P. 1
Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems

|Views: 6|Likes:
Published by Nuno Fraga Coelho

More info:

Published by: Nuno Fraga Coelho on Sep 30, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/13/2014

pdf

text

original

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process

Published by: Sponsored by:

345 Millwood Road Chappaqua, NY 10514 www.raabassociatesinc.com

Copyright  2008  Raab  Associates  Inc.  www.raabguide.com  This  copy  is  provided  courtesy  of  Marketo,  Inc. Permission is hereby granted to reproduce this material so long as it is presented in full and without  modification, including this copyright notice.  Product names may be trademarks or registered trademarks  of their respective owners.

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process  Table of Contents 
Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1  Selection Process ......................................................................................................... 2  Information to Gather.................................................................................................... 6 
Email ............................................................................................................................................... 6  Web Forms and Pages ................................................................................................................... 7  Other Channels............................................................................................................................... 9  Lead Scoring................................................................................................................................. 10  Campaign Management................................................................................................................ 11  CRM Integration............................................................................................................................ 14  Prospect Database ....................................................................................................................... 15  Reporting ...................................................................................................................................... 16  Technology ................................................................................................................................... 18  Implementation and Support........................................................................................................ 20  Pricing........................................................................................................................................... 21  Vendor........................................................................................................................................... 21

Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  All rights reserved.  www.raabguide.com 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 

Introduction 
This Guide is intended to help marketers and technologists select “demand generation systems”.  This is  a relatively new class of systems that help marketers to acquire the names of potential customers (more  commonly called “leads”) and nurture relationships until the leads are qualified to turn over to the sales  department.  The systems work primarily with email and Web contacts, although they may incorporate  other media.  Demand generation functions are not new.  Business marketers have always run programs to gather  leads, send them information, learn about their needs, and to send the best prospects to sales.  Indeed,  many marketing departments consider this their primary mission.  The use of computer systems to help is  somewhat more recent, but marketing databases, campaign managers, scoring tools, lead routing  systems, and marketing resource management software are now well established categories.  Even more  common are execution systems to generate direct mail, manage call centers, place advertising, track  results and, more recently, to send emails and manage Web sites.  Demand generation products combine these functions in a single system.  Even this is not totally new:  “marketing automation” or “enterprise marketing management” vendors have offered comprehensive  marketing management for years.  Indeed, some marketing automation vendors (companies including  Aprimo, Neolane and Unica) are legitimate competitors in the demand generation market.  So are some  customer relationship management (CRM) providers like Oracle/Siebel, Entellium and RightNow.  However, all these vendors aim to manage the complete customer lifecycle, , while demand generation  systems focus on the period before a customer’s first purchase.  Thus, the precise characteristic that  distinguishes demand generation systems is that they provide the full range of lead management  functions, and nothing else. 

How to Use This Guide 
Because demand generation systems are a new category, few marketers or technologists will have  previously used one.  This makes selection especially difficult.  This Guide contains two sections  designed to help:
·

Selection Process describes a systematic approach to choosing a demand generation system.  This  methodology is based on Raab Associates’ many years of experience running similar projects for  companies of all sizes and industries. Information to Gather presents a list, with detailed explanations, of information you may wish to  gather about potential vendors.  This provides a framework for asking questions and comparing  vendor answers.  It should help you to judge which items are important for meeting your own  business needs—the most important consideration in making a wise vendor choice.

·

Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com 

entry as of: 10/21/2008 

page 1 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 

Selection Process 
Selection of a demand generation system is fundamentally similar to selecting any other system or  service: you define your requirements and find the vendor who best meets them.  If your needs are  unusual, there may be only one vendor who qualifies.  But most companies can find several viable  candidates.  You certainly should try to find the best fit among these, but bear in mind that the value  comes from using the system, not running a really great selection project.  Spending excessive time  agonizing over your selection is counter­productive.  The key to a successful selection project is a thorough set of requirements based on your goals for the  system.  So the selection project actually begins with a definition of those goals—what exactly does the  company expect the system to accomplish, and how does it hope to use the system to make that  happen?  The most practical way to define these goals is to identify a set of projects you expect the system to  support.  Then define the process associated with each project: not only what the demand generation  system itself is expected to do, but also what other systems must do (for example, provide data and  receive results), and what people throughout the company must do (approve programs, generate copy,  follow up on leads, close sales).  This will quickly help you to build the list of people and departments who  will interact with the system, and might therefore have some information worth knowing during the  selection process.  It may also identify problems that must be solved during deployment or, in the worst  case, make a particular goal unattainable.  It’s better to know about those obstacles in advance, when it’s  relatively easy to adjust your plans, than to uncover them later.  Most companies will also require a formal financial justification for a new system.  If the goal is simply to  replace a collection of disconnected products and processes with a single, streamlined solution, you  might be able to build this justification on cost savings alone.  This might even let you avoid defining the  types of marketing programs the system will produce, since these are presumably the same as the  existing programs.  All you need to do is specify which tasks and systems the new system will replace,  and the savings in time and effort that result.  But if the new system is intended to enable new kinds of marketing programs, you’ll need to specify the  value expected from those programs.  The math is usually pretty simple: “the new system will enable us  to produce X new leads at a cost of Y dollars per lead, replacing leads that now cost Z dollars each.”  Or  “the new system will generate X new leads that eventually yield Y dollars in sales at a profit margin of Z.”  Or the new system will reduce the handling cost per lead, or reduce the time to convert a lead to sales.  The set of projects identified as system goals provide the basis for these calculations.  The calculations  will also show whether these projects can realistically be expected to generate enough financial benefit to  justify the system cost.  These calculations are the basis for metrics that you will use after deployment to  track the actual value of the system and whether it is performing as expected.  The specific projects intended for the system will depend on each company’s situation.  But most demand  generation projects fall into several common areas:
·

lead generation, to attract and capture new sales prospects.  Demand generation systems are most  likely to execute outbound email programs.  But they also often support other programs by providing  Web landing pages, managing invitations for sales events, and coordinating response via call  centers, direct mail, and other media.  The justification for such projects is to generate more leads,  reduce the cost per lead, or both.

Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com 

entry as of: 10/21/2008 

page 2 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
·

lead nurturing, to build relationships with existing leads until they are ready to hand over to sales.  Demand generation systems can automate the lead nurturing process with streams of email  messages, offers of supporting materials such as white papers and product information, and Web  forms to capture information about lead interests and qualifications.   These projects earn value by  decreasing the cost of managing these leads, increasing the proportion that eventually make a  purchase, and reducing the time before the initial purchase. lead scoring and distribution, which manage the hand­off of leads to the sales department.  The  demand generation system can gather detailed data about lead attributes and behaviors, allowing  more accurate scoring of sales potential.  It can also automate the transfer of leads to sales people,  making it faster and cheaper.  The value of these projects is usually a higher sales rate that comes  from a combination of sending higher quality leads and of sales people paying more attention to the  leads they receive.  There may also be some savings in the costs to manage the transfer process. reporting, which tracks the results of marketing activities.  Reporting by itself does not create revenue  or reduce costs, but it does help managers make decisions that achieve these goals in the long run.  Demand generation systems gather some information that was not previously available, and provide  unified reports on other information that was previously scattered among different systems.  These  projects may yield some cost savings in report production, although the main value is long­term  improvement in marketing efficiency and effectiveness. 

