REPORT OF T H E REGISTER OF COPYRIGHTS FOR T H E FISCAL YEAR 1921-22.

WASHINGTON, C., J d y 7,1922. D. SIR:The copyright business and the work of the copyright office for the fiscal year July I , 1921, to June 30, 1922, inclusive, are summarized as follows :

The gross receipts during the year were $145,398.26. A balance of $14,284.14, representing trust funds and uafinished business, w s on hand July I, 1921, making a total a of $159,682.40 to be accounted for. Of this amount the sum of $5,286.09, received by the copyright oEce, was r e funded as excess fees or as fees for articles not registerable, leaving a net balance of $154,396.31. The balance camed over to July I, 1922, was $15,880.16 (representing trust funds, $I I ,498.68, and total unfinished business since July I, 1897-25 years-$4,38 I .48), leaving fees applied during the had year 1921-22 and paid into the Treasury $138,516.15. This is the largest year's business in the history o the f office The annual applied fees since July I, 1897, are:
. * I

F w , a

. . . . ... . . . . . . . .. . . . . 1899-1900. . . . . . . . . Ipo-IrpI . . . . . . . . . 1 9 0 1 7 . . . . .. . . . . . . 19023 . . . . . . . . . . . . 1903-4. . . . . . . . . . . 1 9 0 4 3 . . . . . . . .. ..1pog-6. . . ... . . . r.. . 16 907 . . . . ... .. . . 1 ~ 4 3 . . .. . . . . . . . . I. * . . . . .. . . . .. Igoc)-IO. . . . . . . . . . . 1910-I.. . . . .I.. .. .
lsg*.

Total . . . . . . .. 2 *378,8*8.50
141

142

Report of the Librarian of Comjwess
EXPENDITURES.

The appropriation made by Congress for salaries in the copyright office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1922, was $104,740. The total expenditures for salaries was $ 1 0 ~ ~ 594.75, or $33,92 I .40 less than the net amount of fees earned and paid into the Treasury during the corresponding year. Sw*~ andThe expenditures for supplies, including stationery and mdrns. other articles and postage on foreign mail matter, etc., was $1,222.73, leaving a balance for the year of $32,698.67 to the credit of the office. c ~ p ~ ~ r t During the 25 fiscal years since the reorganization of the rea w andf e u . t copyright office (from July I , 1897, to June 30, 1922) the copyright fees applied and paid into the Treasury have amounted to $2,378,848.50, the articles deposited number 4,902,475, and the total copyright registrations number 2,7831185E The fees earned ($2,378,848.50) were larger than the oar s d r * I . appropriations for salaries used during the same period ($2,032,915.96) by $345,932.54V J ~ C O ~ P In addition to this direct profit, the large number of nearly cf right deb*. five million books, maps, musical works, periodicals, prints, and other articles deposited during the 25 years were of substantial pecuniary value and of such a character that their accession to the Library of Congress through the copyright office etfected a large saving to the purchase fund of the Library equal in amount to their price.
SI + .

COPYRIGHT ENTRIES AND FEES.

The registrations for the fiscal year numbered 138,633. Of these, 130,893 were registrations a t $I each, including a certificate, and 5,014 were registrations of photographs without certificates, at 50 cents each. There were also 2,726 registrations of renewals, at 50 cents each. The fees for these registrations amounted to a total of $134,763. The number of registrations in each class from July I , I g I 6, to June 30, 1922, is shown in Exhibit D.

Register of Copyrig&
COPYRIGHT D&POSITS

The total number of oepante articles deposited in corn- i2a.rrr pliance with the copyright law, which have been registered, stamped, indexed, and catalogued 'during the fiscal year is 241,262. The number of these articles in each class for the fiscal years July I , 1917, to June 30, 1922, is shown in Exhibit E. I t is not possible to determine exactly how completely the wbk, dai-iy mfimht. works which claim copyright are deposited; but as title cards are printed and supplied upon request to other libraries for all books received bearing United States notice of copyright, the demand for such cards for works not received furnishes some indication of possible percentage o failure to deposit f In response to inquiries received during the year from R , mpw. the card division, the order division, and the reading room in regard to 5 18 books supposed to have been copyrighted but not discovered in the library, it was found that 41 of these works had been received and were actually in the Library, 73 books had been deposited and were still in the copyright office, 40 works were either not published, did not claim copyright, or for other valid reasons could not be deposited, while in the case of 143 works no answers to our letters of inquiry had been received up to June 30, 1922. Copies were received of 22 I works in all in response to requests made by the copyright office during the period o 12 months for the works published in recent years. f The total copyright deposits for the year included 2 0 , 0 7 4 ~ 2 ~ ~ ~ i ~ printed volumes, 41,414 pamphlets and leaflets, 70,006 newspapers and magazines (separate numbers), 3,676 f dramas, 41,916 piem o music,3,718 maps, 12,772 photo graphs, 1 4 , sI~ prints, 8,659 motion pictures, I 6,566 contibutions to periodicals, 4,266 works of a t and drawings, r and 371 lectures. These were all produced in the United States. From abroad there were received 2,901 books in foreign languages and 372 books in English. Our copyright laws have required the deposit of copies-YJ o f for the use o the Library of Congress. The act of 1909, f which expressly provided for such deposit in order to secure the registration o the work, still insisted upon a f

Report

of

the LibrcKio~ C o v e t s of

deposit of two copies (except of foreign books) for the benefit of the Library; but to check the useless accumulation of such copies in the copyright office it is provided that the Librarian of Congress shall determine (I) "what books or other articles shall be transferred to the permanent a collections of the Library of Congress, including the l w library"; (2) " what other books or articles shall be placed in the reserve collections of the Library o Congress for f sale or exchange"; and (3) "or be transferred to other Government libraries in the District of Columbia for use therein." The law further provides (4) that articles remaining undisposed of may, upon specified conditions, be returned to the authors or copyright proprietors. Trau/md lo During the fiscal year a total of 101,I 50 articles deposited Librw. have been transferred to the Library of Congress. This number included 17,963 books, 52,702 periodicals, 24,607 pieces of music, 3,186 maps, and 2,692 photographs and engravings. Td *wasOut of the total number of articles deposited in the Ipcerpra. copyright office during the period from July I, ~gog,to June 30, 1922 (2,748,556), there have been transferred to the Library of Congress 235,613 books, 310,538 pieces of music, 64,445 maps, 49,043 photographs and prints, 494,856 newspapers and magazines (numbers)-+ total of 1,154,495 pieces during 13 years. A total of 27,556 volumes, leaflets, and pamphlets were transferred under (2) for sale or exchange, and included I I ,281 volumes for the War Service Library for the use of soldiers and sailors during the war, I ,243 for John Crerar Library, Chicago, and 15,032 volumes (including 541 received during the fiscal year) o American poetry and drama sent to the f library of Brown University, Providence, R. I. Trarsfert lo orkr Under authority of section 59 there were transferred during the fiscal year to other governmental libraries in the District of Columbia "for use therein" 5,070 books. Under this transfer, up to June 30, 1922, the following libraries have received books as indicated below: Bureau of Education, 13,081; Bureau of Standards, 2,072; Department of Agriculture, 3,025; Department o f Commerce, 5,097; Engineer School, Corps of Engineers, 3,074; Federal Trade Commission, 5,082 ; Surgeon General's

