-employment drug testing? About 20 percent About 40 percent About 60 percent About 80 percent Essentials of Business Communication.Test Your Employment Savvy 7.

You’ve landed a job interview with a company that has a casual dress code. Asian Edition Ch. What should you do? Dress in campus casual attire Dress professionally in a suit Hit a happy medium Call to ask interviewer Essentials of Business Communication.Test Your Employment Savvy 8. 13–16 16 .

13–17 17 . What should you do? Dress in campus casual attire Dress professionally in a suit or Hit a happy medium Call to ask interviewer Essentials of Business Communication. You’ve landed a job interview with a company that has a casual dress code.Test Your Employment Savvy 8. Asian Edition Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication. • Analyze your strengths. Asian Edition Ch. • What will sell you for the job you want? • Study other résumés as models. the Web.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Preparation • Research the job market. qualifications. and other resources to learn about jobs. 13–18 18 . • Experiment with formatting. and employers. • Use newspapers.

Asian Edition Ch. address. • Give information about your studies. and institution. date of graduation. • List your major and GPA.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Heading and Objective • List your name. but don’t inventory all your courses. 13–19 19 . phone. • Include a career objective for a targeted job. • Education • Name your degree. Essentials of Business Communication.

year). Asian Edition Ch. Manager. Ohio Essentials of Business Communication. Fleet Equipment. Dayton. Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. Dayton. Include employer’s name and city. Kmart.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Work Experience • List your previous jobs. 2003. Ohio. 4/02 to 5/03 Tax Preparer. Kettering. 6/03 to present Salesperson. dates of employment (month. 13–20 20 . March. • Start with the most recent jobs. Sinclair College. to present. and most significant title. Ohio.

• Use action verbs to summarize achievements and skills relevant to your targeted job. 13–21 21 . Conducted interviews with over 50 individuals to elicit data regarding taxes.000. Prepared state and federal tax returns for individuals with incomes under $25. Asian Edition Ch.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Work Experience • Describe your experience. Determined legitimate tax deductions and recorded them accurately. Essentials of Business Communication.

• Give evidence of communication.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Work Experience • Include nontechnical skills. Employers want more than empty assurances. Essentials of Business Communication. and interpersonal skills. Praised by top management for enthusiastic teamwork and achievement. Asian Edition Ch. management. 13–22 22 . Organized holiday awards program for 1200 attendees and 140 awardees. Try to quantify your skills.

Asian Edition Ch. databases. especially if they demonstrate leadership. • All employers seek employees proficient with word processing. reliability. Awards • Highlight your computer skills. loyalty.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Special Skills. Achievements. and self-sufficiency. 13–23 23 . initiative. teamwork. • List awards and extracurricular activities. Essentials of Business Communication. and spreadsheets. • Show that you are well-rounded. efficiency.

Project professionalism and quality. Omit humor. Asian Edition Ch. 13–24 24 . • Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. Look for ways to condense your data. • Avoid personal pronouns. Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Additional Tips • • • • Omit references (unless specifically required). Essentials of Business Communication. Double-check for parallel phrasing.

Project professionalism and quality. Asian Edition Ch. Proofread! Essentials of Business Communication. • Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. Look for ways to condense your data. Omit humor. 13–25 25 .Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Additional Tips • • • • Omit references (unless specifically required). Double-check for parallel phrasing. Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer. • Avoid personal pronouns.

Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer. Omit humor. Project professionalism and quality. Proofread! Proofread! Essentials of Business Communication. 13–26 26 . Look for ways to condense your data. • Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. Double-check for parallel phrasing. • Avoid personal pronouns. Asian Edition Ch.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Additional Tips • • • • Omit references (unless specifically required).

Asian Edition Ch. • Avoid personal pronouns. 13–27 27 . Omit humor. Proofread! Proofread! Proofread! Essentials of Business Communication. • Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Additional Tips • • • • Omit references (unless specifically required). Look for ways to condense your data. Project professionalism and quality. Double-check for parallel phrasing.

Look for ways to condense your data. • Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. 13–28 28 . Project professionalism and quality. • Avoid personal pronouns. Omit humor. Proofread! Proofread! Proofread! Proofread! Essentials of Business Communication.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Additional Tips • • • • Omit references (unless specifically required). Double-check for parallel phrasing. Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer. Asian Edition Ch.

Poor Résumé RÉSUMÉ OF JENNIE JENKINS 3320 Lafayette Street. and administrative skills could be utilized in a path leading to advancement into management eventually. DEGREE from San Francisco State University. CA 94561 (415) 781-5592 OBJECTIVE: An entry-level position where my proven communication. Essentials of Business Communication. Broadcast Communication Arts. Bachelor of arts. 13–29 29 . 3. Asian Edition Ch.2 in major. #12 San Leandro. accounting.

Also recruited staff. Expected to help raise funds.1 in Berkeley. Some paperwork. Essentials of Business Communication. Duties included scheduling studios. 13–30 30 . Often given responsibility to act as production manager. Was responsible for the books.94. Chaotic environment. 10/03 to present. underfunded. Asian Edition Ch. I prepared all payroll reports. also for cash transactions. Duties included payroll and benefits for employees of shelter. Took care of some donations.Poor Résumé EXPERIENCE Apprentice KPFA . Pacifica House Position for financial manager. CA. Also petty cash.

Was responsible for volunteers and publicity. Inc. Other temporary positions Manpower. Other places. 1999-02.Poor Résumé Spring.server 1998-1999. Dorhring Company. general duties. Worked at many different places as a temp. receptionist. 13–31 31 . File clerk. Good Earth Restaurant . which is a performing arts troupe operating out of San Francisco. San Francisco. Asian Edition Ch. My duties included scheduling interviews with print and broadcast journalists. 1999 Worked for one spring with Renaissance Rainbow. Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. Marital status: single Birth: 6/15/80 Health: Excellent Hobbies: Knitting. college. like to read First Baptist Gospel Choir Awards: Spirit Award. singing. can finish jobs without supervision.Poor Résumé Personal Self-starter. 13–32 32 . 2 semesters Essentials of Business Communication. Oakland High School Dean’s List.

and the Internet Essentials of Business Communication. able to work without supervision • Proficient with PCs including Word. Excel. 13–33 33 . Asian Edition Ch. CA 94561 (415) 781-5592 Objective: Administrative position involving • Payroll • Accounting • Employee Benefits • Customer Service SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS • Two years’ experience in responsible administrative and accounting positions • Disciplined self-starter. #12 San Leandro.Improved Résumé Jennifer Marie Jenkins 3320 Lafayette Street.

San Francisco. degree.. until a task is successfully . permissions. Asian Edition Ch. and logs involved in weekly productions 2002-03 Financial manager. recruit support staff • Process scripts.1. despite chronically chaotic environment Essentials of Business Communication. Radio Production. schedule studios.completed • B. CA • As production manager.A. The Pacifica House (shelter). KPFA .Improved Résumé • Can be counted on to follow through on every detail. present Berkeley. San Francisco State University RELEVANT EXPERIENCE 10/03 to Apprentice. CA • Used computer to manage payroll and employee benefits for a staff of 26 • Completed all projects on time. 13–34 34 .94.

and fund-raising • Processed all accounts payable and receivable.Company 1999-01 Spring. Renaissance Rainbow (performance arts troupe). Manpower Temporary Services.. San Francisco. state. and quarterly statistical .reports for local. 13–35 35 .Improved Résumé • Managed agency's cash flow. San Francisco. in-kind donations. CA • Scheduled all media interviews and supervised volunteers • Coordinated publicity mailings for African-American Performance Arts Festival Temp positions. CA • Developed customer service skills as telephone interviewer for Dorhring .. Asian Edition Ch. involving funder reimbursements. monthly.000 fund-raising project Publicity coordinator. and federal funding agencies.. oversaw petty cash • Designed a flow chart to track success of a $25. . 1999 Essentials of Business Communication.

2002 GPA in major: 3. San Francisco State University. routed incoming telephone calls.keyboarded accounts payable correspondence.2 Dean's list. recorded accounts payable checks..assignments EDUCATION B. in Broadcast Communication Arts. .Improved Résumé • Maintained files.. learned e-mail systems in various .A. Asian Edition Ch. input employee progress . prepared interoffice memos.journals. 2 semesters Essentials of Business Communication. 13–36 36 ..

and italics. • Avoid unusual typefaces. Asian Edition Ch. underlining. Essentials of Business Communication. 13–37 37 . skills. and characteristics from job description. • Use 10 to 14-point type.Preparing a Computer-Friendly Résumé • Emphasize keywords–nouns that describe traits.

• Don’t fold or staple your résumé. and quality printing. • Provide plenty of white space. Essentials of Business Communication.Preparing a Computer-Friendly Résumé • Use smooth white paper. Asian Edition Ch. 13–38 38 . • Avoid double columns. • Be sure that your name is on the first line. black ink.

Asian Edition Ch. • Be prepared to send your résumé in ASCII.Preparing a Computer-Friendly Résumé • Use abbreviations carefully. 13–39 39 . Note: Unlike a paper résumé. Essentials of Business Communication. • Include all your addresses and telephone numbers. one that will be scanned by a computer may be as long as you think necessary.

They’re a major rip-off. . . inconsistent punctuation.” Essentials of Business Communication. and huge paragraphs that look like job descriptions. 13–40 40 .’ I don't even read them anymore. That’s a major ‘red flag.” • “Odd-sized résumés from services saying ‘Presenting the candidacy of .What Turns Recruiters Off When Reading a Résumé? • A focus group of nine expert recruiters gave these individual responses: • “Personal data. Asian Edition Ch.’ Also typos.

Asian Edition Ch.” Essentials of Business Communication. 13–41 41 .What Turns Recruiters Off When Reading a Résumé? • A focus group of nine expert recruiters gave these individual responses: • “Résumés that show no research.” • “Omissions in terms of dates. And misspellings!” • “Long cover letters and résumés over two pages. not looking at the employer’s needs.

” Essentials of Business Communication. 13–42 42 .” • “Not sending the résumé to the right place.What Turns Recruiters Off When Reading a Résumé? • A focus group of nine expert recruiters gave these individual responses: • “Excess cosmetics. Asian Edition Ch. substituting form for content.” • “A photo. A résumé should look nice but not go overboard. I have to remove them because managers must be color and gender blind.

” Essentials of Business Communication. Plus dates when things happened and accomplishments.” • “Valid information in an easy-to-read.What Do Recruiters Consider Most Important in a Résumé? • “The objective. Asian Edition Ch. less about job history and past duties. attractive style.” • “Information about skills that apply to the job. 13–43 43 .

Asian Edition Ch. If you have an employment gap. include a clear statement explaining it. 13–44 44 .What Do Recruiters Consider Most Important in a Résumé? • “The candidate’s address and phone number. Lots of people put them only in the cover letter!” • “Realizing that the employer is looking for ‘red flags’ and making sure there aren’t any.” Essentials of Business Communication.

backed up with qualifying experience and continuity in the work history. Asian Edition Ch.” • “The presentation and the objective.” • “A clear objective. 13–45 45 .What Do Recruiters Consider Most Important in a Résumé? • “Meeting the qualifications for the job.” Essentials of Business Communication.

Writing a Persuasive Job Application Letter • Opening • Address the letter to an individual by name. and publication. • Show that your qualifications fit the job specifications. • For advertised jobs. • If someone referred you. include job title. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 13–46 46 . or show that your special talents will be assets to the company. show your knowledge of the reader’s business. name the source. date. name that person.

13–47 47 . • Summarize your principal assets from education. Essentials of Business Communication. • Avoid repeating specific data from your résumé. Asian Edition Ch. and special skills.Writing a Persuasive Job Application Letter • Body • Demonstrate that your background and training meet the job requirements. • Refer to your résumé. experience.

Asian Edition Ch. Some recruiters prefer that you call them. • Make it easy to respond. Tell when and where you can be reached (during office hours). Essentials of Business Communication. 13–48 48 .Writing a Persuasive Job Application Letter • Closing • Ask for an interview. Consider hooking the request to a statement reviewing your strongest points.

End Essentials of Business Communication. 13–49 49 . Asian Edition Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication. 14–1 1 . Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. other numbers. • Know the keys to the job–what the job description calls for and how you meet those requirements. 14–2 2 . telephone numbers of possible references.Succeeding in a Telephone Screening Interview • Gather supporting material (your résumé. and a calendar). Essentials of Business Communication. • Know your strengths and weaknesses.

ask if you can call back from the telephone in your office. you'll sound more energetic. Essentials of Business Communication. • Stand as you talk. • Be prepared to ask your own questions. • Remember that you should be talking about 80 percent of the time. Asian Edition Ch.Succeeding in a Telephone Screening Interview • Have your schedule for the next few weeks in front of you. • If caught off guard. 14–3 3 .

Know the leaders.Preparing for a Hiring/ Placement Job Interview • Investigate the target organization. company products. accomplishments. setbacks. 14–4 4 . competition. • Study the job description. finances. Asian Edition Ch. How do your skills and accomplishments fit the position? Essentials of Business Communication. goals.

Get your best responses down pat. Asian Edition Ch. 14–5 5 . • Expect to explain problem areas on your résumé. Essentials of Business Communication.Preparing for a Hiring/ Placement Job Interview • Practice answers to typical interview questions. • Build interviewing experience with less important jobs first.

14–6 6 .Preparing for a Hiring/ Placement Job Interview • Videotape or tape record a practice session to see how you come across. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.

• Greet the interviewer confidently. • Introduce yourself to the receptionist and wait to be seated. • Wait for the interviewer to offer you a chair. • Be courteous and congenial to everyone. • Dress professionally. 14–7 7 . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Sending Positive Nonverbal Messages • Arrive on time or a little early.

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 14–8 8 . • Make frequent eye contact but don't get into a staring contest. • Sound enthusiastic and interested–but sincere. • Smile enough to convey a positive attitude.Sending Positive Nonverbal Messages • Control your body movements.

14–9 9 .Fighting Job Interview Fears • Practice interviewing as often as you can. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Prepare 110 percent. • Know how you will answer the most frequently asked questions. • Be ready with your success stories. • Rehearse your closing statement. particularly with real companies.

• Remember that during some parts of the interview you will be in charge. particularly before the interview. This should give you confidence. Asian Edition Ch.Fighting Job Interview Fears • Take deep breaths. Essentials of Business Communication. 14–10 10 . • Remember that you are also evaluating the interviewer and his or her organization.

Five Important Areas Employers Will Probe • Communication skills. Do you have a positive attitude about yourself and your career? • Aptitude. How well do you present yourself and your ideas? • Attitude. 14–11 11 . Asian Edition Ch. Do your educational training and general life experiences qualify you for this position? Essentials of Business Communication.

14–12 12 . Asian Edition Ch. What are your short.and longterm career goals? Why do you want this job? Essentials of Business Communication.Five Important Areas Employers Will Probe • Potential. How do your attitude and aptitude combine to contribute to this company? • Motivation.

clarify vague questions by asking questions of your own." Essentials of Business Communication. If necessary. such as "By _ _ _ _ do you mean _ _ _ _?" • Use good English and enunciate clearly. 14–13 13 .Answering Interview Questions Effectively • Use the interviewer's name occasionally. Asian Edition Ch. • Be sure you understand the question asked. • Avoid answering with a simple "yes" or "no.

Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. competence. or conceited. • Don't be a "know-it-all. and enthusiasm for the job. 14–14 14 ." Don't be overbearing. • Do not lie. overly aggressive. communication skills.Answering Interview Questions Effectively • Aim your answers at key requirements for the job and at characteristics that interviewers seek: expertise.

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. avoid an attitude of "What can you do for me?" • Don't inquire about salary. • Show what you can do for the company.Answering Interview Questions Effectively • Never make derogatory statements about your present or former employers. 14–15 15 . vacations. and bonuses until the interviewer raises the issue or until you are offered the position.

14–16 16 . Asian Edition Ch.Ten Standard Interview Questions • What would you like to tell me about yourself? • Why do you want this job? • What best qualifies you for this job? • What are your key strengths? • What are your weaknesses? Essentials of Business Communication.

14–17 17 .Ten Standard Interview Questions • What did you like and dislike about your last job? • Do you consider yourself a team player? Why? • What are your career goals? • Where do you expect to be five years from now? • What salary do you expect to receive? Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

work loads. expected performance. in terms of the people. Asian Edition Ch. and rewards? Essentials of Business Communication. 14–18 18 .Ten Good Questions for You to Ask • What will my duties be? • Do you have a written job description for this position? • What is it like working here. management practices.

14–19 19 . and where does this position fit within it? Essentials of Business Communication.Ten Good Questions for You to Ask • What training programs does this organization offer? • What are the possibilities for promotion? • What is the first problem that needs the attention of the person you will hire? • What is the organizational structure. Asian Edition Ch.

14–20 20 . Asian Edition Ch.Ten Good Questions for You to Ask • Who would be my immediate supervisor? • What is the salary for this position? • When will I hear from you regarding further action on my application? Essentials of Business Communication.

say "If I don't hear from you by then. "When can I expect to hear from you?" • After his or her reply. • Say goodbye to the receptionist. Ask. Asian Edition Ch. may I call you?" • Thank the interviewer. stand up and shake hands. Essentials of Business Communication. 14–21 21 . • Find out what action will follow.Closing a Job Interview and Following Up • When the interviewer signals the end of the interview.

• Write a thank-you letter to the interviewer. Essentials of Business Communication.Closing a Job Interview and Following Up • Take notes on the interview as soon as you leave. Show that you really want the job and that you are qualified for it. Asian Edition Ch. 14–22 22 . Remind the interviewer of your visit. • Alert your references that they might be called.

Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication. 14–23 23 .

Asian Edition Ch. 15–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication.

15–2 2 .Importance of Ethical Communication • Learning Ethical models • Helps you discover and make explicit your ethical positions and standards • Enables you to diagnose the ethical position of your interlocutors. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. • Provides you with a conceptual framework that will guide you towards becoming a consistent ethical business communicator.

Asian Edition Ch.Stages in Ethical Development: Lawrence Kohlberg (1973) Level Pre-conventional Stages • Fear of punishment • Desire for rewards as well as fear of punishment • Desire for approval • Sense of duty to obey the law • Regard for standard of society: utilitarianism • Respect for universal principles of justice & welfare Orientation Self Justification • Obedience to Authority. Justice (Social Contract) • Conscience & moral rules guiding actions Conventional Others/Group Post-conventional Universal & humankind Essentials of Business Communication. 15–3 3 . Fairness. Punishment avoidance • Greed (Reward seeking) • Societal norms of a good person • Law & order • Truth.

15–4 4 . Recognizes that decisions made by people can have both positives and negative consequences. Asian Edition Ch. Utilitarian Approach • Focuses on whether the decision made will deliver the greatest good to the greatest number of people affected. • Essentials of Business Communication.Individual Ethical Frameworks A.

Individual Ethical Frameworks B. Stresses the importance of respecting and protecting the fundamental rights of all human beings. 15–5 5 . Essentials of Business Communication. Moral Rights Approach • • Recognizes that human beings are born with fundamental rights and privileges. Asian Edition Ch.

