P. 1
Grenfell, Hunt [Eds.]. The Oxyrhynchus papyri. 1898. Volume 07.

Grenfell, Hunt [Eds.]. The Oxyrhynchus papyri. 1898. Volume 07.

|Views: 82|Likes:
The Oxyrhynchus papyri (1898)


Author: Grenfell, Bernard P. (Bernard Pyne), 1869-1926, ed; Hunt, Arthur S. (Arthur Surridge), 1871-1934, ed
Volumes: 1-15
Subject: Manuscripts, Greek (Papyri)
Publisher: London : Egypt Exploration Fund
Language: English; Ancient Greek
Call number: ocn495198102
Digitizing sponsor: Brigham Young University
Book contributor: Harold B. Lee Library
Collection: americana
The Oxyrhynchus papyri (1898)


Author: Grenfell, Bernard P. (Bernard Pyne), 1869-1926, ed; Hunt, Arthur S. (Arthur Surridge), 1871-1934, ed
Volumes: 1-15
Subject: Manuscripts, Greek (Papyri)
Publisher: London : Egypt Exploration Fund
Language: English; Ancient Greek
Call number: ocn495198102
Digitizing sponsor: Brigham Young University
Book contributor: Harold B. Lee Library
Collection: americana

More info:

Published by: Patrologia Latina, Graeca et Orientalis on Oct 16, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/01/2013

pdf

text

original

LIBRARY

Brigham Young University

^:^.
..:

?A

Ace. No.

196S:^#
-

-.

s

7

THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART
VII

HUNT

^

3315

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND
GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH

THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART
VII
EDITED WITH TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES

ARTHUR
;

S.

HUNT,

D.Litt.
;

HON. PH.D. KOF.NIGSBERG HON. LITT.D. DUBLIN HON. LL.D. GRAZ LECTURER IN PAPYROLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, AND FELLOW OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE CORRESPONDING MEMHER OF THE ROYAL BAVARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

WITH

SIX

PLATES

LONDON
SOLD AT

37 Great Russell St., W.C. AND 527 Tremont Temple, Boston, Mass., U.S.A. KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., Dryden House, Gerrard St., W. BERNARD QUARITCH, Grafton St., New Bond St., W. ASHER & CO., 13 Bedford St., Covent Garden, W.C, and 56 Unter den Linden, Berlin AND HENRY FROWDE, Amen Corner, E.C, and 29-35 West 32ND Street, New York, U.S.A.
I

The Offices of the EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND,

9 10

All righls reserved

OXFORD
HORACE HART, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

PREFACE
The
great majority of the papyri published in the following pages,
including the chief literary pieces, were discovered in the season of

1905-6; a few come from the finds of the years 1903 and 1904, and one or two in the non-literary section from those of 1897. In editing these texts I have unhappily lacked the co-operation of the friend and colleague with whom I have worked in partnership
since the foundation of the

Graeco-Roman Branch.

The

effects of his

be apparent to the readers of this book not only in its somewhat reduced size, which on the present occasion corresponds with our advertised intentions more closely than has
absence are,
I

fear, likely to

frequently been the case.

In particular, the principal novelty here

produced, the

Callimachus

papyrus

(lOll),

happens

to

abound

in

which a second pair of eyes would have been more than usually valuable. In these circumstances it is a matter for much satisfaction that I have again been able to obtain the

problems

for the solution of

generous assistance of Professor U. von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, who has made important contributions to the reconstruction and interpretation of the

new

classical

fragments

(1011-1015), especially of 1011.
I

For

some
to

further helpful suggestions on the last-named text
;

am

indebted

Professor Gilbert Murray

while

Professor U, Wilcken has very

kindly looked through the proofsheets of the non-literary documents,

and they have naturally profited not a little from his criticism. I regret that the promised excursus on the excavations and topography of Oxyrhynchus has had to be postponed, and that I cannot undertake that it will be included in the volume for 1910, which will But a plan consist of another instalment of the Oxyrhynchus Papyri. of the site has been prepared, and I hope that its appearance will not be much longer delayed.

ARTHUR
Queen's College, Oxford,
December, 1909.

S.

HUNT.

Digitized by the Internet Archive
in

2010 with funding from

Brigham Young University

http://www.archive.org/details/oxyrhynchuspapyr07gren

CONTENTS
Preface
List of Plates

...•••••
• •

Table of Papyri Abbreviations Note on the Method of Publication and List of

TEXTS
L
IL
III.

IV.

Theological Fragments (1007-1010) New Classical Texts (1011-1015) Extant Classical Authors (1016-1019) Documents of the Roman and Byzantinf. Periods
.

15

115

(a) Official
{i)

(1020-1026)
(1031-1033)
.

147

Declarations to Officials (1027-1030)
Petitions

i6o
167 175
191

{

(1034-1043) {e) Accounts and Lists (1044-1053) (/) Orders for Payment (1054-1057) (g) Prayers (1058-1060) {h) Private Correspondence (1061-1072)
{d) Contracts
.
.

209
.

212

214

INDICES
I.

New

Literary Texts
(a)

:

II.

1011 (Callimachus, {) Other Texts Emperors
.

Ae/i'a

and

)

233 240
244 246

III.

Consuls, Eras, Indictions

IV.

V.
VI.
VII.

Months and Days Personal Names
Geographical
Religion

246
.

247 252

254

viii

CONTENTS
PAGE
Official and Military Titles

VIII.

IX.

Weights, Measures, Coins

255 256

X. XI.
XII.

Taxes General Index of Greek and Latin Words
Index of Passages Discussed

.....

257 257 269

LIST OF PLATES
I.

1007
1011

recto,

1010
recto

recto,

1022

II.

Fol.

I

III.

1011 Fol.

2

verso
at the end.
.

IV•

V.
VI.

1012 1016
1017

Frs. 1-3

Cols, v-vi

.

Cols, xix-xx

.

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A.D.

1007.

Genesis
I

ii,

iii

.

1008. 1009.
1010.
1011.

Corinthians
iii,

vii-viii iv

.

Philippians
6 Ezra

....

Callimachus, Aetia and Ia7nbi
Treatise on Literary Composition

1012.

1013. 1014.
1015.
1016.

Menander,
Historical

//
Poem
.
.

.

Fragment

Panegyrical
Plato,

Phaednis
Phaednis

1017.

Plato,

1018.
1019.

Xenophon, Cyropaedia
Imperial Rescripts

i

Chariton, Chaereas atid Callirrhoi

1020.
1021.

Notification of the Accession of

Nero

1022. 1023. 1024. 1025. 1026.
1027.

Enrolment of Recruits
Arrival of a Veteran
.

Order

for a

Grant of Seed
of Performers

.

Engagement

.

Attestation of

Agreement

.

Denial of a Claim
Selection of

1028.

Boys

(4{)
.

1029. 1030.
1031.

Return of Hieroglyphic Inscribers
Notification of

Death

Application for Grant of Seed
Petition to the Epistrategus
Petition to Riparii

1032.

1033.
1034.

Draft of a Will

.

1035.
1036.
1037.

Lease of a Weaver's Implement
Lease of a House Lease of an Exhedra
.

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A.

D

1038.

Lease of Part of a House
Contract of Deposit

1039.
1040.
1041.

Loan

of

Wheat
for a

.

Guarantee
Receipt

Loan
.

1042.

Loan of Money
Taxing-List
List of

1043.
1044.

1045.
1046.

Dues

Taxing-Account Account of a Praepositus Account of Corn-Freights Account of Transport

1047.

1048.
1049.
1050.
1051.

Account

for

Games
.

Inventory of Property

1052.

Account of Revenues
Order
Order
for Delivery of
for Delivery

1053. 1054.
1055.

Account of Work on Dykes and of Ex penditure
of

Wine Wine
Aracus

1056.

Order Order

for Delivery of
for

1057.
1058.

Payment

Christian Prayer

1059.
1060.
1061.

Christian Prayer

Gnostic Amulet

.

Letter of Diogenes Letter of

1062.

Marcus

1063. 1064.

Letter to
Letter to

Amois
Didymas

1065.

Letter of Hephaestion

1066.
1067. 1068.

Letter of Nemesianus
Letter of Helene

.

Letter of Satornilus
Letter of Troilus Letter of Aurelius

.

1069.
1070.
1071.

Demareus

Letter of Pambechis Letter of Philoxenus

1072.

NOTE ON THE METHOD OF PUBLICATION AND
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
method followed in this volume is the same as that in new literary texts, two, 1011 and 1013, are printed in a dual form, a literal transcript being accompanied by a reconstruction in modern style. In other cases, and in the fragments of extant authors, the originals are reprogeneral
Parts I-VI.

The

Of

the

duced except
abbreviations,

for division of words, capital initials in

proper names, expansion of

and supplements of lacunae.