Register of Copyrt.$&

145

Office, 4,007; Navy Department, '1,6~0;Public Library of the District of Columbia, 37,125; Soldiers' Home, 1,008; Interstate Cornmere Commission, 689; Treasury Department, 997; Patent Office, 536; Bureau of Mines, 369; Walter Reed Hospital, 290; to 16 other libraries a total of 6,131 volumes, making a grand toid o 79,213. f Under the provisions of the act of March 4, I-, authority ,Rza$*&a is granted also for the return to the claimants of copyright of such copyright deposits as are not needed by the Library of Congress or the copyright office. The notice required by section 60 has been printed for all classes of works &&sited and registered during the years July I, I W , to June 30, 1919. In response to special requests, 7,938 motion-picture films have been returned during the f s a year to the copyicl right claimants and 18,748 other deposits, making a total of 26,686 articles. Since the act went into &ect up to June 30, 1922, a b t a l of 460, I 75 articles have thus been returned to the claimantsof copyright in them, and altogether there have been transferred from the copyright office shelves I ,72 I ,439 articles, thus securing a great saving of space and avoiding useless duplication and accumulation.
INDEX OF COPYRIGHT

ENTRIZS, CATALOCUE, BUtLEf'INS, AND
CIRCUX,ARS.
i . J.

As required by statute all copyright entries are fullyzs-b indexed. During the fiscal year 228,699 rxds were made for this purpose and served also as copy for the Catalogue of Copyright Entries. This catalogue during the calendar year 1921 f o r d 5 octavo volumes totaling nearly 7,000 pages. The catalogue and index division has also headlined 138,633 copyright applications received in t e usual h ie. card form and added them to'the permanent f l s The various permanent indexes to the copyright registrations now contain three and a half million cards. To save cost of duplication so far as practical, the title cards for copyrighted books prepared by tbe Catalouge Division of the Library of Congress are used in preparing printer's copy for the Catalogue of Copyright Entries, Part I , Group I (books). Of the 62,620 titles of books entered during the ee calendar year 1921, 6,950 cards w r so prepared. Th

Report of the Librarian of Congress

k5ydn:z
irqjror.

remaining 55,670 titles were made in the copyright office by the catalogue and index division, as well as the index cards required for all other works registered, the cards numbering, during 192I, nearly 225,000. During the calendar year the usual numbers of the catalogue were prepared and printed, making six volumes in all, as follows:
Part I: Boob, Group I, Nos. 1-126,with annual index, 3 p. 1. 1307 PPPart I, Gmup 2: Pamphlets, leaflets, contributions to newspapers or periodicals; lectures; dramatic compsitions; maps; motion pictures, Nos. 1-12, with annual index, 3 p. 1. 2188 pp. Part 2 Periodicals, Nos. 1-4,with annual index, 3 p. 1 530 pp. : . Part 3 Musical compositions, Nos. 1-13, 4 p. 1. 1814 : pp. Annual separate volume, 18151395pp. Index o Music for 1921, f f Part 4: Worka o art: Drawings or plastic work of a scientific or technical character; photographs; prints and pictorial illustrations; Nos. 1-4, with annual index, 3 p. 1. 419 pp.

NO new bulletins were issued during the year, but it was found necessary to reprint Bulletin No. 14, containing the copyright laws in force. Infonnatio* cirIt was also necessary to reprint the circulars containing &r. the o5cial text of the conventions upon which the International Copyright Union is based, namely, the socalled Berne Convention of 1886 and the Berlin Convention of 1908.' The only new circular printed during the year was No. 60, under the heading "Importation Under the Copyright Laws," two pages quarto.
B-NO.
14.
Summary o/ cobvnoklb u i u r r .

SUMMARY OF COPYRIGHT BUSINESS.

Balance on hand July I,1921............. $14,164. 14 Gross receipts July I,1911, June 30,1912. 145,398.26 to Total to be accounted for. ......... 159,681.40 Refunded ............................... 5,286.09 Balance to be accounted for.

...................

5154,396.31

1 Inlormation Circular N a 4 Internat'bal Copyright Convention. Berne. 1886. and ndditiml act. Pert. r~ PP. 4". Inlonoation Circular N a 4 A. Conventkm creating an InternntW Union lor the Pmtectkm 01 Literary and Artistic Works, dgnd at Berlin. November 13. I@. r o

w.

4O.

I n l o h t i m Circular N a 4 B. A d d i t d l protocol to the International Copyright Cmvcntia~ Bdim. I& d at Bemc. Hue4 s , 1914 1 pp 4'. o

Register of Copyrights
Applied as earned fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $138,516.15 Balance carried over to July I , 1922: Trust funds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1 I , qg8.48 Unfinished business July I , I%?, to June 30, 1922, a5 yeais. ................. 49381.48 15,880.16 Total fees earned and paid into Treasury during the a5 years from July I, 1897,to June 30, 1922. ............ 2,378,848. so Total unfinished business for 25 years.. ................ 4,381.48
FEES FOR FISCAL YEAR.

-

S154t396.3'

Far.

Fees f& registrations, including certificates, at $ I each. ............................. $130,%3.oo Fees for registrations of photographs without certificates, at 50 cents each.. ..... . 2,507.00 Fees for registrationsof renewals, at 50 cents 1,363.-each. ................................. Total fees for registrations recorded. .............
134,t63.00

Fees for certified copies of record, at 50
cents each. ............................ Fees for recording assignments. ............ Searches made and charged for at the rate of 50 cents for each hour of time consumed ................................ Notices o user recorded {music). ......... f Indexing transfers o pmprietaahip. ....... f
I , 2%. 50 I , 810.00

.

302.00 201.75 '49.90 3.753-15 138,516.15
E-.

Total fees for fiscal year 1921-21

................

ENTRIES.

N u m k of registrations. .............................. Number o renewals recorded. ......................... f Number of certified copies of r e d . .................. Number of assignments recorded or copied. .............

-

135 * 907 2 , 726 13~1633 2,579 1.321

The greater part of the business of the copyright office CMS*. is done by correspondence. The total letters and parcels I, received 'during the fiscal year numbered 166~91 while the letters, parcek, etc., dispatched numbered 163,546. During the last 25 fiscal years the money o r d a receivd numbered 683,429.

148

Report of the Librarian of Congress
CONDITION OF COPYRIGFIT OFFICE WORK.

Cordiliox o
m C I 1 rark.

On July 7, 1922, the remittances received up to the third mail o the day had been recorded. The account books of f the bookkeeping division were balanced for June, the financial statements were rendered to the Treasury Department, and all earned fees to June 30 had been paid into the Treasury.
COPYRIGHT LEGISLATION PROPOSD.

On November 15, 1921, a bill to amend section 19 of the act o March 4, ~gog, f was introduced by Hon. Selden P. Spencer, of Missouri.' I t provides "that wherever a date of publication or of issue appears, the notice o copyright f shall also appear." The bill was referred to the Committee on Patents and no further action has been recorded. ~ 1 * l c d Shlu On April 28, 1922, a bill to permit the United States to o d 1 In&rnaL t d C O P W W ~enter the International Copyright Union was introduced by ~ Uum. Hon. J. N. Tinder, and referred to the-House Committee on Patents? The full texts of these bills are printed on pages I 55-158 of this report
~olicr m h of rial1 and d& of

parrcor-.

