Introduction to Religious Institutions in Tanzania

Including contact information
10.05.2010 By: Zameer Noorali

Content

Introduction 1. Background ............................................................................................................................ 3 2. Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 3 2.1. Muslims ............................................................................................................................... 3 2.1.1. Zanzibar ........................................................................................................................... 3 2.1.2. Mainland .......................................................................................................................... 4 2.2. Christians ............................................................................................................................ 4 2.2.1. The Roman Catholic Church (TEC) .................................................................................. 4 2.2.2. The Christian Council of Tanzania (CCT) ......................................................................... 4 3. Legal/Policy Framework of religions in Tanzania .................................................................... 4 4. Role of Religious Institutions in policy making ........................................................................ 5 Section 1 BAKWATA…………………………………………………………………………………………………6 Section 2 TEC……………………………………………………………………………………………………….22 Section 3 CCT……………………………………………………………………………………………………….30 Africa Inland Church…………………………………………………………………………………….38 Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania……………………………………………………………42 Mbalezi Evangelistic Church…………………………………………………………………………...47 Mennonite Church………………………………………………………………………………………52 The Moravian Church…………………………………………………………………………………..56 The Salvation Army……………………………………………………………………………………..61 Section 4 Free Pentecostal Church……………………………………………………………………………….65 Contacts

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1. Background Tanzania has a total area of 945,087 square kilometers and its population is approximately 45 million, of which approximately 44 million1 live on the mainland and 1 million in the Zanzibar archipelago (Pemba and Unguja). Current statistics on religious demography are unavailable, as religious surveys were eliminated from all government census reports after 1967. However, religious leaders and sociologists generally believe that the country's population is 40 to 45 percent Christian and 35 to 40 percent Muslim, with the remainder consisting of practitioners of other faiths, traditional indigenous religions and atheists. Zanzibar, which accounts for 2.7 percent of the country's population, is estimated to be 99 percent Muslim. A semi-autonomous archipelago, Zanzibar elects its own president to serve as the head of government for matters internal to Zanzibar and a parliament that can approve legislation pertaining to local affairs. The Muslim population is most heavily concentrated on the Zanzibar archipelago and in the coastal areas of the mainland. There are also large Muslim minorities in inland urban areas. Between 80 and 90 percent of the country‘s Muslim population is Sunni2; the remainder consists of several Shi'a3 groups, mostly of Asian descent. The Christian population is composed of Roman Catholics, Protestants, Pentecostals, Seventh-day Adventists, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), and members of Jehovah's Witnesses Foreign missionaries operate in the country, including Catholics, Lutherans, Baptists, Seventh-day Adventists, Mormons, Anglicans and Muslims. The Government officially recognizes eight religious holidays; this includes 2 days for Christmas, 2 days for Easter, 2 days for the Muslim holiday of Eid-el-Fitr, 1 day for the Muslim holiday of Eid-el-Hajj, and 1 day for the Muslim holiday of Maulid. Religion may be taught in public schools in the form of a class on religion, but it is not part of the national curriculum. Such classes are generally taught on an ad hoc basis by parents or other volunteers, but must be approved by the school‘s administration and/or parent and teacher association. 2. Introduction This report provides detailed information about the functions of three major Religious bodies in Tanzania, The Christian Council of Tanzania (CCT), Tanzania Episcopal Conference (TEC) and The National Muslim Council of Tanzania (BAKWATA). 2.1. Muslims 2.1.1. Zanzibar The 2001 Mufti Law authorizes the President of Zanzibar to appoint an Islamic leader, or mufti. The mufti serves as a public employee of the Zanzibar Government. The mufti possesses the authority to settle all religious disputes
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Proceedings of the 8th Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, Honolulu, Hawaii, January 2010—2010 World Muslim population report 2 From sunna (tradition or custom), those who adhere to the standard practice (understood to be of the Prophet). Sunnis are the majority of Muslims and follow four schools of jurisprudence: the Shafi'i, Hanafi, Maliki, and Hanbali. 3 From shia (supporters), those who recognized 'Ali as the only legitimate imam (political and religious leader) after the Prophet, and rejected most other caliphs, especially the Umayyads. They developed into several sects which differed in the number of imams they recognized. Most important are: The Twelvers Imamis, The Ismailis, The Fatimids.

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involving Muslims, to approve any Islamic activities or gatherings on Zanzibar, supervise all Zanzibar mosques and to approve religious lectures by foreign clergy or the importation of Islamic literature from outside Zanzibar. 2.1.2. Mainland On the mainland, mosques belonging to the National Muslim Council of Tanzania (BAKWATA) elect a mufti of their own. BAKWATA serves as a nongovernmental organization (NGO), and the mainland mufti is not a public employee. However, when it was first established in 1968, BAKWATA was widely considered to be an unofficial arm of the ruling party Chama Cha Mapinduzi (CCM); to date, public opinion still associates BAKWATA with the ruling CCM party. Several Muslim organizations continued to criticize both Zanzibar‘s Mufti law and the mainland‘s practice of selecting a mufti through BAKWATA, perceiving them as efforts by the union Government to institutionalize government oversight of Islamic organizations. Many Muslim leaders, noting that there are no parallel structures for Christians, criticize the Government for disparate treatment of the country‘s different religious communities. 2.2. Christians The Christian population of Tanzania is composed of Roman Catholics, Protestants, Pentecostals, Seventh-day Adventists, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) and members of Jehovah's Witnesses. There are three church governing bodies; The Tanzania Episcopal Conference (TEC) for Catholics; The Christian council of Tanzania (CCT) comprising of 15 member churches; and Pentecostal Churches of Tanzania – First Pentecostal church of Tanzania (FPCT) 2.2.1. The Roman Catholic Church (TEC) The Roman Catholic Church in Tanzania is part of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership on the Pope and curia in Rome. There are 10-12 million Catholics in the country – about a quarter of the total population. There are 31 dioceses, including 5 archdioceses. 2.2.2. The Christian Council of Tanzania (CCT) The CCT was established in January 1934 as a fellowship of Churches and Christian Organizations. It was then named the Tanganyika Missionary Council until 1964 when it adopted its current name. The CCT has since then grown in membership to 15 National Churches (which includes 75 Dioceses) and 14 Church-Related Organizations. It has a following of upwards of ten (10) million people. 3. Legal/Policy Framework of religions in Tanzania The Constitution provides the freedom of religion, and other laws and policies are contributed to the generally free practice of religion. The law at all levels protects this right in full against abuse, either by governmental or private actors. Customary and statutory laws govern Christians in both criminal and civil cases. Muslims are governed by customary and statutory law in criminal cases; however, Muslims in Zanzibar have a parallel system of kadhi courts to judge matters of divorce, child custody, inheritance, and other matters covered in customary Islamic law. The Kadhi, who is the senior Islamic scholar responsible 4

for interpreting the Qur'an, is approved by the President and recognized as a judge. There is also a Kadhi Court of Appeal. Public schools may teach religion, but it is not part of the national curriculum. Parents or volunteers teach religion on an ad hoc basis. School administration and/or parent and teacher associations must approve the classes. Many private schools and universities are associated with religious institutions. There is an Islamic university in Morogoro, a Catholic university in Mwanza, numerous Islamic and Christian primary and secondary schools throughout the country, and a Baha'i secondary school in Iringa. Religious organizations are banned from involvement in politics, and politicians are restricted from using language intended to incite one religious group against another or to encourage religious groups to vote for certain political parties. The law imposes fines and jail time on political representatives who campaign in houses of worship or educational facilities. The law also prohibits preaching or distributing material considered as inflammatory or that represents a threat to public order. The Government does not designate religion on passports or records of vital statistics; however, it requires stating religion in police reports in cases where individuals may be asked to give sworn testimony. The Government also requires children to indicate a religion on school registration forms, so that children can be assigned to the appropriate religion class if the school offers religious instruction, and on applications for medical care, so that any specific religious custom may be observed. 4. Role of Religious Institutions in policy making One of the most debated issues facing Tanzania today is the role that faith and religion should play in society. In 2009 during Local Government Elections religious institutions published manifestos4 advising voters on the qualities an elected leader should have. The Government took a stance toward the manifestos and asked Religious Institutions to stop publishing Manifestos.
Note: A study in Tanzania on Religion and politics—the influence of religion and religious organizations on political behavior, including voting and campaigns has never been conducted.

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TEC and Assembly of Imams

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Section 1

BAKWATA
Content 1.Mission and Vision of BAKWATA ............................................................................................ 8 2.Structure of the General Assembly .......................................................................................... 8 2.1. Mosque Level...................................................................................................................... 9 2.1.1. Mosques committee ......................................................................................................... 9 2.1.1.2. The Mosque Committee has the following authorities.................................................... 9 2.1.2. General mosque meeting ................................................................................................. 9 2.1.3. General Assembly ...........................................................................................................10 2.1.3.1. Mandates and authorities of the General Assembly......................................................10 2.2. Street Committees .............................................................................................................10 2.2.1. Street Council .................................................................................................................10 2.2.1.1. Mandates and authorities of the street council..............................................................10 2.2.2. Street Sheikh Committee ................................................................................................11 2.2.2.1. Authorities of the street sheikh committee ....................................................................11 2.2.3. General Street Assembly ................................................................................................11 2.2.3.1. Mandates and authorities of the Street General Assembly ...........................................12 2.3. District Level ......................................................................................................................12 2.3.1. District Meetings..............................................................................................................12 2.3.2. District Council ................................................................................................................12 2.3.2.1. Mandates and authorities of the District council ............................................................12 2.3.3.District sheikh committee .................................................................................................13 2.3.3.1. Authorities of the district sheikh committee ...................................................................13 2.3.4. District General Assembly ...............................................................................................13 2.3.4.1. Mandates and authorities of the district general assembly ...........................................14 2.4. Regional Level ...................................................................................................................14 2.4.1. Region Meetings .............................................................................................................14 2.4.2. Members of the Regional Council....................................................................................14 2.4.3. Regional sheikh committee .............................................................................................15 2.4.3.1. Mandates and authorities of the regional sheikh committee .........................................15 2.4.4. Regional General Assembly ............................................................................................15 6

2.4.4.1. Mandates and authorities of the Regional General Assembly .......................................15 2.5. National Level ....................................................................................................................16 2.5.2.2. Mandates and authorities of the High Council ..............................................................16 2.5.3. Ulamaa Committee .........................................................................................................17 2.5.3.1. Mandates and authorities of the Ulamaa Committee ....................................................17 2.5.4. Religious Committee of the General Assembly................................................................18 2.5.4.1. Mandates and authorities of the religious committee of the general assembly..............18 2.5.5. The General Assembly ....................................................................................................19 2.5.5.1. Mandates and authorities of the general assembly .......................................................19 2.5.5. The Board of Trustees.....................................................................................................19 2.5.5.1. Mandates and authorities of the Board of Trustees ......................................................20 3. Organgram ............................................................................................................................20

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1. Mission and Vision of BAKWATA a. To supervise, open, build, help and control religious institutes and normal institutes for Muslims in Tanzania and to provide higher education facilities to Muslim students. b. To stand in and advocate for the rights of Muslims in Tanzania and to revoke any issues which discriminate Muslims. c. The spreading of religion and Muslim beliefs in languages which BAKWATA has included in its constitution (Swahili, English and Arabic). d. To promote proper youth upbringing and life in accordance with Islamic beliefs. e. To support Muslims in Tanzania to start economic projects to alleviate poverty in their communities. f. To build, open, supervise, help and control mosques, holy properties and health services in accordance with BAKWATA‘s guidelines. g. To supervise, support, strengthen and help to collect, store and use Tithes and offerings to fulfill God‘s commandment and to uphold the religion and the Muslims‘ development. h. To supervise, control and help to implement plans of keeping and providing care to orphans, people with disabilities and people in need. i. To supervise and support to follow the guidelines and plans of ‗Hijja and Umra‘ and its services. j. To supervise, control and help to prepare plans of marriages, divorces, wills and rights of owning wealth left without ownership. k. To implement plans of Muslim worshiping and religious celebrations, like the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad, Eid celebrations or New Year celebrations. It is recommended that the Muslim New Year should be a holiday for the whole nation. l. To receive and give support for development purposes, to foster Islamic beliefs and traditions and to provide proper Muslim development in Tanzania. m. To have good relations and collaboration between BAKWATA and Muslims from other countries, and to live in peace with people of other faiths in Tanzania. n. To ask for loans from banks and various internal and external financial institutions, to loan, purchase, sale, transfer, remove, put in bond, build or to have rights over the land for the purpose of fulfilling BAKWATA‘s missions. o. To start economic development projects and to save in financial institutions. p. To receive offerings and support of various things from donors, internally or externally, in order to continue services of BAKWATA. 2. Structure of the General Assembly The General Assembly has the following structure a. Mosques under the Street Leadership b. Street level under the District leadership c. District level under the Region leadership d. Region level under the National leadership e. National level