Additions or corrections by the

same hand as the body of the text are in small thin type, those by a different Non-literary documents are given in modern form with hand in thick type. accentuation and punctuation. Abbreviations and symbols are resolved addi;

and corrections are usually incorporated in the text and their occurrence is recorded in the critical apparatus, where also faults of orthography, &c., are corrected if they seemed likely to give rise to any difficulty. Iota adscript has been printed when so written, otherwise iota subscript is employed. Square brackets [ ] indicate a lacuna, round brackets ( ) the resolution of a symbol or
tions

abbreviation, angular brackets ( ) a mistaken omission in the original, braces letter or letters, double square brackets [[ 1] a deletion in the { } a superfluous
original.

Dots placed within brackets represent the approximate number of
;

letters lost or deleted
illegible
letters.

dots outside brackets indicate mutilated or otherwise dots

Letters with

underneath them are to

be considered

doubtful.
in

Heavy Arabic numerals
in

refer to the texts of the

Oxyrhynchus papyri

this

volume and

Parts I-VI, ordinary numerals to lines, small

Roman
are

numerals to columns.

The
P.

abbreviations

used

in

referring

to

papyrological

publications
:

practically those adopted in the

Archiv

fiir Papyrtisforsclmng, viz.

Amh.
A.

= The
S.

Amherst Papyri
,

(Greek), Vols.

I-II,

by

B.

P.

Grenfell

and

Hunt. Archiv = Archiv fiir Papyrtisforsclmng. B. G. U. = Aeg. Urkunden aus den K. Museen zu Berlin, Griechischc Urkunden. P. Brit. Mus. = Greek Papyri in the British Museum, Vols. I-II, by F. G. Kenyon Vol. Ill, by F. G. Kenyon and H. I. Bell.
;

xii

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

C. P. R.
P.

= Corpus Papyrorum Raineri, Vol. I, by C. Wessely. Fay. = Fayum Towns and their Papyri, by B. P. Grenfell, A. D. G. Hogarth.

S.

Hunt, and

P. Flor.
P. Gen. P.

= Papiri Fiorentini, Vol. I, by G. Vitelli. = Les Papyrus de Geneve, Vol. I, by J. Nicole. Goodsp. = Greek Papyri from the Cairo Museum,
(University of Chicago Decennial Publications).

by E.

J.

Goodspeed

P. Grenf.

=

Greek Papyri, Series

I,

by

B. P. Grenfell, and Series

,

by

B. P.

Grenfell and A. S. Hunt.
P. Heidelberg

Vol.
P. Leipzig

I,

=

= Verofifentlichungen aus der Heidelberger Papyrussammlung, by A. Deissmann. Griech. Urkunden der Papyrussammlung zu Leipzig, Vol. I, by

L. Mitteis.
P.
P.

Leyden = Papyri Graeci Musei Antiquarii Lugduni-Batavi, by C. Leemans. Oxy. = The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Parts I-VL by B. P. Grenfell and A. S.
Hunt. Reinach = Papyrus grecs et demotiques, by Theodore Reinach. Strassb. = Griech. Papyrus der K. Universitatsbibliothek zuj Strassburg im
Elsass, Vol.

P.
P.

P. Tebt.
J.

=

I, Parts 1-2, by F. Preisigke. The Tebtunis Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and E. J. G. Smyly; and Part

,

Goodspeed.
P. Tor.

=

Papyri Graeci Regii Taurinensis Musei Aegyptii, by A. Peyron.

Wilcken, Ost.

=

Griechische Ostraka,

by U. Wilcken.

I.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS.

1007.
5

Genesis
X 6•2 cm.

ii,

iii.

Late third century.
third

Plate

I (recto).

These few verses from the second and
contained on a fragment of a vellum
leaf,

chapters

of

Genesis are

which, like the Genesis papyrus from

Oxyrhynchus already published

(656), appears to be of an unusually early date.
in a

The

text

is in

double columns, written
later

medium-sized upright uncial which
rate.

can hardly be
fragment
at

than the end of the third century, at any
(Berl.

A
the

date

anterior to the third century has been claimed for two vellum leaves, the Kretes

Berlin

Klassikertexte v.

2.

17),

attributed

to

first

century, and a fragment in the British

Museum

of the

De

Falsa Legatione which

Kenyon
latter

Of the assigns to the second [Palaeogr. of Greek Papyri, p. 113). no facsimile has been published, but the age of the former seems to have been considerably exaggerated, and it may be doubted whether either of them The is to be separated from the present example by a very wide interval. columns of 1007, which contained about 33 lines, may be estimated to have measured some 16-5 cm. in height, the leaf having been of a rather square shape, not much taller than it was broad, like that of the Kretes. No stops occur a short blank space in 25 marks the close of a chapter. Qtoi is contracted in the usual way, but and are written out in full, and the only other compendium used is a most remarkable abbreviation of the so-called Tetragrammaton, which in the Septuagint is regularly represented by Kvpios. This abbreviation consists of a doubled Yod, the initial of the sacred name, written in the shape of a with a horizontal stroke through the middle, the stroke being carried without a break through both letters the same form of Yod is found on coins of the second century B. c. This compendium exactly corresponds with that employed in Hebrew MSS. of a later period, '"', which,
;

-,
1.

;

:i—

2
as Dr.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Cowley informs me, occurs
earlier epoch.
in

the tenth century and no doubt goes back

to a

much

As

is

well

known,

it

was a

peculiarity of the version

of Aquila to write the Tetragrammaton in the archaic Hebrew letters instead of but neither the earlier nor later Hebrew forms of the translating it by Kvpios has previously Tetragrammaton, nor the Greek imitation of the later form,
;

appeared

in the text of a

Greek MS. of the

LXX, except

,

the

Hexapla fragment

decided tendency to omit published by C. Taylor, Cairo Palimpsests, p. 26. was, however, observable in the early Oxyrhynchus papyrus (656), the word where in one passage a blank space was originally left in which the missing

A

archetype had

word was supplied by a second hand. Possibly the scribe of that papyrus or its Hebrew symbols before him which he did not understand, or the archetype had been intended to show the Hebrew symbols and they had not been filled in. At any rate, in the light of the present example, the question may be raised whether Origen's statement {in Ps. ii) that in the most accurate copies the (sacred) name is written in Hebrew characters was intended to apply,
' '

as

is

commonly assumed, only

to the copies of Aquila's version.

Apart from the substitution of the Tetragrammaton for Kvpios, the text, though interesting, is not so far as it goes particularly notable. As usual, it evinces no pronounced affinities with any one of the chief extant MSS., but In two passages, again (11. 20 and agrees here with one, there with another.
28),
it

sides with
(1.

some

of the cursives against the earlier

MSS.

of

them

30) having the support of citations in the

New

evidence, in one Testament and in

Philo.

Verso.
Col.
i.

Col.

ii.

]^ [5 ] [(]
[eis

navTos
ii.

TO

7

\eis\

"fyxrjv

(('

ynvwaKtiv

5

[)]
. .

[

napaSfiaoy (V

(
.

€[€

[[ [
ey

ii

16

oe

[]
nty

eOfTo (Kti

[][€
15

ay

[
(
eivai
{

enXaaev
fTi
. .

SK
.

t]t]S

[ [

[\][

[7]!€»'

([

1007.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
Recto.

[aurjjjy

2

25

[]\ ?( 8 [] []] [/ [ ] [ ]5 [
\6\

(
TJe

Col.

i.

iveKiv

.

23

Kev

[ ]€
[ciy

[ [

Col.

ii.

30

[ [

(

ep

.

1

35

([

['\)[

€7£

2.

The

letters are

very faint and uncertain.
authorities.

Possibly the article was omitted, as in

some

cursives
4.

and other

the abbreviation of the Tetragrammaton cf. introd. (so E) suits the space better than (AM). The is directly beneath in 1. 9, final of and ea of ayef, and so eight letters are the most >) of would give ten. But as the ends of the lines are that would be expected, whereas not kept very even and final letters are sometimes considerably compressed, such inferences
12.
-yi)

On

-^
18. 20.

-^ [(
DYM

-[6(

have

little

security.
is

omitted in E.
.

in one of Philo's two of this passage in Philo, Matt. xix. 5, Ephes. v. 31, &c., after quotations, Matt. xix. 5, Mark x. 7, Ephes. v. 31, &c., as well as by several cursives. [ywaocja A, and the citations in Matt., Mark, and 21. npos SO \
:

Ephes.

;

cf the previous note.
:

26.

avSpt in AELM, but is omitted by some cursives as well as added before in the Armenian and Ethiopic versions. Such forms appear here seems to be peculiar to this MS. The fornm 29. sporadically in the papyri from the second century B.C., e.g. P. Tebt. I. 24. 11 cf. Mayser, Granwiatik, p. 322.

28.

](
.
.

.

after

is

Omitted

in

the citations

([\,
;

is

34.

