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A Special Supplement To The Delphos Herald • September 2012

Senior
Lifestyles
with
‘good health’
2 • The Delphos Herald Senior Lifestyles • September 2012
ARA — With 10,000 Americans turn-
ing 65 every day - and according to
recently released research, a majority of
them expecting to live to nearly 90 - the
celebration of older Americans is a devel-
oping trend, and more people are aspiring
to live longer and better than ever before.
The latest research conducted by
Gallup and Robinson as part of Pfizer’s
Get Old initiative asked more than 1,000
Americans 18 to 65+ years old how they
feel about getting old. The results showed
that priorities and perceptions about aging
shift over time.

Key findings of the
research include:
• Nearly half of those over 50 (41 per-
cent) said they were “optimistic” about
getting old as compared with “uneasy”,
“angry” or “prepared”
• A vast majority of those who feel
aging is better than expected cite good
health (74 percent), wisdom (72 percent)
and greater appreciation for friends and
family (72 percent) as the top reasons
• 51 percent of all people surveyed
think they look younger than their age,
and 40 percent think they are wiser than
their age
• Given a list of lifetime achievements,
those 18 to 34 (45 percent) rank having
$1 million first, while those over 65 (48
percent) would rather see their grandchild
graduate from college
“We all have one thing in common -
each day we get older. At every age and
stage of our lives, we can make choices
and take actions that will help us live
longer and better. There are so many posi-
tive role models today who are changing
how people think about aging,” said Dr.
Freda Lewis-Hall, Pfizer’s Chief Medical
Officer. “There’s a huge opportunity to
support the shift that’s underway. At
GetOld.com, we want to hear what people
want and need to live better and healthier
and create a forum for dialogue on what it
means to ‘get old’ today.”
The Get Old initiative is supported
by the following leading organizations:
Easter Seals, International Longevity
Center at Columbia University’s
Mailman School of Public Health, Men’s
Health Network, National Alliance for
Caregiving, National Coalition for Cancer
Survivorship, National Consumers
League, National Family Caregivers
Association, Patient Advocate Foundation,
Society for Women’s Health Research,
Visiting Nurse Associations of America
and WomenHeart: The National Coalition
for Women with Heart Disease.
The goal of Get Old is to amplify the
conversation on aging and learn more
about how Americans at all ages are tack-
ling aging for themselves, their family,
and society. At the center of the initiative
is a first-of-its-kind online community,
GetOld.com, where people can discuss
aging by sharing and viewing stories,
photos, and videos about getting old. The
site provides people the opportunity to
vote on how they feel about aging: Angry,
Uneasy, Optimistic or Prepared.
New research shows people over 50 look forward to golden years,
as leading reasons
and
‘wisdom’
September 2012 • The Delphos Herald Senior Lifestyles - 3
Delaying retirement
has financial, social benefits
MS — The need to save for retirement
is something professionals start hearing
about from the moment they begin their
careers. Whether it’s parents extolling the
virtues of retirement plans or employers
who encourage their employees to take
advantage of their retirement programs,
saving for retirement is never far from the
minds of professionals.
As important as such savings can be,
many workers are deciding to delay their
retirements. As much as men and women
envision retiring to a faraway seaside villa
for their golden years, such retirements
are not terribly common, and many old-
er workers have begun to recognize the
economic and social benefts of delaying
retirement. Those undecided about when
they want to say goodbye to the offce
should consider the following benefts to
delaying retirement.
• Fewer years to worry about fnancing
your lifestyle
Thanks to advancements in medicine
and more and
more people liv-
ing healthier life-
styles, men and
women are now
living longer than
in years past.
While living lon-
ger, healthier lives
is a plus, it does
have an effect on
retirement. Be-
cause people can
now expect to live longer, they must en-
sure their money lasts long enough. By
delaying retirement, men and women will
have fewer retirement years to fnance.
• More chances to save money
It might be your dream to retire early,
but you could be doing yourself a great
disservice by ending your career prema-
turely. Men and women at or near the end
of their careers are often making more
money than they ever have, which enables
them to save more than they have in the
past, especially if children are full grown
and supporting themselves. Take advan-
tage of these high-salary years, even if it
means working an extra few years. If you
do, when you retire you could have sub-
stantially more in savings than you would
have had you retired early.
• Stay socially active
In addition to economic benefts, delay-
ing retirement has social benefts as well.
Many people get the bulk of their social
interaction with colleagues and cowork-
ers. When men and women retire, these
opportunities for social interaction can
dwindle rather quickly, and it’s not un-
common for retirees to battle feelings of
isolation. Delaying retirement allows you
to easily maintain contact with friends and
colleagues, and can lead to a better quality
of life.
• The chance to give back
Many older professionals view retire-
ment as being put out to pasture, where
their years or experience aren’t utilized.
However, individuals who delay retire-
ment can use their extra years around the
offce as an opportunity to leave a legacy
for the next generation. This is something
professionals fnd especially valuable as
their retirement draws nearer and they
want to leave a lasting mark, be it on their
company, within their industry or in the
community in which their company oper-
ates. Delaying retirement provides more
time to build this legacy, and can create a
greater sense of fulfllment when men and
women do decide to retire.
Delaying retirement is growing in-
creasingly popular. Men and women often
see it as a chance to build a bigger nest
egg and leave a more lasting legacy with-
in their company and community.
More and more men and women are
choosing to delay their retirement, a de-
cision that has both economic and social
benefts.
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ARA — Finding the Medicare coverage
that best fits their needs and their pock-
etbooks is challenging for many seniors.
Health care plans make changes to their cov-
erage. People’s health conditions change.
Not keeping on top of these changes can
mean problems. Suddenly seniors may find
they don’t have needed coverage, their doc-
tor no longer takes their plan, or they face
steep medical or prescription drug costs.