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2.1. Mosque Level 2.1.1. Mosques committee This committee is the responsible body for daily activities of BAKWATA in the mosque, under the mosque‘s Imam and the administration of the general assembly of the mosque. The following members comprise the mosque committee a. Mosque Imam b. Five (5) members elected by the general assembly of the mosque c. Two (2) members representing the mosques in the Street General assembly d. Members of the high committees living and worshiping in the respective mosque e. Mosque secretary f. Mosque treasurer 2.1.1.2. The Mosque Committee has the following authorities a. To implement decisions made by the general assembly of the mosque, street, district and region. b. To perform various services of the mosque. c. To do daawa to Muslims leaving near the mosque. d. To start and continue Muslim teachings to the children and adults living near the mosque. e. To create, implement and continue various economic and development projects of the mosque. f. To start and continue social services in the mosque. g. To ascertain and control the income of the mosque. h. To prepare the general assembly meetings. i. To prepare implementation reports of the general assembly in the mosque area and present them in the general assembly of the mosque. j. To store data about the number of Muslims living close to the mosque. k. To store inventories of the general assembly‘s property (transferable and non transferable). l. To receive mediation reports and work on them. The mosque committee performs its normal meetings once a month but can have ad hoc meetings called in by the chairman (imam of the respective mosque). 2.1.2. General mosque meeting The following members comprise the general mosque meeting a. The Mosque‘s Imam b. All members of the mosque‘s committee c. All Muslims living nearby and worshiping in mosque

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2.1.3. General Assembly The general assembly of the mosque is the highest body dealing with all matters related to the general committee of the mosque per constitution unless otherwise stated. 2.1.3.1. Mandates and authorities of the General Assembly a. To instill the Imam of the mosque prior to recommendations from the district sheikhs committee. b. To elect the mosque‘s secretary. c. To select the mosque‘s treasurer. d. To select two (2) members who will join the Street General Assembly. e. To select five (5) members to mediate disputes in the mosque. f. To receive and discuss reports of activities of the mosque‘s committee. g. To receive and discuss income and expenditure of BAKWATA in the mosque area. h. To suspend the Imam when it is clear that he is not acting to the teachings of Qur‘an and Sunna and does not follow the guidelines of BAKWATA. i. To terminate any mosque leader, but not Imam, when such leader is not acting to the guidelines of BAKWATA. j. To develop strong plans of implementation of BAKWATA activities in the mosque area. 2.2. Street Committees On this level BAKWATA has four (4) committees a. Street council b. Street Sheikhs committee c. Street general assembly d. General election assembly 2.2.1. Street Council The following are the members a. Street council chairman b. Three (3) members selected by the street sheikh c. Ten (10) members selected by the general street assembly d. Two (2) members representing the street in the district general assembly e. Street secretary f. Street treasurer The street council will be the implementing body of BAKWATA‘s activities in the street under the leadership of street general assembly. 2.2.1.1. Mandates and authorities of the street council a. To implement orders and instructions of the street general assembly and other higher assemblies. b. To implement activities and plans of Daawa for Muslims living in the area. c. To start and continue Muslim teachings for the children and adults of the area. d. To create, implement and continue various economic and development projects in the street. 10

e. f. g. h. i. j.

To start and continue social services in the street. To ascertain and control the income and expenditure of the street. To prepare general assembly meetings. To prepare implementation reports of BAKWATA in the street and to represent them in the general assembly of the street. To store data of the number of Muslims living in the street. To store inventories of BAKWATA‘s property (transferable and non transferable).

The Street Council will hold its meetings twice a year, but can have ad hoc meetings called in by the chairman or half of the members by the authority of the higher assemblies. 2.2.2. Street Sheikh Committee The following are its members a. Street Sheikh b. Four sheikhs selected from the street general assembly 2.2.2.1. Authorities of the street sheikh committee a. To rule over all matters judging from the Qur‘an and Sunna, or to send the respective persons to the district or regional sheikhs committees or even to the committee of Ulamaa if the need arises to provide clear judgment to the matters. b. To rule over various religious disputes. c. To provide various guidelines on religious matters in the Madrasas, primary schools, secondary schools, education institutes and in that street in collaboration with other bodies. d. To uphold Muslim discipline among Muslims living in the street. The Sheikhs Committee holds its meeting once in six months, but can have ad hoc meetings called in by its chairman (street sheikh). 2.2.3. General Street Assembly The following are the members a. Street Sheikh b. Chairman of the street council c. All members of the street sheikhs committee d. All members of the street council e. Imams of the mosque committees having BAKWATA in that street f. Secretaries of mosque committees having BAKWATA in that street g. Two (2) members from each mosque selected by the mosque general assembly of BAKWATA h. All leaders of the high committees living in the street The Street General Assembly is the final authority on all issues concerning BAKWATA‘s activities in the street in accordance with the constitution, except those that the constitution has put clear that will be dealt with by the District Sheikhs committee or its higher body.

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2.2.3.1. Mandates and authorities of the Street General Assembly a. To instill the street sheikh prior to recommendations from the regional sheikhs committee. b. To select the street council chairman. c. To select four (4) sheikhs who will enter the street sheikhs committee. d. To select ten (10) members to enter the street council. e. To select two (2) members for the district general assembly. f. To select the street secretary. g. To receive and discuss reports of the street council. h. To receive and authorize forecasting and expenditure of BAKWATA in the street every year. i. To suspend the street sheikh when it is clear that his acts and behaviors are not reflecting the teachings of Qur‘an and Sunna and he does not follow the guidelines of BAKWATA. j. To terminate the mosque Imam when it is clear that his acts and behaviors are not reflecting the teachings of Qur‘an and Sunna and he does not follow the guidelines of BAKWATA. The Street General Assembly has its meeting once a year, but can have ad hoc meetings called in by its Street sheikh, the Street sheikhs committee, half of the members of the street general assembly under the authority of the street sheikh or by the above authorities. 2.3. District Level 2.3.1. District Meetings BAKWATA has four (4) committees namely a. District council b. District sheikhs committee which will have five members c. District General assembly d. District General election assembly 2.3.2. District Council The District Council has the following members a. Chairman of the district council b. Three (3) members selected by the district sheikh c. Ten (10) members elected by the district general assembly d. District secretary e. District treasurer The district council is the implementing body of BAKWATA‘s daily activities in the district under the leadership of district general assembly. 2.3.2.1. Mandates and authorities of the District council a. To implement orders and instructions of the district general assembly and other high assemblies of BAKWATA. b. To implement activities and plans of Daawa to Muslims living in the district. 12

c. To start and continue Muslim teachings for children and adults in the district. d. To create, implement and continue various economic and development projects of BAKWATA in the district. e. To be the employment authority of BAKWATA in the district. f. To start and continue social services in the district. g. To ascertain and control income and expenditure of BAKWATA in the district. h. To prepare implementation reports of BAKWATA‘s activities in the district and to present them to the district general assembly. i. To store data of the number of Muslims living in the district. j. To store inventories of BAKWATA‘s property (transferable and non transferable). k. To prepare general assembly meetings. The district council holds its meetings every six months but can have ad hoc meetings called in by its chairman, or half of the members under the authority of the chairman or by the above authorities. 2.3.3. District sheikh committee The following are the District Sheikh Committee‘s members a. District sheikh b. Four (4) sheikhs selected by the district general assembly 2.3.3.1. Authorities of the district sheikh committee a. To rule over all matters judging from the Qur‘an and Sunna, or to send the respective persons to the regional sheikhs committees or to the committee of Ulamaa if the need arises to provide clear judgment to the matters. b. To rule over various religious disputes in the district. c. To provide various guidelines on religious matters in the Madrasas, primary schools, secondary schools, education institutes in the district in collaboration with other bodies. d. To uphold Muslim discipline among the Muslims living in the district. e. To govern on wills, marriages and divorces in the district and to provide ruling on the above matters in accordance with Muslim laws. The district sheikhs committee holds its meetings every six months but can have ad hoc meetings called in by its chairman (district sheikh). 2.3.4. District General Assembly The following are the District General Assembly‘s members a. District Sheikh b. District council chairman c. All members of the district sheikh committee d. All members of the district council e. Street chairmen f. All street sheikhs g. All street secretaries h. Members of the high committee of BAKWATA living in the district 13

i. District secretary j. District treasurer k. Two members (2) of the district general assembly from each street in the district The District General Assembly is the final authority on all issues concerning BAKWATA‘s activities in the district in accordance with the constitution, except those that the constitution has put clear that will be dealt with by the District or its higher body. 2.3.4.1. Mandates and authorities of the district general assembly a. To instill the district sheikh prior to recommendation from the Ulamaa committee. b. To select the district council chairman. c. To select five (5) sheikhs who will enter into the district sheikhs committee. d. To select ten (10) members to enter into the district council. e. To receive and discuss reports of the district council. f. To receive and authorize forecasting and expenditure of BAKWATA in the district every year. g. To plan and coordinate various BAKWATA activities in the district. h. To suspend the district Sheikh when it is clear that his acts and behaviors are not reflecting the teachings of Qur‘an and Sunna and he does not follow the guidelines of BAKWATA. i. To terminate any BAKWATA leader in the district except the district Sheikh and the district secretary. 2.4. Regional Level 2.4.1. Region Meetings In this level BAKWATA has four (4) committees a. Region council b. Region sheikhs‘ committee with five (5) members c. Regional general Assembly d. Regional general election 2.4.2. Members of the Regional Council a. Regional council chairman b. Three (3) members elected by the regional chairman c. Ten (10) members selected by the regional general assembly d. Member of the national council in the region e. Regional secretary f. Regional treasurer The regional council will be the implementing body of BAKWATA daily activities in the region under the leadership of regional general assembly and the regional sheikhs committee.

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2.4.3. Regional sheikh committee The following are its members a. Regional sheikh b. Five (5) sheikhs selected by the regional general assembly to enter in this committee 2.4.3.1. Mandates and authorities of the regional sheikh committee a. To rule over all matters judging from the Quran and Sunna, or to send the respective person to the committee of Ulamaa if the need arises to provide clear judgment of the matters. b. To rule over various religious disputes in the region. c. To provide various guidelines on religious matters in the Madrasas, primary schools, secondary schools, education institutes in the region in collaboration with other bodies. d. To uphold Muslim discipline among Muslim leaders and Muslims living in the region and to take disciplinary measures when the need arises. e. To terminate the street sheikh‘s position and suspend the district sheikh and any high leader in the region committees except the region sheikh and the region secretary. The regional sheikhs committee holds its meetings every six months but can have ad hoc meetings called in by its chairman (regional sheikh) or by the National Ulamaa committee. 2.4.4. Regional General Assembly The following are its members a. Region Sheikh b. Region council chairman c. District sheikhs d. Member of the national council from the region e. District committee chairmen f. District secretaries g. Members of the high committee of BAKWATA living in the region h. Members of the region council i. Members from the regional sheikhs committee j. Region secretary k. Region treasurer The Regional General Assembly is the final authority on all issues concerning BAKWATA activities in the region in accordance with the constitution, except those that the constitution has put clear that will be dealt with by the regional sheikhs committee or on national level. 2.4.4.1. Mandates and authorities of the Regional General Assembly a. To support the region sheikh prior to recommendations from the national Ulamaa committee by secret votes. b. To select the region council chairman. c. To select representative member from the region to the national BAKWATA council. 15

d. e. f. g. h. i. j.

k.

To select five (5) sheikhs who will enter the region sheikhs committee. To select ten (10) members to enter into the region council. To receive and discuss reports of the region council. To receive and authorize forecasting and expenditure of BAKWATA in the region every year. To plan and coordinate various BAKWATA‘s activities in the region. To evaluate BAKWATA‘s plans of activities in the region. To suspend the region sheikh when it is clear that his acts and behaviors are not reflecting the teachings of the Quran and Sunna and he does not follow the guidelines of BAKWATA. To terminate any BAKWATA leader in the region except the region sheikh and the region secretary.