~ d ~ f ~ ~ c n Under n k r
18. Iprp.

i c d .

Proela-atioar

the authority of the act approved December 18, 1919, providing for retrospective copyright protection in the United States for works published abroad after August I, 1914, * * and not heretofore copyrighted in the Uriited States, proclamations have been issued by the President in behalf of Austria, Germany, and New Zealand, under date of May 25, 1922, and in behalf of Hungary and Italy under date of June 3, 1922. The required assurance of reciprocal protection in the case of Germany was furnished in the text of the German act of May 18, 1922. The original German text and the English translation of this brief act will be found printed on pages

*

1 xp.1 (NOV. A bill to omend scctio~ o tbe act em tit^ " ~ act to omemd and 15). 19 f n consdidate the acts r e w e d u copyright." approved M u . 4 . rpop. I n t r o d u d by Mr. Spencer. S 3727. 67th Cont. 1st sess. Printed, a m. 4'. [Referred to the Smatc Committee on P.tmtte.1 a i w a (Apr. 1) A bl to amend the c o p h h t law to permit the United Stata t o 8. i l enter the 1cttemation.d Copyright Union Introduced by Mr. T'ichcr. H R 11476. . 6tth Cm#.,.da Priutcd. 6 pp 4'. IRdcnnf to the Hsnue Committeec htmts.1 m

174-175 of this report and the presidential prodamations on pages 159--171. In the case of New Zealand an order in council was i s s d N zurd. , under date of ~ a n u G 10,192I , to be in &t on January 20, 1921. The full text of this order in council is also printed a t pages 171-173 of this report. C o ~ Cac U On May 3, 1922, the Senate passed a resolution in -favora c a t i a r e i r r , of reviving the copyright convention with Hungary dated-' January 30, 1912. The text of the resolution reads as fdSENATE THE UNITEDSTATES. OF Whereasunder the treaties concluded August a4, 192 I, and August q , 1921, with Austria and Hungary, respectively, to establish securely friendly relatiops between the United States and each of these two foreign nations, the right is secured to the United States to revive, by giving notice to these nations, any bilateral treaty or convention in force between the United States and the former A-Hungarian monarchy prior to the outbreak o the war: Be it f Resolved (two-lhirds o the S e M b r s prarmt concummug f theruin), Thot the Senate advise and consent to the giving d notice by the Resident to Austria and to Hungary, to revive the extradition amvention, concluded on July 3, 1856, between the United States and the former Austm-Hungarian monarchy, and to the giving of notice by the Resident to Hungary to revive the copyright convention, concluded on January 30, 19x2, between the United States and the former Hungarian monarchy to provide between the United States and Hungary reciprocal protection with regard to copyright.

The required notice as to the copyright convention was givcp on May 27, 1922. Respectfully submitted. THORVALD L ~ R G , SO Register of CopyrigMs. HBRBBRT PUTNAY,
.Librarian of C. s
,

I0 5

Report of the Librarian of Congress
afiplied forjiscal ymr ending June p. 1922.

EX~BIT A.-Statement of gross reckpts. rejunds. net reckpts. andjeac
.................

Month

.

July................................. $11 a & 05 o

1

.

1

b w 6 2 S1488+ u

1

1

$8. WI

.10

Navember ............................ 1 0 . ~ 0 3 . 5 7 Dt@nUber ........................... 1 4 7 & 4 7
1912

Jmuow............................. / F ............................ Much ...............................

.

1

rg.as3.60 1.2.3~9.14 11.377.8.1 r1,777.35 13. 21% 7 9

................................ : Jmr+ .................................
M ~ Y

April ................................

I

Total .........................

B b c e brought forward from June ~ o 1-1 . Net receipt. July I 19a1 to June 30 r9aa:
Grorr m ipt..

kss Prnarnt mfuaded .....................................

.............................................. . . ................................
$145,396 a6 5 aa6, op

$4 a &

14

.

Totnl to be m u n t e d for ............................................ 1% 3 9 6 3 1 Copyright fees applied July I 1921 .to June 30 r g a a ............ 1 3 8 s r b 1 s Bdonce carried forward to July I . rgaa: Tnut fun&................................................ I 1 . 4 68

.

140,112 17

.

.

.

Unfi~irhed buriPar

........................................

4 381.48

154.H. 3 1

*C

st
C~I

0s vs a)'LF m 3 s 0s .C OS 61 OF
m1 . 1
00 'CC
00 PI

0S.11 SL ' 1

+I

' o S .LI

0 6 61 US'SC

661

.SL

'CC

6Sc 99

. SC ' C I
' S L I

osp

00.191

'11

S 9 766 b 1 S U '980 ' C I
01.106

om T I
OSF'CI S10'11 &'el Ice*I1

cfp '# m . C p F ! I
os .CFI

05 d6r

m.st
mSt1
0s

.LO1

IS2

Report of the Librarian of Congress
C.-Statement o gross cash receipts, yearly f e u , number o regisf f trations, etc., for 25ficol jwrs.
Yearly fers nppl*d

Exmm

1 $Feisz1 :,"yg
ti-

trati-

tra-

' I&+..
I .

................ .................
................. .................
............... ..............

$ 1 asp, 6.

g

& 1%. 65
f1.07a. SJ 6 9 , s ~ IS. ~ 6% 405. dl 71, m.91 75. p. 83

r&-rgrm. rgm-1901.. 19017.. 19~0-3.. 1903-4. 1-5..

................. 1-4. .................. I p l b 7 . . ................. 194%................... Igogp.. ................. ................ 1910-11.. ................
11 . - 0.

..................

4 Sg 56
8s. b r a pa 87. 31 8s. ow. 03

a7.dls. 5s
1x3. 66s. 83 1s661.5¶ 1 1¶0,14p.51
I I

XgII-X2. 19ItIJ.. ap13-q.. xpxrxs.. 1915-16.. 19x6-17.. 1917-10.. rp1C19.. I919-lO.. 1-1.. IWI-as..

................. ................

................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................

Ms6 ~

122, 636 pa 1 x 5 SP+ IS

1x1. 66+ 41
1 x 5 BoB 51
1% I . -

87

Total..

................ JPB s6 ............ 2, & 4a7. a7
I&

1x7, ~1b96 IS¶, 371.37 141. S P e SJ

No'ta-Detailed statement for 18 fiscnl yean, ~ 8 ~ 7 c~ r6 to 19x4-15. by m m t k t , . may be Iound in h u a l Report of R d e r d Copyrights for yarr 1914-15 @. 177p I 78. Report of the Libra& of Conmas for 1914-15). F r subsequent mars, ~ 9 x 9 1 6 o

to~~o~-.~,ath~mn\nlrrpor~*E.htbitP

Register 'of CopyrQkls
Exmsrr D.-Tabk
o registratiolu mndc during$scd pus f

IS3
191&r7, *I
arranqed by chfsu.1
1911-a1 1p.r-s~

18, Z ~ I & Z ~ , Z ~ 1920-21,0 . 1921-22, Z ~ - 2 and

191617

rprtl8

1918-19

C

h A. Boob (including pamphlcta. IenBN, nnd contributions to periodic: & ) (3 Printed in the United

St.ta.. (b) Rintrd a b d i a n

............
..

3% 364 914 :

ja, 744 636

36.615 %s

37.710 939

39, & . 1.1-

4+Q6 1.-

forriPn.I
(c)

EnslLh boolrs
t e d f MI interim a

ropyripht...........