Three types of justice approach are: distributive. Justice Approach • Focuses on how the costs and benefits of an action are distributed and whether the distribution is fair and equitable. Asian Edition Ch.Individual Ethical Frameworks C. and compensatory justice. procedural. • Essentials of Business Communication. 15–6 6 .

Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. gender) is an example of the lack of distributive justice.g. Distributive Justice Approach • Rewards and punishments should be fairly • distributed based on how much individuals contribute towards. race. Discrimination (e.Individual Ethical Frameworks 1. 15–7 7 .. or deviate from the given organizational goals.

rules. 15–8 8 . and procedures relating to decisions and behaviors should be applied fairly and consistently. The criterion is whether the rules and processes governing the distribution of the rewards and punishments are fair. Asian Edition Ch.Individual Ethical Frameworks 2. • Essentials of Business Communication. Procedural Justice Approach • The policies.

Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. Compensatory Justice Approach • • Involves compensating someone for a past wrong decision or action. Requires that hurt parties be compensated for past injustice.Individual Ethical Frameworks 3. 15–9 9 .

whether the procedures for distributing costs and benefits are fair and clear.whether individuals who are unfairly affected by this course of action are fairly compensated. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Individual Ethical Frameworks When adopting Justice Approach.whether costs and benefits are fairly distributed and how. 15–10 10 . 2. 3. the decision maker should consider: 1.

15–11 11 .Corporate Social Responsibility (CRS) Corporate social responsibility refers to: • Obligations of a corporation. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • How it acts in terms of its own corporate interests and profits in relation to the interests of its external stakeholders.

15–12 12 . Asian Edition Ch.Corporate Social Responsibility (CRS) Corporate social responsibility includes concerns about: •Green and environmental protection issues •Community service •Employment practices •General corporate philanthropy Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Corporate Social Responsibility (CRS) • Effects of corporate social responsibility on organization Examples: • Johnson and Johnson – Tylenol case in 1980s • Vita Soy – Soybean Contamination case in 1997 • The Coca-cola – The recall of drinks after poisoning of a consumer in 2006 • Nike – Inappropriate labor practices in 1990s Essentials of Business Communication. 15–13 13 .

Utilitarian Communication Style • • Believes that the decision should benefit the majority. Utilitarians compare alternative options and are open and receptive to exploring different viewpoints. 15–14 14 .Ethically Based Communication Style A. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

People holding a moral rights perspective focus on analyzing or explaining why a decision or action is either right or wrong. Asian Edition . 15–15 15 Essentials of Business Communication. Moral Rights Communicating Style • • The advocates believe that decisions and actions are either right or wrong. Ch.Ethically Based Communication Style B. rather than the consequences of the decision or action.

Essentials of Business Communication.Ethically Based Communication Style C. 15–16 16 . Justice Communication Style • Justice advocates are interested in how and whether the costs and benefits of decisions and actions are distributed equitably. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. 15–17 17 . Universalist Communication Style • Ethical universalism believes that ethical principles are universal and should be applied to all cultures.Ethically Based Communication Style D. • Universalists stress on conveying universal values. Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Ethically Based Communication Style E. Essentials of Business Communication. When in Rome. do as Romans do. Relativists focus on the different values between cultures. Relativist Communication Style • • • Believes that ethical behavior is influenced by the cultural context. 15–18 18 .

15–19 19 .Possible Ethical Communication Conflict Utilitarian versus Moral Rights Communication Conflicts • The utilitarians may not be interested in the rights or wrongs of a decision. whereas the moral rights adherent is not interested in the pros and cons of the proposed actions. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication.Possible Ethical Communication Conflict Universalistic versus Relativistic Communication Conflicts •While universalists do not recognize that certain rights and traditions of a culture need to be respected. relativists fail to recognize that certain fundamental rights are applicable to all cultures. Asian Edition Ch. 15–20 20 .

• Communication conflicts can still arise among individuals holding differing views about what constitutes justice (e. 15–21 21 .Possible Ethical Communication Conflict Justice Communication Conflicts • Communicators taking the justice approach have a shared perspective and a basis for successful communication. compensatory justice) Essentials of Business Communication. procedural. distributive. Asian Edition Ch.g.

Asian Edition . Rational or Classical Model • • The decision maker selects the best option among alternatives to reach an optimal goal. This method is most costly and time consuming. 15–22 22 • Essentials of Business Communication.Ethics & Decision Models A. It encourages ethical communication by promoting extensive information flow and promotes an open process of communication. Ch.

This model may carry with it a greater possibility of unethical decision making and unequal communication. Behavioral Model • The decision maker identifies one alternative at a time and selects the first satisfactory alternative identified. It is often adopted by managers who are constrained by information. Ch. 15–23 23 • • Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition .Ethics & Decision Models B. costs and time.

Asian Edition . Retroactive Model • The decision maker chooses a favorable alternative early in the decision making process but carries it through the sequential steps of the rational decision making process with other alternatives. 15–24 24 • Essentials of Business Communication. but a change of intention is lacking. A favorable option is considered along with other alternatives.Ethics & Decision Models C. Ch.

15–25 25 . or • the result is in everyone’s best interests. The individual may believe that: • their misconduct is not really illegal. individuals tend to rationalize their inappropriate behavior.Dealing with Ethical Dilemmas When encountering ethical dilemmas in dealing with “borderline” or “gray” area situations. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

15–26 26 . Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Essentials of Business Communication. 1–1 .

1–2 2 . Asian Edition Ch.Communication Skills Why do you need good communication skills? Essentials of Business Communication.

1–3 3 . Asian Edition Ch.Communication Skills Communication skills are essential for • • • • Job placement Job performance Career advancement Success in the new world of work Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition .Trends in the New Workplace • Flattened management hierarchies • • • • • • More participatory management Increased emphasis on teams Heightened global competition Innovative communication technologies New work environments Focus on information as a corporate asset Ch. 1–4 4 Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.The Process of Communication Feedback travels to sender NOISE Sender has idea Sender encodes message Channel carries message Receiver decodes message Receiver “understands” message Possible additional feedback to receiver NOISE Essentials of Business Communication. 1–5 5 .

reading. memos. Ask questions. writing. Essentials of Business Communication. don’t dominate the exchange. TV. voice. e-mail. Others? Hearing. gesturing. Letters. watch responses. body.The Process of Communication How may the sender encode a message? What kinds of channels carry messages? How does a receiver decode a message? When is communication successful? How can a communicator provide for feedback? Verbally or nonverbally. telephone. When a message is understood as the sender intended it to be. Asian Edition Ch. By speaking. observing. 1–6 6 .

noisy surroundings • Psychological barriers—tuning out ideas that counter our values • Language problems—unfamiliar or charged words • Nonverbal distractions—clothing. Asian Edition Ch. 1–7 7 . mannerisms.Barriers to Effective Listening • Physical barriers—hearing disabilities. appearance Essentials of Business Communication.

Barriers to Effective Listening • Thought speed—our minds process thoughts faster than speakers express them • Faking attention—pretending to listen • Grandstanding—talking all the time or listening only for the next pause Essentials of Business Communication. 1–8 8 . Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch.Ten Misconceptions About Listening • Listening is a matter of intelligence. • Speaking is more important than listening in the communication process. 1–9 9 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Fact: Speaking and listening are equally important. • Fact: Careful listening is a learned behavior.

• Listening and hearing are the same process. selective process. Asian Edition Ch.Ten Misconceptions About Listening • Listening is easy and requires little energy. Essentials of Business Communication. 1–10 10 . Hearing is an involuntary act. • Fact: Active listeners undergo the same physiological changes as a person jogging. • Fact: Listening is a conscious.

Asian Edition Ch. • Fact: Listening happens mentally—between the ears.Ten Misconceptions About Listening • Speakers are able to command listening. • Fact: Speakers cannot make a person actually listen. Essentials of Business Communication. 1–11 11 . • Hearing ability determines listening ability.

1–12 12 . • Fact: Nonverbal signals also help listeners gain understanding. Essentials of Business Communication.Ten Misconceptions About Listening • Speakers are totally responsible for communication success. • Listening is only a matter of understanding a speaker’s words. Asian Edition Ch. • Fact: Communication is a two-way street.

1–13 13 . • Competence in listening develops naturally. Asian Edition Ch. • Fact: Without effective listening training.Ten Misconceptions About Listening • Daily practice eliminates the need for listening training. • Fact: Untrained people listen at only 25 percent efficiency. Essentials of Business Communication. most practice merely reinforces negative behaviors.

Essentials of Business Communication. Establish a receptive mind-set.Tips for Becoming an Active Listener • • • • • • Stop talking. 1–14 14 . Capitalize on lag time. Listen for main points. Control your surroundings. Listen between the lines. Asian Edition Ch.

Provide feedback. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Tips for Becoming an Active Listener • • • • Judge ideas. not appearances. Hold your fire. Take selective notes. 1–15 15 .

• Appearance of business documents • Appearance of people Essentials of Business Communication. face. • Eye contact • Facial expression • Posture and gestures • Appearance sends silent messages. and body send silent messages.Nonverbal Communication • The eyes. 1–16 16 . Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. space. • Time (punctuality and structure of) • Space (arrangement of objects in) • Territory (privacy zones) Essentials of Business Communication.Nonverbal Communication • Time. 1–17 17 . and territory send silent messages.

Nonverbal Communication • An example from the world of Dilbert: Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 1–18 18 .

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. Probe for more information. 1–19 19 .Tips for Improving Your Nonverbal Skills • • • • • Establish and maintain eye contact. Use posture to show interest. Improve your decoding skills. Avoid assigning nonverbal meanings out of context.

1–20 20 . Asian Edition Ch.Tips for Improving Your Nonverbal Skills • Associate with people from diverse cultures. • Observe yourself on videotape. • Appreciate the power of appearance. • Enlist friends and family. Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication.Culture and Communication Good communication demands special sensitivity and skills when communicators are from different cultures. 1–21 21 . Asian Edition Ch.

suspicious of evasiveness • Importance of time Precious. ceremonies.Culture and Communication Key North American Beliefs: • Individualism Initiative. rank. literal. preference for informal dress • Direct communication style Impatient. personal achievement • Informality Little emphasis on rituals. 1–22 22 . self-assertion. Asian Edition Ch. correlates with productivity Essentials of Business Communication.

and Foreigner’s Views U .S P ersons’ V iew s Foreigners’ V iew s of Them selves of U .Comparing U. 1–23 23 . frien dly. rud e. o ppo rtunistic P rom ise m o re than they d eliver Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. o verly p erson al In sensitive to status B lun t.S . P ersons Info rm al. casu al E galitarian D irect. ag gressive E fficient G oal/achievem ento riented U nd isciplined. op pressive O bsessed w ith tim e.S.

ingenious Individualistic.S. find identity in work Enthusiastic. progressive Dynam ic. Asian Edition Ch. fearsom e W eak.S.S Persons’ Views Foreigners’ Views of Them selves of U. prefer hardsell Open M aterialistic W ork-oriented.Comparing U. and Foreigner’s Views U. equating “new” with “best” Driven Deceptive. untrustworthy Essentials of Business Communication. deals m ore im portant than people Self-absorbed. Persons Profit-oriented Resourceful. 1–24 24 .

” “He who holds the gold makes the rules. 1–25 25 .Proverbs Reflect Culture What do these proverbs indicate about this culture and what it values? U. try again. try. want not.” Essentials of Business Communication.S Proverbs “The squeaking wheel gets the grease. Asian Edition Ch.” “Waste not.” “The early bird gets the worm.” “If at first you don’t succeed.

Asian Edition Ch. and he will live for a day. very long time.” “A man who says it cannot be done should not interrupt a man doing it. and he will live for a lifetime.” Essentials of Business Communication.” “Give a man a fish.Proverbs Reflect Culture What do these proverbs indicate about this culture and what it values? Chinese Proverbs “A man who waits for a roast duck to fly into his mouth must wait a very. 1–26 26 . give him a net.

” (Italian) “The nail that sticks up gets pounded down. Asian Edition Ch.” (Japanese) Essentials of Business Communication.Proverbs Reflect Culture What do these proverbs indicate about these cultures and what they value? “No one is either rich or poor who has not helped himself to be so.” (German) “Words do not make flour. 1–27 27 .

1–28 28 . Asian Edition Ch.High-Context and Low-Context Cultures High Context Japanese Arab Latin American Spanish English Italian French North American Scandinavian German Swiss Low Context Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. 1–29 29 .High-Context and Low-Context Cultures High-Context Cultures • Relational • Collectivist • Intuitive • Contemplative Low-Context Cultures • Linear • Individualistic • Logical • Action-oriented Essentials of Business Communication.

1–30 30 Essentials of Business Communication. Use simple English. Observe eye messages. Check frequently for comprehension. Asian Edition .Improving Communication With Multicultural Audiences • Oral Messages • • • • • • Learn foreign phrases. Encourage accurate feedback. Speak slowly and enunciate clearly. Ch.

1–31 31 .Improving Communication With Multicultural Audiences Oral Messages (continued) • • • • Accept blame. Listen without interrupting. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. Remember to smile! Follow up in writing.

Use correct grammar. 1–32 32 Essentials of Business Communication. Use short sentences and short paragraphs. Strive for clarity. Ch.Improving Communication With Multicultural Audiences • Written Messages • • • • • • Adapt to local formats. Avoid ambiguous expressions. Asian Edition . Cite numbers carefully.

and openminded listening. Essentials of Business Communication. thoughtful. Asian Edition Ch. use.Effective Communication With Diverse Workplace Audiences • Understand the value of differences. • Practice focused. • Create zero tolerance for bias and stereotypes. 1–33 33 . • Invite. and give feedback. • Don’t expect total conformity.

1–34 34 . • Seek common ground. Essentials of Business Communication.Effective Communication With Diverse Workplace Audiences • Make fewer workplace assumptions. Asian Edition Ch. • Learn about your own cultural self. • Learn about other cultures and identity groups.

Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication. 1–35 .

6–1 1 . Asian Edition Ch.Essentials of Business Communication.

Writing Plan for Information Request • Opening: Ask the most important question first or express a polite command. Ch. and show appreciation. Ask other questions if necessary. 6–2 2 • Body: • Closing: Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition . if appropriate. Explain the request logically and courteously. Request a specific action with an end date.

and your hotel looks possible. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 6–3 3 . I’ve checked a number of places. Improved: Will you please answer the following questions regarding possible accommodations at the Hyatt Regency for a conference in May.Improving Openers for Routine Request Letters Weak: I’ve been given the task of locating a convention site for my company’s meeting.

Asian Edition Ch. 6–4 4 . I noticed an offer of a free video describing your Webbuilding software.Improving Openers for Routine Request Letters Weak: While reading WIRED magazine. Essentials of Business Communication. Improved: Please send me your free video describing your Web-building software.

Improving Openers for Routine Request Letters Weak: I am conducting a training class for students of photography at the Lincoln Training Center. 6–5 5 . Improved: What is the procedure for ordering a copy of a photograph to be used for training purposes? Essentials of Business Communication. and I saw a picture that we would like to use in our program. Asian Edition Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication. 6–6 6 .Improving Closings for Routine Request Letters Weak: Thanks for any information you provide. Asian Edition Ch. Improved: We would appreciate receiving answers to these questions before April 4 so that we will have plenty of time to plan our conference.

Improved: Please send the video by August 15.Improving Closings for Routine Request Letters Weak: Hoping to hear from you at your earliest convenience. Asian Edition Ch. 6–7 7 . Essentials of Business Communication.

Improved: Your answer to my inquiry will help me make my printer choice.Improving Closings for Routine Request Letters Weak: Thank you for your cooperation. Asian Edition Ch. 6–8 8 . Thanks! Essentials of Business Communication.

6–9 9 Essentials of Business Communication. T. Asian Edition . HI 96766 1 blank line Salutation Dear Mr.Parts of a Business Letter Letterhead Island Graphics 893 Dillingham Boulevard Honolulu. HI 96817-8817 line 12 or 2 lines below letterhead Dateline Inside Address September 13. M. Wilson Visual Concepts Enterprises 1901 Haumualii Highway Lihue. Wilson: Ch. 200x 2 to 10 lines Mr.

Parts of a Business Letter 1 blank line Subject Line Body SUBJECT: BLOCK LETTER STYLE 1 blank line This letter illustrates block letter style. Asian Edition Ch. 6–10 10 . it appears two lines below the salutation. If a subject line is included. whichever position is lower. The word SUBJECT is optional. about which you asked. The date is usually placed two inches from the top edge of the paper or two lines below the last line of the letterhead. All typed lines begin at the left margin. The complimentary close appears Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Parts of a Business Letter two lines below the end of the last paragraph. 6–11 11 . Wong Graphics Designer 1 blank line MHW:pil Essentials of Business Communication. 1 blank line Complimentary Sincerely. Close 3 blank lines Signature Block Reference Initials Mark H.

6–12 12 . order number. List items vertically.Writing Plan for an Order Request • Opening: • Body: Authorize purchase of items. • Closing: Essentials of Business Communication. Request shipment by a specific date. description. Express appreciation. Tell method of payment. Provide quantity. and unit price. Suggest method of shipping. Asian Edition Ch.

• Closing: Essentials of Business Communication. 6–13 13 . Include end dating if appropriate. End pleasantly with a goodwill statement. Provide details regarding the action requested. Explain the nature of the claim. Asian Edition Ch. Tell why the claim is justified.Writing Plan for Simple Claim • Opening: • Body: Describe clearly the desired action.

Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. • Closing: End positively with forward-looking thought. Include resale or sales promotion if appropriate. • Opening: Grant the request or announce an adjustment immediately. 6–14 14 . • Body: Provide details about how you are complying with the request.Writing Plan for Granting Claim • Subject Line (optional): Identify previous correspondence. Try to regain the reader’s confidence. Express confidence in future business dealings.

give specific examples of skills and attributes. Essentials of Business Communication.Writing Plan for a Letter of Recommendation • Opening: Identify the applicant. • Body: Describe applicant’s job duties. Compare with others in field. Asian Edition Ch. Establish your relationship with the applicant. and the reason for writing. Offer an overall rating. the position. Draw a conclusion regarding the recommendation. 6–15 15 . • Closing: Summarize applicant’s significant attributes.

Letters of appreciation • To customers for their business • To hosts and hostesses for their hospitality • To colleagues for jobs well done • To individuals who have performed favors Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Three Kinds of Goodwill Messages 1. 6–16 16 .

marriages. anniversaries. Asian Edition Ch. births • For promotions. appointments • For awards • For any significant event Essentials of Business Communication.Three Kinds of Goodwill Messages 2. Letters of congratulation • For engagements. 6–17 17 .

Asian Edition Ch. Letters of sympathy • To console a friend. relative.Three Kinds of Goodwill Messages 3. or loved one Essentials of Business Communication. 6–18 18 .