The Regional General Assembly has its meeting once a year, but can have ad hoc meetings called by its Region sheikh (chairman), Region sheikhs committee or half of the members of the Region general assembly under the authority of the chairman or by the above authority. 2.5. National Level 2.5.1. National Meetings On this level BAKWATA has five (5) meetings which are a. High council b. Ulamaa committee c. General Assembly d. National religious committee e. Board of Trustees 2.5.2. High Council The following are its members a. High council chairman b. One member selected from each region in mainland Tanzania c. Ten members selected by Mufti d. General secretary e. Two deputy general secretaries f. National Finance officer of BAKWATA The high council is the implementing body of BAKWATA for normal and special issues in accordance to the specification of the constitution or by the committee of Ulamaa itself. 2.5.2.2. Mandates and authorities of the High Council a. The High Council is the employment authority of BAKWATA and it can partly authorize the general secretary to act on certain issues. b. To implement orders and instructions from the general assembly, board of trustees and other instructions from the high leaders of the board of trustees and other high leaders of BAKWATA. c. To prepare all general assemblies of BAKWATA. d. To receive all activity reports from all regions and determine suggestions in accordance to its authority. 16

e. To elaborate and provide guidelines for BAKWATA‘s activities and its various committees. f. To formulate the professional cadre of accountants, economic, planners, job trainings, media committees, public relations, social development, women development, children, youth and others when the need arises. g. To receive and accept the instructions on formation of women and youth associations. h. To receive and ascertain the forecasting of income and expenditure of the high committees, regions and all BAKWATA institutions every year. i. To receive development reports of BAKWATA and expenditures from the general office, regions and other institutions. j. To provide guidelines on property and fund usage of BAKWATA country wide and to take legal or discipline actions when the need arises. k. To create and formulate various social institutes of education, economic and other development institutes for proper implementation of BAKWATA‘s objectives. l. To plan and implement any project that supports BAKWATA‘s objectives without abusing the constitution. m. To contract auditors and property verifiers for BAKWATA. n. To hold its budget meeting on the month of Mu‘harram (first month of the Muslim Calendar). o. To provide all important reports to the general assembly. p. To support elected regional and district secretaries of BAKWATA. The high council holds its meetings every six months but can have ad hoc meetings called in by its chairman, or half of its members under the authority of the chairman or by the Ulamaa committee. 2.5.3. Ulamaa Committee This committee has the following members a. The Mufti b. Not more than ten (10) sheikhs elected by the mufti on five years term or when the position is vacant The Ulamaa committee holds its meetings three times a year, but can have other meetings or ad hoc meetings called in by its chairman (the mufti). The Ulamaa committee is the highest body with authority and last decision of BAKWATA upon matters of Muslim laws and traditions in accordance with the Qur‘an and Sunna. The committee has the right to terminate, suspend or correct any BAKWATA official who is not working according to BAKWATA‘s objectives and missions. 2.5.3.1. Mandates and authorities of the Ulamaa Committee a. To protect and uphold Muslim disciplines among the Muslim communities in Tanzania and among various bodies of BAKWATA. b. To rule over all matters judging from the Qur‘an and Sunna and to deal with other issues related to Islamic laws. c. To provide fatwa using the Qur‘an and Sunna and other Islamic laws over religious matters which will be brought to the committee or matters which the committee will see beneficial to the Islamic communities to follow. The fatwa will be final. 17

d. To provide various guidelines and teachings on religious matters to the Muslim colleges and worldly colleges which can be followed by these colleges. e. To publish books, interpret, select and correct religious books which can be used for teaching Muslims and to restrict and ban books which contain wrong Muslim teachings that could bring misunderstanding and chaos among the Muslim believers. f. To recommend and chose sheikhs who will stand for election for regional and district sheikh positions. g. To instruct any committee or authority concerned to discipline any defaulting leader who does not follow the Muslim beliefs. h. To suspend or terminate any leader of the Ulamaa committee, regional sheikh, district sheikh, or any other leader of the general assembly except the mufti, when it is clear that his acts and behaviors are not reflecting the teachings of Muslims and he does not following the guidelines of BAKWATA. i. To provide guidelines on services of ‗Hijja and Umra‘, marriages, divorce, wills and tithes in the country and other issues which are important to the Muslim believers. j. To create law committees, religious education, Daawa and religious celebrations. k. To elect a person who will fill in a vacant position in the board of trustees until the general assembly select again the board of trustee. l. The Ulamaa committee can set aside decisions of BAKWATA by the authority of the mufti when it finds out that those decisions are contrary to the Qur‘an and Sunna and the constitution of BAKWATA. m. The Ulamaa committee can select among the Ulamaa members a person who acts as a mufti when the mufti resigns, or has lost characteristics or when the mufti dies. This person will act for 90 days. 2.5.4. Religious Committee of the General Assembly This committee has the following members a. The mufti b. Members of the Ulamaa committee c. Regional sheikhs d. General secretary e. District sheikhs 2.5.4.1. Mandates and authorities of the religious committee of the general assembly a. To select names of persons who can be elected for the mufti position. b. To prepare and pass policies of Da‘awa, religion education, ‗Hijja and Umra‘, marriages, divorce, wills, tithes, and advice in the country. c. To receive suggestions of people who could candidate for the mufti position. d. To select by secret vote the names of the first and second candidate for the mufti position. e. To select the mufti by secret vote and responsible people for the religious committees 18

f. To suspend the mufti when it is clear that his acts and behaviors are not reflecting the teachings of Muslims and he does not following the guidelines of BAKWATA. 2.5.5. The General Assembly This assembly has the following members a. The mufti b. The chairman of the national high council c. Regional sheikhs d. District sheikhs e. General secretary f. Two (2) deputy general secretaries g. The Ulamaa committee h. The Board of trustees i. Members of the national high committee j. Regional chairmen k. Regional secretaries l. District chairmen m. District secretaries n. The chief finance officer The General Assembly is the final authority having the final say on all issues concerning BAKWATA activities in accordance with the constitution, except those that the constitution has put clear that will be dealt with by the Ulamaa committee and the religious committee of the general assembly. 2.5.5.1. Mandates and authorities of the general assembly a. To receive and accept the election of the mufti as decided by the religious committee. b. To accept nine (9) board members of trustee of BAKWATA recommended by the Ulamaa committee. c. To oversee all plans and activities of BAKWATA in Tanzania. d. To terminate the mufti position by vote (two third majority). e. To receive and discuss the reports of implementations from the high council. f. To change or add any section to the constitution. g. To accept the members of the high committee as selected by regions. The general assembly has its meeting every three years, and its general election meeting every five years, but can have ad hoc meetings called in by the mufti or half of the members of general assembly under the mufti‘s authority. 2.5.5. The Board of Trustees This board has the following members a. Nine members (9) elected by the Ulamaa committee b. General Secretary The trustees will be known as the registered trustees of national Muslim council of Tanzania.

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2.5.5.1. Mandates and authorities of the Board of Trustees a. The registered trustees of the national Muslim council of Tanzania have the power to sale, purchase, transfer, receive, bond or put to use any property of BAKWATA (transferable and non transferable) after getting permission from the Ulamaa committee and the high council. b. The trustees select their own chairman among the board members. c. The number of members to constitute a meeting of the trustees is five (5). d. When a position gets vacant in the trustee‘s council, the Ulamaa committee will select a person who will fill the position in the board of trustees until the general assembly select again the trustee personnel. e. The trustees have a special seal which is put on every legal document to be sold or purchased and to be signed by the trustees to give it power and authenticity. The trustees meet once a year, but can have ad hoc meetings called in by its chairman, the general secretary of BAKWATA or the Ulamaa committee. 3. Organogram See Annex

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Section 2

TEC
Content 1. Background ...........................................................................................................................22 2. Mission..................................................................................................................................22 3. Function ................................................................................................................................22 4. Management .........................................................................................................................22 5. Role of the Catholic Secretariat .............................................................................................22 6. Departments .........................................................................................................................22 7. Units .....................................................................................................................................23 8. Commissions ........................................................................................................................23 9. Institutions .............................................................................................................................24 9.1. Owned and managed by TEC ............................................................................................24 9.2. Operating under TEC .........................................................................................................24 9.3. Owned and managed by the diocese on behalf of TEC ......................................................25 10. Archdiocese and Dioceses ..................................................................................................25 11. Organogram of TEC ............................................................................................................26 11.1. Details of the Organogram ...............................................................................................27 11.1.1. Departments .................................................................................................................27 11.1.2. Commissions.................................................................................................................27

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1. Background The Tanzania Episcopal Conference (TEC) is a permanent institution which is the Assembly of the Catholic Bishops of Tanzania whereby according to the norm of law, certain pastoral functions are jointly exercised. TEC was founded in 1956 and registered with the Government in 1957. It has 29 dioceses and their congregation is estimated to be 11,200,000 people (Tanzania Episcopal Conference). 2. Mission TEC is the official national organization of the Catholic hierarchy in Tanzania, which aims by joint action to adopt the most suitable means of promoting the interests and welfare of the Church, not only in matters of religion but also in the development, and social programs. 3. Function a. To provide a means whereby the Bishops exercise certain pastoral functions both internal to the life of the Church and external in terms of the church‘s service to humankind. b. An intermediary Curia between the Holy See (the Roman Curia) and dioceses (the Dioceses Curia). c. To see a pastoral endeavor arising from the common concerns of Bishops. 4. Management The full authority and responsibility of managing the activities of TEC are vested in the Plenary Meeting of the Conference. The Plenary meeting is composed of all members and has its ordinary meeting once a year. The Plenary meeting is presided by the President of the Conference. The day to day management of the Conference is entrusted to the Permanent Council (PC) which is assisted by the General Secretariat. PC is formed by Bishop Chairmen of TEC Departments under the President of TEC. The General Secretariat is known as the Catholic Secretariat, and its Chief Executive Officer is the General Secretary. 5. Role of the Catholic Secretariat a. To coordinate national, pastoral, social and development programs initiated and implemented by the General Secretariat. b. To facilitate diocesan activities on pastoral, development and social programs. c. To implement the decisions made by the Plenary Meeting. d. To render different services to the Dioceses i.e. clearing of goods, processing visa, passports and registration of hospitals, schools, dioceses as society, trustee, etc. e. To link the dioceses with national and international organizations. f. To offer consultancy and advisory services to the dioceses and TEC affiliated associations/organizations. 6. Departments a. Finance and Operations Department The Finance and Operations Department is a custodian of the funds of TEC. It is responsible for managing and controlling resources of TEC. and income generating projects.

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b. The Pastoral Department The Pastoral Department is entrusted with the facilitations and coordination of pastoral activities of the Church. c. Health Department The Health Department coordinates and facilitates the efforts of the Church in providing health services. d. Caritas Tanzania Caritas Tanzania is responsible for coordinating and facilitating development and relief activities of the Church. e. The Communications Department: The Communications Department is charged with responsibility of promoting communications activities of the Church. f. The Lay Apostolate Department: The Lay Apostolate Department is responsible for coordinating and facilitating the activities of lay apostolate movements, and associations at national level. It also promotes the involvement of the laity in the activities of the Church.

g. The Education and Seminaries Department: The Education and Seminaries Department is entrusted with the promotion of education services rendered by the Church. It coordinates and facilitated the education institutions owned and managed by the Church in all levels. h. The Liturgy Department: The Liturgy Department is responsible for promoting the liturgical activities in the Church. It involves itself in the translation of liturgical books, compilation of hymns and songs and empowering the diocesan liturgy directors on matters related to liturgy. 7. Units a. Building Bureau The Unit is responsible for supporting the Church in planning, design, building and maintenance of various edifices. b. Kurasini TEC Training and Conference Center The Centre is entrusted with hosting training seminars or workshops and Conferences of the Church and its affiliated organizations/associations. c. Coffee Estate 8. Commissions a. The Armed Forces and Prisons Commissions The Commission is responsible for promoting the pastoral ministry in the armed forces and prisons in the country. b. The Pastoral Care of the Migrant and Itinerant People Commissions The commission is responsible for promoting the pastoral care of seafarers, fishermen and displaced people. 23

c. The Theological Commission The Commission deals with theological issues by doing research and Interpretation. d. The Canon Law Commission The Commission is entrusted with legal affairs of the Church. It involves itself in interpreting laws, rules and regulations of TEC and the Church in general. It also assists dioceses and TEC affiliated associations or movements in developing constitutions in accordance with the law of the Church (Canon Law CIC). e. The Justice and Peace Commission The Commission is responsible for promoting justice and peace in Tanzania in the spirit of the Social Teaching of Church. It builds the capacity of the diocesan justice and peace officers, by training them, carry out research for promoting peace and justice. It also runs various program e.g. in the fields of Democracy and Good Governance. f. The Ecumenism and Interreligious Commission The Commission enables the Catholic Church to relate with Christian Churches and other religions.

g. The Tanzania Commission for Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life The Commission is responsible for promoting religious life and creates good relationship among religious h. The Evangelization Commission i. Staffing

9. Institutions 9.1. Owned and managed by TEC a. Bigwa Sisters‘ Secondary School in Diocese of Morogoro. b. Bugando Medical Centre (BMC) in Archdiocese of Mwanza. c. Kurasini Conference and Training Centre in Archdiocese of Dar es Salaam. d. Saint Augustine University of Tanzania (SAUT) in Archdiocese of Mwanza. e. The Catholic Publishers Limited (CPL) in Archdiocese of Dar es Salaam. f. TMP Printing Press and Publication in Archdiocese of Tabora 9.2. Operating under TEC a. Northern Region of Board of Seminaries. b. The Board has four major seminaries c. Our Lady of Angels Major Seminary (Kibosho) in Diocese of Moshi. d. Saint Anthony Major Seminary (Ntungamo) in Diocese of Bukoba. e. Saint Charles Lwanga Major Seminary (Segerea) in Archdiocese of Dar es Salaam. f. Saint Paul Major Seminary (Kipalapala) in Archdiocese of Tabora. g. Southern Region Board of Seminary. The Board has one Major Seminary. h. Saint Augustine Major Seminary (Peramiho) in Archdiocese of Songea.