] [»])[:
:

so

Tetragrammaton
by Theodoret.

as well as

(ALM•. ! .
rijf

:

MSS., but the Space seems too short for the abbreviation of the is omitted in one of two citations of this passage

4

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1008.
I

Corinthians
265 X
14 cm.

vii-viii.

Fourth centur)'.

A

fairly

preserved leaf from a papyrus book, covering parts of the seventh

and eighth chapters of the First Epistle to the Corinthians. The handwriting, a good-sized sloping uncial, may be assigned on its own evidence to the second half of the fourth century, and to this date the accompanying documents, which 1009 and the \vere of the late fourth or early fifth century, also point Callimachus papyrus (1011) were discovered at the same time as this leaf. A rough breathing is occasionally used, and a mark of elision is found in 1. 7 a small comma, which is often not more than a dot, is sometimes employed to separate syllables when consonants occur in juxtaposition, and the same and s. Punctuation is symbol is added after final consonants other than
; ;

effected by means of blank spaces, which, in the case of longer pauses, are exaggerated and accompanied by a marginal coronis, the next line being at the same time made to protrude slightly to the left (11. 63 and 70). In addition to

the

(11. ^6 and 40) common theological contractions that of The text is not without interest. On the whole it is a good
;

is

noticeable.

one, generally
11.

agreeing with the earliest uncials Bt^A
29,

for

some exceptions

see notes on

i,

may be remarked in 11. 29 (punctuaNoteworthy coincidences with A reading found in one cursive of the tenth century, tion), 41, and 61. There are also five peculiar 68, Oeov in vii. 40, reappears in for of these the last two are probably merely variants, at 11. 5, 46, 49, 54, and 57
and
43.
1.
;

due to lipography.
Verso.

[]>
[]
[]
5

(f

?

[]'
[] []

'( ( (
ec
«;'

[]
6

[]

vii.

8

[]
[trai]

[]

[](

' ' ^'('(? ^
((
/?

(

ey


Svva

(

[6fp\os

[\
[] []

15

^ ( 8 ' [] [ « ]
SovXos eaTLv
[So]vXoi
ai/j£flJ]o)i/

1008.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
Xv
fi>


[

€f

""[]

S[e]

[]([']'

[8]

[(]
[]
i[av]

2 \\

[]
[ftlfai

8t[a]

[Se]Seaa[i]

[(] [ []€ []
[yv]vaiKa
[p]os

25

[^
[] []
[]
[€]

[aS]fX(poi

3

[]
35

] [] [ (] [(
]
)(^[(
[a/zjoi/

] ] €[ [ (]ea[v

[][( (^[

][ ] ]
['\
Se

\
Se

[
St

e

>

[

avai\y

([]

](

napOe

Se

[

([](

] []( [] [ ](

[yejt

[^
[

] ] ][
Se

[ [ ]
[
]
Se

eivai

Recto.

[]
4 []

'

€[ [ [aya

[

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Kv
Se

45

^*)?

(
[;]'
S]e

[/
['
avSpi
Aeyo)
S[e

wpos

'[
t8po\i>
t\i

()(]
50
Tiy

(
[

[(]
55
fSpaios
[ro]y

Se e)(fi nepi

Kap'Sia

6

) ??€[ ]
)([]
eav Se

^ [] ([ ([ [] [] [ ^ ([ [\ € [ [ \\ [
'i[S]iov

([( ]

[](

[ '[ - [\
uvai
Se

[

eav

[€

65

ev
ev

[

][ [ ][\ ](
]'
[
ee/^^e

\](

{]

] [
Se

Se\8eTai

[ 6ee

eav ourcoy

70

oSaev

(

] ] [ 8[ ( ] \
//
n[epL

\ ]] 8[
Se

Se

[
ei

] (8[^
[6
Se

e\rv

e

[5
Se ri[y

[ei

SoK]ei

ev[e
Se[i

75

eva [

ayana

ov[tos

]

irepi

[^

1008.
I.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
;

7

Tir

([\]•.

SO

D*FG

T(extus)-R(eceptus).
5.

is peculiar to the papyrus. SO i^AB, Sf KL, R, place fom» after 1 2. The first ( of yeueoee has been converted from an t. nSfX^m follows 13-14. In D*. 14-15. 7\[•: so NBDEF, &c., but -] (A, suitable reading.

The

10.

II.

N*FG

:

(\
;

t^AB, W(estCOU)-H(ort),

DcEKL,

addition of (v before

W—

DEFG

— .(. (
W-H;

DEFG.

^

|

T-R) would

be an equally

20. 23. 24.

[\\ ^: ]:
:

D*FG
SO

add

NB

(^
may
\oinov

(.

the papyrus

A), KL, of course have had
;

W—

R,

with

'" ««Db«EKLP, T-R.
34•

[ ' ([7 " *, (^:
25.

omitted by
28.

:

BFG, and bracketed by W-H. (V D*FG. should have been
:

before

29.

[]/

on so tiAB, &c., DEFG, T-R. so D*, but without interpunction ; tariv
; :

W-H

FG,

(^(€'\€'^
SO

itmv


W—
:

D'^EKL.
R,
5

*

;

D*FG.
as in

'

DEFG.
before
23.

/
1.

is

1.

t^AB
with

W—
D^'FG,

.

{( ), '

SO

^AB,

39• [npf
in
11.

!>?

NABDEFG, W-H;
:

apeafi

KLP, T-R.

The same

variation occurs

40 and
41—2.

45.

SO ii

ABD
:

om.
;

D<'EFGKL.
ay.
ay.

:
The

reading and punctuation of the papyrus coincides with that adopted by AV-H R, and SO Tischendorf with the (= B); addition of before and after om. AD. W-H. is read after ayia by t^BFGKL 43is added before both words by SO DEFGKL, T-R ;

. ( .
SO
ay.

\\ DEFGKL.

om.

D*E.

NAF^',

\
:

.—

;

[(^()
:

[]

NAB, W-H.
44.
45.

46.

N^cEFGKL,
48. evnapeBpo[v:

( () :
0|^
:

om.
1.

.
39.

cf.

note on

MSS. T-R.

SO

NABDE,
:

&C.,

W-H;

49•

etfoi

MSS.
before

50—1.
53•

D*
:

places

D*FG.

( .
is

also

the

reading of i^*ABD*,

W-H;

, T-R.

54• '';] for the lacuna,

f

MSS., but the inclusion of (v would make the supplement rather long and its omission, which was easy after the preceding -fv, is supported
")

by

1.

omits with 57. 55. «Spoios is placed after om. A. 56. fif
:

T-R

KL. (^

in

N^KL, T-R.

57. 58.

iVTi^MSS. KapSia SO i^AB,
T17:
; :

cf.

1.

NAB,
:

59.

W-H W-H SO NAB, W-H
;
;

54, note.

;

DEFGKL, T-R. DEFGKL, T-R. DEFGKL, T-R.

8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
){()•.
SO

KABDE,
n\apefvov
:

W-H
1.

;

(•
W-H;

KLP, T-R.

better

and

is

further confirmed by
e\/ivyTou

6i.

60. 61.

SO

NA,

cm. KL, T-R.
K'm
62.
:

,[ N*ABDEFG, W-H DEFGKL, T— W-H [] N*ABDEFG, W-H (,
so
:

([:
SO

so

;

irctu

l^ADEKL,
;

W-H

(with

It

;

NcRL, T-R. «cKL, T-R.

(),
faiiTov
v.
1.

ya

suits

the

papyrus
as
V. ].,

BDE
T-R.
1.

and

W-H

Cf.

59.
at the
is

the line for by with

W-H
64.

],^:
:

N*ABD*.
Di^L,

SO
is

68.

It

,
: :
:

t^AB, which

;

iroin

is

added

after SfSirai

W-H

;

( ,
(
;

R. There is no room by hicDbcEFGL (so T-R)
;

end of omitted

FG, (= DEFGL, T-R.

.)

.
(t^ADEFGKL)
t^AB
or ynp (B).

impossible to

tell

W-H

[()
72. It
is
fi.

put the

latter in the text

whether the papyrus had be and the former in the margin.
;

other MSS. practically certain that the papyrus agreed with SO the cursive 17

(so

W-H)

in

omitting

it after

tyvoi>[Ki]vai:

73.

is added here by Dl^EKL (T-R), and probably read eyv^ with iiABD*FG (W-H) rather than with D^EKL (T-R). in the papyrus did not agree with D^E in reading -ntpi te 75. mpi place of the better supported ow (rrtpi ( *).

[
:

if is

DEFGKL, T-R. tibtvai KL, T-R. SO NABDEFG, W-H W-H so NAB, DEFGKL, T-R.
added by
;

tyva

the papyrus certainly omitted ovhtv which

^

,

( ! (!
1009.

(
iv.

!

Philippians
15-1

iii,

cm.