That’s why it’s essential to review
Medicare coverage and individual needs
each year, and to use the Medicare annual
open enrollment period to make changes to
coverage. Medicare annual open enrollment
runs from Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, with new
benefit choices effective the following Jan.
1.
“Getting started early is key,” says Mary
Dale Walters, senior vice president of the
Allsup Medicare Advisor, a Medicare plan
selection service. “Choosing Medicare cov-
erage is complicated, even when you have
lots of information on the Web. It can be
difficult to get current plan information and
to get an apples-to-apples comparison of
plans.”
Walters offers these tips for seniors to
manage and lower their health care costs.
1. Be an informed consumer
Millions of seniors, their families and
caregivers will be pleased to know that for
the third straight year the average basic
Medicare prescription drug premiums will
remain steady.
Since enacted, the Affordable Care Act
has helped more than 5.4 million people
with Medicare save more than $4.1 billion
in out-of-pocket prescription drug expenses.
Tips for seniors
on managing health care costs
See TIPS, page 12
4 • The Delphos Herald Senior Lifestyles • September 2012
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ARA — Many Americans are in the pro-
cess of reassessing their spending patterns,
and boomers and seniors are no exception.
Seventy-three percent of adults over age
50 started saving more or cutting back
on spending last year, compared to 2010,
according to a November 2011 report by
the AARP.
In many cases, the new spirit of frugal-
ity is not necessarily born out of financial
necessity, but also out of a desire to simplify
life, avoid excessive consumption and focus
on what’s really important - family, friends
and community.
If you’re an adult over 50, maybe you’re
exploring the hidden treasures of your own
region instead of taking exotic vacations.
Maybe you’re barbecuing with friends in
the backyard instead of going out to eat.
Maybe you’re spending more time playing
with your grandkids instead of buying them
the latest electronic gadgets.
In short, you’re trying to cut back on
spending without sacrificing quality of life.
Here are five tips to help.
Examine recurring expenses
It’s easy to overpay for utilities and other
recurring expenses if you don’t periodically
review your options and make sure you’re
getting the best deal. Many utility compa-
nies offer senior discounts, for example,
but you have to ask. Also consider a lower-
cost no-contract cellphone plan. Consumer
Cellular, for example, offers a variety of
affordable no-contract voice and data plans
that can be changed without penalty at any
time. You’re never locked into a plan that
forces you to pay for more service than you
need, and complementary usage alerts mean
you don’t have to worry about acciden-
tally exceeding your maximum allowance.
Flexible family plans where couples and
families share minutes can save an addi-
tional $20 to $30 per month.
Increase energy efficiency
Another way to reduce your bills is by
increasing the energy efficiency of your
home. You can unplug battery chargers
Easy ways
to reduce costs
September 2012 • The Delphos Herald Senior Lifestyles - 5
when not in use, turn off appliances rather
than leaving them in standby mode, use
energy-efficient light bulbs and turn off
the lights when you leave a room. If you’re
able to invest a little to ensure longer-term
savings - whether through weatherproof-
ing or upgrading aging appliances - you
without sacrificing quality of life
 
Delphos, OH
Ph. 419-692-6618
vancrest.com
Larry Luersman, vocalist, Veronica Leursman on the
keyboard and Bob Hohlbein playing the harmonica, en-
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enjoy games, activities, entertainment and refreshments
daily at Sarah Jane.
1096 N. Ohio Street, Greenville 937-548-1138
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6 • The Delphos Herald Senior Lifestyles • September 2012
MS — Medical advancements have
enabled people to live longer. Though
everyone wants to live longer, some people
outlive their ability to care for themselves.
In such instances, family members must
make a decision regarding how best to care
for an elderly relative.
According to “Aging in Place in
America,” a commissioned study by
Clarity(R) and the EAR Foundation, 63 per-
cent of Baby Boomers are actively involved
in providing some kind of help or assistance
to their elderly parents. Whether this is due
to the rising cost of elder care or simply a
feeling of obligation on the part of the child,
many middle-aged men and women are
responsible for caring for aging parents and
young children.
The emotions that might result from
caring for an aging parent are often mixed.
Some people are happy to do their part to
help make life a little easier for a person
who devoted so much of his or her energy to
raising them. Others in the sandwich genera-
tion can feel like this is a burden or guilty
that they’re not doing enough for a parent.
Signs an elder needs help
When an older relative stops driving,
this is often indicative that he or she needs
assistance with daily living. There also may
be signs that support and care is needed,
such as if the house seems untidy, if he
or she is having trouble maintaining per-
sonal hygiene, if the parent is getting hurt
attempting to do things around the house
or if he or she seems malnourished due to
the inability to cook meals. Limited mobil-
ity or loss of mental faculties also may be
indicative that it is time for a loved one to
receive care.
Questions to ask
Although taking on the care of an aging
parent may seem like the best idea possible,
particularly for a senior who is very afraid
of losing his or her independence, it may
not always be in either party’s best inter-
est. Before anyone determines what will be
done to help a relative, it’s best to answer a
few questions as straightforwardly as pos-
sible.
• What type of care does my parent need?
• How soon into the future is that type of
care bound to change?
• Can this care be handled
by someone who comes
into the house, such as a
visiting nurse?
• Will my parent feel com-
fortable with an outside
person helping with day-
to-day care?
• What are my parent’s limitations?
• Am I capable of handling this on my
own?
• Can I afford an adequate care facility?
• What are my local facility options?
• Will this type of care affect my own per-
sonal well-being?
• Can I handle this emotionally and physi-
cally?