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9.3. Owned and managed by the diocese on behalf of TEC a. Saint Joseph Teachers‘ College (JTC) – Diocese of Moshi b. Sengerema Clinical Officers Training Centre – Diocese of Geita c. The Bethlehem Centre – Diocese of Mahenge. 10. Archdiocese and Dioceses a. Metropolitan of Arusha (Archdiocese) Arusha Diocese Mbulu Diocese Same Diocese Moshi Diocese b. Metropolitan of Tabora (Archdiocese) Tabora Archdiocese Kigoma Diocese Sumbawanga Diocese Singida Diocese Kahama Diocese c. Metropolitan of Dar es Salaam (Archdiocese) Dar es Salaam Archdiocese Zanzibar Diocese Tanga Diocese Mahenge Diocese Morogoro Diocese Dodoma Diocese d. Metropolitan of Mwanza (Archdiocese) Mwanza Diocese Musoma Diocese Geita Diocese Bukoba Diocese Rulenge Diocese Shinyanga Diocese e. Metropolitan of Songea (Archdiocese) Mtwara Diocese Lindi Diocese Tunduru/Masasi Diocese Songea Diocese Mbinga Diocese Mbeya Diocese Njombe Diocese Iringa Diocese

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11. Organogram of TEC
The day to day running is done by the Catholic Secretariat staff headed by the Secretary General helped by nine (9) Executive Secretaries heading departments. The General Secretariat has nine (9) Departments, nine (9) Commissions and two (2) units.

Tanzania Episcopal Conference

President Vice President Permanent Council Catholic Secretariat Secretary General

Departments

Units

Commission

Liturgy Pastoral Lay Apostolate Caritas Tanzania Communication Health Education and Seminars Finance & Operation

Building Bureau Kurasini Center Coffee Estate

Culture Itinerant & Migrants Theological Canon Law Justice & Peace and Armed Forces Ecumenism and Interreligious Consecrated Life Evangelization Staffing

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Family

11.1. Details of the Organogram President of the Conference: Rt. Rev Jude T. Ruwaich OFM Cap. Secretary General: Fr. Anthony Makunde Deputy Secretary General: Fr. Edgar Mbegu 11.1.1. Departments Finance and Operations Department Chairman: Bishop Augustine Shao Executive Secretary: Sr. Marcella Minde (CDNK) Pastoral Department Chairman: Bishop Protase Rugambwa Executive Secretary Fr. Edgar Mbegu Communications Department Chairman: Bishop Michael Msonganzila Executive Secretary Mr. Peter Maduki (M.A. Ed.) Catechetical Department Chairman: Bishop Paschal Kikoti Executive Secretary: Mr. Peter Maduki (M.A. Ed.) Liturgy Department Chairman: Bishop Tarcisius Ngalalekumtwa Executive Secretary: Mr. Peter Maduki (M.A. Ed.) Education and Seminaries Department Chairman: Bishop Severene Niwemugizi Executive Secretary: Vacant Lay Apostolate Department Chairman: Bishop Desiderius Rwoma Executive Secretary: Fr. Vitus Sichalwe Health Department Chairman: Dr. Fredrick Kigdaye Executive Secretary: Vacant Caritas Department Chairman: Bishop Beatus Kinyiya Executive Secretary: Mr. Peter Maduki (M.A. Ed.) 11.1.2. Commissions Canon Law Commission Chairman: Very Rev. R. Kimaryo Secretary: Rev. Fr. Lawena Samuel (PhD)

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Ecumenical Commission Chairman: Bishop Bruno Ngonyani Secretary: Rev. Fr. Joseph Mlola, OSS Inter Religious Dialogue Commission Chairman: Rev. Msemwa Secretary: Rev. Fr. Gallus Marandu (STL) Commission of Justice and Peace Chairman: Bishop Paul Ruzoka Secretary: Rev. Fr. Vic Missiaen (MA. Econ) Commission of Consecrated Life and Apostolic Life Community Chairman: Bishop Nestor Timanywa Secretary: Sr. Dominica Msigwa Commission of Evangelization Chairman: Rt. Rev. D. Dallu Secretary: Elias Kingamkono Commission of Armed Forces Chairman: Bishop P. Ruzoka Commission of Migrant and Itinerant Peoples Chairman: Bishop I. Amani Secretary: Fr. Gallus Marandu Commission of Culture Chairman: Bishop Ndorobo Secretary: Gallus Marandu Commission of Family Chairman: Rt. Rev. Makude Secretary: Process Kasungu Commission of Consecrated Life Chairman: Rt. Rev. Chengula Secretary: Gallus Marandu Commission of Theology Chairman: Rt Rev. Rweyongeza Secretary: Novatus Mrighwa

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Section C

CCT
Content 1.Background ............................................................................................................................30 2.Purpose .................................................................................................................................30 2.1. Function of the Council.......................................................................................................30 3.Values ....................................................................................................................................31 4.Strengths ...............................................................................................................................31 5.Operations and Management .................................................................................................31 5.1. General Secretary ..............................................................................................................31 5.2. Administration and Human Resources Management..........................................................31 5.3. Financial Control ................................................................................................................32 5.4. Accounts ............................................................................................................................32 5.5. Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation ..................................................................................32 5.6. Mission, Ecumenism and Evangelism ................................................................................32 6.Programs ...............................................................................................................................32 6.1. Justice and Peace ..............................................................................................................32 6.2. Capacity Building ...............................................................................................................32 6.3. HIV/AIDS ...........................................................................................................................33 6.4. Women development, gender and children ........................................................................33 6.5. Chaplaincy .........................................................................................................................33 6.6. Public relations ...................................................................................................................34 6.7. Policy analysis and advocacy .............................................................................................34 6.8. Emergency and Relief ........................................................................................................34 6.9. Interfaith relations and evangelism .....................................................................................34 6.10. Media and communication ...............................................................................................35 6.11. Youth and development ...................................................................................................35 7.Governance ...........................................................................................................................35 8.Membership ...........................................................................................................................35 9.Member Churches..................................................................................................................36 9.1. Church related organizations .............................................................................................36 10. Organogram…………………………………………………………………………………………36 29

1. Background The Christian Council of Tanzania (CCT) was established in January 1934 as a fellowship of Churches and Christian Organizations. It was then named the Tanganyika Missionary Council until 1964 when it adopted its current name. The CCT has since grown in membership to 15 National Churches (which includes 75 Dioceses) and 14 Church-Related Organizations. 2. Purpose a. To promote and sustain the spiritual and prophetic unity of the churches. b. To serve as an instrument of the churches for monitoring and expressing a common voice on issues of interest to the churches and those issues concerning the spiritual, moral, socio-economic and physical welfare of the people. c. To promote and take an active role in the development and provision of welfare services for the communities of people served by the churches. d. To strengthen and build capacity of the member churches to respond effectively to emergencies, human displacement, gender equity, good governance, justice and HIV & AIDS pandemic and orphans. 2.1. Function of the Council In addition to its purpose, the functions of the Council shall also be to: a. Bring together representatives of Churches and Christian Agencies for routine meetings and consultations concerning the spiritual and general welfare of the people of Tanzania. Such meetings and consultations shall be held at specified times and places; b. Promote study research and advocacy on all matters relating to and concerning the progress of the Kingdom of God, including every aspect of life; c. Help form an enlightened Christian opinion on all issues touching and concerning the spiritual, moral and physical welfare of the peoples of the Republic, to give expression to such opinion and to bring it to bear on Christian matters; d. Take all necessary steps in furtherance of and to sustain understanding and good relations among all the Members of the Council; and also, to involve itself in matters relating to the Union of the Churches; e. Relate the work of the Churches and international Christian Organizations to that of the World Council of Churches and to represent the Christian people of Tanzania in such international relationships; f. Hold, through its Trustees, movable property, where such holdings will further Christian co-operation; g. Involve itself, to fund and to enable Churches and Agencies to give development and Welfare Services within the Republic; h. Promote the development of a sense of public awareness of the rights and duties likely to be involved in decisions touching on issues relating to public welfare and i. Form, in accordance with the Constitution, such organs and like institutions, as it shall deem appropriate for the performance of its functions.

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3. Values a. Christian faith: CCT acknowledges one God through Jesus Christ, who lived, died and rose again b. Compassion and love: CCT seeks to follow the foot-steps of Jesus Christ in identifying with the poor and oppressed. c. Unity and Ecumenism: CCT differs in traditions, nut united in faith and in building the body of Christ. d. Professionalism and spiritual development: CCT encourages the professional and spiritual development of our staff and our members e. CCT members are stewards of God‘s creation and Church property. f. Participatory Approach: CCT practices a participatory, transparent and facilitation approach in our working relationship. 4. Strengths a. CCT‘s strength is drawn from a long history and experience of working in Tanzania. Some of its strengths include strong committed membership, leadership and staff. b. Its experience in working on spiritual and social development issues simultaneously. c. Its strong interfaith ties with other religious organizations within and outside Tanzania d. It can work through member churches all over the country to reach grassroots and different sections of communities such as youth, women, children, disabled and orphans. e. Its experience on working in collaborations with the Government bodies f. It is a well known and accepted organization in Tanzania with clear vision, mission and track record of performance. g. Its membership and linkage with National, Continental and Global Organizations. 5. Operations and Management The CCT is structured as following 5.1. General Secretary a. Goal Program direction, ecumenism, and networking b. Purpose Advocacy, governance, networking and quality of CCT‘s programs and activities and to see overall management and operations of CCT c. Term The Secretary General is elected during the General Assembly of Bishops which usually takes place in June. Each term is five (5) years and the Secretary General can serve for a maximum of two terms. 5.2. Administration and Human Resources Management a. Goal  Efficiency and effective human resources  To enhance and sustain administrative services  Administer labor and legal disputes, including conflict resolution in workplace  Strengthening of general administrative tasks b. Purpose  Improve the Facilitation and coordination role of CCT 31

5.3. Financial Control a. Goal  Ensuring effective control of Council‘s assets and liabilities  Ensuring financial management systems are in place  Donor liaison on financial matters b. Purpose  Management of funds  Imparting fundraising skills to Diocesan fundraising coordinators  Enhancing the operational capacity and implementation of programs 5.4. Accounts a. Goal  Ensuring management and accounting of the CCT‘s assets and funds b. Purpose  Improving accounting and tracking of CCT funds from various sources  To ensure CCT assets are properly managed and accounted for  Capacity building of the accounting staff 5.5. Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation 5.6. Mission, Ecumenism and Evangelism 6. Programs 6.1. Justice and Peace a. Goal  Enhance peaceful co-existence among CCT members and the communities they live in b. Purpose  Increase CCT members‘ capacity for peace building, conflict management/resolution and promotion of human rights  Raise awareness of human rights among members  Increase skills in conflict management and peace building among members and communities  Coordinate members‘ involvement in advocacy and lobbying for desirable policies at both national and community level 6.2. Capacity Building a. Goal  Enhance and Influence CCT members and communities towards poverty alleviation