6–19 19 . Asian Edition Ch. So this just comes to thank you in a warm and special way– For your hospitality was enjoyed much more than words can say! Essentials of Business Communication.Goodwill Messages: Cards or Personalized Letters? Typical Greeting Card Thank-You Message It's wonderful to visit with someone as nice as you– You make your guests feel so at home by everything you do.

Your gracious hospitality. 6–20 20 . and the lively discussion following dinner all served to create an enjoyable evening that I will long remember.Goodwill Messages: Cards or Personalized Letters? Personalized Thank-You Letter Dear Professor and Mrs. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. the delicious dinner served in a lovely setting. The warm reception you and your wife gave us made the evening very special. Shelton: Thanks for inviting the other members of our business club and me to your home for dinner last Saturday.

6–21 21 .Goodwill Messages: Cards or Personalized Letters? Personalized Thank-You Letter We appreciate the opportunity you provided for us students to become better acquainted with each other and with you. Sincerely. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Instead of generic statements (You did a good job). Asian Edition Ch. • Be specific.Tips for Writing Goodwill Messages The Five Ss • Be selfless. not the sender. 6–22 22 . Essentials of Business Communication. Discuss the receiver. include special details (Your marketing strategy to target key customers proved to be outstanding).

Asian Edition Ch. . . Avoid canned phrases (If I may be of service. Strive to make the message natural. Show your honest feelings with conversational. Essentials of Business Communication.Tips for Writing Goodwill Messages The Five Ss • Be sincere. unpretentious language (We're all very proud of your award). ). . 6–23 23 . fresh. • Be spontaneous. and direct. please do not hesitate .

6–24 24 . although they may be as long as needed. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Tips for Writing Goodwill Messages The Five Ss • Keep the message short. most goodwill messages are fairly short. Remember that.

Writing Thank-Yous Cover three points in gift thank-yous. • Explain how you will use it. Essentials of Business Communication. • Identify the gift. 6–25 25 . • Tell why you appreciate it. Asian Edition Ch.

simple statements. • Maintain credibility with sincere.Writing Thank-Yous Be sincere in sending thanks for a favor. • Avoid superlatives and gushiness. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Tell what the favor means to you. 6–26 26 .

compliment the following: • Fine food • Charming surroundings • Warm hospitality • Excellent host and hostess • Good company Essentials of Business Communication.Writing Thank-Yous Offer praise in expressing thanks for hospitality. Asian Edition Ch. As appropriate. 6–27 27 .

Essentials of Business Communication. • Tell how good the message made you feel. Accept praise gracefully.Answering Congratulatory Messages Respond to congratulations. 6–28 28 . Asian Edition Ch. • Send a brief note expressing your appreciation. • Don't make belittling comments (I'm not really all that good!) to reduce awkwardness or embarrassment.

• In the first sentence mention the loss and your personal reaction. Essentials of Business Communication.Extending Sympathy Refer to the loss or tragedy directly but sensitively. Describe positive personal characteristics (Howard was a forceful but caring leader). praise the deceased. 6–29 29 . • For deaths. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. • End on a reassuring.Extending Sympathy • Offer assistance. especially if you can do something specific. 6–30 30 . positive note. Perhaps refer to the strength the receiver finds in friends. family. colleagues. or religion. Suggest your availability.

End Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 6–31 31 .

7–1 1 . Asian Edition Ch.Essentials of Business Communication.

7–2 2 . • Reduce resistance with counterarguments. • Body • Explain logically and concisely the purpose of your request. Essentials of Business Communication. establish credibility.Writing Plan for Persuasive Request • Opening • Obtain the reader’s attention and interest. Asian Edition Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication. • Make it easy to respond. Asian Edition Ch. 7–3 3 .Writing Plan for Persuasive Request • Closing • Ask for a particular action. • Show courtesy and respect.

• Provide identifying data. 7–4 4 .Tips for Complaints • Begin with a compliment. statement of the problem. Asian Edition Ch. or brief review of action you have taken to resolve the problem. point of agreement. • Explain why the receiver is responsible. Essentials of Business Communication.

Tips for Complaints • Enclose document copies supporting your claim. Asian Edition Ch. and desire for customer satisfaction. ethical and legal responsibilities. • Appeal to the receiver's fairness. 7–5 5 . • Describe your feelings and your disappointment. Essentials of Business Communication.

emotional. or irrational. Asian Edition Ch. • Close by telling exactly what you want done. 7–6 6 .Tips for Complaints • Avoid sounding angry. Essentials of Business Communication.

John M. Box 2051 Little Rock. 7–7 7 . Watson Retail Credit Department Union National Bank P. AR 72203 Dear Mr. Watson: You have charged my wife's Visa account with erroneous "overthe-limit" charges that are quite unfair. O. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Ineffective Persuasive Request Letter Mr. and I am very upset about it.

so we did not know that we were close to the limit. Asian Edition Ch. We were charged a $10 fee for each of these 12 transactions because we exceeded our credit limit. 7–8 8 . we would not have continued to make purchases if we had known we were over our limit. Between August 7 and September 27 we made 12 purchases. However. and ALL WERE APPROVED! Why were they approved if we were over our credit limit? Obviously. Essentials of Business Communication.Ineffective Persuasive Request Letter How can we be charged with "over-the-limit" charges when nearly every one of the charges was approved? We don't keep a running record of our Visa account and all our credit purchases on it. 10 of these transactions were phoned in for approval.

Furthermore. 7–9 9 . our actions were made on the basis of misinformation and errors on the part of your credit processors.Ineffective Persuasive Request Letter It seems to me that your approval system is at fault here. Angrily yours. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. And why aren't new cardholders informed of your rules? The charges we made exceeding the limit were clearly unintentional.

7–10 10 . Does the writer try to blame the bank for the penalty? Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. Does the opening obtain the reader's attention in a positive manner? 2.Ineffective Persuasive Request Letter Discussion: 1. Why does the writer think that the $120 penalty is unreasonable? Does the writer offer convincing reasons? Are they logically presented? 3.

Ineffective Persuasive Request Letter Discussion: 4. What action does the writer seek? 5. How would you feel if you were the receiver? Essentials of Business Communication. Does the letter show courtesy and respect? 7. Asian Edition Ch. Is that action clearly stated? 6. 7–11 11 .

Improved Persuasive Request Letter Dear Mr. Asian Edition Ch. we made 12 Essentials of Business Communication. Between the period of August 7 and September 27. we experienced a charge to our account that we would like to discuss with you. 7–12 12 . however. Recently. Watson: SUBJECT: “Over-the-Limit” Credit Card Charges Because of the wide acceptance of the Visa credit card and because of your bank's attractive interest rate. my wife and I were eager to become cardholders two years ago.

we should have been more aware of our limit and the number of charges that we were making against our account. a copy of which is enclosed. The total charge was $120. Ten of these purchases were given telephone approval. When we received our last statement. Essentials of Business Communication.Improved Persuasive Request Letter small purchases. Asian Edition Ch. we were surprised to see that we were charged $10 each for these purchases because our account was over our limit. 7–13 13 . that if our purchases received telephone approval from your credit processors. We assumed. Of course. we were still within our credit limit. however.

Essentials of Business Communication. Watson. we feel that the $120 charge should be removed.Improved Persuasive Request Letter Please examine our account. Since we have never exceeded our credit limit in the past and since we had received telephone approval for most of the charges in question. Mr. Sincerely. and reconsider this penalty. 7–14 14 . Asian Edition Ch.

2. About 15 months ago your smooth-talking salesperson seduced us into buying your Model RX copier. Essentials of Business Communication.Good and Bad Openings for Persuasive Requests Which of the following openings are effective? 1. you will undoubtedly discover that we first obtained our model RX copier 15 months ago. It was installed in our Legal Department. Asian Edition Ch. 7–15 15 . If you will check your records. which has been nothing but trouble ever since.

and your name was suggested. When we purchased our Model RX copier 15 months ago. We need a speaker for our graduation ceremony. Would you be able to speak at our graduation ceremony on June 7? Essentials of Business Communication.Good and Bad Openings for Persuasive Requests Which of the following openings are effective? 3. Asian Edition Ch. 5. 7–16 16 . we had high expectations for its performance. 4.

We realize that you are an extremely busy individual and that you must be booked up months in advance. Essentials of Business Communication.Good and Bad Openings for Persuasive Requests Which of the following openings are effective? 6. Asian Edition Ch. 7–17 17 . but would it be possible for you to speak at our graduation ceremony on June 7? 7. You were voted by our students as the speaker they would most like to hear at graduation on June 7.

Davis California House of Representatives Sacramento. Asian Edition Ch.Ineffective Favor Request Honorable David H. 7–18 18 . CA 95030 Dear Mr. Many of our Essentials of Business Communication. our Associated Student Organization is having a Career Awareness Day. Davis: Would you be interested in speaking to the students at Foothill College? If you would be in town on April 16.

Our ASO voted you the politician they would most like to hear. Our Career Awareness Day will contain information booths. and politics. Asian Edition Ch.Ineffective Favor Request 15. and its punishments. its rewards.000 students (and most are registered voters in your district) will be attending this function where three major speakers have been invited. 7–19 19 . education. students can talk about careers and learn about them at these Essentials of Business Communication. We hope to find good speakers from industry. We could offer you 30 minutes to impart information about politics as a career.

Asian Edition Ch. we can get some publicity out. Then the three speakers will follow these booths at 12 noon in the Campus Center. Sincerely. 7–20 20 .Ineffective Favor Request booths. Let me know by March 15 if you'd like to be one of our speakers. We'd enjoy having you and it could be good for you. too. Essentials of Business Communication. If you let me know early enough.

Provides an easy excuse for refusal (in second sentence) 3. 7–21 21 . Asian Edition Ch. 1. Fails to emphasize reader benefits (opportunity to influence 15.Ineffective Favor Request Discuss the faults in the previous letter.000 potential voters) Essentials of Business Communication. Starts out directly with a question that could be answered negatively 2.

7–22 22 . Focuses on writer's viewpoint rather than on reader's 6.Ineffective Favor Request Discuss the faults in the previous letter. Lacks unity in sentences and paragraphs 5. 4. Uses imprecise words and inappropriate syntax 7. Asian Edition Ch. Closes without making it easy for reader to grant favor Essentials of Business Communication.

On this day we plan to have three major Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. Davis: Over 15. Davis California House of Representatives Sacramento. April 16.Improved Favor Request Honorable David H.000 students attend Foothill College. 7–23 23 . CA 95030 Dear Mr. and many are registered voters in your district. On Thursday. you will be able to introduce yourself to these potential voters at the Associated Student Organization's Career Awareness Day.

education. To give Foothill students an opportunity to meet you and to learn about a career in politics. 7–24 24 .Improved Favor Request speakers representing industry. please call me at 320-5832 to confirm Essentials of Business Communication. You were selected by our ASO as the politician they would most like to hear. The program culminates with the major addresses given in the Campus Center at 12 noon. you would have 30 minutes to describe a career in politics and its rewards and possible drawbacks. Our Career Awareness Day features information booths where students may learn more about specific careers. Asian Edition Ch. As one of the three featured speakers. and politics.

Cordially. Asian Edition Ch. We will need your approval by March 15 so that appropriate publicity may be prepared.Improved Favor Request this speaking engagement. 7–25 25 . Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition . Introduce the price strategically. Create a desire for the product. • Body • • • • Emphasize a central selling point. 7–26 26 Essentials of Business Communication. Ch. Appeal to the needs of the reader.Writing Plan for a Sales Letter • Opening • Capture the attention of the reader.

7–27 27 . Essentials of Business Communication.Writing Plan for a Sales Letter • Closing • Stimulate the reader to act. Asian Edition Ch.

95. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. Product Feature Six Omaha steak filets from fine. corn-fed beef can be yours for only $62.Attention-Getters for Sales Letters 1. and you could be the sole winner of ONE MILLION DOLLARS! 2. 7–28 28 . Offer Follow my entry instructions.

Asian Edition Ch. Question Do you yearn for an honest. fulfilling relationship? 4.Attention-Getters for Sales Letters 3. Startling Statement Drunk drivers injure or cripple more than 500.000 victims every year! Essentials of Business Communication. 7–29 29 .

doesn't live in a neighborhood like yours. Story Tommy G. Essentials of Business Communication. 7–30 30 .Attention-Getters for Sales Letters 5. He has grown up in a neighborhood with dirty alleyways and drug dealers. he'd see how beautiful life can be. Asian Edition Ch. If only he could go to camp.

Asian Edition Ch. We are also very proud of our guarantee.Ineffective Sales Letter Dear Camera Owner: Hi! I'm Jim Johnson and I'm asking you to continue to use Kent Color Labs for the processing of your film. We feel that you can't get better prices anywhere. 7–31 31 . No matter what we receive from you. We've been in business for a long time and our customers tell us they are quite satisfied with our service and the quality of our processing. you Essentials of Business Communication.

Kent Color labs is the place to go. Are you tired of asking yourself. Sincerely. mail for our business. disks. slides. posters. Send us your next roll of film to be developed as soon as you finish it. Essentials of Business Communication. and much more. "Where should I get my film developed?" Well. Asian Edition Ch. 7–32 32 . We offer a whole range of other services--reprints. Furthermore. we treat it as we treat our own.S. We rely on the U. and this letter is our way of asking for your business.Ineffective Sales Letter don't risk a cent. we are very careful with your film.

Asian Edition Ch.Discussion for Ineffective Sales Letter to Camera Owner 1. Should this letter develop rational or emotional appeals? Essentials of Business Communication. Is a central selling point developed? 3. Is the letter written from the reader's perspective? 4. Does the opening grab your attention? 2. 7–33 33 .

Does the letter use concrete examples? 6. 7–34 34 . Does it stimulate action in the closing? Essentials of Business Communication.Discussion for Ineffective Sales Letter to Camera Owner 5. Does it build confidence in the product or service? 7. Asian Edition Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication. Here's why our customers keep returning: • You get low film processing prices and excellent quality. recently wrote to us saying. "I just wanted to let you know that the pictures you developed for me earlier were the best pictures I have ever received. Asian Edition Ch. most importantly.Improved Sales Letter Dear Camera Owner: Amy Evans. speedy turnaround. reliability–consider Kent Color Labs. 7–35 35 . and. And I can't believe I received them so quickly!" If you are looking for quality film developing. Texas. of Houston.

discs. slides. and more. Essentials of Business Communication. for our reliability. • You get convenience–no more standing in line at the drugstore or camera store. enlargements. it's processed! You can count on that every time. however. We've been in business for more than 47 years.Improved Sales Letter • You get a whole range of services–reprints. Asian Edition Ch. The minute we receive your order. 7–36 36 . • You get film mailing envelopes manufactured from special longfibered paper making them stronger than normal envelopes. wallet photos. And it's fun to receive mail! We're best known. giant photo posters. movies.

We will cheerfully refund your money and send you free film and a coupon to get that film processed without charge. fill out the enclosed mailer. simply return the whole package. We want your business. Right now.Improved Sales Letter Because we're so certain that you will be pleased. 7–37 37 . and drop it in the mail. Sincerely. Asian Edition Ch. If you're not satisfied. Grab a pen. Essentials of Business Communication. we guarantee every roll of film. This is the best guarantee in the business. finish that film in your camera.

7–38 38 .S. we'll process your order at an additional savings of 20 percent. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Improved Sales Letter P. If you respond within one week.

At what audience is the letter aimed? 2. What techniques capture the reader's attention? Essentials of Business Communication. 7–39 39 .Checklist for Analyzing a Sales Letter 1. Is the opening effective? 4. Is the appeal emotional or rational? Is the appeal effective? 3. Asian Edition Ch.

Does the letter emphasize reader benefits? 7. What are some examples of concrete language? Essentials of Business Communication.Checklist for Analyzing a Sales Letter 5. 7–40 40 . Asian Edition Ch. Is a central selling point emphasized? 6.

Checklist for Analyzing a Sales Letter 8. 7–41 41 . Asian Edition Ch. What action is to be taken and how is the reader motivated to take that action? Essentials of Business Communication. How is confidence in the product or service developed? 9. How is price introduced? 10.

Asian Edition Ch. 7–42 42 .End Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 8–1 1 .

• Describe the problem and apologize.Resolving Business Problems • Call the individual involved. • Explain • Why the problem occurred • What you are doing to resolve it • How you will prevent the problem from happening again Essentials of Business Communication. 8–2 2 . Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch.Resolving Business Problems • Follow up with a letter that • Documents details discussed in the phone call • Promotes goodwill Essentials of Business Communication. 8–3 3 .

The Indirect Strategy 1. Asian Edition Ch. Reasons 3. Closing Essentials of Business Communication. 8–4 4 . Buffer 2. Bad News 4.

Asian Edition Ch. 8–5 5 .Possible Buffers for Opening Bad-News Messages • Best news • Appreciation • Agreement • Facts • Understanding • Apology Essentials of Business Communication.

Evaluating Buffer Statements How effective is the following opening for a letter that refuses to grant credit? 1. Unfortunately. your application for credit has been reviewed negatively. (Reveals the bad news bluntly. 8–6 6 .) Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Evaluating Buffer Statements How effective is the following opening for a letter that refuses to grant credit? 2. Asian Edition Ch.) Essentials of Business Communication. 8–7 7 . We are delighted to receive your application for credit. (Gives the wrong impression.

Evaluating Buffer Statements How effective is the following opening for a letter that refuses to grant credit? 3.) Essentials of Business Communication. The recent resurgence of interest in the stock market caught many of us by surprise. Asian Edition Ch. 8–8 8 . (Is not relevant.

Asian Edition Ch.) Essentials of Business Communication. 8–9 9 . Your request for a monetary contribution has been referred to me for reply. (Fails to engage the reader.Evaluating Buffer Statements How effective is the following opening for a letter that refuses a request for a donation? 1.

) Essentials of Business Communication. 8–10 10 . Asian Edition Ch.Evaluating Buffer Statements How effective is the following opening for a letter that refuses a request for a donation? 2. (Compliments the reader but doesn’t imply approval. We appreciate the fine work your organization is doing to provide early childhood programs that meet the needs of parents and very young children.

Ch. Asian Edition . 8–11 11 Essentials of Business Communication. Cite reader benefits. if relevant. if possible. Show that the matter was treated seriously and fairly. Explain company policy.Presenting the Reasons • • • • • Be cautious in explaining. Choose positive words.

8–12 12 . Put the bad news in the middle of a paragraph halfway through the message. Don’t put the bad news in a short. • Use a long sentence. Asian Edition Ch.Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News • Avoid the spotlight. Essentials of Business Communication. simple sentence.

Essentials of Business Communication. Although we have no position for an individual with your qualifications at this time.Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News • Place the bad news in a subordinate clause. we are pleased that you thought of us when you started your job search. Asian Edition Ch. 8–13 13 .

Essentials of Business Communication. 8–14 14 . Try this: A contribution cannot be made at this time.Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News • Use the passive voice. Asian Edition Ch. Instead of this: We cannot make a contribution at this time.

Asian Edition .Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News • Be clear but not overly graphic. Instead of this: Our investigation reveals that you owe three creditors large sums and that you were fired from your last job. Ch. 8–15 15 Essentials of Business Communication. Try this: Our investigation reveals that your employment status and your financial position are unstable at this time.

Try this: Although all our profits must be reinvested in our company this year.Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News • Imply the refusal. Ch. we hope to be able to support your future fund-raising activities. 8–16 16 Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition . Instead of this: We cannot contribute to your charity this year.

Techniques for Deemphasizing Bad News • Suggest an alternative. Essentials of Business Communication. Although the cashmere sweater cannot be sold at the erroneously listed price of $18. we can allow you to purchase this $218 item for only $118. Asian Edition Ch. 8–17 17 .

They are useful in being tactful. . . . Passive voice: Return of the DVD player is not allowed because . .Using the Passive Voice • Passive-voice verbs focus attention on actions rather than on personalities. Active voice: I cannot allow you to return the DVD player because . . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 8–18 18 . .

8–19 19 . Asian Edition Ch. but he missed the error. Essentials of Business Communication.Using the Passive Voice • Passive-voice verbs focus attention on actions rather than on personalities. Passive voice: The report was checked. Active voice: Ryan checked the report. but the error was missed. They are useful in being tactful.

Using the Passive Voice Notice that passive-voice verb phrases always include “helper” verbs. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. 8–20 20 .

Using the Passive Voice • Examples of “helper” verbs forming passive voice: • The report was checked. Essentials of Business Communication. 8–21 21 . • Invitations were sent. Asian Edition Ch. • The schedule is being revised.

Asian Edition Ch. A cash contribution cannot be made this year because of unusally high taxes. • I am unable to make a cash contribution this year because of unusually high taxes. 8–22 22 . Essentials of Business Communication.Try Your Skill Convert the following statement from active to passive voice.

• We cannot process your application this month. Your application cannot be processed this month.Try Your Skill Convert the following statement from active to passive voice. Essentials of Business Communication. 8–23 23 . Asian Edition Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication.Try Your Skill Convert the following statement from active to passive voice. • I have examined your employment record and found that you have little cost accounting experience. Examination of your employment record has revealed that you have little cost accounting experience. Asian Edition Ch. 8–24 24 .

Try Your Skill Convert the following statement from active to passive voice. Essentials of Business Communication. A programming error was made that delayed our project. 8–25 25 . • Mark made a programming error that delayed our project. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition . or self-serving. insincere. 8–26 26 Essentials of Business Communication. Try to personalize the closing with • • • • • An alternative to the refusal Resale or sales promotion A forward look Good wishes Freebies Ch. inappropriate.Closing Bad-News Messages Avoid endings that sound canned.

• Try to include a key idea or word that acts as a transition to the explanation. Asian Edition Ch. 8–27 27 . a quick review of the facts. an expression of appreciation. Essentials of Business Communication.Writing Plan for Refusing Requests or Claims Buffer • Start with a neutral statement on which both reader and writer can agree. or an apology. such as a compliment.

or implying a refusal. • Include resale or sales promotion. Asian Edition Ch.Writing Plan for Refusing Requests or Claims Reasons • Present valid reasons for the refusal. if appropriate. if possible. • Suggest a compromise or substitute. 8–28 28 . avoiding words that create a negative tone. using the passive voice. Bad News • Soften the blow by positioning the bad news strategically. accentuating the positive. Essentials of Business Communication.

Writing Plan for Refusing Requests or Claims Closing • Renew good feelings with a positive statement. • Avoid referring to the bad news. 8–29 29 . • Look forward to continued business. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

8–30 30 . Asian Edition Ch. appreciation. Essentials of Business Communication. or some form of good news. facts.Writing Plan for Announcing Bad News to Customers and Employees Buffer • Open with a compliment. • Include a key idea that leads from the opening to the reasons.

Essentials of Business Communication. Bad News • Position the bad news so that it does not stand out. Consider implying the bad news. if possible. if possible.Writing Plan for Announcing Bad News to Customers and Employees Reasons • Explain the logic behind the bad news. 8–31 31 . • Use positive words. • Try to show reader benefits. • Suggest a compromise or substitute. Asian Edition Ch.

if appropriate. Asian Edition Ch.Writing Plan for Announcing Bad News to Customers and Employees Closing • Look forward positively. Essentials of Business Communication. • Provide information about an alternative. 8–32 32 .

8–33 33 . Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication.

9–1 1 . Asian Edition Ch.Essentials of Business Communication.

9–2 2 .Six Categories of Informal Reports • • • • • • Information Reports Progress Reports Justification/Recommendation Reports Feasibility Reports Minutes of Meetings Summaries Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Useful for informal reports sent to outsiders. • Memo format Memo style. Asian Edition Ch.Report Formats • Letter format Letterhead stationery. Essentials of Business Communication. Useful for informal reports circulated within organizations. 9–3 3 .

• Prepared forms Standardized forms. Useful for routine activities. such as expense reports. Useful for longer. 9–4 4 . Essentials of Business Communication.Report Formats • Report format Plain paper. manuscript form. Asian Edition Ch. more formal reports.

• Edit and revise.General Guidelines for Writing Reports • Define project. 9–5 5 . Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. • Gather data. • Write first draft. • Organize data.

• Search databases and other electronic resources. Asian Edition Ch. • Conduct interviews.Where to Gather Data for Reports • Look in company records. • Make personal observations. • Use surveys. questionnaires. Essentials of Business Communication. 9–6 6 . and inventories.

Organizing Report Data • Indirect Strategy • Problem • Facts • Discussion • Recommendations • Direct Strategy • Problem • Recommendations • Facts • Discussion Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 9–7 7 .

and second-level headings for short reports. • Keep headings short but clear. • Use first. Essentials of Business Communication. • Capitalize and underline carefully. Asian Edition Ch. • Strive for parallel construction.Making Effective Report Headings • Use appropriate heading levels. 9–8 8 .

avoid: Inserting Hypertext Links. . 9–9 9 . For example. Essentials of Business Communication.Making Effective Report Headings • Don't enclose headings in quotation marks. Asian Edition Ch. . • Don't use headings as antecedents for pronouns. These links . .

• Cite sources carefully. Asian Edition Ch.Being Objective in Writing Reports • Present both sides of an issue. 9–10 10 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Separate fact from opinion. • Be sensitive and moderate in language.

Information Reports Introduction • Explain why you are writing. Asian Edition Ch. • Provide background. • Identify report purpose. • Describe credibility of data methods and sources. 9–11 11 . • Offer a preview of the findings. Essentials of Business Communication.

9–12 12 . or by another method. Asian Edition Ch.Information Reports Findings • Organize chronologically. • Group similar topics together. • Use appropriate headings. alphabetically. by importance. Essentials of Business Communication. topically.

9–13 13 .Information Reports Summary • May include or omit summary. • If included. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. summarize findings or highlight main points.

including personnel. Asian Edition Ch. methods. Essentials of Business Communication. 9–14 14 . • Summarize work already completed. • Describe work currently in progress.Progress Reports • Describe the purpose and nature of an unusual or nonroutine project. • Provide background information if necessary. and attempts to remedy obstacles. obstacles.

• Include recommendations and requests. Essentials of Business Communication. 9–15 15 . Asian Edition Ch.Progress Reports • Forecast future activities in relation to the scheduled completion date.

• Announce the recommendation. • Identify the problem or the need briefly.Justification/Recommendation Reports • Use direct organization for nonsensitive topics and recommendations that will be agreeable to readers. Asian Edition Ch. solution. 9–16 16 . or action concisely and with action verbs. Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication.Justification/Recommendation Reports • Present a discussion of pros. 9–17 17 . Asian Edition Ch. and costs. cons. • Explain more fully the benefits of the recommendation or steps to be taken to solve the problem. • Conclude with a summary specifying the recommendation and action to be taken.

• Discuss the benefits of the proposal. Asian Edition Ch. 9–18 18 . • Announce your decision immediately. • Describe the background and problem necessitating the proposal.Feasibility Reports • Prepare a feasibility report when examining the practicality and advisability of following a course of action. Essentials of Business Communication.

9–19 19 . • Calculate the costs associated with the proposal.Feasibility Reports • Describe the problems that may result. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Show the time frame necessary for implementation of the proposal. if appropriate.

• Include the precise wording of motions. the name of the meeting. the date. 9–20 20 .Meeting Minutes • Include name of the group. • List names of attendees and absentees. • Describe disposition of previous minutes. new business. Asian Edition Ch. the time. announcements. Essentials of Business Communication. • Record old business. and reports. the place.

Essentials of Business Communication. • Conclude with the name and signature of the individual recording the minutes.Meeting Minutes • Record the vote and action taken. Asian Edition Ch. 9–21 21 .

Essentials of Business Communication. or a book chapter. findings. such as a business report. • Indicate the goal or purpose of the document being summarized. and recommendations. • Highlight the research methods (if appropriate). Asian Edition Ch. conclusions.Summaries • Compress data from a longer publication. a magazine article. 9–22 22 .

Summaries • Omit illustrations. • Include your reactions or an overall evaluation of the document if asked to do so. Essentials of Business Communication. 9–23 23 . Asian Edition Ch. examples. • Organize for readability by including headings and bulleted or enumerated lists. and references.

Ten Keys to Designing Better Documents • • • • • Analyze your audience. Use a consistent type font. Asian Edition Ch. Separate paragraphs and sentences appropriately. don't justify right margins. Generally. 9–24 24 . Choose an appropriate type size. Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication.Ten Keys to Designing Better Documents • • • • • Design readable headlines. 9–25 25 . Develop expertise with your software program. Asian Edition Ch. Avoid amateurish results. Strive for an attractive page layout. Use graphics and clip art with restraint.

Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication. 9–26 26 .

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 10–1 1 .

Organizing Proposals • Introduction must provide "hook" to capture reader's interest. Essentials of Business Communication. • Background section identifies problems and goals of project. • Proposal discusses plan for solving existing problem. 10–2 2 . Asian Edition Ch.

10–3 3 .Organizing Proposals • Staffing section describes credentials and expertise of project leaders. • Budget indicates project costs. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. • Authorization asks for approval to proceed.

10–4 4 . Asian Edition Ch.Researching Secondary Data • Print Resources • Books • Periodicals • Bibliographic indexes (print. and Web-based) Essentials of Business Communication. CD-ROM.

company profiles. and journal articles • Newsletters. newspaper. reviews. business reports.Researching Secondary Data • Electronic Databases • Magazine. 10–5 5 . and directories Essentials of Business Communication. government data. Asian Edition Ch.

current company news. article reprints. mission statements. scientific reports. 10–6 6 . Asian Edition Ch. government information.Researching Secondary Data • The Web • Product data. press releases. staff directories. and employment information Essentials of Business Communication.

10–7 7 . • Understand the importance of case sensitivity in keyword searches. Asian Edition Ch. • Understand the AND/OR default and the significance of quotation marks. • Prefer uncommon words as search terms. Essentials of Business Communication.How to Become a Savvy Web Researcher • Use two or three search tools. • Omit articles and prepositions.

Asian Edition Ch.g. cent** will retrieve center and centre). • Know your search tool. • Be persistent. Essentials of Business Communication. use FAQs and "How to Search" sections. 10–8 8 . • Bookmark the best..How to Become a Savvy Web Researcher • Use wild cards (e.

West.. Asian Edition Ch. etc. East. North. 10–9 9 . South.) Essentials of Business Communication.Organizing Report Data • Direct strategy (main ideas first) • Indirect strategy (facts and discussion first) • Chronological sequence (historical data) • Geographical or spatial arrangement (e.g.

duties of general manager. when. duties of CEO. how) Essentials of Business Communication. where. Asian Edition Ch.g. etc. 10–10 10 .. what.) • Compare and contrast • Journalistic pattern (who.Organizing Report Data • Topical or functional arrangement (e. why.

Organizing Report Data • Value/size • Importance (most to least or least to most) • Simple to complex • Best case/worst case Essentials of Business Communication. 10–11 11 . Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch.Illustrating Report Data • Reasons for using visual aids • To clarify data • To summarize important ideas • To emphasize facts and provide focus • To add visual interest Essentials of Business Communication. 10–12 12 .

Asian Edition Ch. maps. 10–13 13 .Illustrating Report Data • Most common types of visuals aids • Tables • Charts • Graphs • Photographs. illustrations Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Table To show exact figures and values Essentials of Business Communication. 10–14 14 .

10–15 15 . Asian Edition Ch.Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Bar Chart To compare one item with others Essentials of Business Communication.

10–16 16 .Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Line Chart To demonstrate changes in quantitative data over time Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

10–17 17 . Asian Edition Ch.Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Pie Chart To visualize a whole unit and the proportions of its components Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Flow Chart To display a process or procedure Essentials of Business Communication. 10–18 18 .

Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Organization Chart To define a hierarchy of elements or a set of relationships Essentials of Business Communication. 10–19 19 . Asian Edition Ch.

Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Photograph To achieve authenticity Essentials of Business Communication. 10–20 20 . Asian Edition Ch.

Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Map To spotlight a location Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 10–21 21 .

Matching Visual Aids With Objectives • Illustration To show an item in use Essentials of Business Communication. 10–22 22 . Asian Edition Ch.

• Clearly identify the contents of the visual aid with a meaningful title and appropriate labels. • Refer the reader to the visual aid by discussing it in the text and mentioning its location and figure number. 10–23 23 .Tips for Effective Use of Visual Aids • Choose an appropriate visual aid to illustrate your objective. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

• Strive for vertical placement of visual aids. • Give credit to the source if appropriate. Essentials of Business Communication. 10–24 24 .Tips for Effective Use of Visual Aids • Locate the visual aid close to its reference in the text. Asian Edition Ch.

10–25 25 Essentials of Business Communication. or epitome Ch. synopsis.Parts of a Formal Report • Prefatory Parts • • • • • Title page Letter of authorization Letter of transmittal Table of contents Executive summary. abstract. Asian Edition .

conclusions. 10–26 26 . Asian Edition Ch. recommendations • Supplementary Parts • Footnotes or endnotes • Bibliography • Appendix Essentials of Business Communication.Parts of a Formal Report • Body of Report • Introduction or background • Discussion of findings • Summary.

10–27 27 . Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Essentials of Business Communication. 11–1 1 .

Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool • Improve your pronunciation. 11–2 2 . • “naturally” – not “natcherly” • “accessory” – not “assessory” • “don’t you” – not “doncha” Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. alert. 11–3 3 . • Do you sound friendly. slow-witted. or positive? • Do you sound angry. or negative? Essentials of Business Communication.Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool • Work on the quality of your voice.

• Don’t speak too rapidly. • Don’t make your listeners strain to hear you. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Speak as loudly or softly as the occasion demands. 11–4 4 .Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool • Adjust the volume of your voice and your rate of speech.

• Use of a lower pitch and volume can make you sound professional or reasonable. Essentials of Business Communication. • Stress the words that require emphasis. Asian Edition Ch.Using Your Voice as a Communication Tool • Use emphasis to express meaning. 11–5 5 .

• Give sincere and specific praise. Asian Edition Ch. 11–6 6 . • Choose appropriate workplace topics. • Listen and learn. Essentials of Business Communication. • Avoid negative remarks.Promoting Positive Workplace Relations • Use correct names and titles.

11–7 7 . Use face-to-face communication. Focus on improvement (offer to help).Offering Constructive Criticism on the Job • • • • • • Mentally outline your conversation. not the person. Focus on the behavior.” Essentials of Business Communication. Use “we” rather than “you. avoid broad generalizations. Asian Edition Ch. Be specific.

11–8 8 . • Keep it private.Offering Constructive Criticism on the Job • Encourage two-way communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Avoid anger. and a raised voice. sarcasm. Essentials of Business Communication.

11–9 9 . Paraphrase what was said. Determine the speaker’s intent. Acknowledge what you are hearing. Essentials of Business Communication.Responding Professionally to Workplace Criticism • • • • • • Listen without interrupting. If necessary. Agree—if the comments made are fair. ask for more information. Asian Edition Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication. 11–10 10 . Asian Edition Ch.Responding Professionally to Workplace Criticism • Disagree respectfully and constructively—if you feel the comments made are unfair. • Look for a middle position.

Asian Edition Ch.Common Conflict Response Patterns • • • • • Avoidance/withdrawal Accommodation/smoothing Compromise Competition/forcing Collaboration/problem solving Essentials of Business Communication. 11–11 11 .

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. Reach an agreement based on what’s fair. Show a concern for the relationship. Understand the problem. 11–12 12 . 2. Invent new problem-solving options. Understand the other point of view. 4. Listen carefully. Look for common ground. 5. 3. 6.Six-Step Procedure for Dealing With Conflict 1.

State your affiliation. 3. 11–13 13 . • Use a three-point introduction: 1. State your name.Making Effective Telephone Calls • Placing Calls • Plan a mini agenda. • Bring it to a close. • Be cheerful and accurate. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 2. Give a brief explanation of why you are calling.

Asian Edition Ch. • Leave complete voice-mail messages.Making Effective Telephone Calls • Avoid telephone tag. Essentials of Business Communication. 11–14 14 .

Essentials of Business Communication. • Explain when transferring calls. Asian Edition Ch. • Be cautious when answering calls intended for others. 11–15 15 . • Be responsive and helpful.Making Effective Telephone Calls • Receiving Calls • Identify yourself immediately. • Take messages carefully.

Take only urgent calls. Speak in low. Essentials of Business Communication. talk later. Observe the rules for wireless-free areas. 11–16 16 . Asian Edition Ch. Drive now. conversational tones.Practicing Courteous and Responsible Cell Phone Use • • • • • Be courteous to those around you.

and names).Meetings • Planning a Meeting • Ask yourself whether a meeting is really necessary. • Invite only key individuals. times. 11–17 17 . • Prepare an agenda (include topics. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.

Meetings • Conducting a Meeting • Start the meeting on time. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. suggest possible solutions. • Provide the background of the problem(s). 11–18 18 . • Present a tentative agenda. • Begin with an introduction that establishes the goal and length of the meeting.

summarize and ask for confirmation. but avoid digressions. Asian Edition Ch.Meetings • Establish ground rules. and a recorder. • Encourage participation by all. who will take minutes. • Appoint a secretary. Essentials of Business Communication. • When the group reaches consensus. 11–19 19 . who will track ideas on a flipchart.

• Distribute minutes of the meeting a few days later. 11–20 20 . Essentials of Business Communication.Meetings • Concluding a Meeting and Following Up • End the meeting on time. • Remind group members of their follow-up assignments. • Summarize the results achieved. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. 11–21 21 .End Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. 12–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication.

• Decide what you want your audience to believe. Asian Edition Ch. • Aim all parts of your talk toward your purpose. remember. or do when you finish.Preparing an Oral Presentation • Identify your purpose. Essentials of Business Communication. 12–2 2 .

or self-effacing story. quotation. • Introduce your topic. relevant problem. question. knowledge. expertise. startling fact. • Capture attention by opening with a promise. • Preview the main points. 12–3 3 .Preparing an Oral Presentation • Organize the introduction. • Establish your credibility by identifying your position. or qualifications. Asian Edition Ch. story. • Get the audience involved. Essentials of Business Communication.