Any person facing the prospect of car-
ing for an aging parent can realize that
there is help available, as well as many
different people who can help guide a deci-
sion. The first resource is to ask siblings,
aunts, uncles, and cousins to weigh in on
the situation to help the family come to a
consensus.
There are also social workers who spe-
cialize in this sort of thing, as well as
financial consultants who can spell out the
pros and cons of different types of care and
help determine the most affordable option.
This can also go a long way toward helping
determine the course of action.
The burden of caring for a parent can
take a physical and mental toll on a person.
Knowing there is a support circle available
can ease one’s mind and enable caregivers
to make rational decisions that are in every-
one’s best interest.
Caring for a loved one who can no lon-
ger care for him- or herself is something
that many Baby Boomers are facing on a
daily basis. Although it may be a touchy
subject, it is worth exploring what you will
do before the situation becomes urgent.
When you become the
parent of your
Whether retirement is on the horizon or
has already begun, more free time equates
to an increased opportunity to fill your days
with enjoyable activities.
Individuals facing busy schedules are
often forced to push hobbies to the side-
lines, as more pressing things, such as a job,
household responsibilities, and parenting
tasks, are accomplished. Once retirement
arrives, a newfound freedom in your sched-
ule may occur, and there can be plenty of
hours to devote to the hobbies and pastimes
you find enjoyable.
According to research, hobbies can have
many benefits. They may serve as an emo-
tional outlet or a way to relax. Hobbies
can keep the mind and hands active. They
also allow for quiet time and mind wander-
ing — which can free up creative thinking.
Hobbies can also serve as a means to con-
necting with people and opening up new
groups of friends.
There are many hobbies you can con-
sider, depending on physical health and
abilities. These may be hobbies you once
enjoyed in the past or new activities to
expand your horizons. And hobbies need not
be crafty in the traditional sense, just about
any activity — even being a mentor — can
be a form of a hobby.
Starting a hobby
When deciding on a hobby, you can first
take an inventory of your skills and interests.
If you have always been handy around wood
and construction, perhaps a woodworking
hobby will be enjoyable and also may work
as a source of income revenue.
Other activities that require the use of
the hands and mind include knitting, needle-
point, painting, puzzles, quilting, scrap-
booking, and crocheting. These can keep the
mind active and improve dexterity and fine
motor skills.
Next, you may want to consider the costs
surrounding a hobby. While something like
taking photos may have relatively low costs,
collectibles, exotic sports, sports cars, and
travel could become expensive. It’s impor-
tant to weight the costs against your finances
to ensure that you will be financially com-
fortable while engaging in this particular
hobby.
Explore what your friends are doing.
If you want to get into a new hobby, ask
neighbors and friends what they do to keep
busy — and try it out. You just may find that
you’re naturally inclined to do this type of
activity and enjoy it.
Visit a local hobby shop or craft store and
browse through the aisles. See where your
attention is drawn and give that activity a
try. From building model trains to cultivat-
ing an herb garden, there are dozens of ideas
to try.
Other pastimes
A hobby can take the form of volunteer
work, teaching, mentoring, joining a martial
arts class, taking classes at a college, and
even caring for a pet. If you are the type who
likes to interact with other people instead of
engaging in a solitary hobby, consider one
of these types of activities instead.
Once a hobby is started, it is not set in
stone. If you find you do not feel moti-
vated to do this hobby, try something else.
Remember, the days are now yours to fill,
so maximize time spent with activities you
can enjoy.
Sewing can be a hobby that seniors do
after retirement when they have ample
free time.
215 N. Central Ave.
Lima, OH 45801
(419) 228-5135
Fax (419) 228-3812
E-MAIL: accoa@accoa.org
WEBSITE: www.accoa.org
“Serving Allen County Seniors since 1976”
Allen County Council On Aging, Inc.
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SPECIALISTS
Hobbies for the golden years
September 2012 • The Delphos Herald Senior Lifestyles - 7
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can schedule an energy audit to find out
how to get the biggest bang for your home-
improvement buck.
Be a smart shopper
If you’re not into clipping coupons,
that’s OK. There are other ways to save.
For example, try store-brand products rather
than automatically reaching for the brands
you’ve always purchased - in many cases,
you won’t be able to tell the difference.
Buy in bulk if you use large quantities of
something. Watch for sales on items you
purchase regularly, but don’t buy something
just because it’s on sale - if you wouldn’t
have bought it otherwise, you’re not saving
money. For bigger-ticket items, be sure to
comparison shop to make sure you’re get-
ting the best price. Websites such as price-
grabber.com allow you to research numer-
ous retailers without leaving your home.
Take advantage of free entertainment
Wondering what to do this weekend?
Low-cost, or sometimes free, options are
abundant. Check the events sections of local
newspapers and websites to see what’s hap-
pening in the area - festivals, exhibits and
other special events are often free, and high
schools and colleges frequently host sport-
ing events, plays, concerts and lectures that
are open to the public. Libraries are also an
excellent source of free entertainment - you
can try out new authors, artists and genres
with no risk by borrowing books, audio-
books, DVDs and CDs instead of purchas-
ing them. You might even meet some inter-
esting people while you’re out and about in
the community.
Reassess your gift-giving habits
If you’ve ever found yourself rushing to
the mall to buy a last-minute gift for a loved
one’s birthday, chances are you’ve spent
more than you originally planned, settled
for something you suspected the recipient
might end up exchanging, or avoided the
decision by purchasing a safe but imper-
sonal gift card. However, most of us don’t
really need more things. Instead, consider
giving your loved ones the gift of a shared
experience. If your grandson loves animals,
take him to the zoo. If your sister is into
jazz, take her out for an evening at a jazz
club. Of course, you might not end up
spending less money this way - experiences
come in all price ranges - so do keep your
budget in mind. The point is that instead of
wasting money on something that might just
sit in the garage for years, you’ll enjoy a
meaningful experience together. And that’s
what quality of life is all about.
