NEWSLETTER

THE HIGH SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC SERVICE YOUTH FARM

Farmer  Column  
After  a  week  away,  spent  with  my  family  in  Maine,  it's  always     grounding  to  return  to  the  Youth  Farm.  As  you  might  imagine,  a     week  spent  amongst  70'  tall  Hemlocks  and  White  Pine,  wide  lakes     and  Acadian  mountains  can  conjur  a  mild  case  of  culture  shock.     Indeed,  the  noises  and  smells  of  the  city  were  amazingly  foreign  to     me  after  just  seven  days  in  central  Maine.  I  returned  to  work  on     market  day,  arriving  as  early  as  I  could  muster  to  take  in  the  many     inevitable  changes  that  can  take  place  in  a  just  one  short  week.  As     expected,  there  were  many  exciting  developments  to  behold:  the     farm  was  looking  lush  -­‐  very  much  in  its  late  August  glory:  corn  and     potatoes  looking  ready  for  harvest,  many  new  beds  prepped  and     planted,  Okra  climbing  to  5  feet  tall,  Cosmos  bursting  along  the     perennial  border...  The  many  minute  changes  that  happen  on  a     daily  basis  are  the  wonder  and  sometimes  the  bane  of  farmers:       the  privilege  of  getting  to  witness  the  beauty  of  growth  in  many     small  forms  is,  in  and  of  itself,  quite  fulfilling.  It  is  a  mark  of  work     accomplished,  of  laborious  effort  being  rewarded.  On  the  other     hand,  it  also  means  pulling  out  the  old  to-­‐do  list  and  adding  to  it:     stake  the  ever-­‐growing  Eggplant!  Ripening  tomatoes  need  extra     trellis  to  support  their  weight!  Deadhead  the  Calendula!  Harvest     Bitter  melon!  Weed  the  Chard!    Don't  forget  to  pick  the  Parsley  in     the  hoop  house!  And  on,  and  on.  Our  trainees  and  youth  are     becoming  excellent  observers  (and  list-­‐makers)  as  they  spend  more     time  here  on  the  farm.  To  stay  on  top  of  it  all,  we  have  an  inexhaustable  master  lost  of  tasks  that,  somehow,  all  get  checked  off   bit  by  bit,  thanks  to  serious  team  work.  If  you're  ever  interested  in  knowing  just  how  the  Youth  Farm  runs,  ask  us  the  next   time  you're  on  the  farm  to  take  a  peak  at  our  Task  log.  And  then,  thank  a  trainee,  or  a  Youth  leader,  or  a  market  worker,  for  all   that  they  do.  Farmers,  students,  and  consumers  -­‐  together  with  the  vegetables,  flowers,  bees  and  butterflies,  we  make  a   remarkable  team.     -­‐  Farmer  Molly    

Farm News and Notes
 

New  at  the  Market:  Additional  produce  from  upstate  farms!  We  are  excited  to  continue  to  offer  corn,  peaches,  and  more   from  New  York  farms,  thanks  to  GrowNYC's  Greenmarket  Co.  Stop  by  the  market  to  check  out  our  extra  bounty!  
 

Community  Volunteer  Day   Saturday,  September  15th,  10am-­‐2pm   Join  us  at  the  Farm  and  get  your  hands  Dirty!   Please  bring  a  healthy  lunch,  a  water  bottle,  and  work  clothes.  No  open  toed  shoes  or  sandals.  Youth  under  the  age  of  13  must   be  supervised  by  an  adult.     Have  an  extra  refrigerator?  If  you  would  like  to  generously  donate  an  unwanted  or  extra  refrigerator  to  the  HSPS  Youth   Farm,  please  let  us  know!       Remember:  You  can  always  come  join  us  for  volunteer  work  during  our  farmers  market   -­‐  Wednesdays  from  2:30  to  6:30.  