·

·

Once the target projects are identified and their requirements are defined, it is fairly simple to specify the  system capabilities needed to meet these requirements.  The Information to Gather section lists  functional requirements by project type.)  You should be able to prioritize these requirements, which is a  critical step when weighing the value of different systems.  It’s also extremely important that your requirements include “soft” considerations such as usability and  vendor support.  These can be harder to assess than specific system features, but have a major impact  on project success.  They must be matched to your company’s business situation: a company with  extensive internal technical resources may need less vendor support than a firm with few resources; a  company running large, complex marketing programs may need a system that takes extra effort to set up,  but simplifies these programs’ on­going operations.  Only after you’ve done a thorough job of defining your requirements should you turn to the task of  choosing a specific vendor.  The first step is to develop a list of candidates.  The vendors in the Raab  Guide to Demand Generation Systems are one set to consider, and represent leaders in the field.  Other  choices include marketing automation vendors (Aprimo, Neolane, Unica, etc.), CRM systems  (Oracle/Siebel, RightNow, etc.), and demand generation specialists targeted at smaller firms. A quick  Google search will turn up dozens of candidates.  Use your requirements to build a list of key capabilities,  and check this against the Information to Gather section to determine which are uncommon.   This will  give you a short set of questions to ask potential vendors, and make it easy to eliminate those who do not  fit your needs.  Once you’ve developed a small list of qualified vendors, you can research this group more deeply.  This  is where the work you’ve put into defining your target projects pays dividends.  You should know enough  about the details of these projects that you can ask the most promising vendors to demonstrate how they  would be set up and executed in the vendor’s system.  This is a critical step in the assessment process  because it moves you past the vendor’s description of the system’s glories to a concrete understanding of  what it’s like to use for your types of projects.  In particular, it will help you to assess how well the vendor’s  balance between simplicity and complexity matches your own needs.  Your vendor assessment process should be carefully structured.  This will ensure you gather complete  information and provide documentation to explain the final decision.  For the vendor demonstrations Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 3

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
themselves, prepare a package of materials describing the target cases and send it to the vendors in  advance.  This package should contain all the information needed to set up the cases, allowing the  demonstration itself to move quickly.  Of course, you’ll need to be sure that you understand the work  involved in any steps they prepare in advance.  Also prepare a scorecard for each demonstration that lists  the key items to cover.  Members of your assessment team should fill these out during the demonstration  and then review them as a group immediately after.  This will allow them to compare notes while their  memories are fresh, identify any conflicting impressions that need further research to resolve, and provide  a record to use later in the process.  The demonstrations will focus primarily on functionality and usability.  You may also cover topics such as  technology and support policies if time permits.  Otherwise, you will need to research these separately.  Your technology or procurement departments may have a standard lists of topics to consider in a system  selection project.  You may also be able to draw on documentation from previous projects, or download a  template from any number of Web sites dedicated to the topic, including www.raabguide.com.  The  headings in the Information to Gather section provide a reasonably complete list of areas to consider.  Your selection process may include a formal Request for Proposal (RFP).  If your firm does not require an  RFP as a matter of policy, bear in mind that they that take considerable work for you to prepare and for  the vendor to reply.  Unless there is something unusually complex about your demand generation  requirements, an RFP may not be worth the trouble.  If you do go ahead with an RFP, it’s best to delay  issuing it until you have narrowed your list to a small number of finalists.  Knowing that they have a  realistic chance of winning the business gives vendors a reason to invest the resources necessary to  answer an RFP in detail.  Before making a final vendor selection, you will also want to ask for and talk to references.  These are a  shockingly underused resource in many selection projects.  Even though vendors usually (but not  always!) manage to screen out unhappy clients, the ones they do let you speak with can tell you about  strengths and weaknesses, surprises they found, why they chose the vendor, how they are using the  system, and what it’s like to work with the vendor.  If your business or requirements are unusual, you  should ask the vendor to let you speak with someone as similar to you as possible.  If the vendor cannot  come up with a similar client, you may be heading into unexplored territory.  This is not necessarily a  reason to reject the vendor, but you should know that you’re taking the risk.  Once you’ve gathered all the information about the candidate vendors, you will want to rank them and  make a tentative final selection.  (This is tentative because final price and contract negotiations are still to  come.)  Unless the winner is so obvious that no discussion is necessary, you’ll want to prepare a formal  decision matrix that scores each vendor on the different business requirements.  Raab Associates has  had great success with such matrices in selection projects, and we have found that details matter:
· ·

the headings in this matrix should match the headings in your requirements definition. build the matrix through a group discussion with the project team.  The discussion itself is actually  what’s important, because it provides a structured way to gather everyone’s input and builds  consensus around the final result.  In fact, what typically happens is that the group choice becomes  apparent even before the final scores are calculated. assign weights to the items by first setting them for the general categories, and then for the items  within the categories.  This ensures the broad priorities are correct.  Weights should add to 100%,  which forces the group to explicitly consider the relative importance of each item.  Otherwise, teams  tend to classify almost everything as “essential”. start the weighting by assigning the same weight to all items (if there are 50 items, each gets 2%).  Then classify each item as high, medium or low priority, and give the high items get twice the original  weight and the low items get half the weight.  Once you’ve done this, make additional adjustments as Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 4 

·

·

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
needed to bring the total back to 100%.  Remember: the actual weights matter less than the group  discussion about what is important and why.
·

assign scores on a scale of 1 to 10.  This provides lets the team distinguish between systems where  one is just slightly strong than another.  We’ve found that using a 1 to 5 score almost always ends up  with something ending in a .5. work through the matrix one item at a time, assigning scores for all vendors before moving onto the  next item.  This helps to focus the discussion on how the vendors varied in each area, rather than on  the general preference for one vendor or another. 

·

Once the group has completed the scoring, the scores can be weighted and you can calculate a total  score for each vendor.  This is easy to set on with a simple spreadsheet program.  The “winner” will rarely  be a surprise, but if it is, or scores are closer than the group expected, it’s worth going back into the  matrix to understand what led to the result.  You’ll often find that the weights need adjusting or, less often,  want to reset the scores themselves.  It usually turns out that different vendors are strong in one or two  key areas.  This lets the group focus on the specific trade off: which is more important, extensive reuse of  marketing materials or powerful email customization?  That’s a productive discussion to have.  The matrix or some other process will lead you to selecting your preferred vendor.  Only at this point are  you really ready to enter into the final vendor negotiations on price and contract terms, because now you  can legitimately specify the terms they must meet in order to make the sale.  There may in fact be  relatively little to negotiate with smaller demand generation implementations, where prices are fixed and  include all the system modules and support services.  Aggressive negotiation may also start the  relationship on a sour note.   However, larger deployments do involve complex contract terms and will  certainly require some discussion.  In addition to the system price itself, items to negotiate may include  implementation services and time­frame, training provided, support and service levels, system modules  included, protection against price increases, termination procedures, and various legal subtleties.  You  may have non­negotiable requirements to conform contract language with your own company policies  and to clarify issues such as data ownership and access.  Software negotiations are a combination of art,  science and contact sport, so make sure you have the assistance of an expert.

Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com 

entry as of: 10/21/2008 

page 5 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 

Information to Gather 
This section describes information you may wish to gather about potential vendors.  The initial sections  relate to functional requirements such as email and lead scoring.  The later sections (technology,  implementation and support, pricing and vendor) are non­functional considerations that will also weigh in  your decision.  Each section provides an explanation of the type of information to look for, which features  are common, and why they matter.  The headings correspond to the vendor tables in the Raab Guide to  Demand Generation Systems (www.raabguide.com). 

