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Peace Journalism Training Manual

Peace Journalism Training Manual

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This is an excerpt of the manual. For the complete copy, please contact CMFR.
This is an excerpt of the manual. For the complete copy, please contact CMFR.

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Published by: Center for Media Freedom & Responsibility on Oct 08, 2012
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03/05/2015

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text

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The discussion

focused

on whether

peace

journalism

was pos-

sible given the pressure

from various

sources

on journalists

to produce

stories

that will either boost ratings

or circulation.

There

was consensus

that:

Media

owners,

publishers,

and editors

should

be more in-

volved in the promotion

of peace

journalism. But some

participants

expressed

doubts

that owners

would commit

to making peace

reporting a matter of policy.

Professional

standards

demand that an event should be

covered

professionally,

and according

to the ethical

stan-

dards of journalism,

which means

providing

context and

looking into the situation

of the communities

affected

by

conflict.

Correspondents-who

are usually on the frontlines-lack

support from their media organizations

in terms of ade-

quate pay, or even hazard

pay, and must often spend their
own money to get to and stay in an area of conflict.

Diversification

of sources

is now possible

through the

use of new communication

technologies-such

as mobile

phones

and the Internet-to

contact

all parties

involved

in

a conflict,

rather

than journalists'being

limited

to citing the

military

because

they are usually

the ones available.

Even

rebels

now have mobile phones

and Internet-capable

lap-

tops.

Peace

journalism

actually

demands

no more than what

journalism

used

to be - that is, complete,

accurate,

fair,

rel-

evant and contextualized

reporting,

which among other

requirements

demands

that reporters

present

both sides

involved

in an issue,

or, as in this instance,

conflict.

pEAcEJoURNALTSMTRATNING

MoDuu . 37

Section

4 a

Some

Do's

and Don'ts

Melinda

Quintos

de Jesus

\-

A good press

helps people to think and engages

them in dialogue.

Good,

well-researched

stories

help people

think and promote

mutual

understanding

among various

groups.

o ldentify/Understand

the peace process

initiated

by the govern-

ment

o Know who the participants

are

o Understand,

if any,

the terms/framework

of negotiations

o Establish

the landscape,

the terrain

of conflict

o Search

out other actors

in the field,

innocent

victims

o Contextualize

conflict in reality of the place,

effect on daily life

o Write about the 'dailiness"

of life, what stays

the same,

coping

mechanisms

during crisis.

Military

perspective

should not be the

only perspective

in the press

o Story

should

be based

on facts

that you yourself

validated

o Provide

background

and context

to any outbreak

in hostility

o Avoid sensationalizing

violence

o Story should provide a context, not be presented

as isolated

ran-

dom incident

o Clean

out text of stereotypes

o Write about peace

efforts

o Write about differences

as a fact of national

social

reality

o Provide

options

for peace,

conflict

management,

and resolution

pEAcEJoURNALTsMTRAININGMoDUU
. 39

. Get the children's

stories

out in the press

o Get the views of all those involved and affected by violence and

war

o Reports

empower the public in the endeavor

to resolve

conflict

and bring antagonists

to truce that opens up meaningful

levels

of

peace-building

40 . PEACEJoURNALISMTRAININGMODULE

Section

4 b

Some

Do's

and Don'ts

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