Easy Ways
(Continued from page 5)
helping to raise
Grandparents
Grandchildren
MS — The stalled economy has pushed
many families into the position of doing
whatever is needed to make ends meet.
In many cases, this means both parents
working whatever jobs they can find and
finding the best childcare option while
they are at work. Many people are turn-
ing to their parents to help care for their
kids.
More than 60 percent of families with
children under age 18 had both parents
employed outside the home in 2005 to
2006, according to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics. That compares to less than a
third of mothers in 1975. The numbers
today are around 42 percent, a decrease
that likely has a lot to do with unem-
ployment figures remaining high. Human
Resources and Skills Development
Canada states that there are similar statis-
tics among Canadian families.
With so many men and women heading
to work each day, and money a factor for
doing so, the topic of child care becomes
one of necessity as well as affordability.
Grandparents are regularly stepping up
to help family members who are under a
financial crunch.
Grandparents considering caring for
their grandkids should keep in mind some
things even if the childcare scenario on the
surface seems like it is the best option.
• It’s a big commitment
Once the decision has been made, it
is expected that you will be providing
care for a certain period of time — per-
haps even without a future end date.
Remember, other arrangements will have
to be made if you back out because it’s
simply not working.
• Know your limits
Childcare is not something to take
lightly. While you may have had enough
energy to provide care years ago, maybe
now you are simply not up to the task or
have not identified factors that could hin-
der your ability to care for a grandchild
-- no matter how much you love him or
her.
• Be prepared for changes to your life
You will no longer be able to operate
on your own schedule. Now your days
will largely revolve around caring for your
grandkids. If many of your friends are
living active lives without grandchildren
in tow, this could put a hamper on your
relationships and ability to socialize.
• It could be just what you need
On the flip side, if you have been seek-
ing something to do with your time, being
in the presence of your grandchildren
could be just what you need to find a pur-
pose to your days.
• The relationship may cause
animosity
If you are offering care to one set of
grandchildren and are not doing so to
another, it could strain the relationships
among your children. Think about the
larger factor before agreeing to being the
caregiver.
• Talk to your spouse
If you are married or are in a relation-
ship, this is a decision that will have to be
discussed with your partner, whose life
will be impacted as well. If both of you
aren’t seeing eye-to-eye on the situation,
it may cause a rift that can damage your
relationship.
• Avoid guilt
If you choose to say no to the situation,
it may generate hurt feelings at the onset,
but if you explain your reasons clearly,
chances are the loved one will understand
how you are feeling.
Although grandparents stepping in
to become childcare providers for their
grandchildren while parents are at work
has become a popular situation in recent
years, it is important to weigh the pros
and cons of the situation before delving
headfirst into the arrangement.
8 • The Delphos Herald Senior Lifestyles • September 2012
OPEN 9 AM - 7 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY through September
OCT. 9 AM - 5 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY
SATURDAY 10 AM - 2 PM all year
The
7 West Monroe st., neW BreMen, ohio
(Corner of 66 and 274)
Bicycle MuseuM
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We have
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For information
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call 419-629-9249
or visit our web site at
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• Civil War Flag
• Presidential Medals
• geM ColleCtion
• navy Coin Challenge
2.0
1.6
1.2
0.8
0.4
0.0
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
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REGIONAL FORECAST
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55/61
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49/69
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44/65
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44/61
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42/63
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45/61
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46/60
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49/66
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46/66
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48/65
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48/63
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44/60
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48/60
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51/60
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53/64
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52/62
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50/60
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46/61
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TODAY'S INTERNATIONAL FORECAST
TUESDAY TODAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
National extremes
Low: -6 at Butte, Mont.
High: 89 at Laredo, Texas
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
Today
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Tuesday
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NATIONAL FORECAST
Low 50
High 70
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Low 34
High 48
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High 50
ALMANAC
Sunday through 7 p.m. 0
This month through Nov. 6 0.65 0.68
Total this year 40.31 34.99
Precipitation in inches Total Normal Temperature High Low
30-DAY TEMPERATURE HISTORY
30-DAY PRECIPITATION HISTORY IN INCHES
Indiana extremes
Low: 36 at Fort Wayne
High: 65 at Evansville
SUNDAY’S
EXTREMES
TODAY'S TEMPERATURES
TODAY'S AIR QUALITY INDEX
TODAY'S POLLEN COUNT
TODAY'S UV INDEX
SUN AND MOON
Moderate Unhealthy
Low Medium High
Low Moderate High
Very unhealthy
Sunrise today 7:20 a.m.
Sunset today 5:37 p.m.
Sunrise Tuesday 7:21 a.m.
Sunset Tuesday 5:36 p.m.
Moon rises today 3:47 p.m.
Moon sets today 4:22 a.m.
Source: www.airnow.com
Source: www.pollen.com
0 10+ 6 2 4 8
0 10 6 2 4 8 12
Sunday 63 41
(2:21 p.m.) (7:37 a.m.)
Normal 57 39
Record 77 20
(in 1975) (in 1982)
80°
70°
60°
50°
40°
6 9 3 6 6 3 9 12 noon
a.m. a.m. p.m.
Full Last New First
Nov. 10 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2
Very high
MORE ONLINE
For up-to-the-minute weather, go
to IndyStar.com/weather.