Fourth century.

some verses from the Epistle to same codex as 1008, with which it was found. At first sight it docs not appear to do so, for the writing is rather smaller and the ink, instead of being black, is of a brown colour but the formation of the letters is closely similar, the height and breadth of the column would be approximately the same; and punctuation is effected, as in 1008, by means of blank spaces, not stops. A rough breathing is also occasionally employed
Probably
this

fragment, containing parts of

the Philippians, belonged to the

;

(1.

cf. 1008. 5) 34 misformed breathing.
;

;

the supposed circumflex

accent

in

1.

a6

is

perhaps a

The
of 1008.

textual qualities of this leaf bear also a general resemblance to those
Its
all

tendency

is

to support the three chief

agree at
line of its

consistently with

MSS., though it does not any one of them, and occasionally strikes out a
in
11.

own.

A

remarkable coincidence with the Sinaiticus occurs
be set discrepancies
in
11.

35-6,

but against this

may

a

and

16.

Disagreements with

1009.

THEOLOGICAL FKAGMEiMTS
in
1.

9
15

may be noted in 11. 8 and 10. For the order of the names a parallel is only to be found in the versions, while the variants and 36 are apparently not otherwise recorded.

in

11.

10, 19,

[eTTt

[ [
[^

\avTov
5

^ 8 ]<5 [ /^ ] ] [ 5] ]\ [
niarei
tcuu]
ei

Recto.

iii.

g

(is

(

reTeXti

[
10

15

. [
[ [
[ei

[ (( [€(] [
Se
et

[

]
S(

(
e

Se

](

((((]
€]
6r]epa)y

Tois

T€X\eioi

20

] ]€7[([]( [] (€ []^(
[ [
]

[(]

[][]
;!^
ety

[] (

Verso.

[{[•/

?

(V

ev

2$

( [
[
[(

(

at

iv.

2

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
eu
-

30

\ 8 ([ []
Yatjoere
irpoait^yrj

xaipere [('

\
avois

(
eyyvs

[tmeiKfi
icy

ev

(
et

ev^apa[s

npo[s

35

[](
[
[ev]

[]

[]'

8\\
. The
the ink.
2.
t

] [€ [
([(]\[

1

[

[£7'

(\

ayia

[

of

-^'
:
:

has the appearance of a
i^*.

, perhaps caused by

3.

alone will not fill the lacuna, and the papyrus but probably not both. W-H, or . T-R. 4. It is of course not certain that the papyrus did not read ii«DcEKL, T— R, or with FG.

but omitted

had

either

](! -! ] >*. ,
in

6. 7. 8.

t\v

rat is omitted but added by AB and others, W-H, T-R. 9. It is impossible to say exactly what stood in this lacuna, which is longer by the space of one letter than those of the preceding six lines. Some MSS. omit km (DEF, for instance), others including have and the spellitig has better support than If be omitted, would suit the papyrus not less \vell than the reading adopted. give rai [*;] R has (sO KL) BDcEFGKL, The position of so «AD, text, marg., T-R.

( ]
€K
:

t^AB,

. DEFGKL.

is

added

so

t^ABDE,
add
after

:

D*EFG

The

addition of

& would unduly
SeSucawftui.
et

W—

;

(

KL,

R.

,
t^).

the running of

N^ADEFGKL,
must have
with

lengthen the supplement,

in

K*D*E*FG

(\.
: :

NA

;•,

W—

\<( (\6 \
;.
W-H

:

.

W-H
;

tpavTov,

which ordinarily follows
fif
:

(,
err,

is

peculiar.

12. Totr 14.

(IS 8f

D*FG.

«>

so

15.
16.

(;)

()W-H
NAB,
:

DEFGKL, T-R.

SO the Syriac and Aethiopic

^](:
(](:
(.

Other MSS.,

19.

simply

(,

\\)(.

((
SO

W-H, T-R. moSt MSS., W-H, T-R
tif^KL add
D<^E)

MSS. The papyrus

, (^
;

^
;

ev

]
t^L
(so
[ovv

D*EFG,

(V

agrees with

H*AB

. W-H and
DEFG

in

reading

R),

have

FG).

1009.
2 2.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

ii

ymjaie uv([vye

:

this Order,

T-R.
24.

There
It is

are

some

faint

which has much the strongest support, is inverted in KL, marks above the which might be interpreted as an over-

written V

{>(),
The

clear that

25—6.
29.

.

but they are not certainly ink. which is omitted in D*EFG, stood in the lacuna. papyrus agrees with X* against other MSS., which read

,

adds

the ordinary reading here for other minor authorities substitute peculiar in having both.
:

FG

(()'] KM and some
34. 36.

[

:

]'
Toif after

.

.

. ,
is

but
is

The papyrus

1010.
8-4

6 liZKA.

X

5-6 cm.

Fourth century.

Plate

I (recto).

Oxyrhynchus has already presented us with several fragments in the Greek of theological wrorks extant, entirely or in part, only in the Apocalypse of Baruch (403), the conclusion of the Shepherd of translations, Hernias (404), Irenaeus, Contra Hacreses (405 of. P. Oxy. iv. p. 264), the Acis of Peter (849) and there is now to be added to the list the following specimen of the Greek of 6 Ezra, as modern scholars call the apocalyptic writing which
original

;

;

appears in the printed editions of the Vulgate as 4 Ezra, chapters xv-xvi. This specimen is but a short one, extending to three verses only (xvi. 57~9) which are inscribed on a vellum leaf comparable for its miniature dimensions to
842, the fragment of a lost Gospel.

There, however, the size of the writing was
is

more
are of

in proportion

with that of the leaf than

the case in 1010, where the letters

medium
fill

size,

so that ten or eleven are the usual

complement

of a line,

and

twelve lines
uncials

the page.

The upright and

neat though rather heavily formed

signs

may be attributed to the fourth century. No stops occur nor other beyond a diaeresis the usual horizontal stroke above a vowel at the end of a line represents a v. On the recto (flesh-side), which is numbered at the top , the writing is well preserved, but on the other side of the leaf it is rubbed and sometimes indistinct, though only in one place (11. 21-2) is there a real doubt
;

about the reading.

The sixth book of Ezra was written during a period of persecution, and James {Texts and Studies, iii. 2, p. Ixiv) following Gutschmid {Zeitschr. f wissensch. Theol. iii. i860) places the date of composition about A. D. 268;
Weinel, however {Neutest. Apokryphen,
fixed
p.

3

1

2),

holds that the time cannot be

more

definitely than

between

A. D.

120 and 300.

An

Egyptian origin has

often been postulated, and the discovery of this early fragment at O.xyrhynchus,

; ;

12

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

though of course not conclusive, to some extent strengthens that hypothesis. That the Latin version which alone exists was made from Greek is evident from the use of such words as rumphea in the passage quoted below Dr. Charles believes, on the strength of certain Hebraisms, that some Jewish document lies behind, but that is a question which does not here arise. Resemblances to passages in 6 Ezra have been pointed out in Books xi (ix) and xii (x) of the Sibylline Oracles, but with that doubtful exception no traces of the document have been recognized in Greek, and there are very few early
references in Latin.

The
xvi.

oldest certain quotations are those of the English

though it has been supposed that 60 in Ambrose, Ep. xxix. Two recensions of the Latin version are to be distinguished, a French and a Spanish, of which the principal representatives respectively are the MSS. SA and CM.^ In 6 Ezra (=4 Ezra xv-xvi), according to the conclusions of Dr. James (pp. cit., p. Ixxvii), the Spanish text, though it has often preserved moreover in xv. 59-xvi. 32, right readings, is the less trustworthy on the whole
writer Gildas,
is

who

lived in the si-xth century,

there

an allusion to

;

S parts company with A and joins CM, but the text of A, which is supported by the quotations of Gildas, remains generally preferable. A comparison of the two versions with the Greek bears out this criticism. The text of SA may be said to be very literal, though it
of which the
first

verse figures on our

leaf,

displays a tendency towards compression (58

montibus,

^-{\\. = inter
by
the

59

'

Iv

rots

6(.
of

ient,

58

^-\=^
is

rursum)

and

variation

^
is

=

in

wording
in v.
is

(57

peribunt).

That of

CM

marked
57
closer

same
is

tendencies, but

also less faithful in other ways.

Thus

ipse (ipsa)

not in the Greek, rumphea (SA) though not a Latin word,

gladio

subvertentur

(CM) which is used again later in the is a much less exact rendering of

-{] ),
verse to translate coincide and there
is is is

and

than contereniur

59 mandueabunt carnes siias retains the original order which in On the other hand the to conform to the commoner Latin usage. repetition of the possessive adjective in siiuvi saiiguineni must be placed to the

and

in

v.

CM

is

made

credit of

CM, and

in v. 59,

where S and

CM

a serious
is

divergence from A, the Greek, though the reading
evidently closer to the version of

unfortunately uncertain,
corrupt
;

SCM

than that of A, which

cf note
of the
or the

ad

loc.

A
numeral

slight

difficulty is raised

at the top of the recto.

by the occurrence mentioned above Does this refer to the fortieth leaf

Since the Beiisly-James edition (189•;), two valuable MSS. of the twelfth century have come to light, one at Brussels, described by Donatien de Bruyne in Kev. BenidUtine, 1907, pp. i54-7, the other, which is being utilized by B. Violet for his forthcoming edition, at Leon.

1010.
fortieth

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
no sign of any
figure, in the

13

page

?

There

is

corresponding position of
as here, in the centre of

the verso, but that
it

may

be due to the damaged condition of that side of the leaf: cf e.g. 656, 697, P.

was

usual, at

any rate when the numeral was placed,
;

the upper margin, for each page to be numbered

Amh.

i.

Neither supposition, however,

is

quite satisfactory.

The Greek contained on
;

the

and since the sides of the leaf corresponds with four lines of Bensly's text preceding 56 verses occupy only 96 lines the fortieth leaf would not be expected No doubt \vith a page of such small size an estimate of this kind can so early.

two

only be approximate

;

a preliminary page or two

may

also be reckoned at the

compression which has But these considerations combined would not account On the for a difference of 15 leaves out of 39 (96-^4 = 24, 24 + 15 = 39). the other hand the fortieth page or twentieth leaf ought to have been passed This discrepancy, however, may forty-ninth page is what would be looked for. be explained without much difficulty by supposing that the writing w^as rather smaller at the beginning of the book and that it gradually increased in size. But on either hypothesis some modification of the ordinary view of these two chapters seems necessary. It is generally considered that they were written as an appendix to 4 Ezra (James, op. cit., p. Ixxviii, Weinel, op. cit., p. 311), and That view is now that they never circulated in any other guise or position. tenable only on the supposition that this pocket edition extended to more volumes than one and it certainly does not appear at all probable that the form here exhibited would have been selected for a work on the scale of 4 Ezra and 6 Ezra, which might easily have been reproduced in a small single volume by the employment of a somewhat larger page and a more compressed script. The present discovery therefore rather suggests that the sixth book of Ezra was If the figure 40 is the number of originally current independently of the fourth. the leaf, this would point to the existence of some prefatory matter no longer If, on the other hand, the numeration, as is more represented in the Latin. likely, refers to the page, the book began in the same abrupt manner that now
beginning of the book, and some allowance
for the

made

been noted

in the Latin.

;

;

characterizes

it.

Recto.
A*
r^y
ei>

Verso.

Sia

(
(V

,'

(' [?

:

:

14
5

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
TToXeiy

navTfS
iv
oty

r^H

(8
019

20

VSaroi
(f


(

59

rjKfii

(
'

fi>

Xa[i]fa

€(

[]

Sivrepov

shall

(Thy children) shall die of hunger, and thou shall fall by the sword ; and thy cities be destroyed, and all thy people that are in the plains shall fall by the sword, and they that are on the mountains and highlands shall die of hunger and shall eat their own flesh and drink their own blood in hunger for bread and thirst for water. At first thou art reduced to misery (?) and again a second time (thou shalt receive woe).'
Latin Version of
Studies,
57
iii.

SA

(Bensly, Liber

Ezrae

qtiartus xv. 57-9, in Texts

and

2)
tiii

Et

nati

fame
in

intcricnt, et tu i-iunphea cades, et civitates tiiae contereniur,

58 et

omnes

tut

campo gladio cadent ;

Et

qui sunt in monlibus

peribnnt, et inanducabunt carnes suas et sanguinem bibent a
^^ et siti aquae.

fame fame pants

Infelix primaria venies, et rnrsuvi accipies mala.

57• fumae iibent S'A, bibant
ras.) ?nise
.

A

lui in

SA\

iuae in

A

58.

famae
.

A

(bis)

mandticabatit

S

S

sili

SA', sHis

A

59. infelix

.

.

?»ala ^, propter priorem {-em in

.

.

el iieruin cxcipies

mala

A
cit.,

Latin Version of
57

CM

(Bensly, op.

p. 89)

Et filii

tui fame interient et tu ipse gladio cades, et civitates tue subvententur

58 et

omnes

tui in

campum

gladio cadent.

Et

qui sunt in viontibus

dispericnt.
59

et carnes suas

panis et

siti

aquae.

manducabiint et sanguinein sunm bibent a Infelix, primaria venies. et rursum accipies mala.
]\I

fame fame

57. ipsa

gladio cadent in campo

59.

om. primaria

I. The sentence is to be completed ev 21-2. It is unlucky that there is a doubt concerning the reading here. The termination of is quite uncertain ; it may be or or the last would best account for primaria in SCM, but or are more intelligible and give the expected antithesis to « SfvTfpov. In fifv the is the most doubtful point, the traces suggesting rather or . peXqaas or /if or pe aiveis could be read, but none

-

|.

;

(!

1010.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
sense or explains either of the later versions,

15
whereas

of these gives any good is unsuitable. even if not very satisfactory, is not far from infelix primaria venies ; however remains hardly accounted for. James, op. cit., p. Ixxiii, The alternative in proposes that propter priora miserrima should be restored, and that the Greek might have fXeavus, which would serve to explain the two versions. The emendation may been «V be right, but it is now seen that the ingenious suggestion for the Greek was mistaken. propter priora is not a proper : miserrima is corroborated by both infelix and (-toc) rendering of it is an interpretation rather than a translation. ;

€,

A

II.

NEW CLASSICAL
1011.
Fol.
I

TEXTS.

Callimachus, Aetia and lamhi. 30X
and
18 cm.
III (Fol.
i

Late fourth century.
It

Plates II

recto, Fol. 2 verso).

authors represented

might reasonably have been expected that, among the many classical by the papyri of Egypt, an Alexandrian poet so celebrated and so prolific as Callimachus would not fail to find a prominent place. Hitherto wooden tablet at Vienna has indeed that expectation has not been realized. supplied some considerable pieces of the Hecale (edited by Th. Gomperz, 1893;

A

Wilamowitz, Gotting. Nachrichteu, 1893, pp. 731-47); but the contributions fragment at Alexandria from the Liymns, and a scrap of scholia, also on the Hymns^ in the Amherst collection (P. Amh. 30). The deficiency is, however, now amply made good by a discf.

of the papyri have consisted of a small

covery restoring to us substantial pieces of two important works, previously Iambi; and known only from short and disconnected citations, the Aetia

by a

fortunate chance the new fragments include what was probably the most popular passage of the Aetia, the famous love story of Acontius and Cydippe. As now reconstituted the find, which was made in the winter of 1905-6,
consists

unplaced.

of seven leaves from a papyrus book, with a few small pieces still One of the leaves is nearly perfect and a second is only slightly

broken

;

but the others are
is

all

more or
it

less severely

damaged.

Even where

the papyrus

intact,

however,

is

often extremely difficult to read, owing

partly to the rubbed and discoloured state of the surface, partly to the fading of

i6
the ink, which
period.
Its
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
of the light brown kind frequently

met with

in

the Byzantine

ancient readers had already found the manuscript unsatisfactory in

and letters or words, occasionally whole lines, have here and there been rewritten. In some parts of Foil. 6 and 7, moreover, the ink has run badly, and the papyrus is besides worm-eaten. Where there has been no deterioration the large and handsome script is of course legible enough. Though generally sloping it is sometimes erect, and in the size and quality of the writing, too, some variation is noticeable an irregular appearance is also caused by the occasional
this respect,
;

exaggeration of certain

letters, e.g.
lines,

.

The

coarse

down
;

strokes contrast strongly

which are at times barely distinguishable from the fibres of the papyrus, and are commonly small e and narrow. Like that of 847, this hand seems to represent a transitional stage between the sloping oval style, predominant in the third century, and the squarer, heavier type of the fourth and fifth. Two further considerations assist in the determination of the date (i) the semicursive notes and additions which have been occasionally inserted, in several cases by the original writer, and of which the age is more easily
with the light horizontal
:

estimated than that of the more formal script of the text;
a small group of documents in the

(2)

the fact that

company
is

of which the present papyrus

was

discovered (1033

is

one of them) was dated about the year 400.
this

On

these various

grounds the production of
if

codex

to be placed in the fourth century and,
it

greater precision
;

is

desired, the third quarter of

is

perhaps the

likeliest

period

1008 and 1009, which were also found along with 1011, appear to belong to about the same epoch. The work of the original scribe has undergone a good deal of modification. To him are due the pagination and the stichometrical figures below the columns, some paragraph!, and frequently diaereses and marks of elision but accents, breathings, and stops are to a large extent subsequent additions by one or other of
;

the later hands which have introduced corrections or annotations. hands, at
glosses at
least,
11.

Two

such

are

distinguishable, one writing in irregular uncials (e.g. the
11.

lai, 123, 218), the other in semicursive (e.g.
latter,

261-4), an^^ both,
of the text.

but especially the
accentuation of
11.

using an

ink darker than

that

The

81-9 has the appearance of being original, but this is exceptional, and elsewhere the different shade of ink in the accents commonly shows a later hand, which, however, sometimes only renovated what was already there. Accents are not inserted at all systematically, some leaves (Foil. 2, 3, 4) being plentifully supplied, others (Foil. 1,6, 7) having very few, while Fol. 5 shows many more on the verso than on the recto. From the same source come a few marginal signs, the significance of which is not always evident. The text as and in spite of the efforts of the it originally stood was not a very accurate one
;

1011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
;

17
cf.

correctors the text sometimes remains in an unsatisfactory condition
11.

notes on

7, 39, 6a,

&c.

It

remains to consider the arrangement and subject-matter of the fragments.

The
tion.

position in the
Fol.
I
,

codex of three out of the seven leaves
It

is

fixed

by the paginais

containing the conclusion of the story of Acontius and Cydippe,

numbered

in the left-hand corner of the recto 152.

Callim. Fr. 26 that this

was already known from elegy was part of the third book of the Aetia, and
ii.

according to Schneider, Calliniachea,
third

pp. 99 sqq.,

it

stood early in the book,

a view which, as will be seen, suits the data of the papyrus.

The

subject of the

supposed by Schneider to have been inventions and inventors, and Cydippe's history was, he thinks, introduced in connexion with the art of writing as an illustration of the injurious results to which that art might lead. Acontius,

book

is

handsome youth, fell in love with the beautiful Cydippe and seeing her one day in the temple of Artemis he wrote on a fine apple the words, By Artemis, I will marry Acontius,' and unobserved rolled this in front of Cydippe. She picked it up and read the inscription, then threw it aside, and, thinking no more of Acontius, proceeded to wed another suitor. The preparations were all made when she suddenly fell ill. Three times the same obstacle to the marriage occurred, and at last her father betook himself to the oracle of Apollo and inquired the cause. Apollo informed him of the broken oath and of the anger of Artemis, and advised him to carry out his daughter's undesigned engagement He accepted the advice, the nuptials were duly celebrated, and to Acontius. Acontius and Cydippe lived in happiness. Such in brief summary is the story as told with elaborate elegance by Aristaenetus, Epist. i. ic, whose debt to Callimachus has long been recognized; cf. Buttmann, Mythol. ii. p. 115, and, more recently, Dilthey, De Callim. Cydippa. The papyrus, which preserves the
a
;

'

latter part of the tale, including the illnesses of

Cydippe, the

visit

of her father

to the oracle,
of the

and the happy event

(11.

1-52),

now
:

enables us to see the extent

debt.

Aristaenetus follows Callimachus in the main outlines, and his
cf.
11.

prose frequently echoes the language of the poet

20, 29-31, 42-3,
1.

47-9

with the excerpt from Aristaenetus quoted in the note on

10

;

but he omits

some
is

details

letters

and introduces others of his own. The relation of the two Ovidian between Acontius and Cydippe {Epist. Her. 20, 21) to the Greek versions

comparatively remote.

This discovery, however, not only displays the beauty of the model of
Aristaenetus
says,
it reveals the source of Callimachus. He obtained the story, he from Xenomedes, an early historian of Ceos, whose true character now emerges for the first time cf. 1. 54 and the note ad loc. The legend, then, was a Cean one and the fact that a similar tale is told by Antoninus Liberalis,
;

;

;

c

i8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
i,

on the authority of Nicander, concerning the Cean heroine becomes more intelligible. Callimachus proceeds (11. 56-74) to give a brief summary of the mythical history of Ceos as narrated by Xenomedes, several details of which are quite novel and he expressly credits the historian with a love of the truth (1. 76). The last three verses of the page form the transition to another theme. Between Fol. i and Fol. 2 a large gap intervenes. The verso of Fol. 3 contains the conclusion of the following book of the Aetia. In this epilogue Callimachus, after a reference to the meeting of Hesiod with the Muses at Hippocrene, an experience which he had in the proem to his work represented as having happened in a dream also to himself, takes a formal farewell of poetry, and declares that he will now devote himself to prose. The poet must then at this time have had in view a large and important prose work and it is natural to suppose that he was here alluding to his nimKe?, a kind of literary encyclopaedia, which is said by Suidas to have extended to 20 books and must have occupied the author during a long period. But thellimKes were certainly written at Alexandria and it would hence follow that the Aetia were not completed, as held by Schneider, op. cit. ii. p. 40, at Cyrene, and the choice would lie between the view of Merkel (Apollon. Rhod. p. xxi), that these poems, though begun were not published in youth, and that of Hecker, Coin. Callim. p. 16, that they were the product of the poet's maturity. At any rate the present passage is in thorough accordance with the view of Wilamowitz {Tcxtgesch. d. gr. Bukoliker, pp. 173-4, cf. Gutting. Nachr. 1893, pp. 745-6) that the poetical activity of Callimachus is to be assigned to the prior part of his career, and that his appointment at the Alexandrian library turned his energies into another channel. Below these

Metamorfh.

Ctesylla, at once

;

;

]

;

final verses is inscribed

the

title

of the foregoing book,
the fact that no

the Aetia of Callimachus."

From

The fourth Book of number beyond four had been
'

mentioned
it

in

the citations from this work, the inference had been drawn that

did not include the papyrus.

more than

four books

;

and

this

is

now

definitely confirmed

by

The

fourth

book of the Aetia

is

followed

by the Iambi, with which the
do the numbers
is

remainder of the leaves are occupied.
or to pages

Their arrangement depends largely upon
:

the view taken of the foliation of this codex
?

refer to leaves

As

has been remarked in connexion with 1010, in these early
a figure, which
the

books both sides of a leaf often bear centre of the upper margin and gives that of the page; cf. e.g. 656, 697, P. tion of columns in a roll, 657. In the under side only of the leaf is foliated.

commonly

set in the

number
i,

of the

Amh.

and, for

column rather than the analogous numeranumbers which

present case the left-hand corner of the
Since, however, the three

1011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

19

can be read with certainty (Foil, i, 3 and 5) are all even, it is legitimate to suppose that they refer to pages which were numerated in the series 2, 4, 6, An early parallel for such a method of pagination is, indeed, to seek 8, &c. while, on the other hand, an example of numeration of leaves as opposed to pages is probably to be recognized in Berliner Klassikertexte, v. 2. 18, where
;

a leaf bears

If the gatherings were, as in opposite corners the figures 9 and 6^. seems likely, quaternions, the 9th gathering would begin with the 65th leaf. But let us consider the consequences of the hypothesis that in 1011 leaves and not pages are meant. On the recto of Fol. 2 the critical figure is unfortunately illegible, but since Fol. 3 is numbered 188, and is no doubt either the next leaf or the next but one to Fol. 2, the defaced number on the latter would be Thirty-three leaves at least would therefore be lost between either 186 or 187. Fol. I (=152) and Fol. 2, i.e., on an average of 80 lines to the leaf, 2,640 lines. and the earlier portion of the Foil. I and 2 themselves add 89 lines more story of Cydippe, if it bore about the same relation in bulk to the account of Aristaenetus as the latter part does, may be estimated at approximately 1 15 verses. One more leaf, at least, must be added by way of preface so that even if the Cydippe came at the beginning of the third book, the two last books of the Aeiia will have extended to upwards of 3,000 lines, or, on the assumption that they were more or less equal in size, some 1,500 lines each. Evidently this is not a satisfactory result. There is the analogy of Apollonius Rhodius but poetical books other than dramatic works, whether in Greek or Latin, do not usually run to so great a length, and moreover we have some
; ; ;

positive evidence that the Aeiia were no exception to the rule.

Suidas relates
of
verses.

that Marianus,

the Hecale,

who flourished in the fifth century, produced a Hymns, Aetia, and Epigrams of Callimachus in 6,810 iambic
would rather be
of

^
amount
;

Marianus

is

hardly likely to have effected a considerable reduction in the
in the opposite direction.

number
But the
if

of the lines; the tendency

extant

hymns and genuine epigrams
some
If

Callimachus
lines,

to

1,400 lines, and the Hecale appears to have been a lengthy

the four books of the Aetia averaged

1,500

a

poem much

therefore,

larger total

on the other hand the alternative view be adopted, that the foliation of this MS. referred to pages, and consequently the foregoing estimate of leaves and lines be divided by two, the Seven or eight hundred lines is the normal compass of difficulties disappear.
than 6,810 iambics would be expected.

a book, and the scope of Marianus' metaphrase, with some allowance for

hymns

and epigrams no longer extant, becomes more natural. The Iambi open with a general prologue, extending to about 30 lines, of which the first three and a half had already been correctly reconstructed from
C 2

20
scattered citations.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

At 1. 103 begins the story of Bathycles' cup, which was to be given to the wisest man and went the round of the seven sages until it came a second time to Thales, by whom it was dedicated to Apollo of Didyma cf. Diog. Laert. i. 28 hi] fV Tois

(
hi
is

Maiavbpiov
bovvai

/,
is

'. ((
The
first

yap

(5 ?; ?
brj

, ')•
:

6

(Fr.