Email 
Content Generation.  Every demand generation system gives users tools to build and send personalized  emails.  Typically the basic elements such as sender, subject line, and recipient are entered in a form,  while the body of the email itself is entered in a graphic interface similar to a word processor.   Sometimes  there are additional form entries for standard links such as “unsubscribe” and “forward to a friend”.  The  entire package may be built from a template that defines standard headers, footers, graphics, links and  other elements.  These templates are particularly helpful when you have many emails to manage, both in  terms of saving effort and ensuring consistency.  One feature to check is whether the templates are  simply copied each time you create a new email, or the emails read a master copy of the template each  time they use it.  Having a master copy means that changes to the template are automatically reflected in  all emails that use the template, even if the change is made after the email was created.  This makes it  still easier to keep things consistent.  When templates exist, they can nearly always be shared across campaigns.  Individual emails are usually  sharable as well, which generally means they are stored in a separate folder or library and can be  selected when needed for individual projects.  As with templates, there is a difference between simply  making an independent copy of a “shared” email, and referring to a single master copy that can be  centrally updated.  In general, more sharing is better, especially in organizations with large quantities of  materials to manage.   But setting up the components and then assembling them does require extra effort  compared with entering those elements directly into a single item.  So companies having few items or few  shared elements across items may find it is easier to simply create the items independently.  Most systems are able to display a sample version of an email, so you can be sure it looks the way you  expect.  A good sample will show the email with personalized elements filled in, either for a designated  sample lead or for records selected from the general lead pool.  Sampling functions may include the  ability to actually send the sample email (as opposed to simply viewing it in a browser); ability to send it to  standard list or a user­entered set of sample names; and ability to see it rendered in text and HTML  versions in different email readers.  Many demand generation vendors rely on outside services such as  Strong Mail and Pivotal Veracity to render sample emails and test their ability to penetrate spam filters.  .  Email setup may also include formal testing of alternative versions, or “a/b tests”.  This generally involves  specifying two or more items to test, randomly sending one or the other when a message is needed within  a campaign, and then comparing the results.  Facilities for such testing are generally limited in demand  generation systems.  The testing may be achieved during the email setup process, by specifying  alternative contents within the email itself.  Or it may be achieved by splitting the campaign audience into  different lists and sending different treatments to different lists.  This essentially comes down to creating  separate campaigns.  The latter approach is more work, but makes it easier to vary treatments  consistently at different points in the marketing campaign. Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 6 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
Personalization.  Email text and headers are typically personalized by inserting tags that refer to data  associated with a lead.  This includes attributes stored directly on the lead record and, in most cases,  behaviors from the activity history as well.  It may extend to additional sources such as survey responses  held in a separate table; company, opportunity and sales rep data imported from the CRM system; and  data read on­demand from an external system such as CRM or a data compiler.  In addition, most  systems can create add personalized data to URL links within an email, such as an individual ID or  campaign ID used to track response.  A more advanced and less common form of personalization allows users to embed rules within the email  that select different blocks of content.  (This is more accurately called customization than  personalization.)  For example, the rule might look at the lead rank and send different messages to hot,  warm and cold leads.  This sort of customization allows a single campaign to tailor its messages to  different lead situations, saving the marketer from creating separate campaigns and making it easier to  specify customer treatments.  Ideally, the rules themselves would be shared by multiple campaigns, so  the system can coordinate treatments across different contacts.  Content Delivery.  Nearly all demand generation vendors send emails from their own servers.  In some  cases, the email is sent by a third party vendor, in which case you need to examine how well the two  operations are integrated from a user perspective.  The actual domain may be the vendor’s own domain,  a subdomain of the vendor domain assigned to a particular client, or a domain created for the client  alone.  (This would not ordinarily be the client’s own primary domain, which is usually hosted elsewhere.)  Control over domains and subdomains is important because spam blocking systems may block a domain  that they believe is sending spam.  The demand generation vendors offer different levels of service in  monitoring email deliverability, often relying in part on third party specialists such as Strong Mail and  Pivotal Vercacity.  Email is most often delivered as part of a marketing campaign.  But it’s important to be able to send  emails without creating a campaign, either for testing or because of a one­time project that doesn’t justify  creating a campaign.  Response Tracking.  As discussed under Personalization, demand generation systems track email  response by embedding a unique ID in URL links within the email.  The system then extracts the ID when  the recipient clicks on the link and visits the associated Web page.  Systems vary in how much data they  can encode in the URL in this way.  Most systems can also place a cookie (a small file that identifies the  computer) on the email recipient’s computer when they click on the link, allowing marketers to track  subsequent visits even if the lead does not identify herself.  If one of the client’s cookies is already  present, perhaps from a previous anonymous Web site visit, the system will find it and connect it to other  information about the lead.  List Management.  All demand generation systems provide tools to manage email lists in accord with  government regulations that require options to opt out of future emails.  These include standard  unsubscribe links that can be embedded in emails and add names to do­not­email lists.  The systems  also identify undelivered emails and provide different degrees of control over how these are treated.  Most  allow users to create other types of suppression lists, which may be applied automatically or manually to  some or all outbound emails. 

Web Forms and Pages 
Content Generation.  Demand generation systems build two types of Web pages: landing pages that are  typically related to specific marketing campaigns, and forms that gather information and post it to the lead  record in the system database.  Building a landing page is generally similar to building an email: vendors Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 7 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
provide a graphical interface to lay out the page components, often provide templates to help standardize  the pages, use tags to embed personalized data, and may support rule­driven customization.  The issues  that apply to email (reuse, viewing samples, a/b tests, etc.) generally apply to landing pages as well.  Web forms introduce additional issues.  Users must be able to select data elements to include on the  form, control how these are presented to the visitor, and post them to the system database.  Systems  vary substantially in these areas.  Some allow the end­users to create new fields during the form­building  process, while others require a system administrator to do this.  Some offer a choice of storing data within  the system database or separately, attached to the completed form itself.  This can be used to capture  specialized survey questions or to retain a history of answers to questions that may be asked more than  once.  Some systems store the presentation format (e.g., radio button vs. pull­down list) and available answers  as part of the field definition, meaning these must be the same on all forms.  Other systems define these  separately for each form, meaning they can be changed for different situations.  In some systems, the  answer selected by the site visitor is stored directly in the system database, while other systems can store  a different value.  This is a particularly useful feature.  One advantage is saving space by storing coded  values in the place of long answer strings.  Another is letting the system present a survey in different  languages and still store consistent results.  Most systems let users specify which fields are required for the form to be accepted.  All let can also  check for correct data type and simple formats such as email and telephone number.  Some extend much  further to validate against reference tables of company names, Web domains and street addresses.  Most  let users create custom validation rules of varying sophistication.  Most also allow the form to post data  elements that the user has not entered directly.  This could be used to capture a campaign ID or search  term.  The posted value may be read from the requested URL or hard­coded within the form itself.  (Note:  the “requested URL” is the address of the page being requested.  It is typically specified in a hyperlink  built into an email or Web page, and often contains parameters such as a campaign ID or personal  identifier.  The “referring URL” is the address of a visitor’s previous Web page.  It shows the source of the  visitor and may contain additional information such as a search term.)  Every system can append form information to an existing lead record if that lead has already been  identified.  The identify might based on a visitor log­in, read from the requested URL or, less reliably,  inferred from a cookie.  Otherwise, all systems can check for an exact match on an email address.  Some  products support additional matching rules.  These may be pre­built or specified by a user, and can range  from exact matches on a combination of fields (which will miss many actual matches) to sophisticated  “fuzzy matching” that looks at substrings within fields, phonetic equivalents, and statistical similarity  scores.  Personalization.  Beyond the usual personalization and rule­based customization, forms may vary the  questions they ask based on the existing customer data.  One approach is for the user to specify the set  of questions to ask, the priority for each question, and the maximum number of questions to display at  once.  When a form is presented, the system will present the highest­priority unanswered questions, up to  the specified number.  As answers are gathered over time, those questions are dropped from the form  and new questions appear.  The elaborate forms of these systems use centralized rules to coordinate  questions across all forms, and can consider factors such as when a question was last answered in  determining whether to present it.  Content Delivery.  All demand generation vendors host Web pages and forms on their own server.   But  clients who want to host the content elsewhere must look closely at system capabilities.  It’s usually  possible to export the HTML used to generate a Web page or form.  But systems vary in whether it’s easy  or even possible for these external pages to read data for personalization or post survey answer to the  demand generation database.  Similarly, only some systems allow an external Web page to open a Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 8 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
vendor­hosted form.  Most systems do allow the user to create a “friendly” URL that will be displayed  instead of the actual URL pointing to the vendor’s server.  Response Tracking.  Every demand generation system will capture the referring URL and related data  such as query string, date, and IP address.  All will deposit cookies that identify repeat visitors, will use  the cookie ID to build a visitor history in the system database, and will connect the cookie­based history  with actual lead data once the lead identifies herself.  Most will look up the IP address to attempt to  identify the company a visitor works for (assuming they are Web page from a company computer).  Some  will also block visitors from specified companies, such as competitors, based on IP address or email  domain.  Some can further limit access to Web pages and forms to their intended users, based on visitor  log­in or an ID string embedded in the requested URL.  Activities After Submission.  Form submission is generally part of a larger campaign flow, and can  trigger any action specified within the campaign.  Some systems let users attach specific actions to the  forms themselves, which can be helpful where the same form may be reused across multiple campaigns.  Some systems also allow submission of different forms to trigger a separate, shared campaign, which  offers an alternative approach to coordinating customer treatments across multiple programs.  In general,  activities available after a form is submitted would include sending a confirmation or follow­up email,  directing the visitor to another Web page or form, recalculating the lead score, adding the lead to the  CRM system, notifying the CRM sales rep assigned to the lead, continuing within a campaign flow or  switching to a different campaign.  As always, systems vary widely in the nature of the rules that govern  these treatments. 

Other Channels 
Paid Search.  Any demand generation system will capture a visitor’s referring URL, which is the key  information needed to measure responses to a paid (or unpaid) search marketing campaign.  A few  systems go slightly beyond this to auto­generate requested URL strings with campaign IDs, which are  then built into the links in the paid search ads.  Ideally, the systems would go further to capture marketing  costs and results beyond the initial visit.  This is currently beyond the scope of most or all demand  generation products.  Direct Mail.  All demand generation systems can export a mailing list of selected leads.  Most could do  this more or less automatically as part of a marketing campaign.  A few provide much more sophisticated  direct mail support, including the ability to generate print­ready personalized files and send these directly  to selected printers for production.  Call Center.  Beyond generating lead lists, few demand generation vendors have specific features to  support call centers.  These include transmitting files with personalized calling scripts; automated text­to­  speech messages; and personalized, rule­driven Web forms that call center agents fill out while speaking  to leads.  Vendors with significant call center integration have also set up flows to easily capture call  results and make this part of the demand generation activity history.  Online Chat.  Some demand generation vendors have integrated their own or third­party online chat  capabilities.  The chats may be agent­initiated or visitor­initiated.  Agent­initiated chats may rely on rule­  driven alerts that monitor visitor activities and notify chat agents when a visitor should be contacted.  Visitor­initiated chats require an on­screen button or other mechanism for the visitor to request a chat,  and features to assign chats to available agents.  The chat process itself has additional requirements for  logging, supervision, transcript archiving, and reporting.  Chat results should be posted to the demand  generation activity history and be available to trigger other marketing and sales activities. Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 9 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
Mobile.  The most significant special requirement for mobile marketing campaigns is the ability to route  messages through the phone carriers.  Some demand generation vendors have established relationships  with specialized firms that do this.  Otherwise, the requirements to generate simple, personalized  messages are similar to those needed for basic email campaigns.  Fax.  Fax campaigns are like mobile campaigns: the messages themselves are simple, but the trick is  getting them through the network.  Again, some demand generation systems have been integrated with  vendors who specialize in these areas.  Events.  Demand generation systems are often used to manage sales events such as seminars and  online Webinars.  Standard demand generation functions can send an email promoting the event, link  respondents to a registration form, and send various reminders and follow­up messages.  Events with  physical capacity limits require specialized features such as the ability to stop and start promotions based  on the number of registrations, maintain wait lists, and manage multiple versions of the same event in  different times and places.  Demand generation systems do not generally support paid events or provide  administration features such as room assignments or equipment logistics. 

Lead Scoring 
Scoring Data.  Lead scores are traditionally based on attributes such as demographics (company size,  industry, etc.) and opportunity characteristics (often summarized as BANT: budget, authority, needs,  timeline).  To this, demand generation systems add information derived from user behaviors, such as  Web page visits, information downloaded, emails opened, and surveys completed.  These behaviors can  give particular insight into changes in lead attitudes as they gain or lose interest in a project.  However,  they can also be voluminous, so lead scoring systems often rely on summary measures, such as the  number of site visits in the past week, rather than scoring each event by itself.  Some demand generation systems supplement data provided by the lead and by lead behaviors with data  from external sources.  These may provide information about a company that the lead has not provided,  or has not reported accurately.  They may also record public events (new products, financial results, etc.)  that are relevant to the sales situation but not captured by standard surveys.  Score Calculations.  The traditional approach to lead scoring is to develop a scorecard that assigns  points for specified lead attributes.  The sum of these points is the lead score.  Most demand generation  systems take a generally similar approach, although they vary considerably in the details.  Some systems  can apply “point caps” to certain behaviors, so a single type of activity does not create an inflated score if  it is repeated frequently.  Some systems can reduce the points assigned to a behavior based on how long  ago it occurred.  The amount of the reduction may be specified separately for each behavior (precise but  considerable work), or a single depreciation rule may be applied automatically to all event­related items.  Systems also vary in the interface used to set up the calculations.  Most products use standard system  rules to specify a set of conditions and the points awarded for each condition.  These may in turn be  embedded in a standard marketing campaign.  This approach makes the interface consistent with the rest  of the system, but may require complex rules for concepts such as point caps or time­related  depreciation.  Other systems present the calculations on a grid similar to a traditional scorecard.  This can  be easier for some users to understand, and may allow special features such as point caps and  depreciation to be incorporated more easily.  Some systems allow only one score per lead, while others let users define multiple scores.  These are  particularly useful for companies with multiple products or marketing campaigns that need to be managed  separately.  Some can calculate an average score for all leads from the same company, which is Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 10 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
particularly useful providing an overview of the activity level for the group as a whole.  Most products  store the scores as numeric values, and then define lead ranks (hot, warm, etc.) as score ranges.  Some  vendors use the scoring rules to specify scoring ranks only.  At the opposite extreme, others calculate  separate scores for demographics, BANT and behaviors, and report these individually as well as a  combined total.  Score Updates.  Scores may be updated as part of the flow of a marketing campaign, or triggered  independently by a change in the relevant data.  Most systems react to data changes immediately,  although some periodically scan the database for changes instead.  Scores based on the time since an  event pose a special challenge, since there is no data change to trigger the recalculation when a time  threshold is reached.  Systems with special functions for score depreciation should also have features to  automatically recalculate time­based scores at the appropriate time.  Systems that build depreciation into  standard rules are less likely to do this.  However, most can maintain correct values by using a scheduler  to recalculate all scores at regular intervals.  This is unlikely to be a major issue in most cases, since the  recalculated score would almost always be lower than the previous score, and therefore would probably  not trigger a critical marketing contact.  Score Deployment.  Score changes can usually trigger any standard campaign action, including sending  a lead to the CRM system or starting it in a new campaign.  The action may be part of a campaign flow or  associated directly with score itself, depending largely on how the score itself fits into the flow of the  system. 

Campaign Management 
Program Creation.  The fundamental role of a marketing campaign is to manage a set of related  interactions.  This might be more plainly described as sending a stream of messages, but campaigns also  receive the responses to those messages and adjust future messages accordingly.  The core of the  definition is actually the word “related”: a campaign is more than a single message and less than all  interactions between the company and the lead; rather, it is a group of interactions aimed at a particular  goal.  Typical campaign goals might be to attract new leads, educate existing leads about the company,  or promote an event such as an online Webinar.  Because a campaign has a specific goal, most  companies will run multiple campaigns that are targeted at leads in different stages of the sales cycle.  This means the demand generation system must also include functions to move leads from one  campaign to another when appropriate.  In practice, this switching mechanism is usually built into the  campaigns themselves, in the form of rules that evaluate the lead’s situation and decide whether to  continue within the campaign or change to a new one.  However, this switching mechanism is logically  separate from individual campaigns, and some systems keep is actually separate by creating assessment  functions that run outside of campaigns or are shared across campaigns.  Even though all demand generation systems perform basically the same campaign management  functions, they differ substantially in how they have structured these functions and even more widely in  the terms they use to describe them.  In some cases, campaigns are divided into programs, while in  others, a program is a group of campaigns.  The steps within a campaign may be grouped into a flow,  track or process, and the steps themselves may be described as steps, stages or actions.  Campaign  management also generally involves some concept of a “list”, but this is again used differently in different  systems.  In some cases, a list defines the entry conditions for a campaign, in others it is the set of leads  currently active in a campaign, and still others it is any collection of leads and may be independent from  campaigns altogether.  Whatever their differences, all marketing campaigns share some general features. Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 11 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
·

entry conditions determine which leads will join the campaign.  Entry may be triggered by a specific  event detected in more or less real time, or may occur periodically through database queries that find  leads meeting a specified set of conditions. steps define the actions taken within the campaign.  These may be treatments such as sending a  message or directing the lead to a Web page, or may be internal processes such as calculating a  lead score.  A step often has its own entry conditions that determine whether it is executed for a  particular lead.  Although it’s possible for a campaign to have a single step, such as sending a mass  email, most campaigns at least include response processing, and thus have a minimum of two steps. decision rules determine the flow of events within the campaign.  Decision rules are evaluated after  the step is complete and determine where the lead is sent next.  They may send the lead to another  step in the campaign, to another campaign, or terminate all campaigns and send the lead to the CRM  system.  Routing within the campaign can be quite complex: the decision rule may choose among  several different next steps, or sometimes even send the lead back to a previous step.  Some  systems permit random routing for a/b tests. schedules determine when the campaign executes.  Typically the schedule includes start and stop  dates and an interval which could be anything from every few minutes to once a month.  The interval  generally determines the minimum timing between steps in a campaign, although a single step might  trigger several actions in succession before waiting for the next interval.  Even event­triggered  campaigns may specify an interval to wait between reacting to events, so the system doesn’t  bombard the lead with too many messages in quick succession.  Schedules may also specify the  times of day and days of the week when the campaign is active, typically to ensure that messages  are delivered during business hours. 

·

·

·

Marketing campaign implementations also differ greatly in their user interface.  Complex campaigns have  traditionally been laid out using a Visio­style flow chart, with boxes for actions and diamonds for decisions  connected by arrows for lead flows.  This has the advantage of precision but can get confusing as options  multiply.  It becomes almost unreadable when flows loop back on themselves or leads can migrate from  one campaign to another.  One way to simplify such flows is to group related steps into a single box on  the flow chart, and allow users to drill into this for details when they need to.  Another approach is to show  the steps in the campaign in a list, even though a particular lead may skip some of the steps or a single  step may itself contain alternative actions.  Yet another alternative is to envision the campaign as having  just three stages: entry, execution, and exit.  Active leads are continuously recycled within the execution  stage, receiving different messages each time they are evaluated.  The leads exit when they complete the  campaign or decision rules determine they should move into a different one.  Campaign management systems also share general design issues including component sharing (rules,  actions, messages, etc.); sample generation to confirm the logic works properly; support for a/b testing,  capturing of financial information; and control over who can make changes.  Most demand generation  products approach these similarly through the system: thus, if emails are built from shared components,  campaigns tend to be as well.  One exception is a/b testing, which is often supported at just one level of  the system (within the marketing materials, during list selection, or during campaign execution).  As  elsewhere, more elaborate features are most important to organizations managing complex marketing  programs.  Campaign Selection.  Leads typically enter a marketing campaign by meeting a specified entry  condition.  This may be a specific event detected in real time, or it may be a combination of attributes  identified through periodic queries against the database.  In most systems, the entry rules for each  campaign are independent, but some apply a single rule to identify the most appropriate campaign for  each lead among all the available choices.  Even systems with independent campaign rules often include Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 12

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
checks in their entry conditions that ensure a lead is allowed into a limited number of non­conflicting  campaigns at any one time.  Systems vary in the complexity of the selection rules they let users create.  All demand generation  products allow the rules to access both lead profiles and activity histories.  Most provide predefined  functions for complex conditions such as selecting on the number of events within a specified time period.  Some let the users construct such functions for themselves, while others do not allow them at all.  Many systems also let users directly assign leads to specific campaigns.  These assignments may be an  action within a campaign flow or tied to completion of a Web form.  Most systems also allow users to  manually assign a specific lead or a list of leads to a campaign.  Users can also typically call up the  current list of leads within a campaign and select individual leads to remove.  Demand generation systems generally do not allow users to specify a limit on the number of leads that  can enter a campaign, or on the number of leads that can be active at any time.  The primary exception is  special campaigns designed for seminars and similar events, where there are known capacity limits.  Marketers with other reasons for such limits, such as limited capacity in a call center or a product with  limited inventory, will sometimes (but not always) be able to implement them by writing custom entry  rules.  Campaign selections are sometimes defined in terms of lists.  A list is usually selected by specifying rules  similar to other selection rules.  The difference is often that a list can be saved and reused, while the rules  themselves cannot.  Most systems allow users to create both static lists, whose members are selected  once and then frozen, and dynamic lists, which are reselected each time they are used or at other  intervals.  Lists usually exist outside of campaigns, allowing them to be reused, but some systems  associate lists with a single campaign only.  Some systems let selection rules include list membership as  an attribute, while other systems do not.  Most systems automatically remove duplicate lead entries from  a list, typically by checking against the email address.  Some allow more complex deduplication, either  using standard rules or rules defined by the user.  List selection options sometimes include random  sampling to set up a/b tests.  It’s usually possible to exclude members of one list from another list.  This  might be used to honor do­not­contact requests, exclude members of one campaign from another, or  suppress messages to competitors.  Campaign Activities.  Demand generation systems differ substantially in the range of activities their  campaigns can perform.  Campaigns can nearly always send a marketing message, drop the lead from  the current campaign, add the lead to another campaign, or send the lead to the CRM system.  Most can  notify a system user or the assigned sales rep about an activity, assign a task to the sales rep, send the  lead to the next step in the current campaign, or wait for a specified period before continuing with the  campaign.  Some systems can send the lead to a specific campaign step (not necessarily the next one),  update data on the lead record, add or remove the lead from a list, assign the lead to a specific sales rep,  and initiate other tasks such as scoring or deduplication.  When a specific capability is missing from the  campaign steps, there is usually an alternative way to get it done.  However, this can sometimes involve a  relatively complex workaround.  Marketers who know they will need a specific task should explore  carefully how a proposed system would accomplish it.  Content Management.  Most demand generation systems maintain a central repository of marketing  materials and allow at least some of these to be shared across programs.  However, administrative  features within these repositories tend to be quite limited.  Features that are rarely found include: check in  / check out controls to ensure that the same item is not edited simultaneously by different users;  expiration dates to ensure obsolete items are not used accidentally; and security that specifies which  users can edit which items.  Most systems do identify who created each item and who last edited it, as  well as the dates of these events.  But none retains a full editing history with the intermediate versions.  It’s usually possible to get a list of which campaigns use which item, but not to see details on usage Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 13 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
volume and results.  Marketers with programs in multiple languages will find minimal support: at best,  some vendors could create multi­language versions of an item using rule­driven content selection.  Most  of these features are important only in large marketing organizations.  Project Management.  Some demand generation vendors provide a marketing calendar that shows  when campaigns are scheduled to execute.  There generally show only the start date of recurring  campaigns.  Otherwise, there are virtually no project management functions in any demand generation  system.  Project schedules, task lists and expense budgets are altogether missing, even though they are  common in general­purpose marketing management systems.  Some vendors do provide limited approval  workflows, although these are no more than a two­level security system that assigns different users the  rights to edit content and to release it to production.  There are no serious collaboration features such as  item markup, commenting, notifications, and multi­step approval flows.  Financial Management.  Most demand generation systems can import opportunity data, including sales  results, from a CRM system and use this in financial reporting.  A few of the systems will also track  campaign costs, usually at a high level although occasionally in detail. 

CRM Integration 
Salesforce.com Integration.  All demand generation systems easily integrate with Salesforce.com.  Some vendors have fully automated the process of mapping Salesforce.com fields into the demand  generation database, allowing the integration to be set up in minutes.  Even when the process is not fully  automated, the actual mapping takes less than one hour.  The real effort is deciding which fields to  include, which may take days or weeks of discussion.  Once the mapping is complete, loading the  existing data from Salesforce.com into a new demand generation database can take several hours,  depending on the number of records.  After the initial integration, vendors with automated mapping  systems can usually detect subsequent changes in the Salesforce.com data structure and adjust for  them.  Vendors without automated mapping have systems that check for changes but still require manual  updates to adjust.  All demand generation systems import data from the lead and contact tables in Salesforce.com, and  combine it in the demand generation lead table.  (Leads and contacts in Salesforce.com are types of  individuals.  The distinction is more conceptual than technical: leads are generally unqualified prospects,  while contacts are known individuals or customers.  Multiple contacts, but not leads, can be associated  with an account [i.e., a company].)  The systems can also import activity history from Salesforce.com.  Most, but not all, demand generation systems also import data from the Salesforce.com account and  opportunity tables.  Opportunities represent specific sales efforts and are the source of information on  revenue and sales stages.  Opportunities are also linked to contact records.  Since the contacts are also  linked to marketing campaigns, they form the connection used to link the campaigns to opportunity  revenue.  Data synchronization between all demand generation systems and Salesforce.com is bi­directional: that  is, changes in each system are copied into the other.  As previously noted, the systems will map data  from Salesforce.com lead, contact and sometimes account records into a single demand generation lead  table.  They reverse the process when copying demand generation data back to Salesforce.com.  Update  frequency is generally controlled by the demand generation system, although Salesforce.com imposes  some constraints related to data volume.  In practice, this means that small demand generation systems  can send changes to Salesforce.com as they occur, while larger systems must send updates at intervals  that can range from 2 to 15 minutes.  Data is generally imported from Salesforce.com slightly less often.

Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com 

entry as of: 10/21/2008 

page 14 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
The demand generation systems will also send activity headers to Salesforce.com.  These can be  integrated with Salesforce.com’s own activity history or kept separate.  The activity details are too  voluminous to import; however, the demand generation vendors usually provide a link that lets a  Salesforce.com user click on the activity header to open a window that reads the activity details directly  from the demand generation database.  Most demand generation systems will also automatically create a  new campaign in Salesforce.com when a new campaign is added in the demand generation system, and  will synchronize membership in the campaigns as well.  Some of the systems will also recognize a new  Salesforce.com campaign and create a new demand generation campaign to match.  The matching  campaigns make it easier to synchronize activities between the systems.  It’s generally possible for each system to automatically add new leads as they appear in the other system.  However, this is not necessarily desirable, since the new lead may not be relevant.  In practice, the  demand generation systems all have functions that allow campaigns or business rules to determine when  a new lead will be sent to Salesforce.com to be added.  They can also usually send instructions to  convert the individual from a Salesforce.com lead to a Salesforce.com contact.  Some demand  generation systems can assign the new lead to a sales rep in Salesforce.com, although this may require  rules that list each sales rep separately.  Keeping such rules current could be problematic.  Most systems  let Salesforce.com make the lead assignments, and then import the resulting information so they can use  it for purposes such as signing email messages.  Demand generation campaigns can also usually assign  a Salesforce.com task to a sales rep.  The ability to execute tasks within Salesforce.com is constrained  primarily by what Salesforce.com allows, not the demand generation systems’ technologies.  Since the demand generation systems import the identity of the sales rep assigned to each lead, they can  also send the rep an email outside of Salesforce.com.  All vendors can take advantage of this to issue  alerts about lead behaviors.  These alerts are usually defined as campaign actions but are sometimes  specified separately.  Alerts can also take the form of a Web page pop­up, which requires the sales rep to  keep a demand generation system window in their browser.  Some alerts are issued in real time, while  others are sent after the event.  Most demand generation systems can also send each sales rep a regular  report summarizing recent lead activity, so the rep can decide how to react.  Since activities captured by the demand generation system will also be sent to Salesforce.com as part of  the regular synchronization, it may sometimes be quicker to let Salesforce.com issue its own alerts based  on those changes.  Some demand generation vendors also provide a plug­in for Microsoft Outlook.  Some plug­ins simply  capture the emails sent from Outlook and add them to the demand generation activity history.  This  makes them available for reporting and to demand generation campaign rules.  Other plug­ins route the  Outlook emails through the demand generation vendor’s email engine.  This both captures the email in  the activity history and lets the Salesforce.com user leverage the personalization capabilities of the  demand generation system.  Other CRM Integration.  Some demand generation vendors have integrated with several CRM vendors  beyond Salesforce.com.  This depends primarily on what their clients have requested.  Standard  integrations are generally similar to the Salesforce.com integration.  In other cases, the integration is  limited to batch file exchanges. 

Prospect Database 
Data Structure.  All demand generation systems have lead and activity tables, and most have a separate  company table.  The systems vary more substantially in their support for custom data.  Some allow only  custom fields on the lead table, while others allow custom fields and custom tables.  Systems also vary in Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 15 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
whether custom data can be added only through batch imports, or also via Web forms and API  integration.  Custom tables are critical to expanding the systems beyond the core functions.  Typical uses  include storing opportunity data, purchase history, campaign costs, Web analytics, survey responses, and  event attendance.  Database Administration.  Most systems allow users or system administrators to add whatever custom  fields or tables the system permits.  In some cases, the vendor’s professional services team must make  certain changes.  Data Capture.  The systems capture standard information about Web site visitors, including the referring  URL and IP address.  Most look up the owner of the IP address to attempt to identify the company the  visitor belongs to.  The systems also place cookies on the visitor company to build a contact history.  They will join this to later data if the visitor identifies herself.  Data Import.  All systems allow users to import files of leads.  Some support batch imports to other files.  A Web services API is sometimes available to load limited volumes directly.  Customer Data Integration.  Most demand generation systems use the email address as a primary  customer identifier.  New leads are checked against this to see if they already exist.  Marketers whose  only goal is to avoid duplicate emails will find this adequate.  But marketers who wish to use their  database for other purposes will find it misses many duplicates.  Some systems provide more extensive  matching capabilities, including functions to find near­matches based on user­specified rules.  The best of  these systems could build a reasonably accurate marketing database.  Others would require use of  external products or services. 

