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THE PROBLEMS WITH PLANETARY FORMATION

THE PROBLEMS WITH PLANETARY FORMATION

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Published by DTYarbrough
A NEW THEORY FOR AN OLD PROBLEM
A NEW THEORY FOR AN OLD PROBLEM

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: DTYarbrough on Sep 02, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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09/24/2014

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THE PROBLEMS WITH PLANETARY FORMATION

(C)Copyright 2012 All rights reserved

D T YARBROUGH

THE PROBLEMS WITH PLANETARY FORMATION
The present theory states that planets form from gas and dust in an eccretion disk around a newly formed star. Originally it was thought that gravity caused the dust and gas to combine into larger and larger particles, molecules, etc. More recently, electrostatic forces are believed to be of great importance in the early stages of this formation. Gravity can not cause objects to clump together when the gravitation force of the sun is significantly greater than the the gravitational forces between the objects. The sun forces the objects to move in orbit where each and every object moves at similar speeds. Any significant collisions would most likely knock the objects out of orbit. Recently an experiment aboard the space station showed that salt granules in a sealed plastic bag would clump together in a matter of seconds. This was a case where the gravitational affect between the salt particles was the only gravity present. Look at the asteroid belt or the rings of Saturn. These are the results of colisions that never reformed into a single solid object, and never will. Planets are not formed from left over dust and gas inside a solar system. They are formed elsewhere from molten rock resulting from the collision of stars at the center of galaxies, just as the gases that formed the star where also created there and reseeded the galactic plane. The already formed proto-planets, enter a solar system and their capture into orbit is aided by the eccretion disk. The orbit will gradually be altered until it lies in the plane of the disk. The planet, large enough to exibit greater gravitation forces in it local neighborhood than the sun, will sweep up the gases and dust particles as it's orbit gradually decays. If it reaches an orbit that has already been cleared, it will stabilize within that orbit. It's a case of first come, first served when you look at the present day size of the planets. Meteors and comets where widespread before the solar system was cleared of the excess gas and dust. They seeded the planets with ice. Not just water ice but frozen gases such as nitrogen, oxygen, methane, helium, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, etc. At the very edge of the solar system, under the weaker influence of the Sun, ice particles can form from smaller molecules to create comets. Recent discoveries of rogue planets led to the belief that they had been ejected from solar systems, but while this may be the case in some instances, they did not form within a solar system and most likely have never seen one.

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