95)•

The
is in

sixteen
rather

verses on Fol. 2 are
better case.

much obscured by

mutilation, but Fol. 3 verso

Thales

discovered drawing geometrical figures by Bathycles' son,

who

offers

him the cup.

two verses and the

gist of part of the following

passage were previously known from Diogenes Laertius and Diodorus Excerpt. Vat., by means of which attempts had been made at restoration (Fr. 83 a) with,
as

now

seen, indifferent success

;

cf.

note on
11.

11.

124-8.

The

sequel

is

lost

with the lower half of the leaf; but since
first visit

131 sqq. apparently relate to the
it

to Thales,

and the recto of

Fol. 3 concerns a different subject,

follows

The question then arises, what is the extent of the loss between Fol. 2 and Fol. 3 ? Does the latter follow immediately upon the former, or is there a leaf missing ? The second alternative appears to make the introductory part of the story rather disproportionately
that the story

was

finished off very briefly.

long

:

if

the travels of the cup were narrated in about 40 verses, about 35 ought

to have sufficed to explain the occasion of them.

This Iambus then becomes

a very short one, certainly
of brevity

;

but that would be in accordance with the promise
(1.

made
this

at the outset

103).

A
is

further slight advantage

may

be

claimed

for

view, that

it

is

consistent with

a gathering of six sheets,
;

which

is

perhaps a more likely number than seven
side.

cf.

p.

22.

The

identity

of the third figure on the recto of Fol. 2

too doubtful to be urged as evidence

on either

Several verses from the missing later portion of the
;

poem

are

preserved in the extant fragments

cf.
is

note on
clearly

1.

138.
in the left corner 188,

With the
a fresh topic
is

recto of Fol. 3, which
is
;

numbered

reached.

Some man who was
first

the object of general aversion
is

introduced

but after the

few lines the subject

completely obscured
Fol. 3 quite

by the mutilation
by a
single leaf,

of the papyrus.

Fol. 5, which bears on the recto the

number

192,

was separated from

and the gap

is

certainly to be filled

by

Fol. 4.

This

is

are the
laurel,

evident from the fact that the last few lines of the recto of Fol. 4 (11. 21 1 sqq.) commencement of the story of the contest between the olive and the

which

is

recounted

are fairly preserved.

in Fol. 5. Of the verso of Fol. 4 the first 15 verses They apparently relate to a legend of a reversal of the

1011.

NEW
Aesop

CLASSICAL TEXTS
when the spheres
11.
1.

21
of

common
known
is

order of nature in the reign of Saturn,

men and

beasts were exchanged.

This story

is

referred in

17 1-3, a passage already

as an adcspoton, to

(cf.

the citation in

54 of Xenomedes), but
is

not found in the extant collection of Aesopian fables or in those of Babrius.
rest of the verso
is intelligible until
is

The
that
trees

and the recto
in
1.

is

severely damaged, and there

little

211 the narrative of the dispute between the

two

begun.

If,

as

may

well

be the

case, the preceding lines of the recto all

this, the fable would appear to have been narrated by one of the persons whose meeting is described in 11. 193 sqq. The first two and a half verses of the story itself were already extant (Fr. 93 a), but nothing was

belong to the preface of

the

known concerning the nature of the quarrel, or of Callimachus' treatment poem of which a substantial portion is now happily recovered in
Schneidewin, Exercit. Grit.
ix. p. 57,

of

it

in

Fol. 5.

suggested that the point resembled that of one

of the fables of Aphthonius (Furia 212), where an olive-tree after deriding a fig
for the loss of its leaves
is broken by a snowstorm which left the fig unharmed. the discussion is of a much more This conjecture, however, is not verified In rhetorical speeches the rivals expatiate in turn upon their elaborate kind.
;

own

respective merits and advantages, the laurel dwelling

upon

its ritualistic

and

ceremonial uses, and taunting the olive with the indignity of association with

To this the olive replies at length (11. 242 sqq.), priding (11. 218-239). on assisting to honour the dead, and, with regard to the pretensions of the laurel, pointing out that the olive-branch was the prize of victory at Olympia, The olive proceeds (11. 260 sqq.) to claim which ranked before Delphi. superiority on the ground, first, of a more illustrious origin, secondly, of its At serviceable qualities, and thirdly, of being the emblem of the suppliant. 11. 291-6 another tree intervenes in the interests of peace, but with the result of making the laurel, which is getting the worst of the argument, the more angry, and the would-be peacemaker only meets with abuse. Here the papyrus fails us and, since the next leaf is missing, we cannot tell how the quarrel was brought
corpses
itself

to a termination.

The
which
to the
is

position of Foil. 6
filled

and 7 is less definitely determined. The latter, on both sides not with iambics but trochaic tetrameters, belongs
;

same sheet as Fol. 5 but since the contents are quite different the pair must have been separated by at least two leaves. It is convenient to assign Fol. 6, which in outward condition rather resembles Fol. 7 (cf p. 16), to the vacant position. But Fol. 6 does not contain the beginning of the trochaic poem and therefore cannot be the immediate predecessor of Fol. 7 neither does it appear to follow directly on Fol. 5, for there is no sign of any connexion with the story of the olive and laurel, which can scarcely have been brought to its
;

22

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
6.

conclusion in the course of the eight or nine lines which are missing at the top
of Fol.

Hence,

if

Fol. 6 be placed here,
7,

it

is

best to suppose that four leaves

and that Fol. 6 was the second or third of them. On this theory, unless the unsatisfactory assumption be made that the disposition of the sheets was irregular, the gatherings in this codex will have consisted of six sheets at least. It is certain in the case of Foil. 2-5, of which the last three and probably all four were consecutive, that the verso preceded and either recto and verso should precede alternately (e.g. P. Amh. i and the Cairo Menander), or one should consistently come first in the left half
intervened between Foil. 5 and
;

of the gathering, the other in the right (e.g. P. Heidelberg

i

;

cf.

Dziatzko,
the

Buchwesen,
latter

p. 145).

The gatherings

of the present
is

MS. were arranged on

method,

Foil. 2-5,

where the verso
;

consistently uppermost, belonging to

the

left-hand portion of the gathering
in the opposite portion, to

most
arises

vith regard to Fol.
if

i,

the recto would of course be upperwhich Fol. 7 is referred. difficulty, however, which being divided from Fol. 2 by 34 pages or

A

17 leaves would,

the gatherings uniformly consisted of six sheets,
the
recto

fall

in the

right-hand

half of a gathering, where
is

should

precede the verso.

The

reverse

actually the case

;

and we have therefore

to suppose that

some

of the gatherings were of fewer sheets than six.

To

return to Fol.

6, it is

doubtful which side of the leaf

came uppermost,
(11.

but the aspect of the two margins slightly favours the view that here too the
verso preceded.
367), pentameters

Literary matters are the prevailing topic
(II.

—tragedians

312,

313, 366), poetry (11. 331-2), choliambics and Hipponax but the leaf is badly mutilated, (11. 334-5, cf. 1. 362), the Muses (II. 357, 361) and only here and there a complete verse emerges. No coincidences occur here

with the extant fragments, though the latter include lines which

have been derived from

•,
side
is

this

poem,
there

Fr. 9^ C

Tis rpaytoSos

Of

the contents of Fol.
or,

7

.
;

may

well

e. g.

Fr.

84 ov
to be said.

rpay^hos

is

not

much

No

verse on either

It is, however, something to learn that Callimachus, like other iambographers, wrote in trochaic tetrameters (trochaic pentameters are exemplified in Fr. 115); and the remains

complete,

apparently, capable of successful completion.

his use of the measure was marked by an unexpected middle of the verse is repeatedly neglected cf. II. 378, Callimachus thus allows himself the same licence 381, 390, 396, 418, 421, &c. in this respect as the comedians. On the other hand, he must have been sparing of resolution, since no instance of it occurs in an equivalent of about

are sufficient to

show that
in the

freedom.

Caesura

;

30

verses.

That the Iambi did not extend

far

beyond

this point

cannot of course be

1011.
asserted, but
it

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

23

would hardly be expected, since the bool< is ah'eady of some if the argument above is correct, not less than seven more leaves, or 560 lines, preceded Fol. 7, making, with the addition of the latter, a total of some 700 lines. Extant fragments prove that the Iambi also included pure iambics, so that, unless these occurred on the leaves supposed to be missing between Fol. 5 and Fol. 7, a further considerable addition has to be made on their account. The minimum length of the book may thus be estimated at from 800 to 900 lines.
length.
Fol. 2 contained about 65 lines, and,

the leaves
Fol.