 

Week  1  ·  June  20,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com   Week  11  ·  August  27,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com  

 

Flower of the week
           

Meet a Farmer! Martha Jackson

  This  week    the  languidly  beautiful  Bells  of  Ireland  take  center  stage.     Suddenly  our  second  crop  of  these  very  green,  charming,  and  slightly     aromatic  flowers  have  burst  forth  and  are  at  their  peak  harvest  stage.   For  Shambhala  members,  you're  seeing  these  lovelies  in  your  shares     today.  Farm  members  received  them  last  Wednesday.  Moluccella    

laevis,  as  they  are  known  in  Latin  botanical  terms,  flowers  in  summer  -­‐   though  they  seem  to  prefer  cooler  spells  over  heat  waves,  and  partial   shade  over  direct  sun.  Our  current  crop  is  growing  in  a  well-­‐fertiized   bed  that  w  as  created  this  summer  with  lots  of  hard  work  and  effort     from  summer  youth  leaders.  Bells  of  Ireland,  or,  "Bells"  as  they're     affectionately  called,  need  lots  of  Nitrogen  to  grow  tall  and  strong  and   green.  Mission  accomplished  -­‐  this  is  our  best  crop  of  Bells  yet!  Bells     originate  from  Turkey  and  Syria  -­‐  not  Ireland  -­‐-­‐  though  some  believe     these  spikey  gems  bring  good  luck.  Enjoy!      

    Featured     Vegetable:

Chard

RECIPE:  Swiss  Chard  with  Shallots     Ingredients:   1  tablespoon  olive  oil   1  shallot,  finely  chopped   1/8  teaspoon  red  pepper  flakes   2  bunches  Swiss  chard,  rinsed  well   1  tablespoon  apple  cider  v inegar   1/2  teaspoon  salt    

  Cut  off  and  discard  chard  stems  and  any  tough  center  ribs.  Thinly  slice   leaves.  Set  aside.    Heat  oil  in  a  large  skillet  over  medium  high  heat.  Add   shallot  and  pepper  flakes  and  cook,  stirring  often,  until  softened,  about  2   minutes.  Add  chard,  vinegar  and  salt  and  continue  cooking,  tossing  often,   until  wilted  and  softened,  3  to  4  minutes  more.    Or,  to  cook  in  the   microwave,  place  shallot,  oil  and  pepper  flakes  in  a  very  large   microwavable  bowl.  Microwave  on  high  until  shallot  is  soft,  about  1   minute.  Add  chard,  vinegar  and  salt  and  toss.  Microwave  on  high,   stopping  to  stir  every  minute  or  so,  until  chard  is  wilted  and  soft,  about  6   minutes.  Pour  off  any  excess  liquid  before  serving.     Week  1  ·  June  20,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com   Week  11  ·  August  27,  2012  ·  www.hspsfarm.blogspot.com  

1)  What  is  your  favorite  thing  about  farming?   I  love  being  outside,  getting  to  work  with  my   hands,  and  the  great  connections  that  are   possible  around  good  food.     2)  What  do  you  do  for  a  living?   I  farm!  Sort  of  -­‐  I  work  part  time  at  the  Youth   Farm  as  the  Assistant  Farm  Manager,  which   involves  a  combination  of  farm  work,  education   and  training,  and  administrative  work.     3)  How  did  you  become  interested  in  farming?   My  interest  in  farming  grew  out  of  a  passion  for   food  and  concerns  for  my  own  health  in  our  food   system.  I  realized  I  wanted  to  participate  in  the   system  as  more  than  just  a  consumer,  and  that   growing  food  fits  my  interests  and  abilities.     4)  What  is  one  thing  you've  learned  through  the   farmer  trainee  program?   As  a  co-­‐facilitator  of  the  program,  I  get  the   double  benefit  of  continuing  to  hone  my  farming   skills  through  Bee  and  Molly's  teaching  while   also  building  experience  as  an  educator  and   mentor.  I'm  learning  way  too  much  to  name  just   one  thing  -­‐  but  the  importance  of  organized   systems  for  record-­‐keeping  and  communication   on  the  farm  is  a  big  one.     5)  What  is  your  favorite  vegetable?  Why?   If  I  had  to  pick  just  one,  I  might  say  kale  -­‐  I  love   that  I  can  eat  it  all  winter  (and  summer)  in  so   many  different  dishes  that  I  never  get  tired  of  it.   Although  callaloo  is  becoming  another  favorite   this  season.     6)  Have  you  worked  on  a  farm  before?   I  did  a  very  brief  apprenticeship  at  Garden  of  Eve   in  Long  Island  a  few  years  ago  -­‐  though  it  was  at   the  end  of  the  season,  I  got  a  feel  for  what   farming  is  like  and  confirmed  that  I  wanted  to   pursue  it  in  the  city.    

 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful