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Thanos_Arentzen 2012 - Without Having Seen the Queen. The 1846 European travel journal of Heinrich Schliemann: a transcription and annotated translation

Thanos_Arentzen 2012 - Without Having Seen the Queen. The 1846 European travel journal of Heinrich Schliemann: a transcription and annotated translation

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Published by Sidestone Press
Heinrich Schliemann (1822-1890), a shrewd trader and later in life one of the best known archaeologists of the 19th century, made many travels around the world. He recorded his experiences in several diaries. This publication is a transcription and translation of Schliemann’s first travel diary: his European journey in the winter of 1846/47.
Heinrich Schliemann (1822-1890), a shrewd trader and later in life one of the best known archaeologists of the 19th century, made many travels around the world. He recorded his experiences in several diaries. This publication is a transcription and translation of Schliemann’s first travel diary: his European journey in the winter of 1846/47.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Sidestone Press on Oct 15, 2012
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02/16/2014

The German Heinrich Schliemann is a good example of the
American dream: from a poor and not well-educated shop assistant
to a wealthy businessman and a celebrated and well-known scholar/
archaeologist. Sometimes his life took on mythical proportions and
often the myth was created by Schliemann himself.
In the third quarter of the 20th

century there was much discus-
sion about Schliemann’s claims in his personal life as well as in his
archaeological adventures. We know that his childhood dream of
finding Troy was a myth that had been created by Schliemann him-
self. We know that his wife Sofia was not with Schliemann when he
found Priams treasure, although he claims the opposite. For some
claims we do not know whether it really happened: did he really
meet the President of the United States, as Schliemann claims in his
diary of his visit to the United States in 1850? Based on several false
claims, some contemporary scholars called Schliemann not only a
liar but a pathological liar.
Many books and articles have been written about Schliemann’s
life and excavations. He himself has left a vast legacy of publica-
tions, several thousand letters and 18 diaries. The letters and diaries
are written in many languages and are therefore not very accessible
to researchers. For those who study the life of Schliemann, it is use-
ful to know some languages, such as French, German, Greek and,
maybe, Italian. But what about the parts of his diaries written in
Arabic, Swedish, Russian, and even in Dutch? Who has read them
all? What do these texts say?
Many of his letters, notebooks and diaries are at the Gennadius
Library in Athens and some of the diaries are now made digitally
available. It is now much easier to study the digital diaries via the
internet but the language used in these diaries can still be a problem.
This publication of Schliemann’s first journal will, hopefully, be a
change. The aim of this publication is to provide a fully translated
version of the journal and a full transcription of the original text.
The diary was written in English, French and Italian and in translat-
ing the French and Italian parts, nuances may be lost. To make one
coherent text, the original English text has also been edited. In some
places, the original text has been abridged. By providing the original
text as a transcription, the researcher can now also study more easily
the primary source: the (digitally available) original journal.
This publication reached its final form after a long time. In the
1990’s Wout Arentzen became interested in not only the works of
Schliemann but also in the man himself. Wout was especially inter-

2

without having seen the queen

ested in Schliemann’s life in the Netherlands as well in the love of his
youth, Minna Meincke. In 1995 the Heinrich Schliemann Museum
at Ankershagen (Germany) made it possible for Wout to study the
correspondence of Schliemann till 1847 at Athens. He also obtained
a black and white photocopy (of a microfilm) of Schliemann’s
European travels in 1846. He made transcriptions of the journal
with the only purpose of understanding its contents. Nothing more,
nothing less. In 1999 he wrote an article about Schliemann’s travels
but was advised to cut the article into several parts or to publish
the diary with annotations and comments. He also wrote an arti-
cle about Schliemann’s arrival in the Netherlands, which was not
published untill 2011. At this time, Wout became more and more
interested in the history of archaeology of the 19th

century in the
Netherlands and his work on Schliemann’s travels took a back seat.
In 2008 Wout and I met at a gathering of a group of enthusi-
asts (mostly archaeologists) interested in the history of archaeology,
where he told me about his project on Schliemann’s European trav-
els. I offered to try to get his article and the journal published, and
this is the final result.
I started to make a transcription of the diary with the black and
white copy Wout had. We later obtained a copy of a typescript of
the journal from the Schliemann Museum at Ankershagen. This was
a great help when transcribing the original text. This typescript did
not contain all the misspellings and words used by Schliemann. But
in 2011 we obtained a digital full-colour copy of the journal from
the Gennadius Library in Athens. The difference with the black and
white copy is almost literally like the difference between day and
night. We checked the text again and solved many, but not all, ques-
tions we had about the original text. The digital copy also made
clear what a great effort Wout had made on transcribing the text.
The journal provides some new insights into the personal life of
Schliemann. For example, he tells explicitly about his seasickness,
his admiration for Russian women, his comforts and discomforts of
travelling, his admiration for the art of conjuring, etc. I have the im-
pression that this journal is sincere, without bragging. Schliemann
does not even claim that he met Queen Victoria. I hope that this
publication will form new material for further studies of the life of
Heinrich Schliemann.
I should like to thank several persons who made this publica-
tion possible. First of all my thanks go out to Wout Arentzen for
letting me work on this project. On his behalf I like to thank Dr.
W. Bölke from the Heinrich Schliemann Museum Ankershagen who
made the start of this project possible all those years ago. Together
we like to thank Dr. N. Vogeikoff-Brogan (Doreen Canaday Spitzer

3

preface

Archivist at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens),
for providing the digital copy of the diary and answerings the many
questions I asked. Also: Dr. S. Kennell, independent scholar, who
provided several details and suggestions for the text of the journal.
And many thanks to Corné van Woerdekom and Karsten Wentink
of Sidestone Press, who found this project so interesting that they
wanted to publish it.
Special thanks to those who worked so hard on the translation
and editing of the original text of the journal and all the Dutch
texts: Phil Baker, Kelly Fennema, and Alice Samson.
Last but not least I want to express my gratitude to the fol-
lowing persons how helped me with the text in any various ways:
Alesia Ausiannikava, Ayolt Brongers, Evert van Ginkel, Anne-Marie
Goossens, Tiziano Goossens, Barry Peters, and Tim de Ridder
When this publication of Schliemann’s first journal was nearing
completion, I obtained from the Gennadius Library a full colour
copy of Schliemann’s travels to Italy and the Near East in 1858 (di-
ary: number A3). This is a journal with 250 densely written pages
(about 320 words per page) and mostly written in Arabic, Italian
and Greek, with some pages in English, French and even Swedish.
It will be an even greater task than the publication of Schliemann’s
European travels. It will certainly provide much more information
about Schliemann himself and his travels. And hopefully, it will pro-
vide much new discussion about Schliemann’s life.

Christo Thanos

Leiden, the Netherlands
December 2011

zum Andenken an Henry Schliemann St Petersburg 11 August 1861

5

introduction

Chapter 1

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