Unit Map 2012-2013

Saigon South International School Collaboration / Science 5* / Grade 5 (Elementary School)
Friday, October 5, 2012, 8:33PM

Unit: Motion and Design (Week 20, 6 Weeks)
Stage 1: Desired Results

Standards & Benchmarks DE: GLE: Science, DE: Grade 5 , S1: Nature & Application of Science Technology Enduring Understandings: Scientific inquiry involves asking scientifically-oriented questions, collecting evidence, forming explanations, connecting explanations to scientific knowledge and theory, and communicating and justifying the explanation.  Design and conduct simple to multi-step investigations in order to test predictions. Keep constant all but the condition being tested. Level: Essential Accurately collect data using observations, simple tools and equipment. Display and organize data in tables, charts, diagrams, and bar graphs or plots over time. Compare and question results with and from others. Level: Essential Construct a reasonable explanation by analyzing evidence from the data. Revise the explanation after comparing results with other sources or after further investigation. Level: Essential Communicate procedures, data, and explanations to a variety of audiences. Justify the results by using evidence to form an argument. Level: Essential Use mathematics, reading, writing, and technology when conducting scientific inquiries. Level: Important

Enduring Understanding: The development of technology and advancement in science influence each other and drive each other forward.  A. Science and technology are related. Technology provides the tools needed for science to investigate questions and may provide solutions to society’s problems, wants, or needs. Not all technological solutions are effective, uniformly beneficial, or equally available to everyone. Level: Compact

Enduring Understanding: Understanding past processes and contributions is essential in building scientific knowledge.  A. Contributions by individuals have been essential in advancing the body of scientific knowledge. Level: Compact

DE: GLE: Science, DE: Grade 5 , S3: Energy & Its Effects Enduring Understandings: Energy takes many forms. These forms can be grouped into types of energy that are associated with the motion of mass (kinetic energy) and types of energy associated with the position of mass and with energy fields (potential energy).  B. The energy of a moving object depends on its speed. Faster moving objects have more energy than slower moving objects. Level: Essential C. Energy can be stored in an elastic material when it is stretched. Level: Important

Enduring Understandings: Changes take place because of the transfer of energy. Energy is transferred to matter through the action of forces. Different forces are responsible for the transfer of the different forms

of energy.  A. Force is any push or pull exerted by one object on another. Some forces (e.g., magnetic forces and gravity) can make things move without touching them. Level: Essential B. The speeds of two or more objects can be compared (i.e., faster, slower) by measuring the distance traveled in a given unit of time, or by measuring the time needed to travel a fixed distance. Level: Essential C. A force must be applied to change the speed of a moving object or change its direction of motion. Larger forces will create greater changes in an object’s speed in a given unit of time. Level: Essential D. Pushing and pulling forces can be used to transfer energy from one object to another. Level: Important

NETS: Educational Technology (2007), NETS: All Grades, NETS.S: The Next Generation 2. Communication and Collaboration Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students:    a. interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts or others employing a variety of digital environments and media. b. communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats d. contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

3. Research and Information Fluency Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Students:  d.process data and report results.

Standards Connection.docx Motion & Design Unit Template Brief Summary (IB:Include TOK/Int'l Connections) This unit allows students the opportunity to explore the physics of motion and to apply concepts of technological design. Using K’NEX Education "Forces, Energy and Motion" kits, students design a variety of cars powered by different sources of energy. A key concept of this unit is creating "fair tests" with one independent variable and accurate measurement and data collection of the dependent variable. Additionally application of the "design process" is key to the modification of student cars based on collected data in order to achieve improved results of the dependent variable when an experiment is repeated. Some of the physic concepts explored in the unit include gravity, potential and kinetic energy, friction, and air resistance. Real life connections to environmental issues are discussed by incorporating alternative sources of energy to power transportation vehicles. Additionally, students consider transportation safety by designing a car in which a raw egg is placed and rolled down a ramp into a wall.