37a

'l?ot.l.

..................
116 374

C a sB. Periodicals (numbaa) ls C h C Lecture% samops.
oddrrrsa.
C p s D. Drwntic ar ls

..................
dn-

m a t i ~ m u s i dwmpdtian

........................

3.418

Class= M u s i d cwnpo6itbs. C ~ P ~ ~ F . M................ PP CLassG. Wathdort:modcb
=designs
Clpss H.

...................
XI

Reproductions d waka d nrt................. Clnrr I. Dnwhga o p W c r works d a scientifica technical chnndcr.. 1x1 C l a s s J . P h o ~ g r q......... 7.564 h Clpss E Printl nnd pictorin1 illustratims. ................ 11, $14 C k L Matian-PietU~% b l

............

&
641~9

s 7 ~ 4 . ~ 1
Iw 7

914

739

Ibo

6m.s
1494s Is418
npb

7

664s
o 139
1.

o 161
1.

0561 .
1. BI

................... WW..
Ckss M. Motim pi

2.410 310 1,wa

$87

I. a95 134 1.906

.

)4

ptlotodnyr Renew&

................. ..................... Total ...................

not

- - - - 1.119 1, 2,rfi
I I I . ~ I&. ~

151 1.8~7 7.8

3 9

'80

1 1 3 . 0 ~ 3 1=6,s61 1 ~ ~ 1 . 1 8 0 1 3 4 6 ~ ~

For detailed stntemmt of registrations made lor f i d ycnn Iran rpor-a to 1914-1s F a subUlUrnt see Annual Report of Register of Copyrights for 1914-1s. pp. I&-I&. ymn, ~ 9 x 5 - t l t o: i the re m see . v nnnunl rrports. Exhibit F .

I54

Report of tke Librarian of Coqvess

EXHIBIT E.-Tabk of articles deposifeddun'ttq I ~ z ~ - - I ~ , z ~ ~--1- A ? o , 11,
and 1921-22, uith totab of articles deposiiedfor years 1897-@ to 1921-22. -

9

I

-

I

1991-1'2

Td'

I.

BooLs:
(a)

---I-vdmned.
ppmphleu.lcn0ets.etc.. .. 13, 570 Contributio~r nerrpsto pua and paiodicrl.. 14 lop

Printed in the United SC.ts.

.................
...

tp6

:a 156
54638 13, dp1

1 ~ 3 6 4 074 35.636 41.414 xj.1~5

'I'd

...................

~ 6 9 7 ~ &av& r . a
I

6, 81.546

(b) Printed sbmod 'in a foreitul

language .................... English wwka registered f a ad interim copyright.. ...... 'I'd.1.

.......... .......... r 4 566 .......... 78.054 .......... 1 . ~ 1..........
37s

rU

UI

4 7

..........

a. Paiodimls.. J. Lectures. smnoahetc..
4

.......................

.................... sa6.o s 166 ............ 1ss

64.41. 57.870 116 so63 M. 566 3 . d a.r~s
1 1

m860

81.397

14
I@

I. %or, 7 0 . 0 6 I. I&, 128 a. s r s 371

Dramatic a dmmatico-md~d can-

............. 6.Maps ............................... 7.WorLsdort.modehordesiQU. .....
s M u s i d compositiau.. .

P0sitkm.s.........................

w,m1
s.3r . ~ 3 14

a ~ e p o d u a i a u d w o r k art...... d 80 Chmmoa and lithoonphr.. 9. Drawings a plastic w o r b d . e d n t i 6 c a tcchnid chrrrscta.. ...... 894 1. P h o t o m a ~ I..................... 0 ~. a671 11. Printa and pictorial illusuntiau.. 14 w 3

............................................
1.354

3 . ~ 5 3.676 47.688 41.916 .3.718 sfr* m.960 1,134 r 14

.

77.0

1.09617. BOUJ
fa,r, o86 &, 71s
14w ~51,614 UJ. 034 73.060 4 067

Motion-picture photoplay^.. 13. Motion pictured ndr photophys..
rr.

. ....... ..

r 174 s
r s XIU 7.469 5%

I. 174 13.649 x4sw

r. w 2. a
14551

7.319 rsr

4 su
676

I& M i d l a n e n u (unclassified utides)

....................................
135. r r r 141,161

BPI 358

77s r, s r 7

IS. F ~ b o o b d v u l u n d a s r t d

MU.

- - - TotJ .......................... 188,3. I-.. 113.149 4901,475

........................................................

NOTE-For detailed statanent o artid- deposited during fiscpl years 189rpB to f 1914-rs. see Annual Report of Register of Copyrights for 1914-1s. m. 183-166. For subsequent yetan 1915-16 to r e a r . ue the respective annual reports. Exhibit G.

The d M c n t i o o "Chmma .nd lithomphr" k
0.L

Circa in t& L w &a July I.

ADDENDUM I.
(67th Cong., 1st mess. S. 2717.

In the Senntc of bb2 United Stntes. Nwembcr IS, 1.. 91)

Mr. Spencer introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Patents:
A BILL To amend section 19 of the act entitled "An act to amend N~ and consolidate the acts representing copyright," approved March +&. 4~x909.
o/

Be i t aacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That section 19 of the act entitled "An act to amend and consolidate the acts respecting copyright," approved March 4, I W , be, and the same is hereby, amended so as to read as follows : "Sac. 19. That the notice ol copyright shall be applied, in the case of a book or other printed publication, upon its title-page or the page immediately following: Prm'ded, That wherever a date of publication or of issue appears, the notice of copyright shall also appear, or if a periodical either upon the title-page or upon the first page of text of each separate number or under the title heading, or if a musical work either upon its title-page or upon the first page of music: Provided, That one notice of copyright in each volume or in each number of a newspaper or periodical published shall suffice, except as herein provided,"

(67thcang.. ad m s .

H R. 11476. In the House 01 .

R c p m e n t a t i v s , April a8. rplz.)

Mr. Tincher introduced thefollowing bill; which was referred to the Committee on Patents and ordered to be printed :
A BILL To amend the copyright law to permit the United States to , enter the International Gpyright Union. Copyriokt U * a .

Be i t enacted by h Senute and House of RePresentdiws e of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President o the United States be, and is hereby, auf

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thorized to effect and proclaim the adhesion of the United States to the convention creating an International Union for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, known also as the International Copyright Union, signed a t Berlin, Germany, November 13, 1908, and to the "Additional Protocol" to the said convention, executed a t Berne, Switzerland, March 20, 1914. Sec. 2. That it is hereby declared that the United States desires to be placed in the first class of the countries which are members of the International Copyright Union, as provided in article 23 of the said convention of 1go8. S B ~ 3. That the rights and remedies granted by the act . entitled "An act to amend and consolidate the acts respecting copyright," approved March 4, 1909, and the act amendatory thereof shall be, and are hereby, extended to the authors of works of architecture and choreographic works and pantomimes as, class (n) and class (o), respectively, in the list of classes of copyright works in section 5 of the said act. J SIX.4. That sections I 5, I 6, I 7, 2 I (as amended Decem22, ber-18, ~ g ~ g ) , and 31 of the said copyright act of 1919 are hereby repealed, and that the said act is further amended by striking out from section g the words "except in the case of books seeking an ad interim protection under section 2 I of this act;" by striking out from section 12 the words "which copies, if the work be a book or periodical, shall have been produced in accordance with the manufacturing provisions specified in section 15 of .this act;" and by striking out from section 55 the words "in the case of a book the certificate shall also state the receipt of the affidavit, as provided by section 16 of this act, and the date of the completion of the printing, or the date of the publication of the book, as stated in the said affidavit." Sec. 5. That on and after the date of the President's proclamation foreign authors, not residents of the United States, who are citizens or subjects of any country, which is a member of the International Copyright Union, or whose books are f i s t published in and enjoyed copyright protection in any country which is a member of the Copyright Union, shall have within the United States the same rights and remedies in regard to their works, which citizens of the