Albuquerque 29 53 Rn 29 50 Pc
Anchorage 20 28 Sn 12 22 Pc
Atlanta 43 68 Su 45 69 Su
Atlantic City 42 61 Su 43 62 Su
Baltimore 42 62 Su 46 65 Su
Billings 18 42 Su 23 47 Pc
Birmingham 49 70 Su 53 75 Su
Boise 24 44 Pc 26 47 Pc
Boston 41 61 Su 47 67 Pc
Bowling Green 49 70 Pc 49 70 Ts
Branson, MO 56 65 Ts 58 69 Ts
Buffalo 46 61 Pc 50 62 Pc
Burlington, VT 28 58 Su 38 60 Su
Charleston, SC 54 71 Su 54 71 Pc
Charleston, WV 38 66 Su 42 69 Su
Charlotte 38 67 Su 43 69 Su
Cheyenne 21 37 Cdy 22 37 Su
Chicago 55 61 Cdy 52 66 Rn
Cincinnati 44 65 Pc 46 70 Pc
Cleveland 45 61 Pc 50 65 Pc
Dallas 64 75 Ts 64 77 Ts
Daytona Beach 64 79 Rn 64 79 Rn
Denver 22 40 Cdy 23 36 Sn
Des Moines 35 58 Pc 41 44 Rn
Detroit 48 58 Rn 50 62 Cdy
El Paso 43 66 Pc 38 58 Su
Fairbanks 11 7 Sn -3 -2 Sn
Fargo, ND 30 44 Pc 26 45 Pc
Flagstaff 21 38 Sn 12 42 Su
Fort Myers 62 83 Pc 62 83 Pc
Grand Rapids 50 59 Pc 46 56 Rn
Green Bay 38 54 Su 37 44 Rn
Honolulu 72 84 Su 72 84 Su
Houston 67 81 Cdy 70 83 Ts
Jackson, MS 53 77 Pc 57 81 Pc
Jacksonville 59 73 Rn 60 72 Pc
Juneau 33 40 Rs 31 36 Rs
Kansas City 43 62 Ts 57 59 Ts
Knoxville 40 68 Su 44 72 Su
Las Vegas 44 60 Su 41 60 Pc
Little Rock 57 73 Cdy 61 75 Ts
Los Angeles 48 65 Su 48 68 Su
Louisville 49 69 Pc 54 75 Su
Memphis 55 73 Pc 58 77 Ts
Miami Beach 70 80 Pc 69 81 Pc
Milwaukee 46 55 Pc 46 53 Rn
Minneapolis 32 50 Su 33 43 Rn
Myrtle Beach,SC 50 70 Su 53 71 Pc
Naples 62 80 Pc 62 85 Pc
Nashville 48 70 Pc 50 75 Su
New Orleans 63 78 Pc 65 80 Pc
NewYork City 43 59 Su 46 67 Su
Norfolk, VA 47 65 Su 48 69 Pc
Oklahoma City 58 70 Ts 60 63 Rn
Omaha 31 57 Cdy 40 40 Rs
Orlando 63 81 Rn 63 82 Pc
Pensacola 58 72 Pc 59 76 Cdy
Philadelphia 40 61 Su 43 65 Su
Phoenix 50 63 Rn 45 67 Su
Pittsburgh 38 62 Su 42 65 Su
Portland, OR 41 51 Rn 44 54 Pc
Portland, ME 35 54 Su 42 58 Pc
Providence 39 63 Su 41 65 Su
Raleigh 39 66 Su 44 67 Pc
Rapid City 24 43 Pc 27 46 Cdy
St. Louis 53 64 Ts 55 72 Ts
Sacramento 39 60 Su 38 62 Pc
Saginaw 32 59 Pc 42 58 Cdy
Salt Lake City 30 37 Pc 28 38 Su
San Antonio 69 79 Cdy 67 81 Ts
San Diego 51 66 Pc 53 70 Su
San Francisco 47 60 Pc 46 62 Pc
San Juan, PR 76 86 Ts 76 84 Ts
Santa Fe 28 43 Rn 26 40 Pc
Savannah 53 71 Su 52 73 Pc
Seattle 42 50 Rn 44 51 Cdy
Sioux Falls, SD 25 52 Pc 31 42 Rs
Spokane 25 47 Cdy 29 48 Cdy
St. Thomas, VI 78 85 Ts 78 86 Ts
Tallahassee 52 75 Pc 50 77 Pc
Tampa 60 83 Pc 60 83 Pc
Tucson 46 59 Rn 36 60 Su
Tulsa 59 70 Ts 62 71 Ts
Washington 42 63 Su 44 65 Su
100°
80°
60°
40°
20°
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
HIGH LOW
Amsterdam 48 53 Cdy
Athens 53 67 Su
Baghdad 50 73 Su
Bangkok 81 91 Ts
Beijing 43 54 Cdy
Beirut 57 73 Su
Berlin 42 56 Su
Bermuda 72 76 Cdy
Buenos Aires 63 82 Pc
Cairo 60 78 Su
Cancun 66 81 Pc
Copenhagen 43 50 Pc
Dublin 39 51 Pc
Edmonton 27 38 Pc
Geneva 48 58 Rn
Halifax 41 52 Su
Helsinki 42 47 Rn
Hong Kong 75 81 Ts
Istanbul 47 57 Su
Jerusalem 50 61 Su
Johannesburg 59 79 Su
Kabul 46 64 Pc
London 51 56 Cdy
Madrid 42 63 Rn
Manila 79 88 Ts
Mexico City 52 76 Pc
Montreal 43 57 Pc
Moscow 23 31 Pc
Nairobi 64 79 Ts
Nassau 72 85 Pc
New Delhi 64 86 Su
Oslo 36 41 Pc
Paris 48 52 Cdy
Rio de Janeiro 66 80 Su
Rome 54 68 Rn
Seoul 48 66 Pc
Singapore 77 87 Ts
Stockholm 39 46 Cdy
Sydney 65 81 Ts
Tokyo 56 68 Rn
Toronto 46 62 Pc
Vancouver 39 46 Rn
Vienna 45 54 Pc
Winnipeg 19 37 Sn
Zurich 44 53 Pc
Detroit
48/58
Good
Plan on lots of
clouds today with a
chance of a few
sprinkles or
showers. Despite
the clouds, it will
be mild with highs
in the mid 60s today and around
70 Tuesday.
— - Chikage Windler Showers pos-
sible, espe-
cially north
and west
Mostly
cloudy and
warm. Rain
late tonight
Rain likely,
up to 1 inch
possible
Cool and
blustery
Veteran's
Day will be
breezy and
cool
B8 » MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 1 S T THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR » INDYSTAR.COM A B C