Students will use a variety of technology throughout this unit to gather, record, share and report data and information. Additionally, students will blog regularly about their investigations incorporating text, pictures and video to reflect on the design and experiment processes. Understandings Essential Questions

Students will understand that… • Moving objects have energy. Faster moving objects have more energy than slower moving objects. • Energy can be stored (potential energy) in a twisted rubber band. This energy can make things move. • Changes in the motion of an object can be produced by different sized forces. • Changes in the motion of an object can be produced by forces from different directions. • Speed is the amount of distance traveled over a certain amount of time. • Speeds of objects can be compared (faster, slower) through knowing distance and time.

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What happens to the energy in a system — where does this energy come from, how is it changed within the system, and where does it ultimately go? How does the flow of energy affect the materials in the system? How do we know that things have energy? How can energy be transferred from one material to another? What happens to a material when energy is transferred to it? How have technological improvements helped scientist conduct investigations and gather, record, share and report data and information to others?

Knowledge        Technical drawings ensure close similarity among the finished products. Technical drawings can be used to convey a particular design to others. A pulling force may cause a vehicle to move in the direction of the pull. Scientist usually use the metric system when collection and reporting data. Variables such as mass, friction and air resistance effect the speed of a vehicle. A force must be applied to start or change the motion of a vehicle. Mass is the amount of material in an object whereas weight is the force of gravity acting on the mass. The load on a vehicle is a force that acts in a downward direction (when placed on the vehicle). A twisted rubber band stores potential energy that can be used to move (kinetic energy) a vehicle. The greater the potential energy, the greater the potential motion of the vehicle. Scientists conduct multiple trials to ensure that the results are not flawed. Air resistance slows a vehicle’s movement.

Skills         Create a multi-view technical drawing, then use the drawing to build a model. Make predictions before conducting an investigation. Follow simple steps in an investigation. Record observations and collect data accurately. Share or report data electronically. Use data to draw conclusions and modify a design for improved results. Given a problem; design, plan, and implement a solution. Create a "fair test" with one independent variable and systematically record the dependent variable. Conduct multiple trials of each investigation to ensure accurate results. Form conclusions based on observations and collected data.

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Stage 2: Assessment Evidence

Performance Tasks & Assessments Student Response Sheet 5 Performance: Quizzes Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the relationship between weight of a vehicle, ramp steepness and distance that a vehicle will travel. They will construct a reasonable explanation after analyzing evidence from the data they collected. Lesson 10: Egg-citing Design Brief

Performance: Projects

"Egg-citing Design Brief." Students design cars using K'NEX and any other materials they want. Each car must have a "seat" for a raw egg. The car will be rolled down a ramp into a wall. The objective is for the egg to "survive" the impact.

Summative Assessment: All team members must individually prepare a final report that details the safety features implemented, how the testing was conducted, and the results of this testing. Reports must also include additional safety recommendations that might be considered. Final reports should be delivered digitally. Rolling Racer Comparison Analysis Performance: Projects Students will construct and compare two different rubber band powered vehicles (choosing one variable to manipulate), and speculate which vehicle they think would travel the furthest, given the same amount of potential energy (rubber band windings).

Following the brainstorming, students will create fair test procedure to determine which racer will travel further, given the same number of rubber band windings.

Students will create their own data display and share their findings through a multimedia lab report that includes images, videos, as well as their data display and findings. This will be organized as a blog post with embedded documents and media. Summative Assessment Performance: Tests Paper and pencil summative assessment to be administered at the end of the unit.

Assessment Outcomes Motion & Design Summative Assessment.doc motion & design Summative Assessment.pdf M&D Summative Assessment Teacher.doc
Stage 3: Learning Plan

Learning Plan

Resources

Lesson 1: In small groups students investigate the K'NEX Education "Forces, Energy and Motion" kits. components of the K’NEX Education "Forces, Energy and Motion" kits. Students are told they will create a "gravity car" that should roll a far distance after going down a ramp. In pairs students create a