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United States possess under the copyright l a m o thc United f States, and the enjoyment and the exercise by such foreign authors, not residents of the United States, of the rights and remedies accorded by the copyright laws of the United States shall not be subject to any formalities, and they shall not be required to comply with the provisions of the copyright laws of the United States as to notice of copy~QWright, or deposit of copies, and registration: Pr&d, ever, That the duration of the protection for such rights in the United States shall not exceed the term of protection granted in the country of which such foreign author is a citizen or subject or in the country within the union in which such author's book was first published; and no right or remedy given pursuant to this act shall prejudice lawful acts heretofore done within the United States or rights in copies heretofore lawfully made in the United States prior to such date. - SEC. That during the existence of the American copy6. right in any book the importation into the United States of any copies. thereof shall be, and is hereby, prohibited, except with t e assent of the proprietor of the American h copyright subsequent to the registration of American publication and the deposit in the copyright office a t Washington, District of Columbia, of two copies of any such book: Provided, however, That, except as regards piratical copies, such prohibition shall not apply: (a) To any book as published in the country of origin with the authorization of the author or copyright proprietor when imported, not more than one copy a t one time, for individual use and not for sale, or when imported for use and not for sale, trot more than one copy in any one invoice, in good faith, by or for any society or institution incgrporated for educational, literary, philosophical, scientific, or religious purposes, or for the encouragement of the h e arts, or for any college, academy, school, or seminary of learning, or for any State, school, college, university, or free public library' in the United .States, provided the publisher of the American edition of such book has (within ten days after written demand) declined or neglected to agree to supply the copy demanded; (b) to h k s which form parts of libraries or

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collections purchased en bloc for the use of societies, institutions, or libraries designated in the foregoing paragraph, or form parts of the libraries or personal baggage belonging to persons or families arriving from foreign countries and are not intended for sale; (c) to works in raised characters for the use of the blind; (d) to works imported by the authority or for the use of the United States; (e) to the authorized edition of a book in a foreign language or languages of which only a translation into English has been published in this country; ( f ) to a foreign newspaper or magazine, although containing matter copyrighted in the United States printed or reprinted by authority of the copyright proprietor, unless such newspaper or magazine contains also copyright matter printed or reprinted without such authorization : Provided, That copies imported as above may not lawfully be used in any way to violate the rights of the proprietor of the American copyright or annul or limit the copyright protection secured by this act, and such unlawful use shall be deemed an infringement of the copyright. Sec. 7. That rules and regulations for practice and procedure in any action, suit, or proceeding instituted for infringement of copyright under the provisions of this act shall be as prescribed by the Supreme Court of the United States. Sm. 8. That this act shall take effect immediately, and that rights and remedies assured under this act shall be effective on and after the date o the President's f proclamation.

ADDENDUM 1 . 1

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas i t is provided by the act of Congress, -approved March 4, I-, entitled "An act to amend and consolidate the acts respecting copyright," that the copyright secured by the act except the benefits under section I {e) thereof, as to which special conditions are imposed, shall extend to the work of an author or proprietor who is a citizen or subject of a foreign state or nation, only upon certain conditions set forth in section 8 of said act, to wit: (a) When an alien author or proprietor shall be domiciled within the United States a t the time of the first publication of his work; or @) When the foreign state or nation of which such author or proprietor is a citizen or subject grants, either by treaty, convention, agreement, or law, to citizens of the United States the benefit of copyright on substantially the same basis as to its own citizens, or copyright protection substantially equal to the protection secured to such foreign author under this act or by treaty; or when such foreign state or nation is a party to an international agreement which provides for reciprocity in the granting of copyright, by the terms of which agreement the United States may, a t its pleasure, become a party thereto; And whereas it is further pcovided by the act of Congress approved December 18, 1919, entitled "An act to amend sections 8 and 21 of the copyright act, approved March 4, I=," "that all works made the subject of copyright by the laws of the United States first produced or published abroad after August I , 1914, and before the date of the President's proclamation of peace, of which the authors or proprietors are citizens or subjects of any foreign state or nation granting similar protection for works by citizens of

Mw as.

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the United States, the existence of which shall be determined by a copyright proclamation issued by the President of the United States, shall be entitled to the protection conferred by the copyright laws' of the United States from and after the accomplishment, before the expiration of fifteen months after the date of the President's proclamation of peace, of the conditions and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States: Provided further, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to deprive any person of any right which he may have acquired by the republication of such foreign work in the United States prior to the approval of this act." And whereas the President is authorized to determine and declare by proclamation made from time to time the existence of the reciprocal conditions aforesaid, as the purposes of the act may require; And whereas the President by proclamation dated April 9, 1910, did declare and proclaim that one of the alternative conditisns specified in section 8 of act of March 4, 1909, was then and from July I , 1909, had been fulfilled in respect to the subjects of Austria, and that the subjects of Austria were and since July I , 1909, had been entitled to all the benefits of the said act. other than the benefits of section I (e) thereof; And whereas satisfactory official assurance has been given by the Government of Austria that by the laws o f Austria protection is granted for works by citizens of the United States similar to the protection provided by the act approved December 18, 1919. Now therefore, I, Warren G. Harding, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim(I) That the coaditions specified in the act of December 18, 1919, now exist and are fulfilled in respect to the citizens of Austria, and that Austrian citizeds are entitled to all the benefits of the said copyright act, approved December 18, 1919, subject to the exception specified in the aforesaid proclamation of April 9, 1910; Provided that the enjoyment by any work to which the provisions of this proclamation relate of the rights and benefits conferred by the copyright act approved December 18, 1919, shall he conditional upon compliance with the

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requirements and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States, and shall commence from and after compliance wit& those requirements, constituting due registration for copyright in the United States. 2. Nothing in this proclamation shall be construed to abrogate or limit any rights and benefits conferred under the reciprocal arrangements with Austria providing for copyright protection heretofore proclaimed. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done a t the city of Washington this twenty-fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord One thousand [SEAL.] nine hundred and twenty-two and of the-1ndependence of the United States of America the One hundred and forty-sixth. WARREN . HARDING. G By the President: CHARLGS HUGHES, E. Secrelary of Stde.

_

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by the act of Congress, approved March 4, 1909, entitled "An act to amend and consolidate the acts respecting copyright," that the copyright secured by the act, except the benefits under section I (e) thereof, as to which special conditions are imposed, shall extend to the work of an author or. proprietor who is a citizen or subject of a foreign State or-nation only upon certain conditions set forth in section 8 of said act, to wit: (a) When an alien author or proprietor shall be domiciled within the United States a t the time of the first publication of his work; or (b) When the foreign State or nation of which such author or proprietor is a citizen or subject grants, either by treaty, convention, agreement, or law, to citizens of the United States the benefit of copyright on substantially the same basis as to its own citizens, or copyright protection sub-

M0~'s-1921.