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b. Purpose  Increase the participation of CCT members and communities in monitoring poverty and comparing it to Millennium Development Goals (MDG),  Increase the number of CCT members and community leaders trained in rights based approach towards development  Increase the number of CCT members participating in the monitoring of implementation of government policies at local and national level to enhance citizen participation  Strengthen the capacity of the capacity building program 6.3. HIV/AIDS a. Goal  Increase Contribution to the national efforts in reducing risk and vulnerability due to HIV&AIDS b. Purpose  Increase support toward CCT member‘s competence in facilitating access to HIV prevention, impact mitigation and care  Improve the quality of lives of OVC and PLHA in the selected communities  Provide intensive life skills interventions on HIV&AIDS among youth, prisoners, children and community  Develop and Implement HIV&IDDS policies and advocacy strategies for equitable access and accountability of financial resources at national and local government levels  Enhance operational capacity to implement programs 6.4. Women development, gender and children a. Goal  Women and children empowerment to achieve gender equity and quality of life for people of Tanzania promoted b. Purpose  Increase Women and children participation in decision making for political and socio-economic well being  Support and increase the capacity of CCT women in the establishment of community initiatives for political, socio-economic activities and advocacy against gender based violence  Strengthen the facilitation and provision of spiritual and ethical education to children in member churches  Enhance operational capacity to implement programs 6.5. Chaplaincy a. Goal  Provide Pastoral ministry and Christian education to higher learning institutions b. Purpose  Students, staff and people living around the campuses are ministered unto  Strengthen pastoral ministry in higher institutions of learning  Enhance exchange programs between universities 33

 

Train ministry volunteers Enhance operational capacity to implement programs

6.6. Public relations a. Goal  Enhance CCT‘s image and presence b. Purpose  Improve dissemination of information related to CCT and provide support to CCT‘s sustainability initiatives  Produce and disseminate publicity and information materials related to CCT and its programs 6.7. Policy analysis and advocacy a. Goal  enhance the participation and engagement of CCT members in influencing public policy process b. Purpose  CCT and its members‘ leadership should be actively engaged in influencing public policy processes that will improve the lives of the poor and marginalized people of Tanzania  Increase the number of CCT members and effectively engage them in the process of public policy  Improve analytical and activist capacity of CCT and its members for proactive public policy engagements  Enhance collaboration and networking among CCT members, FBOs, NGO, and CBO 6.8. Emergency and Relief a. Goal  Improve the capacity of CCT members and communities to respond to disasters and assurance of food security b. Purpose  Enhance CCT members and its respective community‘s capacity to mitigate disasters and ensure food security  Strengthen institutional arrangements for emergency response during disaster  Improve food security in the areas that experience food shortages 6.9. Interfaith relations and evangelism a. Goal  Form Interfaith councils/forums at grassroots level to promote ecumenism b. Purpose  Improve Facilitation and coordination role of CCT  Strengthen capacities of religious leaders, men and women to interact with other faiths to build good relations  Strengthen ecumenism among CCT members 34

6.10. Media and communication a. Goal  Make effective use of communication enhancing holistic ministry to achieve CCT vision b. Purpose  Produce Radio and TV programs  Increase capacity to prepare and transmit radio programs 6.11. Youth and development a. Goal  Promote youth development and care, holistic growth and unity among youths b. Purpose  Develop Ecumenism and responsible citizenship among youth  Promote ecumenicalism, peace and civic education among youth  Provide leadership capacity of youth, counseling and care services  Enhance economic empowerment for youths through SACCOS/VICOBA and entrepreneurship training 7. Governance The Organs of the Council shall be: a. the General Assembly; b. the Executive Council; c. the Standing Committee; d. the Officers; and e. the Secretariat. 8. Membership Means churches and church related organization willing and agreed to abide by the regulations, statement of faith and by-laws of the Christian Council of Tanzania. The Council shall have the following classes of membership: Full members, Associate members, Probationary members and honorary members. a. Full membership is open to all Churches duly constituted in Tanzania b. Associate membership is open to all locally constituted Christian organizations, fellowships or groups organized to promote some definite Christian activities not directly under any Church as defined above. c. Probationary Membership: Applicants for full membership, if approved by the Council shall in all cases be first accepted into probationary membership. The period of probation shall be an opportunity for members of the Council to be acquainted with the Applicant better and for the Applicant to appreciate the responsibilities of membership. The period of probation shall normally be one year and shall not exceed three years unless otherwise directed by the General Assembly or its 35

Executive Council. The period of probation can be terminated at any time by the withdrawal of the new member, or by the General Assembly or its Executive Council admitting the applicant to full membership or rejecting the application. d. Honorary Membership: The Council may confer membership to any person recommended by the Executive Council. No group shall be accepted into any class of membership without a minute of acceptance by the General Assembly or its Executive Council. 9. Member Churches a. Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania (ELCT) b. Anglican Church Tanzania (ACT) c. Moravian Church in Tanzania (MCT) d. Africa Inland Church Tanzania (AICT) e. Mennonite Church in Tanzania (MCT) f. Baptist Conventional Church in Tanzania g. Salvation Army h. Church of God i. Presbyterian Church of East Africa j. Kanisa la Biblia k. Mbalizi Evangelistic Church l. Methodist Church m. Christian Brethren Assembly n. African Brotherhood Church o. Tanzania Yearly Meeting 9.1. Church related organizations a. Bible Society of Tanzania (BST) b. Scripture Union (SU) c. Tanganyika Christian Refugee Service (TCRS) d. Young Men‘s Christian Association (YMCA) e. Yong Women‘s Christian Association (YWCA) f. African Evangelistic Enterprise (AEE) g. Life Ministry of Tanzania h. Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) i. Emmanuel International j. Habitat for Humanity k. Summer Institute of Linguistic (SIL) l. Dodoma Christian Medical Centre (DCMC) m. Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) n. Compassion International Tanzania 10. Organogram See Annex

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African Inland Church
Content 1.Background ............................................................................................................................38 2.Purpose of AICT ....................................................................................................................39 3.Vision of AICT ........................................................................................................................39 4.Mission of AICT ......................................................................................................................39 5.Core Values and beliefs of AICT ............................................................................................39 6.Departments ..........................................................................................................................39 7.Institutions..............................................................................................................................40

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1. Background Africa Inland Church Tanzania (AICT) had its beginning in the work of Africa Inland missionaries from America. The first AIM missionaries to arrive at Nassa mission station in Tanganyika were Emil and Marie Sywulka in June 29, 1909. However, these were not the first Christian missionaries to preach the Gospels of Jesus Christ among the people of the northwestern Tanzania. The Christian mission work in this area began in 1882 when the Church Missionary Society (CMS) established the first mission station south of Lake Victoria at Buzilima in the Usambiro chiefdom among the Sukuma people. This mission station operated from 1882 to 1990. Although Usambiro (Buzilima) was abandoned as a mission in 1890, CMS mission work continued at Mpwapwa, Nassa and Uganda. The isolated CMS station at Nassa was established in 1888. The Nassa mission station was located about 600 miles from Mpwapwa and 280 miles from Uganda, on the opposite shore of Lake Victoria. Bishop Tucker, who was in charge of CMS's British East Africa colonies, felt that it was too difficult for his mission to administer the isolated Nassa station from Uganda. Finally, CMS relinquished the Nassa mission field to the Africa Inland Mission in 1909. AIM expanded its work in Tanganyika between World War I and World War II. During that time the AIM missionaries with the help of native evangelist managed to establish other stations at Kijima (1910), Mwanza (1912), Kolandoto (1913) and Luhumbo (1922). They also established local churches and primary schools. Memories of forced departures during World War I left AIM missionaries fearful. With World War II looming, AIM missionaries and the African church leaders agreed that African leaders would inherit the church in the event of another major war. Consequently, on 22 January 1938, the AIM field council gave the Africa Church leaders 'self rule but under the authority of the AIM. The newly formed church was called Ekklesia Evangel ya Kristo (EEK). EEK was never given full responsibility by AIM in part because World War II ended and AIM missionaries no longer feared evacuation. By the late 1950s political consciousness heightened in Tanganyika and various mission agencies began handing over full responsibilities to their daughter churches. The provisions accompanying this new ownership included homes, offices and frequently a foreign financial subsidy towards the ongoing work. As independence from the British colonial government grew imminent, African pastors working under AIM anticipated similar independence from all AIM control. On 17 February 1957, Yeremia Mahalu Kisula was appointed the first African director of the church, and the name of the church was officially changed from EEK to Africa Inland Church (AIC) Tanganyika. Subsequently, in 1962, the African leaders gained full control of all affairs of their church and AIC leadership changed the title of their leader from director to bishop. The rapid expansion of the church justified the need to decentralize its administrative functions into four dioceses: a. Diocese of Mwanza b. Diocese of Mara and Ukerewe c. Diocese of Shinyanga d. Diocese of Geita In the year 1995 Pwani diocese was inaugurated. Tabora Diocese started in the year 2006. Despite the diocese structure, the bishops work under the leadership of one archbishop.

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2. Purpose of AICT Africa Inland Church Tanzania is committed not only to love and glorify God but also to plant and cultivate maturing local churches through the preaching of the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the end of the earth beginning in Tanzania. Through a variety of ministries AICT is serving men, women and children for Jesus Christ and strives to meet their spiritual, educational, social and physical needs. 3. Vision of AICT ―A world where all human beings believe in God to their fullest potential to promote harmony, love and peace; and in which no one lives in poverty, fear or oppression.‖ 4. Mission of AICT ―To help all human beings to believe, worship and mature in the knowledge of the Holy Trinity and seek for holistic development by maintaining a prosperous cordial relationship with God, other human beings and the environment.‖ 5. Core Values and beliefs of AICT AICT is guided by a central belief that God has created human beings to know him and worship him. In order to help people to know God, holistic development is extremely important in helping them to meet their spiritual and physical needs necessary for upholding and enjoying the love and goodness of God. Henceforth, AICT has the following beliefs and core values: a. Belief in the Holy Trinity b. Belief in the Bible c. Evangelism and discipleship: preaching the gospel d. Universal Unity, Love, Peace, Solidarity and Integrity e. Transparency and Accountability f. Integral mission: promoting holistic development (spiritual, mental and physical development) through evangelism and missions g. Effective and efficient systems and procedures h. Good stewardship: using resources with integrity and faithfulness for the benefit of the intended beneficiaries. i. Respect for human dignity and promotion of human rights 6. Departments a. Evangelism and Missions b. Literature The CMS Missionaries started Literature work at Nassa in 1895 with the installation of a small printing press to print translated tracts and pamphlets in Kisukuma language. At last the very printing press moved to Bwiru-Mwanza in 1960, with the new name Literature department. Thus includes, Inland press, Inland publishers and Inland bookshop. The great mission statement Literature department is to print and distribute Religious books, booklets and magazines for all churches in order to reach the word of God to people through printed matters in Tanzania and East Africa countries. Currently the Literature department is operating with two units, thus are Inland Press which is dealing with printing and Inland publishers which is dealing with editing, translating and distributing printed matter. c. Christian Education d. Youth Development 39

e. f. g. h. i. j. k.

Health Development Women/Gender Development Technical Theological Education and Bible Schools Development Education and Vocational Training Broadcasting/Studio

7. Institutions a. Nassa Theological College Up until the end of 1988 the Africa Inland Church, Tanzania relied upon its two "four year" Bible Training Schools at Katungulu and Majahida for the training of her leadership. To meet specific needs within the church, the AICT has had to look for scholarships and trainings from outside Tanzania. On the January 16, 1989, the NTC first year started with eight students and four teachers. The purpose of NTC is to equip Christians to be leaders for services in the church. Graduates will have received training enabling them to serve as rural or urban pastors, teachers of Bible Training schools and leaders of other church ministries. Study Programs include advanced Diploma in Theology, one Year Certificate of Biblical Studies and Ministry Skills and Women‘s Ministry Program. b. Katunguru Bible School c. Majahida Bible School

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Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania (ELCT)
Content 1.Background ............................................................................................................................42 2.Mission of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania .......................................................42 3.The Structure of the ELCT .....................................................................................................42 3.1Leadership ...........................................................................................................................42 3.2Decision Making Bodies .......................................................................................................42 3.3The Head Office ...................................................................................................................42 3.4.Secretary General and Departments ...................................................................................43 3.5.Institutions ...........................................................................................................................43 4.Programs ...............................................................................................................................43 5.Services .................................................................................................................................43 6.ELCT Communications Policy ................................................................................................44 6.Radio .....................................................................................................................................44 6.2Uhuru na Amani Magazine ...................................................................................................44 6.3Tega Sikio – Newspaper ......................................................................................................45 6.3.1Objectives of Tega Sikio....................................................................................................45 7.1.Women‘s Program ..............................................................................................................45 7.1.1Gender sensitization .........................................................................................................45 8.Organogram of ELCT .............................................................................................................46 8.1 Details for the Organogram .................................................................................................46