Reporting 
Standard Reports.  All demand generation systems provide a set of standard reports.  These typically  share capabilities including tabular and graphic display formats, options to specify parameters such as a  date range and campaigns to include; ability to drill into reports to see the underlying data; export to Excel  and other formats; and subscriptions to receive reports on a regular basis.  Despite these similarities, there is substantial range in reporting features.  Items that differentiate vendors  include the variety of reports; control over report contents; ability to combine separate reports into  dashboards; options for time­series analysis; and creation of a separate analytical data mart.  Because  access to underlying data is often highly constricted, users should examine standard reporting features  carefully to be sure they are sufficient.  Ad Hoc Reports.  Most demand generation systems do not provide an ad hoc report writer.  The  prominent exception is Market2Lead, which provides access to an analytical data mart using Informatica  PowerAnalyzer.  Otherwise, users have some control over standard reports in terms of selecting the set  of records to report on and, in some cases, the data elements to include.  They may also be able to  export the underlying data tables to analyze externally.  Predictive Modeling.  None of the demand generation vendors in this study provide integrated predictive  modeling or have built links to external modeling systems.  This may change as more sophisticated  clients find they require predictive models to help optimize customer treatments.   Use of such models is  common in consumer marketing systems.  Web Reports.  All demand generation vendors provide basic reports on visits to system­generated Web  pages.   Typical information includes page views, visitor sources, search terms, unique visitors, repeat Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 16 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
visitors, and visit times.   Most of this data is provided by the Web page requests themselves, as captured  in a server log or a tag (actually a small Javascript program) embedded in the Web page that transmits it  to the vendor’s system.  It is combined with data from cookies that identify repeat visits from the same  computer.  Some vendors can also report on visits to all pages on a client’s Web site, including those not created by  the demand generation system.  This requires that each page contain the same sort of tag mentioned  earlier.  It’s usually possible to place one tag on a master template which automatically incorporates the  tag into each page as it is rendered, instead of tagging each page separately.  Assuming a master tag is  used, the setup takes only a few minutes.  It does require assistance from whoever is running the  company Web site.  A demand generation system may also use data from third­party Web analytics  products such as Omniture or Google Analytics.  In this case, it would be these vendors’ tags that are  inserted into the client Web pages.  Having information on visits to all Web pages allows the demand generation system to provide several  types of information.  One is a more complete history of each lead’s Web activity.  This allows marketers  and sales reps to track and analyze Web visits in detail, and lets the system react to visits to key pages.  A second use for such data is identifying key events, such as purchases or stages in the sales cycle, that  are measured by visits to a specified Web page.  For example, a visit to the e­commerce checkout  confirmation page indicates that someone has made a purchase, even if the demand generation system  cannot read data from the e­commerce system itself.  Finally, the data can show the sequence of pages  that visitors select.  Such “click path” analyses can be done for a single visit or aggregated to show the  average results for all visitors.  This helps marketers understand how visitors are moving through the Web  site and where there may be problems that are leading them off the desired path.  Such reports are  standard outputs of Web analytics systems, so some marketers may already have them available.  Email Reports.  Standard email reporting is similar across all systems.  For each item, it shows how  many were sent and the various outcomes such as the number delivered, opened, click­throughs,  unsubscribes, etc.  Users can typically drill into the reports to see details on the individual leads.  Some  vendors do a better job than others of showing the performance of a single email in different campaigns  (when reuse is permitted) and the performance of different emails within a single campaign.   Some will  compare results to industry benchmarks.  Keyword Reports.  All systems can report on the source URL and search terms of Web page visitors.  This can be used to measure response to paid search advertising and to evaluate the effectiveness of  search engine optimization.  It could also be used to calculate the “cost per click” of such efforts, but none  of the demand generation vendors capture the costs needed for this calculation.  The next level of  analysis is to track subsequent performance for visitors from each source.  Web marketers do this by  specifying the URLs of pages that indicate significant behaviors, such as a checkout page reached when  a customer has made a purchase.   As with other Web reporting, this requires capturing visits to pages  outside the demand generation system.  Of the vendors in this Guide, only Manticore currently provides  this capability.  Campaign Reports.  Nearly all demand generation systems can report on the number of leads  generated by each campaign.  Most also import opportunity results from the CRM system and use these  to associate revenue with campaigns.  In general, this association involves determining which leads were  associated with each opportunity, and which campaigns were associated with those leads.  However,  systems vary significantly in the details of how they determine which campaigns get credit for which  opportunities and in how much control users have over those details.  Systems also vary substantially in  the whether they capture campaign cost information, and in what level of detail.  The most extensive  implementations capture expected as well as actual values for revenues, costs and unit sales, down to  the level of programs and offers within campaigns.  Where CRM campaigns are synchronized with Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 17 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
demand generation campaigns, information on campaign costs may be imported from CRM.  Only  systems that capture both cost and revenue can produce campaign return on investment reports.  CRM opportunity data may show the progress of leads through different opportunity stages.  Demand  generation systems that import this may provide “funnel” reports that show how many leads reach each  stage, average time in each stage, average time to move from one stage to the next, and similar  statistics.  Lead Reports.  All demand generation systems can provide basic counts on the number of leads in their  database.  Some can show additional details such as number of leads added by time period, distribution  of lead scores, and marketing contacts by lead rank.  Such reports can provide insights into over­all  marketing performance by showing trends in the number and quality of leads being generated and in how  well they are being nurtured.  Content Reports.  Demand generation systems vary widely in the level of reporting on contents.  Reports  to look for include: which campaigns use each item; how often each item is sent (for an email) or  accessed (for a Web page); and results by item (response rate for emails, completion rates for forms,  etc.). 