,

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stantially equal to the protection secured to such foreign author under this act or by treaty; or when such foreign State or nation is a party to an international agreement which provides for reciprocity in the granting of copyright, by the terms of which agreement the United States may, a t its pleasure, become a party thereto: And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress approved December, 18, 1919, entitled "An act to amend sections 8 and 2 1 of the copyright act, approved March 4, ~gog,""that all works made the subject of copyright by the laws of the United States f i s t produced or published abroad after August I, 1914, and before the date of the President's proclamation of peace, of which the authors or proprietors are citizens or subjects of any foreign State or nation granting similar protection for works by citizens of the United States, the existence of which shall be determined by a copyright proclamation issued by the President of the United States, shall be entitled to the protection conferred by the copyright laws of the United States from and after the accomplishment, before the expiration of fifteen months after the date of the President's proclamation of peace, of the conditions and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States: Provided further, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to deprive any person of any right which he may have acquired by the republication of such foreign work in the United States prior to the approval of this act." And whereas the President is authorized to determine and declare by proclamation made from time to time the existence of the reciprocal conditions aforesaid, as the purposes of the act may require; And whereas the President by proclamation dated April g, I ~ I O , declare and proclaim that one of the alternative did conditions specified in section 8 of the act of March 4, rgog, was then and from July I, ~gog, been fulfilled in respect had to the subjects of Germany and that the subjects of Germany had been entitled to all the were and since July I, ~gog, benefits of the said act other than the benefits of section I (e) thereof; And whereas the President by proclamation dated December 8, 1910, did declare and proclaim that satisfactory

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official assurances having been received that in Germany the law permitted to citizens of the United States rights similar to those accorded in section I (e) of the act of March 4, 1909,the subjects of the G m a n Empire were entitled to all the benefits of section I (e) of the said act of March 4, 1909; And whereas satisfactory official assurances have been received from the Government of Germany that by the laws of Germany protection is granted for works by citizens of the United States similar to the protection provided by the act approved December 18, 1919; Now therefore I, Warren G. Harding, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaimI. That the conditions specified in the act of December 18, 1919, now exist and are fulfilled in respect to the citizens of Germany and that German citizens are entitled to all the benefits of the said copyright act approved December 18, 19x9. Provided that the enjoyment by any work to which the provisions of this proclamation relate of the rights and benefits conferred by the copyright act approved December 18, 1919, shall be conditional upon compliance with the requirements and formalities prescribe3 with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States, and shall commence from and after compliance with those requirements, constituting due registration for copyright in the United States. 2. Nothing in this proclamation shall be construd to abrogate or limit any rights and benefits conferred under the reciprocal arrangements with Germany providing for copyright protection heretofore proclaimed. In witness whereof I have Ipereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington this twenty-fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine [SEAL.] hundred and twenty-two and of the independence of the United States o America the one hundred f and forty-sixth. WARREN . HARDINC. G By the President: CHARLES HUGHBS, E.
SecreWy of

S& t.

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of

the Librarian of Congress

BY THE PRESIDENT THE UNITEDSTATES, AMERICA. OF OP
A PROCLAMATION.
Jw3.IW2.

Whereas it is provided by the act of Congress approved March 4, ~gog, entitled "An act to amend and consolidate the acts respecting copyright," that the copyright secured by .the act except the benefits under section I (e) thereof, as to which special conditions are imposed, shall extend to the work of an author or proprietor who is a citizen or subject of a foreign state or nation only upon certain conditions set forth in section 8 of said act, to wit: (a) When an alien author or proprietor shall be domiciled within the United Statw a t the time of the first publication of his work; o r (b) When the foreign state or nation of which such author or proprietor is a citizen or subject grants, either by treaty, convention, agreement, or law, to citizens of the United States the benefit of copyright on substantially the same basis as to its own citizens, or copyright protection substantially equal to the protection secured to such foreign author under this act or by treaty; or when such foreign state or nation is a party to an international agreement which provides for reciprocity in the granting of copyright, by the terms of which agreement the United States may, at its pleasure, become a party thereto; ' And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress approved December 18, 1919, entitled "An act to amend sections 8 and 21 of the copyright act approved March 4, ~gog,""that all works made the subject of copyright by the laws of the United States first produced or published abroad after August I , 1914, and before the date of the President's proclamation of peace, of which the authors or proprietors are citizens or subjects of any foreign state or nation granting similar protection for works by citizens of the United States, the existence of which shall be determined by a copyright proclamation issued by the President of the United States, shall be entitled to the protection conferred by the copyright laws of the United States from and after the accomplishment, before the expiration of fifteen months after the date of the President's proclamation of peace, of the

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conditions and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States: Provided further, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to deprive any person of any right which he may have acquired by the republication of such foreign work in the United States prior to the approval of this act." And whereas the President is authorized to determine and declare by proclamation made from time to time the existence of the reciprocal conditions aforesaid, as the purposes of the act may require; And whereas satisfactory official assurance has been given by the Government of Hungary that by the laws of Hungary protection is granted for works by citizens of the United States similar to the protection provided by the act approved December 18, 1919. Now therefore, I, Warren G. Harding, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and praclaimThat the conditions specified in the act of December 18, 1919, now exist and axe fulfilled in respect to the citizens of Hungary, and that Hungarian citizens are entitled to all the benefits of the said copyright act approved December 18, 1919. Provided that the enjoyment by any work to which the provisions of this proclamation relate of the rights and benefits conferred by the copyright act approved December 18, 1919, shall be cpnditional upon compliance with the requirements and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States, and shall commence from and after compliance with requirements, constituting due registration for copyright in the United States. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of W~hingtonthis thud day of June in the year of our L r one thousand nine od [SEAL.] hundred and twenty-two and of the Independence .of the United States of America the one hundred and f orty-sixth. WARREN HARDING. G. By the President: . CHARLES 33. HUGHES, Sm&y of st&.

Report of the L i b r a r i a n of Congress

BY

THE

PRESIDENT T H 3 UNITEDSTATES OF OF AMERICA.
A PROCLAMATION.

3

.

w -

Whereas it is provided by the act of Congress, approved March 4, ~gog,entitled "An act to amend and consolidate the acts respecting copyright," that the copyright secured by the act, except the benefits under section I (e) thereof, as to which special conditions are imposed, shall extend to the work of an author or proprietor who' is a citizen or subject of a foreign state or nation, only upon certain conditions set forth in section 8 of said act, to wit: (a) When an alien author or proprietor shall be domiciled within the United States a t the time of the first publication of his work; or (b) When the foreign state or nation of which such author or proprietor is a citizen or subject grants, either by treaty, convention, agreement, or law, to citizens of the United States the benefit of copyright on substantially the same basis as to its own citizens, or copyright protection substantially equal to the protection secured to such foreign author under this act or by treaty; or when such foreign State or nation is a party to an international agreement which provides for reciprocity in the granting of copyright, by the terms of which agreement the United States may, a t its pleasure, become aparty thereto: And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress approved December 18, 1919, entitled "An act to amend sections 8 and 2 I of the copyright act, approved March 4, 1909," "that all works made the subject of copyright by the laws of the United States first produced or published abroad after August I , 1914, and before the date of the President's proclamation of peace, of which the authors or proprietors are citizens or subjects of any foreign State or nation granting similar protection for works by citizens of the United States, the existence of which shall be determined by a copyright proclamation issued by the President of the United States, shall be entitled to the protection conferred by the copyright laws of the United States from