12–4 4 . • Prepare transitions. by comparison and contrast.Preparing an Oral Presentation • Organize the body of your presentation. now I want to move to Y. Use "bridge" statements between major points. or by some other strategy. (I've just discussed three reasons for X. Asian Edition Ch.) Use verbal signposts: however. • Develop two to four main points. for example. etc. Streamline your topic and summarize its principal parts. • Arrange the points logically: chronologically. from most important to least. Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication. Tell how listeners can use this information. • Organize the conclusion. Asian Edition Ch. why you have spoken. Be prepared with more information and visuals if needed. 12–5 5 . • Have extra material ready. • Provide a final focus. or what you want them to do. • Review your main points.Preparing an Oral Presentation • Organize the body of your presentation.

Precede or follow with story. Control length. Adapt to audience. Asian Edition Ch.Types of Verbal Support Type Example Use Illustrate Clarify Add interest Comments Usually best in groups of two or three. Must support thesis. Story Prove point Illustrate Essentials of Business Communication. 12–6 6 .

Follow up with restatement or explanation.Types of Verbal Support Type Quotation Use Prove point Add credibility Add interest Comments Cite source. 12–7 7 . Link familiar with unfamiliar. Be sure comparison or analogy is valid. May paraphrase or read verbatim. Comparison Improve understanding Add figurative interest Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

round off.Types of Verbal Support Type Statistics Use Prove point Add credibility Comments Link to audience needs. Support with visuals. Asian Edition Ch. 12–8 8 . Essentials of Business Communication. Use sparingly. handouts.

describe a problem. . you will . . Asian Edition Ch. 12–9 9 .Nine Techniques for Getting Your Audience’s Attention • A Promise • “By the end of my talk.” • Drama • Tell a moving story. . • Eye contact • Command attention by making eye contact with as many people as possible. Essentials of Business Communication.

Use a rhetorical question. 12–10 10 . Essentials of Business Communication. • A demonstration • Include a member of the audience.Nine Techniques for Getting Your Audience’s Attention • Movement • Leave the lectern area. Asian Edition Ch. • A question • Ask for a show of hands. Move toward the audience.

• Visuals • Use graphics and other visual aids. Asian Edition Ch.Nine Techniques for Getting Your Audience’s Attention • Samples. pass out samples. • Appeal to the audience’s selfinterest • Audience members want to know. “What's in it for me?” Essentials of Business Communication. gimmicks • Award prizes to volunteer participants. 12–11 11 .

• Simile (a comparison that includes the words like or as) • Example: His mind works like a computer. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. • Metaphor (an implied. nonliteral comparison) • Example: The old office building became a money pit. 12–12 12 . • Analogy (a comparison of something familiar with something unfamiliar) • Example: To understand how the heart is divided. imagine a house with two rooms upstairs and two downstairs.Maintaining Rapport • Use imagery.

• Personal anecdotes • Personalized statistics • Worst. nonverbal messages.and best-case scenarios • Send positive. Ch. 12–13 13 Essentials of Business Communication.Maintaining Rapport • Use other interest-building devices. Animate your body. Asian Edition . “Punctuate” your words. • • • • Get out from behind the podium. Vary your facial expression.

Asian Edition Ch.Stage Fright Symptoms • • • • • • • Stomach butterflies Pounding heart Shortage of breath Sweaty palms Dry throat Unsteady voice Trembling hands • Wobbly knees • Tied tongue Essentials of Business Communication. 12–14 14 .

Use positive self-talk. Prepare 150 percent.How to Overcome Stage Fright Select a familiar. • • • • Essentials of Business Communication. Convert your fear into anticipation and enthusiasm. 12–15 15 . • Shift the focus from yourself to your visual aids. relevant topic. Asian Edition Ch.

• Make your listeners your partners. Get them involved. 12–16 16 .How to Overcome Stage Fright • Give yourself permission to make an occasional mistake. Essentials of Business Communication. Don't apologize. • Ignore stumbles. take some deep breaths. keep going. Asian Edition Ch. • Just before you begin to talk.

Presentation Enhancers Medium Overhead projector Flipchart Cost Low Size of Audience 2 to 200 Level of Formality Formal or informal Informal Informal Low 2 to 200 2 to 200 Write-and-wipe Medium board Slide projector Medium 2 to 500 Formal Essentials of Business Communication. 12–17 17 . Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. 12–18 18 .Presentation Enhancers Medium Cost Size of Audience 2 to 100 Level of Formality Formal or informal Formal or informal Formal or informal Video monitor Medium Computer slides Handouts Low 2 to 200 Varies Unlimited Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. and potential effectiveness. • Consider the size of the audience and the degree of formality desired.Designing and Using Graphics • Select the medium carefully. • Consider cost. ease of preparation. 12–19 19 .

• Avoid overkill.Designing and Using Graphics • Highlight main ideas. Essentials of Business Communication. • Focus on major concepts only. Asian Edition Ch. Showing too many graphics reduces their effectiveness. 12–20 20 . • Keep all visuals simple.

12–21 21 . • Use large type for transparencies and slides. • Paraphrase its verbal message. don't read it. Essentials of Business Communication. • Give the audience a moment to study a visual before discussing it. • Position the screen high enough to be seen. Asian Edition Ch.Designing and Using Graphics • Ensure visibility. • Be sure all audience members can see. • Enhance comprehension.

perfecting your handling of the visual aids. Essentials of Business Communication. 12–22 22 . • Talk to your audience and not to the visual aid. Asian Edition Ch.Designing and Using Graphics • Practice using your visual aids. • Rehearse your talk.

12–23 23 . • Not answering the audience's most pressing question: “What's in it for me?” Essentials of Business Communication. • Not repeating your main point often enough. • Being dull.Eight Serious Presentation Blunders • Getting distracted just before you speak. Relying on only one or two illustrations to make your points. Asian Edition Ch.

• Neglecting to time your presentation and practice it “out loud. 12–24 24 . Essentials of Business Communication.Eight Serious Presentation Blunders • Failing to use signal phrases to focus on main points. • Answering hypothetical questions after your presentation.” • Forgetting to check your visual aids for readability. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication. 12–25 25 .

13–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Test Your Employment Savvy 1. Asian Edition Ch. 13–2 2 . The average employee will have worked at how many jobs over the course of a career? 1 to 3 4 to 7 8 to 11 12 to 15 Essentials of Business Communication.

The average employee will have worked at how many jobs over the course of a career? 1 to 3 4 to 7 8 to 11 12 to 15 Essentials of Business Communication.Test Your Employment Savvy 1. 13–3 3 . Asian Edition Ch.

Having your job terminated ranks in the top ten of life’s most severe crises. Asian Edition Ch. True False Essentials of Business Communication.Test Your Employment Savvy 2. 13–4 4 .

True False Essentials of Business Communication. 13–5 5 .Test Your Employment Savvy 2. Asian Edition Ch. Having your job terminated ranks in the top ten of life’s most severe crises.

Test Your Employment Savvy 3. Asian Edition Ch. 13–6 6 . What format do recruiters generally prefer? Chronological (arranged around dates) Functional (arranged around skills) Combination Essentials of Business Communication. You are putting together a résumé.

You are putting together a résumé.Test Your Employment Savvy 3. 13–7 7 . What format do recruiters generally prefer? Chronological (arranged around dates) Functional (arranged around skills) Combination Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Many experts in the field of recruiting think that the surest way for a college graduate to find a job today is by Searching the Internet Sending out hundreds of résumés Networking Reading the classified ads Essentials of Business Communication. 13–8 8 .Test Your Employment Savvy 4. Asian Edition Ch.

Test Your Employment Savvy 4. Asian Edition Ch. 13–9 9 . Many experts in the field of recruiting think that the surest way for a college graduate to find a job today is by Searching the Internet Sending out hundreds of résumés Networking Reading the classified ads Essentials of Business Communication.

You begin your job search the way most people do by looking through the newspaper ads.Test Your Employment Savvy 5. Asian Edition . What percentage of available opportunities can you find in those ads? 10 to 19 percent 20 to 29 percent 30 to 49 percent 50 percent or more Ch. 13–10 10 Essentials of Business Communication.

What percentage of available opportunities can you find in those ads? 10 to 19 percent 20 to 29 percent 30 to 49 percent 50 percent or more Ch. Asian Edition . 13–11 11 Essentials of Business Communication.Test Your Employment Savvy 5. You begin your job search the way most people do by looking through the newspaper ads.

friends. neighbors.Test Your Employment Savvy 6. your doctor. associates School alumni and former instructors Your dentist. Who should be on your list of people to contact? Potential employers and professional organizations Family members. Asian Edition Ch. You’ve heard that “networking” is a good way to find a job. other service providers All of the above Essentials of Business Communication. 13–12 12 .

Asian Edition Ch. friends. other service providers. associates School alumni and former instructors Your dentist. You’ve heard that “networking” is a good way to find a job. 13–13 13 . your doctor. Who should be on your list of people to contact? Potential employers and professional organizations Family members.Test Your Employment Savvy 6. All of the above Essentials of Business Communication. neighbors.

What percentage of companies will require pre-employment drug testing? About 20 percent About 40 percent About 60 percent About 80 percent Essentials of Business Communication.Test Your Employment Savvy 7. 13–14 14 . You’re now a serious candidate for a job. Asian Edition Ch.

13–15 15 . You’re now a serious candidate for a job. Asian Edition Ch.Test Your Employment Savvy 7. What percentage of companies will require pre-employment drug testing? About 20 percent About 40 percent About 60 percent About 80 percent Essentials of Business Communication.

Test Your Employment Savvy 8. You’ve landed a job interview with a company that has a casual dress code. 13–16 16 . Asian Edition Ch. What should you do? Dress in campus casual attire Dress professionally in a suit Hit a happy medium Call to ask interviewer Essentials of Business Communication.

What should you do? Dress in campus casual attire Dress professionally in a suit or Hit a happy medium Call to ask interviewer Essentials of Business Communication.Test Your Employment Savvy 8. Asian Edition Ch. 13–17 17 . You’ve landed a job interview with a company that has a casual dress code.

13–18 18 . and other resources to learn about jobs. the Web. • Experiment with formatting. qualifications. • Use newspapers.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Preparation • Research the job market. • Analyze your strengths. Asian Edition Ch. and employers. • What will sell you for the job you want? • Study other résumés as models. Essentials of Business Communication.

• List your major and GPA.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Heading and Objective • List your name. date of graduation. • Give information about your studies. Asian Edition Ch. but don’t inventory all your courses. address. phone. • Education • Name your degree. and institution. 13–19 19 . • Include a career objective for a targeted job. Essentials of Business Communication.

dates of employment (month. to present. Dayton. and most significant title. Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. 4/02 to 5/03 Tax Preparer. Dayton. Ohio. Asian Edition Ch. Ohio Essentials of Business Communication. • Start with the most recent jobs. Ohio. March. Sinclair College. Manager. 2003. year). Include employer’s name and city. Fleet Equipment. 13–20 20 . Kmart. Kettering.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Work Experience • List your previous jobs. 6/03 to present Salesperson.

000. • Use action verbs to summarize achievements and skills relevant to your targeted job. 13–21 21 .Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Work Experience • Describe your experience. Essentials of Business Communication. Conducted interviews with over 50 individuals to elicit data regarding taxes. Prepared state and federal tax returns for individuals with incomes under $25. Determined legitimate tax deductions and recorded them accurately. Asian Edition Ch.

• Give evidence of communication. and interpersonal skills. Praised by top management for enthusiastic teamwork and achievement. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Work Experience • Include nontechnical skills. Employers want more than empty assurances. 13–22 22 . Organized holiday awards program for 1200 attendees and 140 awardees. management. Try to quantify your skills.

Asian Edition Ch. • All employers seek employees proficient with word processing. Essentials of Business Communication. Awards • Highlight your computer skills. and self-sufficiency. databases. Achievements. • Show that you are well-rounded. • List awards and extracurricular activities.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Special Skills. efficiency. especially if they demonstrate leadership. loyalty. 13–23 23 . and spreadsheets. reliability. initiative. teamwork.

• Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. Look for ways to condense your data. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Additional Tips • • • • Omit references (unless specifically required). Omit humor. Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer. 13–24 24 . Double-check for parallel phrasing. Project professionalism and quality. • Avoid personal pronouns.

13–25 25 . • Avoid personal pronouns. Double-check for parallel phrasing. Project professionalism and quality. Asian Edition Ch. Omit humor. Look for ways to condense your data. Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Additional Tips • • • • Omit references (unless specifically required). • Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. Proofread! Essentials of Business Communication.

Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer. Look for ways to condense your data. Omit humor. Project professionalism and quality. Proofread! Proofread! Essentials of Business Communication. Double-check for parallel phrasing. • Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. Asian Edition Ch. • Avoid personal pronouns. 13–26 26 .Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Additional Tips • • • • Omit references (unless specifically required).

Double-check for parallel phrasing. • Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. Asian Edition Ch. Project professionalism and quality. • Avoid personal pronouns. Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Additional Tips • • • • Omit references (unless specifically required). Proofread! Proofread! Proofread! Essentials of Business Communication. Look for ways to condense your data. Omit humor. 13–27 27 .

Project professionalism and quality. Proofread! Proofread! Proofread! Proofread! Essentials of Business Communication. Omit humor. Double-check for parallel phrasing. Use 24-pound paper and a quality printer. Asian Edition Ch. • Have a friend or colleague critique your résumé. Look for ways to condense your data.Writing a Persuasive Résumé • Additional Tips • • • • Omit references (unless specifically required). • Avoid personal pronouns. 13–28 28 .

Essentials of Business Communication.2 in major. Broadcast Communication Arts. accounting. 3. 13–29 29 . and administrative skills could be utilized in a path leading to advancement into management eventually.Poor Résumé RÉSUMÉ OF JENNIE JENKINS 3320 Lafayette Street. Asian Edition Ch. CA 94561 (415) 781-5592 OBJECTIVE: An entry-level position where my proven communication. #12 San Leandro. Bachelor of arts. DEGREE from San Francisco State University.

Expected to help raise funds. 10/03 to present. Also recruited staff. Duties included scheduling studios.94. Often given responsibility to act as production manager. underfunded. Took care of some donations. also for cash transactions. Some paperwork.Poor Résumé EXPERIENCE Apprentice KPFA . CA. Also petty cash. Duties included payroll and benefits for employees of shelter. Asian Edition Ch. 13–30 30 . Was responsible for the books. Essentials of Business Communication. I prepared all payroll reports.1 in Berkeley. Chaotic environment. Pacifica House Position for financial manager.

13–31 31 . Essentials of Business Communication. File clerk. Good Earth Restaurant . receptionist.server 1998-1999. San Francisco. Asian Edition Ch. general duties. Other places. which is a performing arts troupe operating out of San Francisco. Inc. Other temporary positions Manpower. Dorhring Company. Was responsible for volunteers and publicity. 1999-02. Worked at many different places as a temp.Poor Résumé Spring. My duties included scheduling interviews with print and broadcast journalists. 1999 Worked for one spring with Renaissance Rainbow.

Poor Résumé Personal Self-starter. like to read First Baptist Gospel Choir Awards: Spirit Award. 2 semesters Essentials of Business Communication. college. singing. can finish jobs without supervision. Oakland High School Dean’s List. Marital status: single Birth: 6/15/80 Health: Excellent Hobbies: Knitting. Asian Edition Ch. 13–32 32 .

and the Internet Essentials of Business Communication. able to work without supervision • Proficient with PCs including Word. #12 San Leandro. 13–33 33 . Excel. CA 94561 (415) 781-5592 Objective: Administrative position involving • Payroll • Accounting • Employee Benefits • Customer Service SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS • Two years’ experience in responsible administrative and accounting positions • Disciplined self-starter.Improved Résumé Jennifer Marie Jenkins 3320 Lafayette Street. Asian Edition Ch.

recruit support staff • Process scripts. CA • As production manager. San Francisco. San Francisco State University RELEVANT EXPERIENCE 10/03 to Apprentice. permissions. and logs involved in weekly productions 2002-03 Financial manager. KPFA . until a task is successfully .A. present Berkeley. 13–34 34 .completed • B.. Radio Production. CA • Used computer to manage payroll and employee benefits for a staff of 26 • Completed all projects on time.1.94. despite chronically chaotic environment Essentials of Business Communication. degree. schedule studios. The Pacifica House (shelter). Asian Edition Ch.Improved Résumé • Can be counted on to follow through on every detail.

Asian Edition Ch. and quarterly statistical . oversaw petty cash • Designed a flow chart to track success of a $25. in-kind donations. Renaissance Rainbow (performance arts troupe).and fund-raising • Processed all accounts payable and receivable.Company 1999-01 Spring. San Francisco. San Francisco.Improved Résumé • Managed agency's cash flow. . CA • Developed customer service skills as telephone interviewer for Dorhring . 13–35 35 . Manpower Temporary Services.000 fund-raising project Publicity coordinator. CA • Scheduled all media interviews and supervised volunteers • Coordinated publicity mailings for African-American Performance Arts Festival Temp positions.reports for local. involving funder reimbursements... and federal funding agencies. 1999 Essentials of Business Communication. monthly.. state.

keyboarded accounts payable correspondence. prepared interoffice memos. input employee progress .assignments EDUCATION B. San Francisco State University. learned e-mail systems in various . recorded accounts payable checks. Asian Edition Ch.A.Improved Résumé • Maintained files. in Broadcast Communication Arts...2 Dean's list.. 2002 GPA in major: 3.journals. . routed incoming telephone calls. 13–36 36 . 2 semesters Essentials of Business Communication.

13–37 37 . underlining. and characteristics from job description.Preparing a Computer-Friendly Résumé • Emphasize keywords–nouns that describe traits. • Use 10 to 14-point type. skills. • Avoid unusual typefaces. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. and italics.

black ink. and quality printing. 13–38 38 . • Provide plenty of white space. • Avoid double columns. Asian Edition Ch. • Don’t fold or staple your résumé. • Be sure that your name is on the first line.Preparing a Computer-Friendly Résumé • Use smooth white paper. Essentials of Business Communication.

• Be prepared to send your résumé in ASCII. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. one that will be scanned by a computer may be as long as you think necessary. 13–39 39 . Note: Unlike a paper résumé.Preparing a Computer-Friendly Résumé • Use abbreviations carefully. • Include all your addresses and telephone numbers.

” • “Odd-sized résumés from services saying ‘Presenting the candidacy of . . Asian Edition Ch. They’re a major rip-off.’ I don't even read them anymore. inconsistent punctuation.What Turns Recruiters Off When Reading a Résumé? • A focus group of nine expert recruiters gave these individual responses: • “Personal data.’ Also typos. 13–40 40 . . That’s a major ‘red flag.” Essentials of Business Communication. and huge paragraphs that look like job descriptions.

Asian Edition Ch. And misspellings!” • “Long cover letters and résumés over two pages.What Turns Recruiters Off When Reading a Résumé? • A focus group of nine expert recruiters gave these individual responses: • “Résumés that show no research.” • “Omissions in terms of dates. not looking at the employer’s needs.” Essentials of Business Communication. 13–41 41 .