weather
Stay up to date
at m.indystar.com
On your mobile device,
check out the latest news
24/7 at m.indystar.com
Get forecasts on
your mobile phone
Text Wand city (WIndianapolis) or
ZIP code (W46206) to 44636 (4INFO)
for latest forecast.
IS-5764572 IS-5764572
NEEDED
AREA RESIDENTS
to try new DIGITAL
Technology in Hearing Aids
HEARING
TESTS
OFFERED
3 Days Only!
Pl ease cal l i mmedi atel y.
Appoi ntments are Li mited !
REWARD!
If your eval uati on shows heari ng
i mprovement wi th new i nstruments,
you may choose to retai n them and recei ve
$500 OFF one i nstrument or
$1000 OFF A COMPLETE SET.
You wi l l al so recei ve a FREE Li feti me
I n-Offi ce Mai ntenance for the l i fe of the heari ng ai ds
and a year suppl y of Batteri es.
Benefits of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper fit. Beltone Hearing Care Centers are independently owned and operated. Participation may vary by location. © 2011 Beltone
Hearing Centers
True

Technology
• OpenEar Comfort
• Virtually Invisible
• Automatically Adjusts
• Same Day Fit
Look!
She’s wearing
new open ear
technology!
Indy Northwest
2250 W 86th St.
(across from St. Vincent Hospital)
(317) 334-4444
Indy South
7007 S. Hwy. 31
(corner of Southport & Hwy 31)
(317) 885-4444
Greenfield
1789 N. State St.
Greenfield IN. 46140
(317) 462-9999
Noblesville
247 Sheridan Rd.
(Western Plaza)
(317) 770-9999
Indy West
1451 S. Green St. • Brownsburg
(St. Rd. 267 S. of Brown Med Ctr)
(317) 858-8444
Indy Northeast
6115 Allisonville Rd.
(317) 359-4444
Many convenient locations throughout Indiana for additional locations near you call 1-800-371-HEAR
Bird Feed
Headquarters
FREE 5lb. Bag of Bird Feed
Text NURSERY to 44636
2.0
1.6
1.2
0.8
0.4
0.0
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
New York
City
Washington, D.C.
Detroit
Indianapolis
Nashville
Atlanta
Miami
Orlando
New Orleans
Dallas
Houston
Kansas City Denver
Salt Lake City
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Seattle
Portland
Chicago
H L
100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s -10s
Rain
Stationary Warm front Cold front
Snow
Minneapolis
Phoenix
REGIONAL FORECAST
Chicago
55/61
Louisville
49/69
Cincinnati
44/65
Richmond
44/61
Columbus
42/63
Cleveland
45/61
Toledo
46/60
Evansville
49/66
Bloomington
46/66
Indianapolis
48/65
Terre Haute
48/63
Fort Wayne
44/60
South Bend
48/60
Lafayette
49/60
Gary
51/60
St. Louis
53/64
Springfield
52/62
Champaign
50/60
Peoria
51/61
Davenport
42/60
Muncie
46/61
Lexington
45/65
TODAY'S INTERNATIONAL FORECAST
TUESDAY TODAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
National extremes
Low: -6 at Butte, Mont.
High: 89 at Laredo, Texas
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
NATIONAL FORECAST
Low 50
High 70
Low 48
High 65
Low 52
High 57
Low 34
High 48
Low 31
High 50
ALMANAC
Sunday through 7 p.m. 0
This month through Nov. 6 0.65 0.68
Total this year 40.31 34.99
Precipitation in inches Total Normal Temperature High Low
30-DAY TEMPERATURE HISTORY
30-DAY PRECIPITATION HISTORY IN INCHES
Indiana extremes
Low: 36 at Fort Wayne
High: 65 at Evansville
SUNDAY’S
EXTREMES
TODAY'S TEMPERATURES
TODAY'S AIR QUALITY INDEX
TODAY'S POLLEN COUNT
TODAY'S UV INDEX
SUN AND MOON
Moderate Unhealthy
Low Medium High
Low Moderate High
Very unhealthy
Sunrise today 7:20 a.m.
Sunset today 5:37 p.m.
Sunrise Tuesday 7:21 a.m.
Sunset Tuesday 5:36 p.m.
Moon rises today 3:47 p.m.
Moon sets today 4:22 a.m.
Source: www.airnow.com
Source: www.pollen.com
0 10+ 6 2 4 8
0 10 6 2 4 8 12
Sunday 63 41
(2:21 p.m.) (7:37 a.m.)
Normal 57 39
Record 77 20
(in 1975) (in 1982)
80°
70°
60°
50°
40°
6 9 3 6 6 3 9 12 noon
a.m. a.m. p.m.
Full Last New First
Nov. 10 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2
Very high
MORE ONLINE
For up-to-the-minute weather, go
to IndyStar.com/weather.