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and after the accomplishment, before the expiratios of fifteen months after the date of the President's proclamation of peace, of the conditions and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States: Provided further, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to deprive any person of any right which he may have acquired by the republication of such foreign work in the United States prior to the approval of this act." And whereas the President is authorized to determine and declare by proclamation made from time to time the existence of the reciprocal conditions aforesaid, as the purposes of the acts may require; And whereas the President, by proclamation dated April 9, 19x0, did declare and proclaim that one of the alternative conditions specified in section 8 of the act of March 4,1909, was then and from July I , I W , had been fulfilled in respect to the subjects of Italy, and that the subjects of Italy were and since July I , 1909, had been entitled to all the benefits of the said act other than the benefits of section I (e) thereof; And whereas the President, by prodamation dated May I , 1915, did declare and proclaim that satisfactory official assurances having been receivd that in Italy t e law permits h to citizens of the United States rights similar to those accorded in section I (e) of the act o March 4, 1 9 9 , the s u b f jects of Italy were entitled to all the benefits of section I (e) of the said act of March 4, IW, including copyright controlling the parts of instruments serving to reproduce mechanically the musicai work. And whereas satisfactory official assurances have been received from the Government of Italy that by the laws of Italy protection is granteQfor works by citizens of the United States similar to the protection provided by the act, approved December 18, 1919; Now, therefore, I, Warren G. Harding, President of the United States of America, do hereby dedare and proclaimI. That the conditions specified in the act of December 18, 1919, now exist and are fulfilled in respect to the s u b jects of Italy and that Italian subjects are entitled to all the benefits of the said copyright act, approved December 18, 1919.

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Provided that the enjoyment by any work to which the provisions of this proclamation relate of the rights and. benefits conferred by the copyright act, approved December 18, 1919, shall be conditional upon compliance with the requirements and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States and shall commence from and after compliance with those requirements, constituting due registration for copyright in the United States. 2. Nothing in this proclamation shall be construed to abrogate or limit any rights and benefits conferred under the reciprocal arrangements with Italy providing for copyright protection heretofore proclaimed. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done a t the city of Washington this third day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine [SEAL.] hundred and twenty-two, and of the independence of the United States of America the one hundred and forty-sixth. G. WARREN HARDING. By the President : CHARLES HUGHES, E. Secretary of St&.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF
i w ~ z sI . ~
Z .

THE UNITEDSTATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it is provided by the act of Congress, approved March 4, 1909, entitled "An act to amend and consolidate the acts respecting copyright," that the copyright secured by the act except the benefits under section I (e) thereof, as to which special conditions are imposed, shall extend to the work of an author or proprietor who is a citizen or subject of a foreign state or nation, only upon certain conditions set forth in section 8 o said act, t~ wit: f (a) When an alien author or proprietor shall be domiciled within the United States a t the time of the first publication of his work; or

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(b) When the foreign state or nation of which such author or proprietor is a citizen or subject grants, either by treaty, convention, agrkment, or law, to citizens of the United States the benefit of copyright on substantially the same basis as to its own citizens, or copyright protection substantially equal to the protection secured to such foreign author under this act or by treaty; or when such foreign state or nation is a party to an international agreement which provides for reciprocity in the granting of copyright, by the terms o which agreement the United States f may, at its pleasure, become a party thereto; And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress approved December 18, 1919, entitled "An act to amend sections 8 and 21 of the copyright act, approved March 4, IW," "that all works made the subject of copyright by the laws of the United States first produced or published abroad after August I , 1914, and before the date of the President's proclamation of peace, of which the authors or proprietors are citizens or subjects of any foreign state or nation granting similar protection for works by citizens of the United States, the existence of which shall be determined by a copyright proclamation issued by the President of the United States, shall be entitled to the protection conferred by the copyright laws of the United States from and after the acc~mplishment,~ before the expiration of fifteen months after the date o the President's proclamation f of peace, of the conditions and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States: Prcrvided further, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to deprive any person of any right which he may have acquired by the republication of such foreign work in the United States prior to the appmval o this act." f And whereas the President is authorized to determine and declare by proclamation made from time to time the existence of the reciprocal conditions aforesaid, as the purposes of the act may require; And whereas the President by proclamation dated April 9, 1910, did declare and proclaim that one of the alternative conditions specified in section 8 of the act of March 4, I W , was then and iron1 July 1, lyoy, had been iufilled in respect

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to the subjects of Great Britain and her possessions, and that the subjects of Great Britain and her possessions were and since July I, 1909, had been entitled to all the benefits of the said act other than the beneiits of section 1 (e) thereof; And whereas the President by proclamation dated February 9, 1917, did declare and proclaim that one of the alternative conditions specified in sections I (e) and 8 (b) then existed and was fulfilled in of the act of March 4, ~gog, respect to citizens of New Zealand, and that citizens of New Zealand were entitled to all the benefits of section I (e) of the said act; And whereas satisfactory official assurances have been received from the Government of Great Britain that the Government of New Zealand issued an order in council, dated January 10, 192I , by which protection is granted for works by citizens of the United States similar to the protection provided by the act approved December 18, 1919. Now therefore, I, Warren G. Harding, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaimI. That the conditions specified in the act of December 18, 1919, now exist and are fulfilled in respect to the citizens of New Zealand, and that citizens of New Zealand are entitled to all the benefits of the said copyright act, approved December 18, 1919. Provided that the enjoyment by any work to which the provisions of this proclamation, relate of the rights and benefits conferred by the copyright act approved December 18, 1919, shall be conditional upon compliance with the requirements and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States, and shall commence from and after compliance with those requirements, constituting due registration for copyright in the United ~ktes. 2. Nothing in this proclamation shall be construed to abrogate or limit any rights and benefits conferred under the reciprocal arrangements with Great Britain providing for copyright protection heretofore proclaimed. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine [SEAL.]hundred and twenty-two and of the independence of the United States of America the one hundred and forty-sixth. G. WARREN HARDING. By the President: CHARLES HUGHES, E. Secretary of Stde.
NEW ' ZBALAND.

Extension of copyright act, 1913, to certain works first published in the United States of America.
Uellicoo governor ~eneral. Order in council. At the Government b u i l d i i at Web Ja10 (4lington, this loth day of January.1pa1.1 fdk J a w 10). rw.

Present: The Right Hon. W. F. Massey, P. C., presiding in council. Whereas by reason of conditions arising out of the war difficulties have been experienced by citizens of the United States of America in complying with the requirements of the copyright act, 1913, as to the first publication within New Zealand of their works first published in the United States of America during the war; And lwhereas the governor general is advised that the Government of the United States of America has undertaken upon issue o this order to extend the protection f afforded by the United States law of the eighteenth day of December, cne thousand nine hundred and nineteen, entitled "An act to amend sections eight and twenty-one of the copyright act, approved March 4, ~gog,"to British subjects in New Zealand; And whereas by reason of the said undertaking of the Government of the United States of America the governor general is satisfied that the said Government has made, or has undertaken to make, such provision as it is expedient to require for the protection of works first made or published in New Zealand, between the first day of August, one thousand nine hundred and fourteen, and the termination of the war and entitled to copyright under Part I of the copyright act, 1913;

-

.