I have to remove them because managers must be color and gender blind.What Turns Recruiters Off When Reading a Résumé? • A focus group of nine expert recruiters gave these individual responses: • “Excess cosmetics. 13–42 42 . A résumé should look nice but not go overboard. Asian Edition Ch.” Essentials of Business Communication.” • “A photo.” • “Not sending the résumé to the right place. substituting form for content.

” Essentials of Business Communication. 13–43 43 .” • “Information about skills that apply to the job. Plus dates when things happened and accomplishments. Asian Edition Ch.What Do Recruiters Consider Most Important in a Résumé? • “The objective.” • “Valid information in an easy-to-read. less about job history and past duties. attractive style.

What Do Recruiters Consider Most Important in a Résumé? • “The candidate’s address and phone number. include a clear statement explaining it. Lots of people put them only in the cover letter!” • “Realizing that the employer is looking for ‘red flags’ and making sure there aren’t any. 13–44 44 . If you have an employment gap. Asian Edition Ch.” Essentials of Business Communication.

” • “A clear objective. Asian Edition Ch.” • “The presentation and the objective. backed up with qualifying experience and continuity in the work history.” Essentials of Business Communication.What Do Recruiters Consider Most Important in a Résumé? • “Meeting the qualifications for the job. 13–45 45 .

Essentials of Business Communication. include job title. show your knowledge of the reader’s business. 13–46 46 . • Show that your qualifications fit the job specifications. and publication. • For advertised jobs. or show that your special talents will be assets to the company. name the source.Writing a Persuasive Job Application Letter • Opening • Address the letter to an individual by name. Asian Edition Ch. • If someone referred you. date. name that person.

• Refer to your résumé. Asian Edition Ch. • Summarize your principal assets from education. 13–47 47 . and special skills. Essentials of Business Communication.Writing a Persuasive Job Application Letter • Body • Demonstrate that your background and training meet the job requirements. • Avoid repeating specific data from your résumé. experience.

Some recruiters prefer that you call them.Writing a Persuasive Job Application Letter • Closing • Ask for an interview. Tell when and where you can be reached (during office hours). • Make it easy to respond. 13–48 48 . Consider hooking the request to a statement reviewing your strongest points. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.

End Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 13–49 49 .

Asian Edition Ch.Essentials of Business Communication. 14–1 1 .

Succeeding in a Telephone Screening Interview • Gather supporting material (your résumé. and a calendar). telephone numbers of possible references. 14–2 2 . Asian Edition Ch. • Know your strengths and weaknesses. other numbers. • Know the keys to the job–what the job description calls for and how you meet those requirements. Essentials of Business Communication.

• If caught off guard. • Stand as you talk.Succeeding in a Telephone Screening Interview • Have your schedule for the next few weeks in front of you. • Remember that you should be talking about 80 percent of the time. Asian Edition Ch. you'll sound more energetic. • Be prepared to ask your own questions. Essentials of Business Communication. ask if you can call back from the telephone in your office. 14–3 3 .

Asian Edition Ch. company products.Preparing for a Hiring/ Placement Job Interview • Investigate the target organization. setbacks. accomplishments. How do your skills and accomplishments fit the position? Essentials of Business Communication. • Study the job description. Know the leaders. goals. 14–4 4 . competition. finances.

Preparing for a Hiring/ Placement Job Interview • Practice answers to typical interview questions. 14–5 5 . Asian Edition Ch. • Expect to explain problem areas on your résumé. Essentials of Business Communication. Get your best responses down pat. • Build interviewing experience with less important jobs first.

Preparing for a Hiring/ Placement Job Interview • Videotape or tape record a practice session to see how you come across. 14–6 6 . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

• Be courteous and congenial to everyone. Essentials of Business Communication.Sending Positive Nonverbal Messages • Arrive on time or a little early. 14–7 7 . Asian Edition Ch. • Wait for the interviewer to offer you a chair. • Greet the interviewer confidently. • Introduce yourself to the receptionist and wait to be seated. • Dress professionally.

Sending Positive Nonverbal Messages • Control your body movements. Asian Edition Ch. • Sound enthusiastic and interested–but sincere. Essentials of Business Communication. 14–8 8 . • Make frequent eye contact but don't get into a staring contest. • Smile enough to convey a positive attitude.

Asian Edition Ch. 14–9 9 . • Know how you will answer the most frequently asked questions.Fighting Job Interview Fears • Practice interviewing as often as you can. • Be ready with your success stories. Essentials of Business Communication. • Prepare 110 percent. • Rehearse your closing statement. particularly with real companies.

14–10 10 . This should give you confidence. • Remember that during some parts of the interview you will be in charge. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Fighting Job Interview Fears • Take deep breaths. particularly before the interview. • Remember that you are also evaluating the interviewer and his or her organization.

Five Important Areas Employers Will Probe • Communication skills. 14–11 11 . How well do you present yourself and your ideas? • Attitude. Asian Edition Ch. Do your educational training and general life experiences qualify you for this position? Essentials of Business Communication. Do you have a positive attitude about yourself and your career? • Aptitude.

and longterm career goals? Why do you want this job? Essentials of Business Communication. What are your short. How do your attitude and aptitude combine to contribute to this company? • Motivation. 14–12 12 . Asian Edition Ch.Five Important Areas Employers Will Probe • Potential.

If necessary. • Avoid answering with a simple "yes" or "no. • Be sure you understand the question asked. clarify vague questions by asking questions of your own. 14–13 13 .Answering Interview Questions Effectively • Use the interviewer's name occasionally. such as "By _ _ _ _ do you mean _ _ _ _?" • Use good English and enunciate clearly." Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

or conceited. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • Don't be a "know-it-all. 14–14 14 . competence. overly aggressive. • Do not lie. communication skills.Answering Interview Questions Effectively • Aim your answers at key requirements for the job and at characteristics that interviewers seek: expertise." Don't be overbearing. and enthusiasm for the job.

14–15 15 . Asian Edition Ch. vacations. avoid an attitude of "What can you do for me?" • Don't inquire about salary. • Show what you can do for the company.Answering Interview Questions Effectively • Never make derogatory statements about your present or former employers. Essentials of Business Communication. and bonuses until the interviewer raises the issue or until you are offered the position.

Asian Edition Ch. 14–16 16 .Ten Standard Interview Questions • What would you like to tell me about yourself? • Why do you want this job? • What best qualifies you for this job? • What are your key strengths? • What are your weaknesses? Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. 14–17 17 .Ten Standard Interview Questions • What did you like and dislike about your last job? • Do you consider yourself a team player? Why? • What are your career goals? • Where do you expect to be five years from now? • What salary do you expect to receive? Essentials of Business Communication.

work loads.Ten Good Questions for You to Ask • What will my duties be? • Do you have a written job description for this position? • What is it like working here. management practices. expected performance. and rewards? Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. in terms of the people. 14–18 18 .

Ten Good Questions for You to Ask • What training programs does this organization offer? • What are the possibilities for promotion? • What is the first problem that needs the attention of the person you will hire? • What is the organizational structure. and where does this position fit within it? Essentials of Business Communication. 14–19 19 . Asian Edition Ch.

Ten Good Questions for You to Ask
• Who would be my immediate supervisor? • What is the salary for this position? • When will I hear from you regarding further action on my application?
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 14–20 20

Closing a Job Interview and Following Up
• When the interviewer signals the end of the interview, stand up and shake hands. • Find out what action will follow. Ask, "When can I expect to hear from you?" • After his or her reply, say "If I don't hear from you by then, may I call you?" • Thank the interviewer. • Say goodbye to the receptionist.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 14–21 21

Closing a Job Interview and Following Up
• Take notes on the interview as soon as you leave. • Alert your references that they might be called. • Write a thank-you letter to the interviewer. Remind the interviewer of your visit. Show that you really want the job and that you are qualified for it.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 14–22 22

End

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 14–23 23

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–1

1

Importance of Ethical Communication
• Learning Ethical models
• Helps you discover and make explicit your ethical positions and standards • Enables you to diagnose the ethical position of your interlocutors. • Provides you with a conceptual framework that will guide you towards becoming a consistent ethical business communicator.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–2

2

Stages in Ethical Development: Lawrence Kohlberg (1973)
Level
Pre-conventional

Stages
• Fear of punishment • Desire for rewards as well as fear of punishment • Desire for approval • Sense of duty to obey the law • Regard for standard of society: utilitarianism • Respect for universal principles of justice & welfare

Orientation
Self

Justification
• Obedience to Authority; Punishment avoidance • Greed (Reward seeking) • Societal norms of a good person • Law & order • Truth, Fairness, Justice (Social Contract) • Conscience & moral rules guiding actions

Conventional

Others/Group

Post-conventional

Universal & humankind

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–3

3

Individual Ethical Frameworks
A. Utilitarian Approach
• Focuses on whether the decision made will deliver the greatest good to the greatest number of people affected. Recognizes that decisions made by people can have both positives and negative consequences.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–4

4

Individual Ethical Frameworks
B. Moral Rights Approach
• • Recognizes that human beings are born with fundamental rights and privileges. Stresses the importance of respecting and protecting the fundamental rights of all human beings.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–5

5

Individual Ethical Frameworks
C. Justice Approach
• Focuses on how the costs and benefits of an action are distributed and whether the distribution is fair and equitable. Three types of justice approach are: distributive, procedural, and compensatory justice.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–6

6

Individual Ethical Frameworks
1. Distributive Justice Approach
• Rewards and punishments should be fairly

distributed based on how much individuals contribute towards, or deviate from the given organizational goals. Discrimination (e.g., race, gender) is an example of the lack of distributive justice.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–7

7

Individual Ethical Frameworks
2. Procedural Justice Approach
• The policies, rules, and procedures relating to decisions and behaviors should be applied fairly and consistently. The criterion is whether the rules and processes governing the distribution of the rewards and punishments are fair.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–8

8

Individual Ethical Frameworks
3. Compensatory Justice Approach

Involves compensating someone for a past wrong decision or action. Requires that hurt parties be compensated for past injustice.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–9

9

Individual Ethical Frameworks
When adopting Justice Approach, the decision maker should consider:
1.whether costs and benefits are fairly distributed and how; 2.whether the procedures for distributing costs and benefits are fair and clear; 3.whether individuals who are unfairly affected by this course of action are fairly compensated.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 15–10 10

Corporate Social Responsibility (CRS)
Corporate social responsibility refers to:
• Obligations of a corporation. • How it acts in terms of its own corporate interests and profits in relation to the interests of its external stakeholders.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–11 11

Corporate Social Responsibility (CRS)
Corporate social responsibility includes concerns about:
•Green and environmental protection issues •Community service •Employment practices •General corporate philanthropy

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–12 12

Corporate Social Responsibility (CRS)
• Effects of corporate social responsibility on organization Examples:
• Johnson and Johnson – Tylenol case in 1980s • Vita Soy – Soybean Contamination case in 1997 • The Coca-cola – The recall of drinks after poisoning of a consumer in 2006 • Nike – Inappropriate labor practices in 1990s
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 15–13 13

Ethically Based Communication Style
A. Utilitarian Communication Style
• • Believes that the decision should benefit the majority. Utilitarians compare alternative options and are open and receptive to exploring different viewpoints.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 15–14 14

Ethically Based Communication Style
B. Moral Rights Communicating Style
• • The advocates believe that decisions and actions are either right or wrong. People holding a moral rights perspective focus on analyzing or explaining why a decision or action is either right or wrong, rather than the consequences of the decision or action.
Ch. 15–15 15

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Ethically Based Communication Style C. 15–16 16 . Justice Communication Style • Justice advocates are interested in how and whether the costs and benefits of decisions and actions are distributed equitably.

15–17 17 . Universalist Communication Style • Ethical universalism believes that ethical principles are universal and should be applied to all cultures.Ethically Based Communication Style D. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. • Universalists stress on conveying universal values.

Asian Edition Ch. do as Romans do. Relativists focus on the different values between cultures. 15–18 18 . When in Rome. Essentials of Business Communication. Relativist Communication Style • • • Believes that ethical behavior is influenced by the cultural context.Ethically Based Communication Style E.

Asian Edition Ch. 15–19 19 . Essentials of Business Communication. whereas the moral rights adherent is not interested in the pros and cons of the proposed actions.Possible Ethical Communication Conflict Utilitarian versus Moral Rights Communication Conflicts • The utilitarians may not be interested in the rights or wrongs of a decision.

relativists fail to recognize that certain fundamental rights are applicable to all cultures.Possible Ethical Communication Conflict Universalistic versus Relativistic Communication Conflicts •While universalists do not recognize that certain rights and traditions of a culture need to be respected. 15–20 20 . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

distributive. procedural.g. Asian Edition Ch. compensatory justice) Essentials of Business Communication. • Communication conflicts can still arise among individuals holding differing views about what constitutes justice (e. 15–21 21 .Possible Ethical Communication Conflict Justice Communication Conflicts • Communicators taking the justice approach have a shared perspective and a basis for successful communication.

15–22 22 • Essentials of Business Communication. This method is most costly and time consuming. Rational or Classical Model • • The decision maker selects the best option among alternatives to reach an optimal goal. Asian Edition . It encourages ethical communication by promoting extensive information flow and promotes an open process of communication.Ethics & Decision Models A. Ch.

This model may carry with it a greater possibility of unethical decision making and unequal communication. Asian Edition . 15–23 23 • • Essentials of Business Communication. Behavioral Model • The decision maker identifies one alternative at a time and selects the first satisfactory alternative identified. It is often adopted by managers who are constrained by information.Ethics & Decision Models B. Ch. costs and time.

Asian Edition . but a change of intention is lacking. 15–24 24 • Essentials of Business Communication.Ethics & Decision Models C. Retroactive Model • The decision maker chooses a favorable alternative early in the decision making process but carries it through the sequential steps of the rational decision making process with other alternatives. A favorable option is considered along with other alternatives. Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication. The individual may believe that: • their misconduct is not really illegal. 15–25 25 .Dealing with Ethical Dilemmas When encountering ethical dilemmas in dealing with “borderline” or “gray” area situations. Asian Edition Ch. or • the result is in everyone’s best interests. individuals tend to rationalize their inappropriate behavior.

End Essentials of Business Communication. 15–26 26 . Asian Edition Ch.

Essentials of Business Communication. 1–1 . Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch. 1–2 2 .Communication Skills Why do you need good communication skills? Essentials of Business Communication.

1–3 3 .Communication Skills Communication skills are essential for • • • • Job placement Job performance Career advancement Success in the new world of work Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Trends in the New Workplace • Flattened management hierarchies • • • • • • More participatory management Increased emphasis on teams Heightened global competition Innovative communication technologies New work environments Focus on information as a corporate asset Ch. Asian Edition . 1–4 4 Essentials of Business Communication.

The Process of Communication Feedback travels to sender NOISE Sender has idea Sender encodes message Channel carries message Receiver decodes message Receiver “understands” message Possible additional feedback to receiver NOISE Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 1–5 5 .

The Process of Communication How may the sender encode a message? What kinds of channels carry messages? How does a receiver decode a message? When is communication successful? How can a communicator provide for feedback? Verbally or nonverbally. TV. By speaking. When a message is understood as the sender intended it to be. body. gesturing. 1–6 6 . observing. reading. Ask questions. memos. telephone. voice. Essentials of Business Communication. don’t dominate the exchange. watch responses. Letters. e-mail. Asian Edition Ch. writing. Others? Hearing.

appearance Essentials of Business Communication. 1–7 7 . Asian Edition Ch. mannerisms. noisy surroundings • Psychological barriers—tuning out ideas that counter our values • Language problems—unfamiliar or charged words • Nonverbal distractions—clothing.Barriers to Effective Listening • Physical barriers—hearing disabilities.

Asian Edition Ch. 1–8 8 .Barriers to Effective Listening • Thought speed—our minds process thoughts faster than speakers express them • Faking attention—pretending to listen • Grandstanding—talking all the time or listening only for the next pause Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch.Ten Misconceptions About Listening • Listening is a matter of intelligence. • Speaking is more important than listening in the communication process. 1–9 9 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Fact: Speaking and listening are equally important. • Fact: Careful listening is a learned behavior.

Ten Misconceptions About Listening • Listening is easy and requires little energy. • Listening and hearing are the same process. • Fact: Active listeners undergo the same physiological changes as a person jogging. Essentials of Business Communication. • Fact: Listening is a conscious. Hearing is an involuntary act. Asian Edition Ch. selective process. 1–10 10 .

1–11 11 . • Fact: Speakers cannot make a person actually listen. Essentials of Business Communication.Ten Misconceptions About Listening • Speakers are able to command listening. • Hearing ability determines listening ability. • Fact: Listening happens mentally—between the ears. Asian Edition Ch.

• Fact: Nonverbal signals also help listeners gain understanding. Asian Edition Ch.Ten Misconceptions About Listening • Speakers are totally responsible for communication success. 1–12 12 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Fact: Communication is a two-way street. • Listening is only a matter of understanding a speaker’s words.

most practice merely reinforces negative behaviors. 1–13 13 . • Competence in listening develops naturally. • Fact: Untrained people listen at only 25 percent efficiency. • Fact: Without effective listening training. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Ten Misconceptions About Listening • Daily practice eliminates the need for listening training.

Capitalize on lag time.Tips for Becoming an Active Listener • • • • • • Stop talking. Listen between the lines. 1–14 14 . Control your surroundings. Essentials of Business Communication. Listen for main points. Asian Edition Ch. Establish a receptive mind-set.

Provide feedback. Hold your fire. Essentials of Business Communication. 1–15 15 . Asian Edition Ch. not appearances. Take selective notes.Tips for Becoming an Active Listener • • • • Judge ideas.

Nonverbal Communication • The eyes. and body send silent messages. 1–16 16 . face. • Eye contact • Facial expression • Posture and gestures • Appearance sends silent messages. Asian Edition Ch. • Appearance of business documents • Appearance of people Essentials of Business Communication.

• Time (punctuality and structure of) • Space (arrangement of objects in) • Territory (privacy zones) Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. space. 1–17 17 . and territory send silent messages.Nonverbal Communication • Time.

Asian Edition Ch.Nonverbal Communication • An example from the world of Dilbert: Essentials of Business Communication. 1–18 18 .

Essentials of Business Communication. Avoid assigning nonverbal meanings out of context. Asian Edition Ch. Improve your decoding skills.Tips for Improving Your Nonverbal Skills • • • • • Establish and maintain eye contact. Probe for more information. 1–19 19 . Use posture to show interest.

Asian Edition Ch. • Appreciate the power of appearance. 1–20 20 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Observe yourself on videotape.Tips for Improving Your Nonverbal Skills • Associate with people from diverse cultures. • Enlist friends and family.