Albuquerque 29 53 Rn 29 50 Pc
Anchorage 20 28 Sn 12 22 Pc
Atlanta 43 68 Su 45 69 Su
Atlantic City 42 61 Su 43 62 Su
Baltimore 42 62 Su 46 65 Su
Billings 18 42 Su 23 47 Pc
Birmingham 49 70 Su 53 75 Su
Boise 24 44 Pc 26 47 Pc
Boston 41 61 Su 47 67 Pc
Bowling Green 49 70 Pc 49 70 Ts
Branson, MO 56 65 Ts 58 69 Ts
Buffalo 46 61 Pc 50 62 Pc
Burlington, VT 28 58 Su 38 60 Su
Charleston, SC 54 71 Su 54 71 Pc
Charleston, WV 38 66 Su 42 69 Su
Charlotte 38 67 Su 43 69 Su
Cheyenne 21 37 Cdy 22 37 Su
Chicago 55 61 Cdy 52 66 Rn
Cincinnati 44 65 Pc 46 70 Pc
Cleveland 45 61 Pc 50 65 Pc
Dallas 64 75 Ts 64 77 Ts
Daytona Beach 64 79 Rn 64 79 Rn
Denver 22 40 Cdy 23 36 Sn
Des Moines 35 58 Pc 41 44 Rn
Detroit 48 58 Rn 50 62 Cdy
El Paso 43 66 Pc 38 58 Su
Fairbanks 11 7 Sn -3 -2 Sn
Fargo, ND 30 44 Pc 26 45 Pc
Flagstaff 21 38 Sn 12 42 Su
Fort Myers 62 83 Pc 62 83 Pc
Grand Rapids 50 59 Pc 46 56 Rn
Green Bay 38 54 Su 37 44 Rn
Honolulu 72 84 Su 72 84 Su
Houston 67 81 Cdy 70 83 Ts
Jackson, MS 53 77 Pc 57 81 Pc
Jacksonville 59 73 Rn 60 72 Pc
Juneau 33 40 Rs 31 36 Rs
Kansas City 43 62 Ts 57 59 Ts
Knoxville 40 68 Su 44 72 Su
Las Vegas 44 60 Su 41 60 Pc
Little Rock 57 73 Cdy 61 75 Ts
Los Angeles 48 65 Su 48 68 Su
Louisville 49 69 Pc 54 75 Su
Memphis 55 73 Pc 58 77 Ts
Miami Beach 70 80 Pc 69 81 Pc
Milwaukee 46 55 Pc 46 53 Rn
Minneapolis 32 50 Su 33 43 Rn
Myrtle Beach,SC 50 70 Su 53 71 Pc
Naples 62 80 Pc 62 85 Pc
Nashville 48 70 Pc 50 75 Su
New Orleans 63 78 Pc 65 80 Pc
NewYork City 43 59 Su 46 67 Su
Norfolk, VA 47 65 Su 48 69 Pc
Oklahoma City 58 70 Ts 60 63 Rn
Omaha 31 57 Cdy 40 40 Rs
Orlando 63 81 Rn 63 82 Pc
Pensacola 58 72 Pc 59 76 Cdy
Philadelphia 40 61 Su 43 65 Su
Phoenix 50 63 Rn 45 67 Su
Pittsburgh 38 62 Su 42 65 Su
Portland, OR 41 51 Rn 44 54 Pc
Portland, ME 35 54 Su 42 58 Pc
Providence 39 63 Su 41 65 Su
Raleigh 39 66 Su 44 67 Pc
Rapid City 24 43 Pc 27 46 Cdy
St. Louis 53 64 Ts 55 72 Ts
Sacramento 39 60 Su 38 62 Pc
Saginaw 32 59 Pc 42 58 Cdy
Salt Lake City 30 37 Pc 28 38 Su
San Antonio 69 79 Cdy 67 81 Ts
San Diego 51 66 Pc 53 70 Su
San Francisco 47 60 Pc 46 62 Pc
San Juan, PR 76 86 Ts 76 84 Ts
Santa Fe 28 43 Rn 26 40 Pc
Savannah 53 71 Su 52 73 Pc
Seattle 42 50 Rn 44 51 Cdy
Sioux Falls, SD 25 52 Pc 31 42 Rs
Spokane 25 47 Cdy 29 48 Cdy
St. Thomas, VI 78 85 Ts 78 86 Ts
Tallahassee 52 75 Pc 50 77 Pc
Tampa 60 83 Pc 60 83 Pc
Tucson 46 59 Rn 36 60 Su
Tulsa 59 70 Ts 62 71 Ts
Washington 42 63 Su 44 65 Su
100°
80°
60°
40°
20°
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
HIGH LOW
Amsterdam 48 53 Cdy
Athens 53 67 Su
Baghdad 50 73 Su
Bangkok 81 91 Ts
Beijing 43 54 Cdy
Beirut 57 73 Su
Berlin 42 56 Su
Bermuda 72 76 Cdy
Buenos Aires 63 82 Pc
Cairo 60 78 Su
Cancun 66 81 Pc
Copenhagen 43 50 Pc
Dublin 39 51 Pc
Edmonton 27 38 Pc
Geneva 48 58 Rn
Halifax 41 52 Su
Helsinki 42 47 Rn
Hong Kong 75 81 Ts
Istanbul 47 57 Su
Jerusalem 50 61 Su
Johannesburg 59 79 Su
Kabul 46 64 Pc
London 51 56 Cdy
Madrid 42 63 Rn
Manila 79 88 Ts
Mexico City 52 76 Pc
Montreal 43 57 Pc
Moscow 23 31 Pc
Nairobi 64 79 Ts
Nassau 72 85 Pc
New Delhi 64 86 Su
Oslo 36 41 Pc
Paris 48 52 Cdy
Rio de Janeiro 66 80 Su
Rome 54 68 Rn
Seoul 48 66 Pc
Singapore 77 87 Ts
Stockholm 39 46 Cdy
Sydney 65 81 Ts
Tokyo 56 68 Rn
Toronto 46 62 Pc
Vancouver 39 46 Rn
Vienna 45 54 Pc
Winnipeg 19 37 Sn
Zurich 44 53 Pc
Detroit
48/58
Good
Plan on lots of
clouds today with a
chance of a few
sprinkles or
showers. Despite
the clouds, it will
be mild with highs
in the mid 60s today and around
70 Tuesday.
— - Chikage Windler Showers pos-
sible, espe-
cially north
and west
Mostly
cloudy and
warm. Rain
late tonight
Rain likely,
up to 1 inch
possible
Cool and
blustery
Veteran's
Day will be
breezy and
cool
B8 » MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 1 S T THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR » INDYSTAR.COM A B C
weather
Stay up to date
at m.indystar.com
On your mobile device,
check out the latest news
24/7 at m.indystar.com
Get forecasts on
your mobile phone
Text Wand city (WIndianapolis) or
ZIP code (W46206) to 44636 (4INFO)
for latest forecast.
IS-5764572 IS-5764572
NEEDED
AREA RESIDENTS
to try new DIGITAL
Technology in Hearing Aids
HEARING
TESTS
OFFERED
3 Days Only!
Pl ease cal l i mmedi atel y.
Appoi ntments are Li mited !
REWARD!
If your eval uati on shows heari ng
i mprovement wi th new i nstruments,