multi-view technical drawing (with labels) of a car Wooden or reinforced cardboard ramps. At least 3-4 they wish to create using only the components of the identical. K'NEX kit. (For lessons 1-5 use "Student Response Sheet 1" from the K'NEX Teachers Guide) 25+ meter tape measure. One for each ramp. Elastics or rubber bands (20) Lesson 2: Students build a vehicle by following the technical drawings they created. It is okay for Stop watches students to make modifications from their drawings to their models, but encourage them to make note of the reasons why they are making modifications. Students compare their model with the technical IT integration component: drawing and note similarities and difference. Student blogs Lesson 3: Students create a "fair test" with the Student wiki independent variable being the car design and the dependent variable being the distance the car Student Gmail accounts travels. The height of the ramp should remain constant for all groups. Students should document parts of their experiment using photos or video. Digital camera/video Students should record their results electronically on a spread sheet. School/Class online photo sharing account (Flickr) School/Class online video sharing account (Youtube) Lesson 4: Students create a 3-5 minute presentation to share their car design and results. The presentation should include pictures and/or video of parts of the experiment. The presentation should also include an electronically created graph or graphs Force and Motion by Newbridge Publishing displaying their data. Using a Googledoc each group United Streaming.com should add their data to a single document including Fossweb.com trial results and mean of their data. As a class analyze the team data and car design to draw conclusions about which design components contributed to the best results. Have students upload photos and videos to a common file sharing site (Flickr, Youtube). For homework have students create a reflective blog post on the investigation and results. Be sure to remind students that most of their blog readers will have no idea what we did in class, so their blog should summarize the investigation and results.

Lesson 5: Using prior knowledge gained from the previous experiment students modify their gravity cars and repeat the investigation. Review the "fair test" procedures. Students should focus on the questions:    What modification did you make? Why did you make this modification? What were the results?"

Again students should document their investigation with photos and/or video, record data electronically

to create graphs, and create a reflective blog post explaining the process.

Lesson 6: Student pairs are posed with the questions: "Does wheel size make a difference to the distance the vehicle travels?" (For lessons 6 use "Student Response Sheet 2" from the K'NEX Teachers Guide)

Students should design a "fair test" investigation complete with materials needed, detailed procedure, and data collection devise. They should then conduct the investigation and report their findings digitally.

Lesson 7: Student pairs are posed with the questions: "Does the height of the ramp make a difference to the distance the vehicle travels?" (For lessons 7 use "Student Response Sheet 3" from the K'NEX Teachers Guide)

Students should design a "fair test" investigation complete with materials needed, detailed procedure, and data collection devise. They should then conduct the investigation and report their findings digitally.

Lesson 8: This is an open investigation. Student pairs should design a fair test centered around an independent variable stated as a question. (For lesson 8 use "Student Response Sheet 4" from the K'NEX Teachers Guide)

Examples: Will a vehicle's load affect distance the vehicle will traveled? Does the starting location on the ramp affect the distance a vehicle will travel? Does the length of a vehicle affect the distance a vehicle will travel?

Students should report data and conclusions electronically.

Lesson 9: "Student Response Sheet 5" is a formative written assessment. Score and review/reteach as necessary.

Lesson 10: "Egg-citing Design Brief." Students design cars using K'NEX and any other materials they want. Each car must have a "seat" for a raw egg. The car will be rolled down a ramp into a wall. The objective is for the egg to "survive" the impact.

Project Based Assessment: All team members must individually prepare a final report that details the safety features implemented, how the testing was conducted, and the results of this testing. Reports must also include additional safety recommendations that might be considered. Final reports should be delivered digitally.

Lesson 11: Rolling Racer Creating a rubber band powered vehicle. After discussing the concept ask the students to determine the minimum number of twists of the rubber band that are required to start the Rolling Racer moving. It is expected that students will apply prior knowledge to formulate and test additional ways to increase the distance the Rolling Racer will travel. Students will also be expected to create their own data chart to display the data they collect.

Lesson 12: Blog post sharing the results of the experiment, as well as communicating their findings and the significance of their results.

Lesson 13: Students will compare two rubber band powered vehicles, and speculate which vehicle they think would travel the furthest, given the same

amount of potential energy (rubber band windings).

Following the brainstorming, students will create fair test procedure to determine which racer will travel further, given the same number of rubber band windings.

Students will create their own data display and share their findings through a multimedia lab report that includes images, videos, as well as their data display and findings. This will be organized as a blog post with embedded documents and media.

Lesson 14: Reviewing and reflecting on essential questions, knowledge, and skills in anticipation of final assessment.

Summative Assessment (provided with the Foss kits).

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Last Updated: Friday, October 5, 2012, 8:33PM Atlas Version 7.2.6 © Rubicon International 2012. All rights reserved

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