1–21 21 . Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Culture and Communication Good communication demands special sensitivity and skills when communicators are from different cultures.

suspicious of evasiveness • Importance of time Precious. self-assertion. preference for informal dress • Direct communication style Impatient. personal achievement • Informality Little emphasis on rituals.Culture and Communication Key North American Beliefs: • Individualism Initiative. ceremonies. correlates with productivity Essentials of Business Communication. 1–22 22 . rank. literal. Asian Edition Ch.

and Foreigner’s Views U . rud e. casu al E galitarian D irect. 1–23 23 .Comparing U.S. P ersons Info rm al. frien dly.S . o ppo rtunistic P rom ise m o re than they d eliver Essentials of Business Communication. ag gressive E fficient G oal/achievem ento riented U nd isciplined. op pressive O bsessed w ith tim e. Asian Edition Ch. o verly p erson al In sensitive to status B lun t.S P ersons’ V iew s Foreigners’ V iew s of Them selves of U .

fearsom e W eak. 1–24 24 . untrustworthy Essentials of Business Communication.Comparing U.S. Persons Profit-oriented Resourceful.S Persons’ Views Foreigners’ Views of Them selves of U. find identity in work Enthusiastic. deals m ore im portant than people Self-absorbed. and Foreigner’s Views U.S. prefer hardsell Open M aterialistic W ork-oriented. Asian Edition Ch. progressive Dynam ic. ingenious Individualistic. equating “new” with “best” Driven Deceptive.

Asian Edition Ch.” “The early bird gets the worm.S Proverbs “The squeaking wheel gets the grease. 1–25 25 .Proverbs Reflect Culture What do these proverbs indicate about this culture and what it values? U.” Essentials of Business Communication. try again. try.” “Waste not.” “He who holds the gold makes the rules.” “If at first you don’t succeed. want not.

Proverbs Reflect Culture What do these proverbs indicate about this culture and what it values? Chinese Proverbs “A man who waits for a roast duck to fly into his mouth must wait a very. Asian Edition Ch. give him a net.” “Give a man a fish. and he will live for a lifetime.” “A man who says it cannot be done should not interrupt a man doing it. and he will live for a day.” Essentials of Business Communication. 1–26 26 . very long time.

” (Japanese) Essentials of Business Communication.” (German) “Words do not make flour. 1–27 27 .Proverbs Reflect Culture What do these proverbs indicate about these cultures and what they value? “No one is either rich or poor who has not helped himself to be so.” (Italian) “The nail that sticks up gets pounded down. Asian Edition Ch.

1–28 28 . Asian Edition Ch.High-Context and Low-Context Cultures High Context Japanese Arab Latin American Spanish English Italian French North American Scandinavian German Swiss Low Context Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. 1–29 29 .High-Context and Low-Context Cultures High-Context Cultures • Relational • Collectivist • Intuitive • Contemplative Low-Context Cultures • Linear • Individualistic • Logical • Action-oriented Essentials of Business Communication.

Check frequently for comprehension. Speak slowly and enunciate clearly.Improving Communication With Multicultural Audiences • Oral Messages • • • • • • Learn foreign phrases. 1–30 30 Essentials of Business Communication. Ch. Use simple English. Asian Edition . Observe eye messages. Encourage accurate feedback.

Asian Edition Ch. 1–31 31 .Improving Communication With Multicultural Audiences Oral Messages (continued) • • • • Accept blame. Listen without interrupting. Essentials of Business Communication. Remember to smile! Follow up in writing.

Use correct grammar. Cite numbers carefully. Avoid ambiguous expressions. Ch. 1–32 32 Essentials of Business Communication. Use short sentences and short paragraphs. Asian Edition .Improving Communication With Multicultural Audiences • Written Messages • • • • • • Adapt to local formats. Strive for clarity.

Essentials of Business Communication. and give feedback.Effective Communication With Diverse Workplace Audiences • Understand the value of differences. thoughtful. and openminded listening. Asian Edition Ch. • Don’t expect total conformity. use. • Practice focused. • Invite. 1–33 33 . • Create zero tolerance for bias and stereotypes.

Asian Edition Ch. • Learn about other cultures and identity groups.Effective Communication With Diverse Workplace Audiences • Make fewer workplace assumptions. • Seek common ground. Essentials of Business Communication. 1–34 34 . • Learn about your own cultural self.

Asian Edition Ch.End Essentials of Business Communication. 1–35 .

1-1 Ch. Asian Edition Ch. 2–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition . you need • • • • Good teaching materials with excellent model documents An effective writing process A trainer (like your instructor) Practice Ch.Improving Your Business Writing • The best business writing is • Audience oriented • Purposeful • Economical • To improve your writing skills. 2–2 2 Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. 2–3 3 .The Writing Process Stage 1: Prewriting Analyzing Anticipating Adapting Stage 2: Writing Researching Organizing Composing Stage 3: Revising Revising Proofreading Evaluating Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. 2–4 4 .Factors Determining Channel Selection • Importance of message • Amount and speed of feedback required • Necessity of a permanent record • Cost of the channel • Degree of formality required Essentials of Business Communication.

voice mail. memo. Web • What channel is best to announce decreased insurance benefits for 250 employees? E-mail or memo Essentials of Business Communication. 2–5 5 . fax.Factors Determining Channel Selection Possible Channels: E-mail. meeting. Asian Edition Ch. letter. telephone. conversation. report.

Factors Determining Channel Selection • What channel is best for a sales message promoting a new product to customers? Letter • What channel is best for responding to similar customer inquiries? Web. telephone Essentials of Business Communication. letter. Asian Edition Ch. 2–6 6 .

Try this: You will enjoy total peace of mind with our affordable hospitalization plan that meets all your needs. 2–7 7 Essentials of Business Communication. Ch.Reader Benefits Shape your statements to involve the reader. Strive to develop the “you” attitude. Instead of this: We are promoting a new plan that we believe has many outstanding benefits. Asian Edition .

Reader Benefits Shape your statements to involve the reader. Try this: You may begin making purchases on your new account in two weeks. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. Instead of this: Before we can allow you to purchase items on this new account. 2–8 8 . we must wait two weeks to verify your credit. Strive to develop the “you” attitude.

Try this: Your quick response means your vacation schedules will be ready next week. 2–9 9 . Asian Edition Ch.Reader Benefits Shape your statements to involve the reader. Essentials of Business Communication. Instead of this: I need your response immediately so that I can make the employee vacation schedule by next week. Strive to develop the “you” attitude.

2–10 10 . Essentials of Business Communication. Try this: I’m happy to . .Conversational Language Instead of this: The undersigned takes pleasure in . . . Asian Edition Ch. . . Instead of this: It may be of some concern to you to learn that your check has been received and your account has been credited for $250. Try this: We’ve credited your account for $250. .

2–11 11 . Instead of this: We cannot fill your order until we receive an exact model number. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. Try this: We can fill your order once we receive an exact model number.Positive Language Instead of this: Employees may not use the First Street entrance during remodeling. Try this: Employees may use the Market Street entrance during remodeling.

Asian Edition Ch. They may imply a hidden message that the writer does not intend. Think twice before using the following negative expressions.Hidden Messages Some words and phrases convey a negative and unpleasant tone. Essentials of Business Communication. 2–12 12 .

Asian Edition Ch.Hidden Messages Negative Language: You overlooked You state that You failed to You claim that You are wrong You do not understand Your delay You forgot to Essentials of Business Communication. 2–13 13 .

Try this: Have you called a salesperson? All executives have their own offices. 2–14 14 . Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Inclusive Language Instead of this: Have you called a salesman? Every executive has his own office.

I’m happy to welcome you to our staff.Try Your Skill Revise this sentence to create a more conversational tone and to state your idea positively. • The undersigned takes great pleasure in welcoming you to our staff. Essentials of Business Communication. 2–15 15 . Asian Edition Ch.

Try Your Skill Revise this sentence to create a more conversational tone and to state your idea positively. • We cannot send your order from our warehouse until June 1. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. Your order will be on its way to you June 1. 2–16 16 .

You have 15 different financial plans from which to choose. • I have 15 different financial plans to offer my investors. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Try Your Skill Revise this sentence to create reader benefits. 2–17 17 .

you won’t have to drive to work for the first three months because you can carpool. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Try Your Skill Revise this sentence to create reader benefits. 2–18 18 . • We want all newly hired employees to use our carpooling program for at least three months. As a newly hired employee.

Simple Translation: You may wish to comment on whether the proposed plan meets the requirements of the 2003 law. Asian Edition Ch. bureaucratese.Plain Language Avoid federalese. meets the requirements of the 2003 law. a comment on whether the proposed plan. 2–19 19 . Essentials of Business Communication. to the Department of Labor official described above. and inflated language. Federalese: Each person to whom the request is herein addressed is henceforth solicited to submit. in his or her considered view. or to have his or her department representative submit.

Use short. Less familiar words: encounter extrapolate obligatory terminate Simple alternatives: meet project required end Ch. difficult. Asian Edition . and common words whenever possible. simple.Familiar Words Avoid long. and unfamiliar words. 2–20 20 Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Try Your Skill Revise this sentence using simpler language. You may meet difficulties in ending the contract. 2–21 21 . • You may encounter difficulties in terminating the contract.

Try Your Skill Revise this sentence using simpler language. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. • As stipulated. 2–22 22 . we projected the budget figures for two years. we extrapolated the budget figures for two years. As required.

Asian Edition Ch. 2–23 23 .Try Your Skill Revise this sentence using simpler language. • Will you utilize workbooks during the obligatory training period? Will you use workbooks during the required training period? Essentials of Business Communication.

We expect that most of the choices will be basic enough to meet our needs. • We anticipate that a majority of the alternatives will be fundamental enough to meet our requirements. 2–24 24 . Asian Edition Ch.Try Your Skill Revise this sentence using simpler language. Essentials of Business Communication.

2–25 25 . and Web pages • Using collaborative software for team writing Essentials of Business Communication. presentations.Seven Ways Technology Can Improve Your Business Writing • • • • • • Fighting writer’s block Collecting information electronically Outlining and organizing ideas Improving correctness and precision Adding graphics for emphasis Designing and producing professional-looking documents. Asian Edition Ch.

End Essentials of Business Communication. 2–26 26 . Asian Edition Ch. 1-26 Ch.

3–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

• Access electronically (Internet. Asian Edition Ch. surveys. questionnaires. focus groups). • Go to the source (interviews. magazines.Formal Research Methods for Gathering Information • Search manually (books. Essentials of Business Communication. journals). databases. 3–2 2 . compact discs). • Conduct scientific experiments (measure variables using control groups).

Informal Research Methods for Gathering Information • Look in organization files. • Talk with your boss. Asian Edition Ch. • Interview the target audience. • Brainstorm for ideas. 3–3 3 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Conduct an informal survey.

evidence B.Organize Information With an Outline Title I. Detail. evidence 2. evidence 2. First major component A. illustration. 3–4 4 . illustration. evidence Essentials of Business Communication. Second subpoint 1. Detail. Detail. Detail. Asian Edition Ch. illustration. illustration. First subpoint 1.

Second major component A.Organize Information With an Outline II. Asian Edition Ch. evidence 2. Detail. illustration. illustration. evidence Essentials of Business Communication. 3–5 5 . Detail. First subpoint 1.

Strive to make each component exclusive (no overlapping). • Use details. • Don’t put a single item under a major component. Divide the topic into three to five main points. 3–6 6 .Organize Information With an Outline Tips: • • • • Define main topic in title. Asian Edition Ch. Break the components into subpoints. and evidence to support subpoints. Essentials of Business Communication. illustrations.

3–7 7 .Organizing Business Messages Direct Strategy Main idea comes first followed by details and explanations Indirect Strategy Explanation precedes main idea Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition .Organizing Business Messages Direct Strategy Advantages: • Saves reader’s time • Sets a proper frame of mind • Prevents frustration • Appears businesslike Indirect Strategy Advantages: • Respects feelings of audience • Encourages a fair hearing • Minimizes a negative reaction Ch. 3–8 8 Essentials of Business Communication.

3–9 9 .Organizing Business Messages Direct Strategy Useful when: • Receiver is receptive • Receiver requires no education about topic • Message is routine Indirect Strategy Useful when: • Receiver may be upset • Receiver may be hostile • Receiver must be persuaded or educated • Message is sensitive Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Asian Edition Ch.Effective Sentences Complete sentences have subjects and verbs and make sense (are capable of standing alone). Example: Subject Verb Employees send many e-mail messages. Essentials of Business Communication. 3–10 10 .

Independent clauses can stand alone. you reveal yourself. 3–11 11 . dependent clauses rely on independent clauses for their meaning. Essentials of Business Communication.Effective Sentences Clauses also have subjects and verbs. Example: Dependent Clause Independent Clause When you speak. Asian Edition Ch.

I work at the mall. 3–12 12 . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. Example: Phrase Phrase In the afternoon.Effective Sentences Phrases are groups of related words without subjects and verbs.

many candidates applied. 3–13 13 . Many candidates applied. Essentials of Business Communication. Fragment Even though the pay was low.Effective Sentences Avoid sentence fragments. Revision: Even though the pay was low. Asian Edition Ch.

but only one was hired. only one was hired. Essentials of Business Communication. Only one was hired. Two candidates applied. Fused Sentences Two candidates applied only one was hired. 3–14 14 . Two candidates applied. Asian Edition Ch.Effective Sentences Avoid run-on (fused) sentences. Revisions: Two candidates applied.

3–15 15 . Essentials of Business Communication. Many were qualified. Jeff was hired. Jeff was hired. Asian Edition Ch. Jeff was hired. Revisions: Many were qualified. Many were qualified.Effective Sentences Avoid comma-splice sentences. Jeff was hired. but Jeff was hired. Many were qualified. Comma Splice Many were qualified. however.

You can create a Web-based job portfolio. run-on sentences. 3–16 16 . Asian Edition Ch.Try Your Skill Revise the following to avoid fragments. and comma-splices. • You can create a Web-based job portfolio it will impress potential employers. Essentials of Business Communication. it will impress potential employers.

run-on sentences. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. Send a scannable résumé when you apply for a job. 3–17 17 .Try Your Skill Revise the following to avoid fragments. • Send a scannable résumé. When you apply for a job. and comma-splices.

Communication skills are also in great demand. run-on sentences. 3–18 18 . • Although technical skills are important. Asian Edition Ch. communication skills are also in great demand. Essentials of Business Communication.Try Your Skill Revise the following to avoid fragments. and comma-splices. Although technical skills are important.

Asian Edition Ch. and comma-splices. run-on sentences. 3–19 19 . College used to be for young people. Essentials of Business Communication. many older students now seek degrees. • College used to be for young people. however many older students now seek degrees.Try Your Skill Revise the following to avoid fragments. however.

Asian Edition Ch.Emphasis Through Mechanics Underlining: Which of these methods do you prefer? Essentials of Business Communication. 3–20 20 .

Asian Edition Ch.Emphasis Through Mechanics Italics and Boldface: The use of boldface and italics captures the reader’s attention. Essentials of Business Communication. 3–21 21 .

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 3–22 22 .Emphasis Through Mechanics All Caps: Notice how EXPENSE-FREE stands out.

Emphasis Through Mechanics Dashes: Other methods–including dashes–may be used. 3–23 23 . Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Third item Essentials of Business Communication.Emphasis Through Mechanics Tabulation: Listing items vertically emphasizes them: 1. Second item 3. First item 2. Asian Edition Ch. 3–24 24 .

Emphasis Through Mechanics
• Other means of achieving mechanical emphasis include the following: use of white space, color, lines, boxes, columns, titles, headings, and subheadings. • Which of the above techniques are appropriate in business letters? Memos? E-mail messages? Reports?
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 3–25 25

Emphasis and Deemphasis Through Style
• To emphasize an idea:
• Use a vivid expression, such as in bug-free software rather than dependable software. • Label the idea with expressions such as more importantly, the principal reason, or the best alternative. • Put the important idea first or last in the sentence. • Put the important idea in a simple sentence or in an independent clause.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 3–26 26

Emphasis and Deemphasis Through Style
• To deemphasize an idea:
• Use general, rather than specific, words (some customers complained, rather than 125 customers complained). • Place the idea in a dependent clause connected to an independent clause containing a positive idea. Example:
Although items cannot be returned for cash, you will receive store credit for any returned purchases.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 3–27 27

Active- and Passive-Voice Verbs
Active-voice verbs show the subject performing the action. Examples:
Most major employers require drug testing.
(Active voice; the subject is acting)

Dr. Smith recommended Tina for the job.
(Active voice; the subject is acting)

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 3–28 28

Active- and Passive-Voice Verbs
In passive-voice sentences, the subject is being acted upon. Passive-voice verbs require helper verbs. Examples:
Drug testing is required by most major employers.
(Passive voice; the subject is being acted upon)

Tina was recommended for the job by Dr. Smith.
(Passive voice; the subject is being acted upon)

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 3–29 29

Active- and Passive-Voice Verbs
• Use the active voice for most business writing. • Use the passive voice to emphasize an action or the recipient of the action–rather than the actor (Specialists were hired; Laura was honored). • Use the passive voice to break bad news (Although your lease cannot be renewed, we can offer . . . ).
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 3–30 30

Try Your Skill
Convert the following sentence to active voice. You may have to add a subject.
• Our membership meeting was postponed by the president. The president postponed our membership meeting.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 3–31 31

Try Your Skill
Convert the following sentence to active voice. You may have to add a subject.
• The résumés of job candidates are sorted quickly by the software program Resumix. The software program Resumix sorts résumés of job candidates quickly.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 3–32 32

Try Your Skill
Convert the following sentence to active voice. You may have to add a subject.
• Computer paper was ordered yesterday. Rachel ordered computer paper yesterday.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 3–33 33

Try Your Skill
Convert the following sentence to passive voice.
• We must delay shipment of your merchandise because of heavy demand. Your merchandise shipment must be delayed because of heavy demand.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 3–34 34

Try Your Skill
Convert the following sentence to passive voice.
• The technician could not install the computer program. The computer program could not be installed.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 3–35 35

Developing Parallelism
Parallel expression results from balanced construction. Match nouns with nouns, verbs with verbs, phrases with phrases, and clauses with clauses.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 3–36 36

Developing Parallelism
The process of writing involves organizing, composing, and revision. Parallel: The process of writing involves organizing, composing, and revising. (Matching endings of verbals)
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 3–37 37

Poor:

Developing Parallelism
We are very concerned with the quality of raw materials, where they are located, and how much it costs to transport them. Parallel: We are very concerned with the quality, location, and transportation costs of raw materials. (Matching nouns)
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 3–38 38

Poor:

Developing Parallelism
Serena takes the telephone orders, Matt locates the items in the warehouse, and the items are sent by Yolanda. Parallel: Serena takes the telephone orders, Matt locates the items in the warehouse, and Yolanda sends the items. (Matching voices of verbs)
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 3–39 39

Poor:

Try Your Skill
How could parallelism be improved in the following sentence?
• Our knowledge management system focuses on the collecting, storage, and sharing of best practices. Our knowledge management system focuses on the collecting, storing, and sharing of best practices.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 3–40 40

Try Your Skill
How could parallelism be improved in the following sentence?
• We are pleased to recommend Elizabeth because she has sincerity, she is reliable, and she works with diligence. We are pleased to recommend Elizabeth because she is sincere, reliable, and diligent.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 3–41 41

Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers
For clarity, modifiers must be close to the words they describe or limit. Be particularly careful to place a logical subject immediately after an introductory verbal phrase.

Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition

Ch. 3–42 42

Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers
Poor: After considering the problem carefully, new procedures were suggested by management.

Revised: After considering the problem carefully, management suggested new procedures.
Essentials of Business Communication, Asian Edition
Ch. 3–43 43

Revised: Any student who is enrolled in the college has full online privileges.Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers Poor: Any student has full online privileges who is enrolled in the college. Asian Edition Ch. 3–44 44 . Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers Poor: It’s hard to understand why employees would not go to our technical support staff with software problems. Revised: It’s hard to understand why employees with software problems would not go to our technical support staff. 3–45 45 .

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. we finally located the Web site. the Web site was finally located. 3–46 46 .Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers Poor: Using a search engine. Revised: Using a search engine.

one must have two years of experience. Retain the introductory phrase. Asian Edition Ch. • To be hired. Essentials of Business Communication. two years of experience is required. To be hired.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to correct any misplaced modifiers. 3–47 47 .

3–48 48 .Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to correct any misplaced modifiers. Asian Edition Ch. • Dipped in butter. you can really enjoy a fine lobster. Essentials of Business Communication. Retain the introductory phrase. Dipped in butter. a fine lobster can truly be enjoyed.

• She died in the house in which she was born at the age of 88. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. At the age of 88.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to correct any misplaced modifiers. 3–49 49 . she died in the house in which she was born.

Asian Edition Ch. fill out this application.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to correct any misplaced modifiers. • To receive an employment form. “You” is the understood subject of a command. Essentials of Business Communication. (Tricky!) The sentence is correct as it stands. 3–50 50 .

3–51 51 . Repeat a key idea or key word(s). develop coherence by using one of these devices: 1. Asian Edition Ch. Next month we plan to launch a promotion for our new Web site.Three Ways to Achieve Paragraph Coherence To help guide your reader or listener from one thought to another. Essentials of Business Communication. The promotion will involve newspaper and TV campaigns.

They are more profitable when left on deposit for long periods of time. Asian Edition Ch. Considerable interest is now being shown in our extended certificates of deposit. Essentials of Business Communication.Three Ways to Achieve Paragraph Coherence 2. Use a pronoun. 3–52 52 .

3–53 53 Essentials of Business Communication.Three Ways to Achieve Paragraph Coherence 3. second meanwhile next until when. Asian Edition . after first. Use an appropriate transitional expression. Time Association before. whenever Contrast although but however instead nevertheless on the other hand Ch.

Three Ways to Achieve Paragraph Coherence 3. Cause–Effect consequently for this reason hence therefore Additional Idea furthermore in addition likewise moreover similarly Essentials of Business Communication. 3–54 54 . Asian Edition Ch. Use an appropriate transitional expression.

3–55 55 . Asian Edition Ch. Illustration in this way for example Essentials of Business Communication.Three Ways to Achieve Paragraph Coherence 3. Use an appropriate transitional expression.

Essentials of Business Communication.Paragraph Length Paragraphs with eight or fewer printed lines look inviting and readable. Asian Edition Ch. 3–56 56 .

Decide whether to sprint write (get your thoughts down quickly and revise later) or revise as you go. 3–57 57 . Prohibit calls. • Imagine you are talking to a reader or listener. Organize information using an outline. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. Find a quiet place to concentrate and work. and interruptions. visitors.Composing the First Draft • • • • • Complete all necessary research.

End Essentials of Business Communication. 3–58 58 . Asian Edition Ch.

4–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

4–2 2 • Proofreading: Essentials of Business Communication. spelling.Revising and Proofreading • Revising: Improving content and sentence structure. May involve adding. Asian Edition . punctuation. and mechanics. Correcting grammar. Ch. cutting. recasting. format.

Instead of this: We are of the opinion that Please feel free to In addition to the above At this point in time Despite the fact that Try this: We think Please Also Now Although Ch. Asian Edition 3 .Concise Wording Revise your messages to eliminate wordiness. 4–3 Essentials of Business Communication.

Try this: We don’t generally cash personal checks. 4–4 4 Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition .Wordy Prepositional Phrases Instead of this: We don’t as a general rule cash personal checks. Students seldom receive parking tickets. Students in very few instances receive parking tickets. Ch. She calls monthly meetings. She calls meetings on a monthly basis.

I am writing this letter to say thanks to everyone who voted. Essentials of Business Communication. 4–5 5 . Asian Edition Ch. Thanks to everyone who voted.Long Lead-Ins Instead of this: This memo is to inform you that all employees meet today. Try this: All employees meet today.

Asian Edition Ch. 4–6 6 .Outdated Expressions Outdated: as per your request pursuant to your request attached hereunto under separate cover Modern: at your request at your request attached separately Essentials of Business Communication.

Essentials of Business Communication. Instead of this: Try this: The manager is actually quite pleased with your proposal because the plan is definitely workable. 4–7 7 . quite. Asian Edition Ch. and so forth. really. avoid excessive use of adverbs such as definitely. actually. The manager is pleased with your proposal because the plan is workable.Needless Adverbs To sound more credible and to streamline your writing.

Try this: Two employees should be promoted. Asian Edition . Instead of this: There are two employees who should be promoted. It was Lisa and Jeff who were singled out. Ch. 4–8 8 Essentials of Business Communication. Lisa and Jeff were singled out.Fillers Revise sentences to avoid fillers such as there and it when used merely to take up space.

wordy prepositional phrases. Asian Edition Ch. • This e-mail message is to inform you that in all probability we will actually finish in two weeks. and/or other forms of wordiness. outdated expressions. needless adverbs. Essentials of Business Communication. fillers. 4–9 9 .Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid a long lead-in. We will probably finish in two weeks.

needless adverbs. wordy prepositional phrases. and/or other forms of wordiness.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid a long lead-in. outdated expressions. Many brokers are certain that these stocks are safe. fillers. • There are many brokers who are quite certain that these stocks are completely safe. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. 4–10 10 .

Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid a long lead-in. two contracts are attached. wordy prepositional phrases. and/or other forms of wordiness. there are two contracts that are attached hereto. • Pursuant to your request. 4–11 11 . As you requested. outdated expressions. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. needless adverbs. fillers.

wordy prepositional phrases. outdated expressions. employees may not use computers for personal activities. Generally. fillers.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid a long lead-in. and/or other forms of wordiness. Asian Edition Ch. 4–12 12 . needless adverbs. Essentials of Business Communication. • All employees are hereby informed that as a general rule computers may not be used for personal activities.

What words could be omitted in these expressions? advance warning close proximity exactly identical filled to capacity final outcome necessary requisite new beginning past history refer back thought and consideration Essentials of Business Communication.Redundant Words Avoid unnecessarily repetitious words. 4–13 13 . Asian Edition Ch.

Computer jargon: queue export bandwidth Alternative language: list of documents waiting to be printed transfer data from one program to another Internet capacity Is jargon ever permissible? Essentials of Business Communication.Jargon Avoid technical terms and special terminology that readers would not recognize. Asian Edition Ch. 4–14 14 .

naïve someone stupid or silly relax Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Slang Avoid slang (informal expressions with arbitrary or extravagantly changed meanings). to nag. 4–15 15 . to complain unaware. to bag on clueless turkey chill/chill out to tease.

Slang An example from the world of Dilbert: Essentials of Business Communication. 4–16 16 . Asian Edition Ch.

We could go no further. Substitute more precise words. you should keep your nose to the grindstone. Finally. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.Clichés Avoid clichés (overused expressions). Last but not least. you should work diligently. 4–17 17 . We had reached the end of our rope.

Finally. the attorney referred back to an exactly identical case. • Last but not least.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid slang. Essentials of Business Communication. the attorney referred to an identical case. and redundancies. clichés. Asian Edition Ch. 4–18 18 .

and redundancies. Asian Edition Ch. we could have sold out before our stocks tanked. 4–19 19 . clichés. • With a little advance warning.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid slang. With warning. Essentials of Business Communication. we could have sold out before our stocks hit bottom.

4–20 20 . clichés. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication. Miller. and redundancies. Miller.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence to avoid slang. demanded final completion by January 1. who is straightforward. • Ms. Ms. demanded completion by January 1. who shoots straight from the shoulder.

lackluster.Precise Verbs • Revise your writing to include precise verbs instead of general. 4–21 21 . Market researchers said that profits would improve. Market researchers predicted improved profits. all-purpose ones. Essentials of Business Communication. What more precise verbs could replace said? Market researchers forecasted improved profits. Asian Edition Ch. Market researchers promised improved profits.

An application must be made by the job seeker. Essentials of Business Communication. The job seeker must apply. Asian Edition Ch. 4–22 22 .Precise Verbs • Revise verbs that have been converted to nouns. The manager came to the realization that telecommuting made sense. The manager realized that telecommuting made sense.

4–23 23 . Asian Edition Ch. Could they be more efficiently and forcefully converted to verbs? Essentials of Business Communication.Precise Verbs • TIP: Look for words ending in tion or ment.

The seller promised to e-mail [telephone or fax] you. 4–24 24 . Asian Edition Ch. • The seller said he would contact you.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence using more precise verbs. Essentials of Business Communication.

Asian Edition Ch. • We must give encouragement to our team. We must encourage our team. 4–25 25 . Essentials of Business Communication.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence centering the action in a verb.

Asian Edition Ch. • Have you made an application for employment? Have you applied for employment? Essentials of Business Communication.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence centering the action in a verb. 4–26 26 .

Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. The general manager calculates monthly sales. 4–27 27 . • A duty of the general manager is the calculation of monthly sales.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence centering the action in a verb.

Essentials of Business Communication.Try Your Skill Revise the following sentence centering the action in a verb. • The establishment of new methods was effected by Kevin. Asian Edition Ch. Kevin established new methods. 4–28 28 .

Essentials of Business Communication.Concrete Nouns Revise your writing to include specific. Jeff Jones asked for a 10 percent salary increase. concrete nouns instead of general. The man asked for a raise. An employee presented a proposal. Asian Edition Ch. 4–29 29 . Kelly Keeler. abstract ones. presented a plan to stagger hours. production manager.

dynamic adjectives instead of overworked. Asian Edition Ch. comprehensive). allpurpose ones. The report was persuasive (or detailed. painstaking. complete. original. The report was good. 4–30 30 . (Possible revisions?) Essentials of Business Communication.Vivid Adjectives Revise your writing to include descriptive. thorough. The report was bad.

Asian Edition Ch.What to Watch for in Proofreading Spelling Grammar Punctuation Names and numbers Format Essentials of Business Communication. 4–31 31 .

• Reduce your reading speed. Essentials of Business Communication. Be prepared to find errors. Asian Edition Ch. preferably double-spaced.How to Proofread Complex Documents • • • • Allow adequate time. Read once for meaning and once for grammar/mechanics. Print a copy. 4–32 32 .

Asian Edition Ch.How to Proofread Complex Documents For documents that must be perfect: • Have someone read aloud the original while someone else checks the printout. 4–33 33 . • Spell names. • Note capitalization. • Spell difficult words. Essentials of Business Communication. • Note punctuation.

4–34 34 .End Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

5–1 1 .Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Smart E-Mail Practices • Getting Started • Consider composing off line. Asian Edition Ch. 5–2 2 . • Type the receiver’s address correctly. Essentials of Business Communication. • Avoid using a misleading subject line.

Asian Edition Ch. • Never respond when you’re angry. 5–3 3 . Essentials of Business Communication. • Don’t send anything you wouldn’t want published. • Care about correctness. Tone.Smart E-Mail Practices • Content. Correctness • Be concise. • Resist humor and tongue-in-cheek comments. • Don’t use e-mail to avoid contact.

5–4 4 . Essentials of Business Communication.” • Consider using identifying labels. • Announce attachments.” “URGENT.Smart E-Mail Practices • Netiquette • Limit any tendency to send blanket copies.” “FYI.” “RE. • Never send “spam. Asian Edition Ch.” • Use capital letters only for emphasis or for titles. such as “ACTION.

Asian Edition Ch.Smart E-Mail Practices • Netiquette (continued) • Seek permission before forwarding. Essentials of Business Communication. 5–5 5 . • Don’t automatically return the sender’s message. • Revise the subject line if the topic in a series of messages (a “thread”) changes. • Scan all messages before replying to each individually.

Asian Edition Ch.Smart E-Mail Practices • Personal Use • Don’t use company computers for personal matters. • Assume that all e-mail is monitored. 5–6 6 . Essentials of Business Communication.

• Consider cultural differences. 5–7 7 .Smart E-Mail Practices • Other Smart Practices • Use design to improve readability of longer messages. Essentials of Business Communication. • Double-check before hitting the Send button. Asian Edition Ch.

5–8 8 . Asian Edition Ch. Entered automatically Entered automatically Include meaningful topic summary.com>).Formatting E-Mail Messages • Guide Words To: Consider keying receiver’s full name with e-mail address in angle brackets (Heather Jones<hjones@peach. From: Date: Subject: Essentials of Business Communication.

” or “Good morning!” • Include name in first line (“Thanks. . 5–9 9 .”). for your help . Heather.” “Dear Heather:.Formatting E-Mail Messages • Salutation Options • No salutation • “Heather. Asian Edition Ch. . Essentials of Business Communication.” “Hi.

5–10 10 .Formatting E-Mail Messages • Body • Cover just one topic. Asian Edition Ch. • Use uppercase and lowercase letters. • Use short line length if message might be forwarded. Essentials of Business Communication.

5–11 11 . Asian Edition Ch.Formatting E-Mail Messages • Closing • Consider a complimentary closing such as “Best” or “Cheers. Essentials of Business Communication.” • Include your name and identification– especially in messages to outsiders.

5–12 12 . 2004 9:05:12 AM EST Matt Ferranto <mferranto@qualcom. Asian Edition Ch. September 3. As part of their supervision.Sample E-Mail Message Date: To: From: Subject: Matt: Two interns will work in your department from September 20 through November 30.com> Supervising Two Assigned Interns Essentials of Business Communication.com> Brooke Johnson <bjohnson@qualcom. you should do the following: * Develop a work plan describing their duties.

Asian Edition Ch. Please examine the packet being sent to you. Call me at Ext. It contains forms and additional information about the two students assigned to your department. 5–13 13 . Brooke Essentials of Business Communication. * Assess their professionalism in completing assigned work. 248 if you have questions. Best.Sample E-Mail Message * Supervise their work to ensure positive results.

5–14 14 .” Align all words after the colon following “Subject.” and “Subject.” • Top Margin • Full sheet–start on line 13.” “To.Formatting Hard-Copy Memos • Guide Words • Double-space “Date. Essentials of Business Communication. • Half sheet–start on line 7.” “From. Asian Edition Ch.

• Spacing • Single-space. Asian Edition Ch. 5–15 15 . Essentials of Business Communication.Formatting Hard-Copy Memos • Side Margins • Leave 1 to 1¼ inches.

Sample Hard-Copy Memo line 13 DATE: TO: FROM: Qualcom Enterprises Interoffice Memo September 3. Asian Edition Ch. 5–16 16 . 2004 1 blank line Matt Ferranto Brooke Johnson SUBJECT: Supervising Two Assigned Interns Essentials of Business Communication.

As part of their supervision. It contains forms and additional information about the two students assigned to your Essentials of Business Communication. Please examine the packet being sent to you. you should do the following: • Develop a work plan describing their duties.Sample Hard-Copy Memo 2 blank lines Two interns will work in your department from September 20 through November 30. • Supervise their work to ensure positive results. Asian Edition Ch. 5–17 17 . • Assess their professionalism in completing assigned work.

Asian Edition Ch.Sample Hard-Copy Memo department. 248 if you have questions. 5–18 18 . Call me at Ext. Enclosure Essentials of Business Communication.

5–19 19 Essentials of Business Communication. Ch. Asian Edition . or present a closing thought. summarize the message.Writing Plan for Routine Memos and E-Mail Messages • Subject line: • Opening: • Body: • Closing: Summarize memo contents. State the main idea. Request action. Provide background data and explain the main idea.

and preoccupied. and full of preoccupation.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Parallelism Instead of this: Workers were nervous. stressed. Try this: Workers were nervous. stressed. Essentials of Business Communication. 5–20 20 . Asian Edition Ch.

you should first disconnect the power cord. do the following: * Disconnect the power cord. dry cloth. Asian Edition . 5–21 21 Essentials of Business Communication. * Open the front cover. Ch.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Instructions Instead of this: To clean the printer. Try this: To clean the printer. Then you open the front cover. * Clean the printer area with a soft. and the printer area should be cleaned with a soft. dry cloth.

5–22 22 . Asian Edition Ch. Try this: Date April 3 May 20 City Toledo Detroit Speaker Troy Lee Erin Win Essentials of Business Communication. and the speaker is Erin Win. On May 20 we will be in Detroit. and the speaker is Troy Lee.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Headings Instead of this: On April 3 we will be in Toledo.

Asian Edition . Try this: Our team constantly tries to (a) achieve our goals. and (c) hit our production targets.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Within Sentences Instead of this: Our team constantly tries to achieve our goals. customer service must be improved. 5–23 23 Essentials of Business Communication. Ch. (b) improve customer service. and our production targets must be hit.

Ch. and you can learn about leasing.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Bulleted Items Instead of this: At the AutoSelect Web site. you can research the best financing. we let you compare car prices. you can do the following: • Compare car prices. • Research the best financing. Try this: At the AutoSelect Web site. 5–24 24 Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition . • Learn about leasing.

5–25 25 . A new vacation schedule will be available in two weeks. A new vacation schedule will be available in two weeks. Try this: Vacations. Asian Edition Ch. Essentials of Business Communication.Improving Memo Readability With Listing Techniques • Paragraph Headings Instead of this: The next topic is vacations.

Try Your Skill • Arrange the following in a concise. 5–26 26 . In the next training session. and how to maintain an Internet directory. Essentials of Business Communication. bulleted list. Asian Edition Ch. how to share multiple programs. the trainer will demonstrate how to use video conferencing.

5–27 27 .Try Your Skill Improved Version: The next training session will demonstrate • Video conferencing • Sharing multiple programs • Maintaining an Internet directory Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch.

Giving responses in a mock interview is another good practice technique. you should begin by studying the job description. Itemizing your most strategic skills and qualifications is also important.Try Your Skill • Improve the readability of the following instructions that will become part of a student employment booklet. you should be prepared to ask relevant questions. Essentials of Business Communication. Asian Edition Ch. 5–28 28 . Last. In preparing for an employment interview.

5–29 29 .Try Your Skill Improved Version: You can prepare for interviews by doing the following: • Study the job description. • Practice giving responses in a mock interview. Essentials of Business Communication. • Prepare to ask relevant questions. Asian Edition Ch. • Itemize your most strategic skills and qualifications.

Asian Edition Ch. 5–30 30 .End Essentials of Business Communication.

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