you may choose to retai n them and recei ve
$500 OFF one i nstrument or
$1000 OFF A COMPLETE SET.
You wi l l al so recei ve a FREE Li feti me
I n-Offi ce Mai ntenance for the l i fe of the heari ng ai ds
and a year suppl y of Batteri es.
Benefits of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper fit. Beltone Hearing Care Centers are independently owned and operated. Participation may vary by location. © 2011 Beltone
Hearing Centers
True

Technology
• OpenEar Comfort
• Virtually Invisible
• Automatically Adjusts
• Same Day Fit
Look!
She’s wearing
new open ear
technology!
Indy Northwest
2250 W 86th St.
(across from St. Vincent Hospital)
(317) 334-4444
Indy South
7007 S. Hwy. 31
(corner of Southport & Hwy 31)
(317) 885-4444
Greenfield
1789 N. State St.
Greenfield IN. 46140
(317) 462-9999
Noblesville
247 Sheridan Rd.
(Western Plaza)
(317) 770-9999
Indy West
1451 S. Green St. • Brownsburg
(St. Rd. 267 S. of Brown Med Ctr)
(317) 858-8444
Indy Northeast
6115 Allisonville Rd.
(317) 359-4444
Many convenient locations throughout Indiana for additional locations near you call 1-800-371-HEAR
Bird Feed
Headquarters
FREE 5lb. Bag of Bird Feed
Text NURSERY to 44636
1541 Allentown Road, Suite C
Lima
419-773-4021
Mon.-Thurs. 9-5
912 E. 2nd St., Suite 106
Defiance
419-773-4021
Tues. & Fri. only 9-5
REWARD!
If your evaluation shows hearing
improvement with new instruments, you may choose to
retain them and receive
$500 OFF one instrument or
$1000.00 OFF A COMPLETE SET.
You will also receive a FREE Lifetime In-Office
Maintenance for the life of the
hearing aids and a FREE $50 Visa Card*.
HEARING
TESTS
OFFERED
3 Days Only!
Please call immediately.
Appointments are limited!
NEEDED
AREA RESIDENTS
to try new DIGITAL
Technology in
Hearing Aids
*Hearing aids must be purchased for 30-day Trial.
Patient may return aids within 30 days of purchase for a full refund.
www.beltonehearingaid.com
These are significant results as the law clos-
es the Medicare Part D donut hole coverage
gap, according to the Centers for Medicare
& Medicaid Services.
Seniors can capitalize on those savings
by knowing exactly what they are paying
for; shop around for better prescription
prices and ask about costs. For addition-
al savings, use generic medications. Take
advantage of Medicare preventive services,
including many types of screenings, tests,
shots, counseling, training and supplies now
offered without co-pays or other out-of-
pocket costs.
2. Ask for help
In addition to guidance on retirement,
estate and long-term care planning, seniors
can rely on professionals to help them with
health care choices. Walters points out this
can include Medicare specialists such as
Allsup or financial planners who often con-
sult Medicare experts.
“Health care planning is a quality of life
and a financial issue,” Walters says. “If you
need assistance sorting through the over-
whelming number of options, it’s important
to know that help is out there for you; don’t
be afraid to ask.”
Grace Hercules used Allsup to research
her Medicare needs and found she could
save more than $1,000 a year by switching
drug plans.
“I thought a mail-order prescription plan
was best for me, but their specialists proved
me wrong about this; and I am so happy,”
she says. “People can probably do their own
taxes, but when they pay a tax adviser they
get better returns. It’s getting the mindset
that good help is available. It’s really worth
getting expert help and not having the
aggravation.”
3. Be proactive
Having known and been around seniors,
Hercules says she is saddened that so many
settle for high costs or keep the same
Medicare plan year after year because of a
lack of understanding.
Just as seniors review their finances or
taxes each year, Medicare annual enroll-
ment is the ideal time to review health care
coverage, Walters says. “It’s OK to admit
it’s confusing and that help will be valuable.
Look at all your Medicare options and take
charge of your health care.”
In addition to annual Medicare enroll-
ment, special enrollment periods happen
throughout the year for specific situations.
For an evaluation of Medicare options, call
an Allsup Medicare Advisor specialist at
866-521-7655, or go to medicare.allsup.
com.
Tips
(Continued from page 3)

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