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1. Background The Lutheran Church began its activities in Tanzania during the 19th century. It has continued to grow despite interruptions by the Hehe/German War in 1891, the Majimaji war of 1905-1906, the 1st World War 1914-1918 and later on the 2nd World War of 1939-1945. By 1938 there were seven Churches in Tanganyika, as the country was known at that time. a. The Lutheran Church of Northern Tanganyika in the north. b. The Usambara/Digo Lutheran Church in the northeast. c. The Uzaramo/Uluguru Lutheran Church in the east. d. The Augustana Lutheran Church of Irimba/Turu, located in Central Tanganyika. e. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in the North West Tanganyika. f. The Iraqw Lutheran Church in the Northern Province g. The Ubena/Konde Lutheran Church in the Southern Highlands. In 1938, the Churches founded a federation known as the Federation of Lutheran Churches in Tanganyika, which brought together these seven churches. On June 19, 1963, the seven Churches, under the umbrella of a federation, merged to become a single Church, known as the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania. The ELCT Head Office is in the Lutheran Centre located in Arusha along Boma Road opposite the Central Post Office near the Clock Tower roundabout at the Sokoine/Joel Maeda and Boma Road junction. The ELCT, which is comprised of 20 dioceses, has a membership of more than 5.3 million in a population of nearly 46 million Tanzanians. 2. Mission of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania The aim of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania (ELCT) is to enable people to know Jesus Christ and gain eternal life. The Church is built on Jesus Christ as its foundation, is guided by the Word of God as found in the Old and New Testaments, and is strengthened by the Sacraments. It does so in accordance with the Lutheran Confessions, which are true interpretations of the Word of God. 3. The Structure of the ELCT 3.1 Leadership The Presiding Bishop or ―Mkuu‖ is elected for a four-year term from amongst the Bishops of the dioceses. 3.2 Decision Making Bodies The General Assembly of the Church meets every four years. An Executive Council consisting of a. diocese Bishops b. diocese Secretaries General c. directors of Church institutions meets three times each year, while an Executive Committee meets more frequently. 3.3 The Head Office The three-pronged role of the ELCT Head Office is capacity building, advocacy and facilitation for the entire church. There are at least 40 employees including supporting staff. 42

3.4. Secretary General and Departments Under the new organizational structure that became effective in July 1998 are four departments answerable to the Secretary General. The Secretary General‘s Office has the Advocacy, Democracy and Communication Desks. Auditor General is advisor to the Executive Council. The four Departments are as follows: a. Mission and Evangelism b. Finance and Administration c. Planning and Development d. Social Services and Women's Work 3.5. Institutions The ELCT has several institutions serving the entire church and its units. These are: a. The Lutheran Junior Seminary in Morogoro, a secondary school up to form six; a Leadership Training department; language and Orientation course; a Production Farm and Kindergarten/Nursery School. b. Radio Voice of Gospel, shortwave and FM, in Moshi. c. Primary Schools for deaf children in Mwanga and Njombe. d. Lutheran Teachers Training College in Mbeya. e. The New Safari Hotel based in Arusha is one of the major investments-cum-income generating schemes commonly owned by the Church. f. Tumaini University, the national university of the ELCT The organization is also affiliated with the following institutions locally and internationally a. All Africa Conference of Churches b. Action by Churches Together c. Christian Council of Tanzania d. Lutheran Mission Cooperation (Tanzania). LMC is a joint instrument of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania (ELCT) and her partners to fulfill their visions, goals and priorities in accordance with their "mission calling." e. Lutheran World Federation f. Mission Aviation Fellowship g. Tanganyika Christian Refugee Service 4. Programs a. HIV/AIDS b. Dairy Cattle c. Mission and Evangelism d. SACCO 5. Services a. Disaster response: During time of flood, drought or other disaster, the ELCT seeks to respond to the needs of those who suffer. One of the ELCT's major disaster responses is through Tanganyika Christian Refugee Service (TCRS), a joint outreach of the ELCT and Lutheran World Federation b. Health Care c. Multimedia

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6. ELCT Communications Policy In May 2000 ELCT Executive Council adopted a policy, containing the following eleven (11) priorities: 1. The ELCT needs to intensify its efforts in bolstering education, Christian faith, the well-being of its members as well as give the proper image of its witness in the world throughout the communication mass media. 2. Every member of the congregation should be able to read and write as a human right. 3. The ELCT should recruit a publisher in-charge of Church Literature Ministry. 4. The ELCT should strengthen Uhuru na Amani magazine. 5. The ELCT should implement the decision to launch Tega Sikio which is a liberal weekly newspaper. 6. The ELCT should apply for a medium wave (AM) licence for RSYI Station. 7. The ELCT should start zone FM stations. 8. ELCT should launch its own website and get connected to internet; and all dioceses should use computers in performing accounts and secretarial work. 9. Every ELCT diocese should have an e-mail link to ease communication. 10. The ELCT should use the e-mail technology to launch an e- mail network to ease information sharing huddles within the ELCT family. 11. The ELCT should introduce degree courses in communication at the MUCO branch of Tumaini University. 6.1 Radio For ELCT radio is an effective tool for mission and evangelism because message can be transmitted simultaneously to all the people the mass medium can reach. The ELCT's radio work was started in 1962 in Moshi as a recording studio for the Addis Ababa based Radio Voice of the Gospel (RVOG). It was very popular among the Swahili speakers in Eastern and Central Africa. In 1977, when Emperor Haile Selassie was overthrown by Mengistu Haile Mariam, the Ethiopian radio stopped functioning. In 1979, LWF assisted in the resumption of the studio production in Moshi. The programmes were aired by Radio FEBA in Seychelles and later by TransWorld Radio based in Manzini. It was through the assistance of Bavaria that in 1994 the studio got a license to operate an FM station known as RSYI, Swahili acronym for RVOG. The policy is to have 30 per cent religious or Gospel Programmes and 70 percent Development Programmes. But in most cases religious programmes account for more than 50 percent. 6.2 Uhuru na Amani Magazine Uhuru na Amani started in 1932 at Vuga press near Lushoto under a different name and format. It was known as The Lords Kingdom (Ufalme wa Mungu) and later on changed its name to The Christian Flag (Bendera ya Mkristo) and during the 1960s, when everyone was agitating for independence, the name was changed to Freedom and Peace (Uhuru na Amani). In the 60s and 70s it was published every month. In the 80s the frequency was 6 times a year while in the 90s the frequency dropped to between twice to three issues a year. Through the 70s the paper was funded by the Church as part of the ELCT Common Work budget. Since that time, the cost has been met through  subsidy from the LCS/ LMC Block Grant like other departments of the ELCT Head Office  the 2% contributed by the Dioceses  sales of the magazine 44

6.3 Tega Sikio – Newspaper Tega Sikio means "lend me your ear." The purpose of ―Tega Sikio‖, published by the Church for circulation all over the country, is to produce a good community and religious newspaper. The newspaper is issued weekly hitting the streets on Wednesdays. Its office is located in Dar es Salaam, but coverage and circulation are country-wide. 6.3.1 Objectives of Tega Sikio a. To chronicle the life of the Church and times in the work of the society through collecting news, editorialising, giving opinion, educating the public, advertising, giving announcements and entertaining through the print medium. b. To serve as a paper for common people and a forum for democratic ideas as well as a vehicle for Christian mission. The purpose of this three-pronged objective is to serve as a Prophetic voice of the Church and all peace advocates. c. To serve as a vehicle for news collection, presentation, proprietors, advertising and publicity agents, journalists and literacy agents as well as give forum for democratic opinion. d. To serve as advertising agents, advertisement contractors and designers of advertisements in all their branches. It will adopt such means of advertising as may seem expedient for the purpose of making the business known and attractive to the public. e. To apply, acquire and hold privileges, licenses or other rights and powers from the Government or any other authority to constitute the newspaper publishing service. f. To support the establishment and support of associations, institutions, funds, trusts and conveniences calculated to benefit employees of the newspaper and to grant pensions and allowances and to make payments towards insurance and subscribe or guarantee money for charitable purposes. 7. Social Services The Directorate of Social Services and Women's Work is involved in four major areas a. Health and HIV/AIDS b. Education c. Women's Work d. Diaconal Work 7.1. Women’s Program The membership of ELCT is constituted of more than 50% women. Their work in Church activities is very visible at congregational level. They are the ones who oversee the kindergarten and play schools that are owned by the parishes. However, when one looks at the decision-making mechanism and the hierarchy of the church, women are not visible. The decision by the national church to ordain women was made in 1990. To date, there are still some dioceses that have not ordained women. 7.1.1 Gender sensitization The reasons for women's secondary leadership roles are more than cultural. One sees the influence of the Mission Agency that works in the area. In the Executive Council of the Church which is the next highest decision making body to the General Assembly, amongst 52 members, 5 are women. In other decision-making organs, women constitute less than 20%.

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Some of the ways being used to address this situation include: a. Gender Training Sensitization. This has been done for Bishops and General Secretaries of Dioceses. b. Leadership Training for Women. This is a 10 weeks course that is conducted yearly. c. Counseling courses. These are conducted yearly for women leaders. d. English language courses. These are conducted for women leaders subject to the availability of funds. e. Human Rights Training. 8. Organogram of ELCT See Annex 8.1 Details for the Organogram a. Presiding Bishop: Alex Gehaz Malasusa b. Secretary General: Mr. Brighton Killewa c. Deputy SG Finance & Administration: Vacant d. DSG Mission & Evangelism: Rev. Ambele Mwaipopo e. DSG Social Services: Rev. Sabina Lumwe f. DSG Planning and Development: Vacant g. Recording Secretary: Exaudi Ndulu

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Mbalezi Evangelistic Church
Content 1.Background ............................................................................................................................48 2.Mission...................................................................................................................................48 3.Programs ...............................................................................................................................48 3.1.Youth ..................................................................................................................................48 3.2Women ................................................................................................................................48 3.3.Vocational Training .............................................................................................................48 3.4.Health .................................................................................................................................48 3.5Tourism ................................................................................................................................48 3.6Farming................................................................................................................................48 4.Organogram of the Mbalezi Evangelic Church .......................................................................49

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1. Background The first Swiss evangelistic missionaries arrived in 1957 in Mbeya, founding the Mbalezi Evangelistic Mission. With the growing number of members, in 1980 they founded the Mbalezi Evangelistic Church, with a number of now (2009) 150 churches and 8 500 members in Tanzania, mostly in Mbeya Region. The Swiss Missionaries are continuously present in the church, in 2009 with three couples and three female missionaries. Each of the church is self-governed and organizes the church services itself. The churches are built only with local resources. Each parish elects a leader that has to be re-elected (or a new one to be elected) every year. Experienced parish members can be appointed by the Central Assembly of the Church to become teachers or pastors to preach in the services. Professional Pastors and Evangelists from the Assembly visit the parishes regularly. 2. Mission The Mbalezi Evangelistic Church describes its mission as ‗Serve God and help people‘ 3. Programs The Mbalezi Evangelistic Church conducts programs in the following areas 3.1. Youth a. Sunday School b. Youth Group c. Choir d. Food supply for orphans 3.2 Women a. Bible study b. Seminars/Trainings c. Sewing and Handicraft Courses 3.3. Vocational Training a. Carpenter b. Car mechanic c. Domestic Economy d. Computer School e. Driving school f. School for Missionary Children (Swiss schooling system) g. Bible School (Boarding school, 2 year courses, student and family stay on campus) in Mshewe 3.4. Health a. Hospital with 200 beds b. Nursing School 3.5 Tourism a. Guest Houses in Mbeya, Malawi Lake, Ifisi b. Ravine Gamepark 3.6 Farming a. Tegemeo Farm (Coffee) 48

4. Organogram of the Mbalezi Evangelic Church See Annex

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Tanzania Mennonite Church
Content 1.Background ............................................................................................................................51 2.The development of the structure of the Mennonite Church in Tanzania ................................51 3.Programs ...............................................................................................................................52 3.1.Women and Girls ................................................................................................................52 3.2.Health .................................................................................................................................52 3.3.Education ............................................................................................................................52 3.4.Literature .............................................................................................................................53 3.5.Community Development ....................................................................................................53