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And whereas by the copyright act, 1913, authority is conferred upon the governor general to extend by order in council the protection of the said act to certain classes of foreign works within New Zealand; And whereas by reason of these premises it is desirable to provide protection within New Zealand for literary or artistic works first published in the United States of America between the first day of August, one thousand nine hundred and fourteen, and the termination of the war which have failed to accomplish the formalities prescribed by the copyright act, 1913, by reason of conditions arising out of the
war:

Now, therefore, His Excellency the Governor General of the Dominion of New Zealand, acting by and with the advice and consent of the executive council of the said Dominion, and in pursuance and exercise of the power and authority conferred upon him by the copyright act, 1913, doth hereby direct as follows: I. The copyright act,. I 913, shall, subject to the provisions of the said act and this order, apply to works first published in the United States of America between the first day of August, one thousand nine hundred and fourteen, and the termination of the war, which have not been republished in New Zealand prior to the commencement of this order in like manner as if they had been first published in New Zealand: Provided, That the enjoyment by any work of the rights conferred by the copyright act, 1913, shall be conditional upon publication of the work in New Zealand not later than six months after the commencement of this order, and shall commence from and after such publication, which shall not be colourable only, but shall be intended to satisfy the reasonable requirements of the public. 2. The provision of section fifty-two of the copyright act, 1913, as to the delivery of books to the General Assembly Library shall apply to works to which this order relates upon their publication in New Zealand. 3. In the case of musical works to which this order relates, and provided that no contrivances by means of which the work may be mechanically performed have before the commencement of this order been lawfully made or

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placed on sale within New Zealand, copyright in the work shall include all rights conferred by the said act with respect to the making of records, perforated rolb, and other contrivances by means of which the work may be mechanically performed. 4. Nothing in this order shall be construed as depriving any work of any tights which have been lawfully, acquired under the provisions of the copyright act, 1913, or any order in council thereunder. 5. This order shall come into operation on the twentieth day of January, one thousand nine hundred and twenty+ne, which date is in this order referred to as the commencement of this order. F. D. THOMSON, C h k of the Executive COUMJ.

ADDENDUM IIL
GERMANY.
Gnmn May 18. rprt.
o f

Gesetq iiber den Schutz der Urheberrechte- der Angehvrigen der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika. Vom 18. Mai 1922. [Reichsgesetzblatt 1922, Nr. 7, Theil 11. Berlin, den 23. Mai 1922.1 Der Reichstag hat das folgende Gesetz beschlossen, das mit Zustimmung des Reichrats hiermit verkiindet wird : $1. Die Angehorigen der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika geniessen fur ihre Urheberrechte an Werken der Literatur, der Kunst und der Photographie, in Hinblick auf die in den Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika den Angehorigen des Deutschen Reichs zugesicherte gleiche Stellung, im Deutschen Reiche den gesetzlichen Schutz in dem ~bereinkommenvom IS. Januar 1892 (Reichsgesetzblatt, S. 473) bezeichneten Umfang. Dies gilt insbesondere auch fur die in der.Zeit zwischen dem I . August 1914 und dem 2. juli 1921 entstandenen Werke; doch bleiben die Rechte unberiihrt, die ein anderer durch die Vervielfaltigung oder Verbreitung eines solchen Werkes vor dem 18. Dezember 1919 erworben haben sollte. $2. Inwieweit im Falle einer ~ n d e r u ndes Schutzes ~ der deutschen Urheberrechte in den Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika eine Anderung des im 9 I vorgesehenen Schutzes fur die Angehorigen der Vereinigten Staaten im Deutschen Reiche eintritt, bestimmt die Reichsregierung mit Zustimmung des Reichsrats. 93. Dieses Gesetz tritt mit dem Tage der Verkiindung in Kraft.
GERMANY.

tm.

Ewlisktlamla-I,aw for the protection of copyrights belonpng to citizens of the United States of America, May 18, 1922. The Reichstag has enacted the following law which, with the assent of the Reichsrat, is herewith promulgated:
174

Register

of

CopyrigCrCs

175

SEWON I . Citizens of the United States o America f enjoy fvr their copyrights of works of literature, art, and photography, in consideration of the assurance of the same treatment of citizens of Germany in the United States of America, legal protection to the extent set forth in the agreement of January I 5 , I 892. This applies especially to works published in the period between August I , 1914, and ~ u l2, ~ ' 1921. Any rights remain unaffected, however, which may have been acquired by any person by means of the reproduction or distribution of such a work before December 18, 1919. SECTION In case there is a change in the protection 2. of German copyrights in the United States of America, the extent to which the protection assured in section I of this law to citizens of the United States of America in Germany may be modified is to be determined by the Reichsregierung with the assent of the Reichsrat. 3. SECTION. This law goes into effect upon the day of its promulgation.

ORIENTALIA: ACQUISITIONS
By Walter T. Swingle, chainnan library committee, United States Department of Agriculture.

in numbers all other 341 works in 7,469 volumes; the Japanese accessions number about 65 works in 192 volumes; the Korean, I work in 9 volumes. The Chinese acquisitions represent an increase of approximately 5 per cent in the number of works and 1 1 per cent in the number of volumes. During the past year I 15 official gazetteers were added to Ckiwse ~ & i d welkmr. the large collection in the Library of Congress. In all, I general gazetteer of the whole Chinese Empire, 12 prefectural, and 102 district gazetteers were added during the year. Of these, I prefectural and 17district gazetteers are duplicates already in the Chinese collection. I t should be said, however, that most official gazetteers are so carelessly printed and poorly bound that duplicate copies nearly always serve to complete missing pages omitted by the binder or blurred pages spoiled by the printer. The Library of Congress now contains I, I 62 gazette- and also 101duplicate copies. The most valuable single gazetteer added to the collection last year is a copy of the imperial edition of the Ta ching i t'ung chih or general official gazetteer o the whole Chinese f Empire. The copy secured is of the first edition published in I 744 during the reign of the Emperor Ch'ien Lung, in 356 Chinese books, bound in 104 volumes. The only copy of this monumental work hitherto found in the Library of Congress was a cheap lithographic reprint of the last edition dated 1784and reprinted in Shanghai in 1902. ~ e o , , r a p ~ , c a Among the unofficial geographical works secured during ~ wb. the past year are the following: The Li tai ti li yen ko piao by Ch'On Fang-chi is a very useful record in tabular form of the numerous changes in the

Chinese. Jab* Chinese books, as usual, far exceed nrse, and Kcwean W ~ S . East Asiatic accessions. They total

APPvopriatwn Acts, 1923-24
LEGISLATIVE.

147

* * Library of Congress, $111,6oo; Library Buildf ing and Grounds, $24,gp6; Architect o the Capitol, $gr,104; Botanic Garden, $13,440; Government Printing O f c , fie
$9h,o00.

*

*

*

0

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*

SEC. That so much as may be necessary to pay the 8. increased compensation provided in this act to persons employed under trust funds who may be construed to be employees of the Government of the United States or o the f District of Columbia is authorized to be paid, respectively, from such trust funds. SEC. g. That the additional compensation granted in this act shall be applied by administrative officers in such a manner that the appropriations made herein will not be
exceeded.