Technology 
Integration.  There are two fundamental ways that external systems can access a demand generation  system.  One is to query system data directly.  Vendors generally avoid this because the queries could  harm operational performance.  The only current exception is Market2Lead, which allows queries against  its analytical data mart.  Since this is separate from the system’s operational data, performance is not an  issue.  Most vendors do let users extract copies of their operational data and report against that.  The other form of external access is to use an Application Program Interface (API) which lets an external  program call the system’s own functions.  Most of the demand generation vendors offer or plan to offer an  API of some sort.  The specific functions available through the APIs will vary.  Most are used for limited  tasks such as accessing a specific lead’s data or adding a lead to a campaign.  There may also be formal  or practical constraints on the data volumes the API can handle or the response times it can provide.  Some APIs can be used to add data to the system.  Systems that allow an external Web form to post data  typically do this through an API.  Scalability.  Scalability is generally measured by data volume (i.e., the number of leads) and of users.  Most demand generation implementations are so small that neither is likely to be problem.  If an issue  does arise, it is less likely to be the ability of the system to physically process the required data volumes  than whether it provides the functions needed to manage large numbers of campaigns, leads or users.  For example, marketing departments with many users typically want fine­grained control over which users  can perform which tasks, and may further want to limit user access to particular campaigns or marketing  materials.  Demand generation vendors who have not serviced such clients may not have built in this  level of detail.  The one situation where even physical scalability could be an issue is when a system is asked to process  a much higher volume of data than ever before.  An order of magnitude increase may reveal bottlenecks  or inefficiencies that were previously undetected.  Marketers whose systems would be vastly larger than  the largest existing installation for a given vendor should test this thoroughly before making a  commitment, or at least ensure they receive detailed, binding service level guarantees that include a clear  exit path if the system does not meet their requirements. Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 18 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
Service Model.  All the demand generation vendors in this Guide offer their systems on the “software as  a service” (SaaS) model, meaning the vendor controls the hardware and software.  This approach is  increasingly popular because it removes much of the burden of running the system from the client. Some  organizations are reluctant to adopt it because they are uncomfortable allowing critical corporate data to  reside externally or because they want to tightly integrate demand generation with other systems.  Concerns over external data can usually be addressed: most IT departments are willing to accept an  external system so long as it meets a defined set of security and reliability requirements.  Integration is a  more difficult challenge, because access to the system is in fact likely to be constrained, particularly when  large data volumes are involved.  (As noted above, integration typically relies on APIs that may limit the  nature and amount of activity to ensure adequate system performance.)  Clients with unusual functional  requirements may also find a SaaS solution does not meet their needs: because the systems can only be  modified by the vendor, traditional customization is not an option.  SaaS implementation are often described as an “multi­tenant” model, meaning that several clients  (tenants) share the same system.  Exactly what is shared may vary.  The application software is nearly  always shared, since running customized variations add significant cost and risk for the vendor.  Hardware is usually shared, although some clients prefer to run on their own servers.  The database  instance is shared slightly less often (meaning data for different clients is held within the same tables).  A  shared database instance means the data structures for all clients must be identical, although it’s still  possible for different clients to see different labels for the same field, to create their own “custom” fields,  and even to add “custom” tables.  Similarly, the shared application software can usually be configured to  act differently for different clients.  Some clients worry that a shared database poses security risks,  although this issue can usually be addressed.  Shared hardware and database instances provide  significant cost savings to the vendors.  Some will support dedicated resources for clients who are willing  to pay extra.  Security.  Security, as the term is used here, describes how the system controls what each user is  allowed to do.  The usual approach in today’s systems is to create user groups that have different set of  rights.  These groups are often arranged in a hierarchies who members “inherit” rights from higher levels,  and then modify them to more specific circumstances.  For example, a group of “marketing planners”  might have a set of rights related to marketing budgets, while subgroups be limited to plans for different  regions.  This allows administrators to manage complex policies with relatively little work and a minimum  opportunity for errors.  Users can often belong to multiple groups to further accommodate individual  situations.  Security features in demand generation systems are quite primitive compared with this model.  Some  systems assign rights on a user­by­user basis, while others use only two or three groups whose members  are treated identically.  Most systems assign rights to classes of items, such as all emails, rather than  individual items or items with specific characteristics, such as emails written in French or offers available  in Japan.  In cases where there are only two or three classes of users, the rights for even the most  restricted group must be quite broad so those users can be sure to have the capabilities they need.  Marketing organizations with a small number of users will have no problem with this level of security,  since most users will in fact be performing many tasks, and it’s easy for managers to track user activities  directly.  Large marketing organizations, where responsibilities are more clearly divided and whose  company may have strict security requirements of its own, may require more precise control.  Many of the  demand generation vendors are working to expand and refine their security systems to accommodate  such needs.  User Interface.  All the demand generation systems are accessed via Internet browsers.  Most vendors  can work with any modern browser, although one (Eloqua) works only with Internet Explorer.  None of the  vendors provides for disconnected operation or a special interface for mobile (smartphone) browsers.  This should not be an issue for most marketing activities. Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com  entry as of: 10/21/2008  page 19 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 

Globalization.  Data and marketing materials in most of the demand generation systems are compatible  with UTF­8 character coding, which means they can be in any language.  The user interfaces, however,  are available only in English.  Some of the systems have additional features tailored to global  installations, such as support for multi­language versions of marketing materials and campaigns, tracking  of the lead’s language of choice, and tracking each user’s local time zone.  In general, as with security,  these features are very limited compared with support for global deployments in other types of systems.  Hosting Facilities.  All of the demand generation vendors rely on third­party data centers to physically  host their systems and connect them with the Internet.  Most can provide detailed information on the  security, backup and uptime policies of these vendors.  Any should meet most companies’ standard  requirements in these areas. 

Implementation and Support 
Implementation.  All vendors walk their clients through the process of setting up the system.  The  physical effort involved is minimal: opening a browser and mapping to Salesforce.com or another  supported CRM database.  Mapping is automated for some vendors and manual in others, but in either  case it takes only a few minutes so long as the client simply imports all the CRM fields.  What takes time  is deciding which fields to import and, if custom fields are involved, how to relate them between systems.  Beyond the CRM integration, implementation also requires setting up emails, Web pages and campaigns,  as well as the new business processes needed to support the system.  Most vendors cite a range of two  to eight weeks for the initial implementation, depending on complexity.  Large vendors tend to have staff dedicated to implementations, while smaller vendors rely on their  account managers and general support staff.  All vendors have a methodology of some sort of guide the  process.  Implementation usually includes a couple hours of formal training, followed by personal  assistance as needed.  Most implementation is handled remotely, although on­site support is usually  available to clients who need it and are willing to pay extra.  Some vendors offer formal packages of  deployment services including different levels of assistance.  Most vendors can supplement their internal  resources with partners to support a large deployment project.  Training.  Some vendors offer formal classes for new and experienced users.  These are usually online  and may be free or paid.  Many companies offer libraries of training materials, templates and case studies  that clients can access as desired.  In general, the larger and older vendors have more comprehensive  training programs.  Support.  All vendors provide telephone and email support during business hours.  Some staff their  support centers around the clock, while most of the others provide at least informal off­hours emergency  support via pager.  Most vendors have a formal case tracking system to help manage their support  process.  Additional Services.  Some vendors provide professional services such as consulting on marketing  processes and analysis.  A few will execute marketing programs for their clients.  Most rely on business  partners for such services.  Community.  Most of the vendors provide an online forum where their clients can ask questions and  share information.  Most also have a company blog.  The larger ones run local or worldwide user  conferences.

Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com 

entry as of: 10/21/2008 

page 20 

Raab Guide to Demand Generation Systems: Selection Process 
Pricing 
Price Basis.  Pricing is always related to the size of a client’s system.  Specific parameters always  include the number of leads, and sometimes extend to message volume, number of users, and modules  purchased.  Some vendors charge separately for implementation services, training, and enhanced  support levels.  Prices.  Some vendors publish their prices and others do not.  Published prices start around $1,500 per  month for small systems.  For larger clients and vendors with complex pricing schemes, it’s safe to  assume that some negotiation is possible.  Free Trial.  Many vendors offer some form of free trial to qualified prospects.  These trials include  assistance with setting up and using the system. 

Vendor 
Address.  This shows the vendor’s headquarters address.  Some firms have additional local offices.  Telephone.  This shows the vendor telephone and fax numbers.  Internet.  This shows the vendor Web site and email addresses.  Year Founded.  This shows the year the company was founded.  Ownership.  All the vendors in this group are privately held.  Number of Employees.  This shows the number of employees.  Year Product Released.  This shows the year the company’s demand generation product was released.  Some firms had earlier products with other functions.  Number of Clients.  This shows the number of active clients reported by the company.  Industries.  This shows the main industries of the company’s clients.  All do the majority of their business  with high tech companies.  Some are branching into other industries.  Reference Accounts.  This shows clients listed on the vendor Web site.  It gives some idea of the nature  of the company’s client base.  Many vendors serve only divisions or smaller groups within large  companies.  Partners and Alliances.  This lists firms shown on the vendor Web site as partners.  It distinguishes  between technology partners and service agencies.

Copyright 2008 Raab Associates Inc.  www.raabguide.com 

entry as of: 10/21/2008 

page 21 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->