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1. Background The Lancaster Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church) opened its mission work in Musoma District, Tanganyika Territory, East Africa, on May 26, 1934, when John H. Mosemann, Jr. and his wife and Elam Stauffer and wife, the first couples to be sent out, landed at Shirati. The beginning of the church in East Africa was on 15 September 1935, when 15 persons were baptized and 6 others received into church fellowship. The total membership of the churches in Musoma District grew by 1953 to 864. The five stations were Shirati, Bukiroba, Mugango, Bumangi and Nyabasi. From the beginning the objective was to build self-supporting, self-propagating, and selfgoverning churches. No money was brought from America for the native African church. Church buildings and church operation were supported only by money and labor given in Africa, and self-propagation of the church was the responsibility of the native members. This was in the form of organized village work. Government of the church while it was small was by counseling all of its members. In 1938 the first steps were taken toward setting up the African General Church Council, when several members were chosen to counsel with the missionaries on matters of church government. The General Church Council in 1953 was made up of members chosen biennially by the churches to serve as elders or counselors. In 1948 there were 17 African elders who with all ordained missionaries on the field constituted the General Church Council, which acted in an advisory capacity. It was set up to aid in indigenous governing from the beginning. Steps were under way for formal organization of the African church and ordination of African leaders. Elam Stauffer summarized above the establishment of Mennonite mission work in various parts of Tanganyika, initially in an area East of Lake Victoria (1934-1940), later in other parts of the territory (1940-1950). From 1950 to 1954 the church experienced local expansion. Workers were placed in Ikoma-Mugumu, and stations were established at Kisaka, Tarime, and Musoma. Only in 1963 were workers were placed in Dar es Salaam. Thus, for 30 years Mennonite efforts focused on a two-county area, in part because applications to the colonial government and respect for comity with other missions were obstacles to expansion. Since 1970 the church has planted congregations in Mwanza, Biharamulo, Arusha, Tabora, Dodoma, and Sumbawanga. The church had 200 members in 1944 and 50,000 members in 280 congregations in 2003. The accelerated rate of growth after 1964 resulted from ongoing revival, programs of special training for leaders, and the transfer of leadership to national leadership (first Tanzanian bishop in 1974). 1. The development of the structure of the Mennonite Church in Tanzania In the beginning all members shared in congregational decisions. As numbers increased, elders were chosen to assist in pastoral care. They also served in congregational and district councils; they chose representatives for the General Church Council (GCC). In 1946 the council began to write a church polity. A committee was chosen to help with difficult marriage problems and another to give counsel in matters of evangelism. In 1947 the church had to choose whether to participate in the developing national education system. Recognizing that the decision should be made by Tanganyikans, the mission called a joint session with the GCC, promising to support the council in its choice. The first Tanganyikan pastors and deacons were called by their respective districts. During the decade that followed, 17 more pastors and deacons were ordained. During this period consensus developed for the name, Tanganyika Mennonite Church (TMC). As need arose, the bishop called meetings of the ordained leaders to handle matters of 51

doctrine, church polity and the discipline of ordained persons. The first bishop was chosen in a meeting of this type, and since then, all candidates for ordination have been chosen in these sessions. Overall administration continued to be handled by GCC. In preparation for autonomy, the GCC officers served with the mission officers. The constitution drafted by a GCC committee did not satisfy bishops of the Lancaster Mennonite Conference (MC), the sponsoring North American conference for the Tanganyikan Mennonite mission. The bishops offered suggested revisions through fraternal delegates to a special meeting of the GCC. The council offered its own revisions and adopted its constitution on 25 August 1960. The church now became a church conference (mkutano mkuu) with an executive committee (kamiti kuu) to handle matters between annual meetings. After the church received government registration, properties were transferred and the mission dissolved. In 1966 Zedekia Kisare was chosen as first national bishop. In 1972 the church revised its constitution and adopted a Swahili name, Kanisa la Mennonite Tanzania (KMT), although "Tanzania Mennonite Church (TMC)'' is also used. The ordination of a second bishop, Hezekiah Sarya, in 1979 was followed by the formation of two dioceses. Bishop Kisare was given oversight of the areas with large Luo populations, North Mara Diocese and Kenya, and Bishop Sarya of the Southern Diocese. 2. Programs 2.1. Women and Girls From the beginning of the TMC, each station held weekly sewing and Bible classes to attract women to the church. Women's conferences enlarged their circle of friendship and gave help on spiritual issues. In time the women's groups were structured to develop leadership skills. In many places church women, Mennonites included, gave leadership to the women's progress groups promoted by the political party. Since 1964, domestic science courses at Bukiroba have been popular. 2.2. Health Mennonites in Tanzania have been diligent in ministry to the sick. Within a year Shirati had a dispensary staffed by a doctor and nurse and within 20 years a full-fledged hospital and leprosarium. After 18 years the leprosarium could be closed because new patients with leprosy received medication in local dispensaries and the enlarged hospital provided treatment for the advanced cases. Since 1964 Shirati Hospital has been the base for significant research and since 1974 has been conducting maternal child health clinics, part of a nationwide preventive ministry. From the beginning there was training for medical aides. A nurses' training school was launched in 1960; midwifery was added in 1970. Each of the other five stations also moved beyond the dispensing of pills and established dispensaries. Bedded dispensaries were developed at Nyabasi, Mugango, and Kisaka. For a time some remote churches were served by a medical van or flying doctor service. For the past 50 years health ministries in Mara Region have contributed to population growth, the decline in incidence of Hansen's Disease, and some control of malaria. 2.3. Education The Mennonites operated a network of bush schools in which first-generation church and community leaders got their start. Successful bush schools developed into primary schools. The first two registered primary schools were established in 1947. Through 52

the participation of the churches, in 10 years the nation had half of its children in primary school. After the nationalization of education in 1970 the Tanzania Mennonite Church turned over 44 primary schools. Mennonites shared in developing two graded Bible courses used throughout the nation. Teacher training was perhaps the church's most important educational ministry. Across the nation Christian schools, primary and secondary, set the pace in character, academics, and sports. The Mennonites participated in the alliance that managed Katoke Teacher Training College and Kahororo Secondary School, Bukoba; they became a managing partner in Musoma Alliance Secondary School. The church sponsored students in Mennonite colleges and in vocational trainee programs. 2.4. Literature Mjumbe wa Kristo (Messenger of Christ) featured testimonies and Bible expositions. After the 1946 reawakening Mjumbe became a channel of communication for the revival fellowship with wide circulation. In the mid-1960s Sauti ya TMC (Voice of TMC) was launched with a major focus on TMC news. The economic hardships of the 1970s brought the demise of both. Mennonite missionaries gave a hand in Bible translation, in compiling hymnals, and in preparing literacy primers--in the Jita, Zanaki, and Kurya languages. They helped with a Swahili primer for use nationwide and assisted in training literacy teachers in Mara Region. The Mennonite catechism and supplement were produced in both Swahili and Luo. 2.5. Community Development Tanzanian Mennonites learned some modern agricultural practices from missionary gardens and government extension service. A number gave leadership in community cooperatives. When Tanzania began moving rural peoples into village settlements, church youth launched a small farm which developed into a settlement. While small voluntary settlements had prospered, compulsory settlement did not work and the policy was withdrawn. Traditional agricultural methods are being taken more seriously. By the later 1950s fewer than half of primary school graduates could find opportunity for further study. The Mennonites in Majita and Shirati experimented with establishing community schools, but failed. In the early 1980s a small vocational school was launched by Nyabasi Mennonites. Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA) made resources available for a score of projects in the mid-1960s. While this gesture of brotherhood was welcomed, only a few caught the MEDA vision and succeeded.

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The Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum) in Tanzania
Content 1. Background ...........................................................................................................................55 1.1 Formation of Unitas Fratrum/Moravian Church ...................................................................55 1.2 Introduction of the Moravian Church in Tanzania ...............................................................56 2. The Believe of the Church .....................................................................................................56 3. The Structure of MCT ............................................................................................................56 3.1 National Structure ..............................................................................................................56 3.2 The Structure of the administration of the MCT ..................................................................57 3.2.1 The Permanent Governing Board .....................................................................................57 3.2.2 The Governing Board .......................................................................................................57 3.2.3 The Permanent Executive Committee ..............................................................................57 3.2.4 The Executive committee .................................................................................................57 4. Structure of the Provinces .....................................................................................................57 5. Programs ..............................................................................................................................58

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1. Background The Moravian Church in Tanzania (MCT) aims at proclaiming and expounding the gospel of Jesus Christ in order to win souls to Christ. MCT is founded on strong Christian ideologies from both the old and new testaments and is reinforced by the sacraments. MCT seeks to attain this in harmony with the Moravian doctrine. The MCT, which is comprised of four full provinces and 3 mission provinces, has a membership of more than 800,000 followers. It has 751 Pastors and 459 Congregations. 1.1 Formation of Unitas Fratrum/Moravian Church The Unitas Fratrum, or Moravian Church, is a branch of the Christian Church which has it roots at Kunvald in Bohemia in the year 1457. It arose from the national revival of religion in Bohemia, in which the writings of Wyclif had great influence, and of which John Hus was the greatest leader. Within the movement Peter of Chelcic represented the traditions of Eastern Puritanism and freedom from official control in matters of religion. Amidst these influences, the Unitas Fratrum was founded under the leadership of Gregory the Patriarch, with a three-fold ideal of faith, fellowship and freedom, and a strong emphasis on practical Christian life rather than on doctrinal thought or church tradition. The statutes of Reichenau, 1464, contain the earliest statement of this common mind. Its numbers grew rapidly. This extension drew the attention of the church authorities and the power of the state was called in to suppress them, but persecution furthered their growth. The impact of the Brethren on the spiritual life in their country and over the boundaries of their homeland far exceeded the numerical strength of membership. Between 1722 and 1727, some families from Moravia, who had kept the traditions of the old Unitas Fratrum, found a place of refuge in Saxony, on the estate of Nicolaus Ludwig, Count Zinzendorf. Other people of widely differing views also found a place there of religious freedom, but their differences threatened to make it a place of strife. Zinzendorf gave up his position in state service to devote himself to unite these various elements into a real Christian fellowship. He became their spiritual leader, as well as their patron and protector against interference. By his example and pastoral care Zinzendorf quickened their Christian fellowship and united them for communal life under the Statutes of Herrnhut (May 12, 1727), which were found to follow the pattern of the old Unitas Fratrum. In following out this impulse, relations were established with earnest Christians in many lands of Western Europe, in England from 1728, and in North America from 1735, while in 1732 their first mission to the heathen began among slaves of St. Thomas in the West Indies. Today the Unitas Fratrum, which has asserted throughout its history that Christian fellowship recognizes no barrier of nation or race, is an international Unity with congregations in many parts of the world. The Unitas Fratrum cherishes its unity as a valuable treasure entrusted to it by the Jesus Christ. It stands for the oneness of all humankind given by the reconciliation through Jesus Christ. Therefore the ecumenical movement is of its very lifeblood.

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1.2 Introduction of the Moravian Church in Tanzania The first missionaries of the Moravian Church came to Tanzania in the late 19th century soon after Germany assumed control of the territory. The first Moravian mission station was established at Rungwe in Southern Tanzania in 1891. Another station in Western Tanzania was handed over to the Moravian Board in Herrnhut. In 1976 the southern province was divided into two, and the same was done with the western province in 1986. Since then the Moravian Church in Tanzania has four provinces. With the creation of the new provinces the need to establish the Moravian Church in Tanzania as a national body to coordinate and unify the work became greater. The MCT as a church would run and oversee joint ventures and programmes and represent the provinces inside and outside the country. On August 4, 1986 delegates from the four Moravian provinces met at Sikonge and resolved to formally establish the MCT as a church to unite all Moravians in Tanzania. On November 23, 1986 the MCT was officially inaugurated and in April, 1987 it was registered by the government. The MCT was formally recognized by the Unity Synod of the Unitas Fratrum at its meeting in Antigua, West Indies in 1988. The MCT coordinates and oversees the development and growth of the theological college, which has become, since 2004, Teofilo Kisanji University. It is responsible for the publication of hymn books, liturgy and text books and other church literature produced by the Moravian Theological Commission. It represents the provinces before the government, other churches, agencies and ecumenical organizations. Above all, its major responsibility is, through the provinces, to preach the holy gospel of salvation within and outside the church. The church in Tanzania is growing and membership is increasing rapidly. Each province has a specific area for evangelization. Each province is also engaged in outreach work beyond the borders of the country, in the DRC, Malawi and Zambia. 2. The Believe of the Church ―With the whole of Christendom we share faith in God the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. We believe and confess that God has revealed Himself once and for all in His Son Jesus Christ; that our Lord has redeemed us with the whole of humanity by His death and His resurrection; and that there is no salvation apart from Him. We believe that He is present with us in the Word and the Sacrament; that He directs and unites us through His Spirit and thus forms us into a Church. We hear Him summoning us to follow Him, and pray Him to use us in His service. He joins us together mutually, so that knowing ourselves to be members of His body we become willing to serve each other.‖ 3. The Structure of MCT 3.1 National Structure The MCT is based four (4) provinces a. Southern Province – Rungwe b. Western Province – Tabora c. Southern-West Province – Mbeya d. Rukwa Province – Sumbawanga Each of the Provinces of the MCT in Tanzania has a bishop. a. Three Provinces are supervised by the main provinces b. Eastern Tanzania and Zanzibar – supervised by the Southern Province 56

c. Northern Tanzania – supervised by the Southern-West Province d. Kenya – supervised by the Western Province 3.2 The Structure of the administration of the MCT 3.2.1 The Permanent Governing Board Members a. Bishop Cheyo (Head Bishop) b. Bishop Nicodemo (Assistant to the Head Bishop) c. Rev. Cornard Nguvumali (Secretary General) d. Br. A.M Mbotwa (Treasurer) The Governing Board Members a. Rev. E. Vuzuka b. Rev. Ambukhege c. Rev. Mwamwezi d. Rev. Mwakilema e. Rev. Kibona The Permanent Executive Committee Members: a. Bishop Cheyo b. Bishop Nicodemo c. Rev. Cornard Nguvumali d. Rev. D. Nsweve e. Rev. Ambukeghe f. Rev. R. Lwali g. Rev. F A. Sewbe h. Rev. Mwanakenja (Attorney) i. Rev. Mayengo The Executive committee Members a. Dr. Kassimoto b. Rev. Mwakilema c. Rev. J M. Kibona d. Rev. Mayengo

3.2.2

3.2.3

3.2.4

4. Structure of the Provinces Each of the main provinces is structured as following: a. Bishop b. Bishops Office c. Executive Committees d. Chairperson e. Vice Chairperson f. General Secretary g. High Council h. Treasure Office i. Missionary Committees (Western and South-Western Province) 57

5. Programs a. Secondary Schools b. Women and Children c. Youth and Christian Education d. Orphans e. Widows f. Hospitals and Health Service g. University Theophilo Kisanji h. Vocational Training i. Guest Houses/Campsites/Conference Center

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The Salvation Army
Content 1.Background ............................................................................................................................60 2.Mission of the Salvation Army ................................................................................................60 3.Structure of the Salvation Army ..............................................................................................60 3.1. International Headquarter...................................................................................................60 3.2. IHQ Departments ...............................................................................................................61 3.2.1. Administration Department ..............................................................................................61 3.2.2. International Personnel Department ................................................................................61 3.2.3. Business Administration Department...............................................................................61 3.2.4. Program Resources Department .....................................................................................61 3.2.5. Zonal Departments ..........................................................................................................62 3.2.5.1. Countries where the Salvation Army is at work .............................................................62

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1. Background The Salvation Army opened its first Headquarters, Eastern Start, in 1867 in Whitechapel Road, London, England, founded by Catherine and William Booth. In 1868, they published the first issue of The Salvationist. In 1878, the term ‗Salvation Army‘ was used for the first time and William Booth became known as the general. In August of the same year, the first doctrines and principles of The Salvation Army were established and the first corps flag were presented by Catherine Booth in September. The Orders and Regulations for The Salvation Army were issued in October 1878. In 1880 the first training home opened and programs for children were conducted. In the same year, the Salvation Army started working outside Great Britain for the first time, extending its work to Australia. In the following years the Salvation Army extended its work throughout Europe and British colonies such as India and South Africa and the Salvation Army became more involved in Social Programs, i.e. Food Supply, leprosy work, the inauguration of a children and youth corps and Women‘s groups. On October 29, 1933, the Salvation Army started its work in Tanzania. Today the Salvation Army is present in over 100 countries on all continents. 2. Mission of the Salvation Army The Salvation Army, an international movement, is an evangelical part of the universal Christian Church. Its message is based on the Bible. Its ministry is motivated by the love of God. Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and to meet human needs in God‘s name without discrimination. 3. Structure of the Salvation Army 3.1. International Headquarter The Head of the Salvation Army is the General. The International Headquarter exists to support the General as he/she leads the Salvation Army to accomplish its worldwide mission to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and meet human needs. In so doing, it assists the General: a. To give spiritual leadership, promote the development of spiritual life within the Army, and emphasize the Army's reliance on God for the achievement of its mission. b. To provide overall strategic leadership and set international policies. c. To direct and administer the Army's operations and protect its interests - by means of appointments and delegation of authority and responsibility with accountability. d. To empower and support the territories and commands, encourage and pastorally care for their leaders, and inspire local vision and initiatives. e. To strengthen the internationalism of the Army, preserve its unity, purposes, beliefs and spirit, and maintain its standards. f. To promote the development, appropriate deployment and international sharing of personnel. g. To promote the development and sharing of financial resources worldwide, and manage the Army's international funds. h. To promote the development and international sharing of knowledge, expertise and experience. i. To develop the Army's ecumenical and other relationships. 60

In fulfilling its mission, International Headquarters seeks to achieve the highest standards of promptness, efficiency and service. 3.2. IHQ Departments 3.2.1. Administration Department The Administration Department is responsible for all matters with which the Chief of the Staff deals; for records and planning advice relating to international human resources; for international external relationships; and for ensuring that the strategic planning and monitoring process is implemented and used effectively. 3.2.2. International Personnel Department The International Personnel Department works in the interests of international personnel in support of the Chief of the Staff and the zonal international secretaries. Responsibilities include facilitating the personal and vocational development of all personnel, their pastoral care and physical well-being. The department exists to encourage and facilitate the sharing and appropriate deployment of personnel resources on a global basis, to assist in the identification of officers with potential for future leadership, to monitor training and development and register and coordinate all offers for international service 3.2.3. Business Administration Department The Business Administration Department is responsible for international accounting, auditing, banking, property and related matters. The International Secretary for Business Administration has the oversight of the finance functions in territories and commands. 3.2.4. Program Resources Department The Program Resources Department participates with others to envision, coordinate, facilitate and raise awareness of program that advance the global mission of The Salvation Army. It offers a focal point of support and advice to effectively link program resources around the world, and the opportunity for face to face interaction on various facets of The Salvation Army‘s integrated mission. It also offers a framework for mission-focused strategic planning. The department includes: a. Mission Resources b. Projects and Development Services c. Emergency Services d. Enterprise Development Services e. International Health Services f. Communications These embrace projects, programs and capacity building for evangelism, community development, disaster relief, youth, social, health, HIV/Aids, international media and public relations, the written word, and assistance towards territorial self sufficiency. The department functions as an international resource network, making connections for learning and facilitating cross-fertilization of ideas, information and program material.

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3.2.5. Zonal Departments The zonal departments are the main administrative link with territories and commands. The international secretaries give oversight to and coordinate the Army‘s work in their respective geographical areas. a. Africa b. Americas and Caribbean c. Europe d. South Asia e. South Pacific and East Asia 3.2.5.1. Countries where The Salvation Army is at work a. A country in which the Army serves is defined in two ways:  Politically  Where the General has given approval to the work, thus officially recognizing it, ensuring it has legal identity and a Deed Poll is published to acknowledge this. b. As far as political status is concerned, for the Army‘s purposes, three categories are recognized:  Independent countries, e.g., USA and New Zealand;  Internally independent political entities which are under the protection of another country in matters of defense and foreign affairs, e.g., The Færoes, Isle of Man, Puerto Rico;  Colonies and other dependent political units, e.g., Bermuda, French Guiana, Guam, Guernsey, Jersey, Virgin Islands. Administrative subdivisions of a country such as Wales and Scotland in the UK are not recognized as separate countries for this purpose.

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Section 4

Free Pentecostal Church of Tanzania (FPCT)
Content 1. Background ...........................................................................................................................64 2. Organogram of the Free Pentecostal Curch of Tanzania.......................................................65 3. Outreach Programs ...............................................................................................................65 3.1. Health ................................................................................................................................66 3.2. Media and Communication .................................................................................................66 3.3 Mission and Evangelsim......................................................................................................66 3.4. Youth and Children ............................................................................................................66 3.5. Women and community......................................................................................................67 3.6. Literature publishing ...........................................................................................................67

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1. Background The Free Pentecostal Church of Tanzania (PCT) has its roots in the early 1930's. In the year 1932 the Pentecostal churches in Sweden ordained and sent missionaries to Tanganyika under the name of the Swedish Free Mission. The Swedish Free Mission was incepted in Tanganyika in 1932 at Nzega district, Tabora Region, by the early Missionary pioneers commissioned by the Swedish Free Mission in Stockholm, Sweden for the purposes of forming local churches and performing social work. The Swedish Free Mission was incorporated as a Mission Society in 1955 under the Laws of Tanganyika. After Tanganyika's political independence in 1961, the Swedish Free Mission volunteered to hand over the portfolio and established a Trust and executed a transfer of the Mission properties and those of individual missionaries, to the Trustees of the Pentecostal Churches Social Association in Tanzania (PCSAT) or its Kiswahili translation "Chama cha Ujamaa cha Makanisa ya Pentekoste katika Tanzania (CUMPT). PCSAT registered a Trust on May 09, 1964 to manage the Trust properties thereof in accordance with a Trust Deed and Constitution under which the local Churches were run and also under a common Constitution for the Association under which the local Churches were associated. PCSAT changed its name to be the Pentecostal Churches Association in Tanzania (PCAT/UMPT) on January 29, 1986. The concept of 'membership' as constituted by the said Association of local churches under PCAT was replaced by the more doctrinal concept of membership within the spiritual body of Christ on December 09, 2000. A new Constitution was also adopted on this date. PCAT changed its name to be Free Pentecostal Church of Tanzania (FPCT).

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2. Organogram of the Free Pentecostal Church of Tanzania

3. Outreach Programs a. Health b. Education c. Theological education d. Media and Communication e. Mission and evangelism f. Youth and Children g. Women and community h. Literature publishing 65

3.1. Health a. Nkinga Hospital b. Mchukwi Hospital, Kibiti c. Biahru H/C, Kasulu d. Lowa H/C, Kahama e. Mpera H/C, Kahama f. Itanana H/C, Bukene g. Bigabiro Dispensary, Kigoma h. Nyamabuye, Kasulu i. Msambara Dispensary, Kasulu j. Keza Dispensary, Kibondo k. Kabara Dispensary, Kibondo l. Isanzu Dispensary, Nzega m. Bulangamilwa Dispensary, Nzega n. Ikwiriri Dispensary, Kibiti o. Nkinga Nurses training College p. Nyamahanga Children home q. Muhanga Children home 3.2. Theological education a. Sanjaranda Bible College, Itigi b. Bigabiro Bible College, Kigoma c. Tazengwa Bible College, Nzega d. Sumbawanga Bible School, Sumbawanga e. Handeni Bible School, Handeni f. Sanjaranda Bible School, Itigi g. Bigabiro Bible School, Kigoma h. Tazengwa Bible School, Nzega 3.3. Education a. Umoja Secondary School, Nzega b. Nyakato VTC, Mwanza c. Mpera VTC, Kahama d. Nyamahanga DCC, Biharmulo e. Furaha Blind School, Tabora f. Ruo Agricultural School, Lindi g. USAPTA, Dar es Salaam 3.4. Media and Communication a. Redio Habari Maalum, Arusha 3.5. Mission and evangelism a. Mkuu wa Idara, Mwanza 3.6. Youth and children a. Huima Training Centre, Tabora b. Amana Vijana Centre, Dar es Salaam c. Stone Town Youth Centre, Zanzibar d. Novelty Youth Centre, Tanga e. Wete Vijana Centre, Wete 66

f. g. h. i.

Agape Vijana Centre, Kigoma Mwanza Vijana Centre, Mwanza Empowering project, Arusha Optical Shop, Tabora

3.7. Women and community a. Mkuu wa Idara, Arusha 3.8. Literature publishing a. Kimahama Bookshop, Arusha b. Kimahama Publishers, Arusha c. Habari Maalum, Arusha d. Kibrel, Arusha e. Kimahama Bookshop, Tabora f. Optical Shop, Arusha g. Optical Shop, Dar es Salaam

Reference
1. 2. 3. 4. US Government report on Religious Freedom in Tanzania BAKWATA Tanzania Episcopal Conference constitution Tanzania Corruption Tracker System http://www.corruptiontracker.or.tz/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=82&Itemid=51 5. Assembly of Imams constitution 6. Report on Islam and Christianity in Sub-Saharan Africa by Pew Forum http://pewforum.org/executive-summary-islam-and-christianity-in-sub-saharan-africa.aspx 7. Free Pentecostal Church Tanzania – Kurasini

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ANNEX 1

Organizational Chart of Religions in Tanzania

Religions in Tanzania Christians 40 - 45 % Vatican (Liasion to Vatican) 12th Imam (Iran) TEC 10-12 Million ppl CCT 10+million ppl Others 20-25%

Islam 35%

Sunni 95% BAKWATA 80% Assembly of Imams 20 %

Shia'h 5%

FPCT/PCT 500K+

Witchcraft/ Atheists

Baha'i

Hindu

Budhism

Ismailis (Seveners)

Protestants

Pentecostals

Several Sects.

Catholics

15 Member Churches

Several churches

Kakobe