For the sake of clearness a may here be added
:

brief

summary

of the disposition and contents of

I

Fol. 2 verso

verso and recto (pp. 151-2) = Aet. iii, story of Cydippe. Aet. iv, conclusion, and Iamb., prologue. (p. 185 ?)
recto (p. 186?)

= =

conclusion

of

prologue, and

story of

Bathycles

{Iamb.
Fol. 3 verso (p. 187)

1).

=
:

story of Bathycles continued.
2).
?).

recto (p. 188)
Fol.

subject doubtful {Iamb.

4 verso

Fol. 5

= story of the reign of Saturn (continuation of Iamb. 2 recto [p. 190] = story of dispute between laurel and olive {Iamb. 3). verso and recto (pp. 191-2) = dispute between laurel and olive con[p.

189]

tinued.

Fol. 6 verso

and

recto [pp. 195-6 or 197-8?]

=

a piece relating to poetical
4).

composition, especially tragedy {Iamb.
Fol. 7 recto and verso [pp. 201-2
?]

=

trochaic

poem

{Iamb.

5).
I

In the reconstruction and interpretation of this difficult text

have received

invaluable assistance from Professor U. von Wilamowitz-Moellendorfif, to
is

whom

Many no slight degree such success as may have been attained. restorations and comments will be found expressly attributed to him in the notes below but the frequency of these references is by no means the measure The proofsheets were also seen by Professor Gilbert of my great obligations. Murray, whom I have to thank for a number of acute suggestions and criticisms.
due
in
;

24

5

^((• \8\•( '^•

\€ '(^( ^ '8((.
Fol.
I

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
verso.

eevvt/'^^eao)(ooeevoo

15

("€.'> [. .]€€
V

(.\\ €^€ €(•
('[.]

i

('([.] (€€

20

2

(^ \\( '](<
\€(€ \\(^
[.

•/[ '^''^^
{..\^

3

..(
.]'\€€
,
.

€ '^
.

]011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
verso.

25

Fol.

I

{) \(
'

8

5

10

((,
15

'

• !
e^efeneiv

,{)' '4
yap

'

aeiarj

, , ', •
^
nep
'iSes

,
lepa
etXe

pev

o^eiav

h

' ' {) ', ' '\( [] (, ' 4( • ({)) \\ 3 ,
ey

20

[] (€
6
Tfj

'

€v

25

'

.

.

.

, '. ? ,. ^ [ , .•[ , (, ,, , .€
"

,( € ,
ijpvyes

,
[]$

e^fi.

kv

[]({)

'

a6

35

)(^€€(' 88 \.'\(. ''^.
. . .

40

( / )8
Fol.
recto.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

((8' \\(.'( ^^^^
Plate

(('€ ^8\
'
45 5°

.

55

^ ^^
€€(
.

'\€\ '• ''' €((€ '(€
-^^. .^
[.]
. .

[.]

.

(>

.

.

.

1011.

NEW

?
35

^
y
S'

CLASSICAL TEXTS

27

€[](' )(\\\
Xij/eaij
6

40

, '(){)• , ,
6•
'
avems ndv

, ^ ,.
{) '
6

^^.

nevOepoi,

6

Keios

oilpeos

Albs

re

oprvyes kv

()
Oios

ey

.
Plate
eiai

eipero

S'

'inos.

)(rj

{)
<€
45

5 (

? ^, () ? . ( ^ ^^
kiriTpiyov
St

(

\ ?. ? ,? ? ?, ?
Fol.
1

recto.

II.

oiTives

5e

'4'

Kele,

55

^ '
Tas

'
.

^^€ , ^?
^
'

ivl

as

[.

.

[.]

] ]€ ;[ ^ ?, (,
6 ^)€
. .

,

...

iv

Kapvais'

28
60

[.]€^((\^. (€)( €(\€( '

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

65

(\ '(:) ^'^ \>^'\^
^^( (•(€( ((( •€ [ [. €^^ ^^.^^ ,
. .
.

70

75

^ (
.

If

'€(

[.][

.((\( '€[.'\€(((
V
.

.'€€[.]\

€(€^([.]]

/

8

}
.

.

[

[
. .

.

[

.

.

.

.

Fol. 2 verso.

Plate III.

[.

.

.\'

[.

.

.]([
(

'\^'
1/!^*'''.'

'\

[.

.

.]€/)7//••;5»'[

.]€^

....[..].[

85

)(^€'[.

/?»;

.]

^^GS3.i
1011.

NEW
«TTt

CLASSICAL TEXTS
aUi
Seyerai
Ipa

29

60 [w]s Te

Zeis

Kapes

}> ^, '
Jfis

'
Kims•

{)[

fv

65

70

75

, ! ' • ([] € , ,, (" '
(
8([,
ay
eiv€K

KfpavvLov, ev Se

[\[
.

m

re

6

pev

Xp(v)aovs

'

'-,. ? ''
.

[]?

()[],

uwe

,

Kite,

{$) h
,

8

(
.

ye
.
.

^ ?
([
[


.

onis

.

.

.
y

.

.

\(

.

[

16

(?)

leaves lost'

Fol. 2 verso.
[.

Plate III.

.]apiv

OT

[.

.

.]
[.
.

(

[

.]€

85

, ,

(,

' [] • }. ' []
o^loy

[(]6

]€ ] ]
'
elne

....[..].[

'

epxeo

30
^=-

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

€()'[.]'•

-^^

[.
>

.

.

.]aiuS

[.

.

.]

"'^1

]

((][. 9
.

'[.]' (''. .]'
. . .

^

.

.

.]
[.
.

.

[
[

[

]'''[•

[

/ (
••-•1

.

'

y


.

^ '^
Fol. 3 recto.
,
.

.

•^f"'f[•]

fa

.

.

..:'..'.'

.^
[•••]

•[•"?'?

].6.

[

^^apai6a
^ '

.

oeiKea ••
'
.

.
'-

.

«iyLiiJ'

[

.

i.\oiaey[

...'.. ' [....]

.

^' ''\^'[
'*
.

]8€ ]'([
.

[ ".:.[

.

.

[

...

.

..[.]'.'.].

.

LviKaiyapovb

105 A'*yi"''X°'^?^. .

•]''^.-'
.

'6[.
.

.]

(([.] ((( ]8[
...

.

[

[

\''( '1
.


.

'
. .

.

'.

.

.

.

]

;

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

^Kaiyapi

.

.

.

'^'.

1011.

90

1

.

.

0/iO '
,

(

]

.

.

'' [ [\
tSiv

, )(
NEW
[.]
.

CLASSICAL TEXTS

[](
.

.
)[
.

31

[1]

".]

'
[

95 \jh^

'\[\

\auS\ovTa
.

[•••]•[!'''"•[

[.

.

.

\(•!^
61'

.

,

.

.


9
. . .

Fol. 2 recto.
.

[

]y

.

''
1
'

•[

'.

[

]'
]

]

\
•(\ .
ovS'
Sivelv
. . .
. . .

-i

.

,

....'. '. ...]

.

'—
ive,
.

[

',','_[[

... >
105
. .

..[.]'.[.].

)([\
6;6[.

...

(6[ [ \

[]
.|

y

('
...
'
.

..].«?
]

.?
. .
.

avros

...'....


e
.

.

.

.

.

,

.

(

^
.

32

115

1

2

/

^ -^
.

] (.[}8(\8\8( '[. .]':
'....[
evOa
.
. .

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

^
opveov

[•]

C

.]

1

.

t^ayapxj
?VP

.

[.

•](

[.

[

.

.

[

[.j7retT'€^[

F0I. 3 verso.

('88€(€[.]>
Tov^ivp

'8•)[.]<

125 ['.

^
<[.
e/cfif.

£€[ ([. ][.] .][
•]_/[
.

.]
[

130

\}< €[ ([.]^ .]6)(€ [.]{[ .])('[
[
.

'(•8[ ']^[
8[.
.

[

135

[•

.]'''(}[
. .

(([.](8''
8\[.
.]
.

[ \[
'.

[

•]«.'[

1011.

NEW
[ ]

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Tovs

.

.

.

.

{)
,
. .

^'
.

S
.
.

€7[.
;c[.
.

.]

.

.

,
'

'

'

33

"fap
\<u
''
.

115

[•

-y^i
.]

.

.]

!'

[

[.

.[...]...[

20

Tois

135

[] [' []
,

€, . [] (() \] ) €()€ ' <[,] \
Fol. 3 verso.
rj

((

'

Spveov

kv

<\\•^

6[] '' '
i[hr(V

'
[ovrepos
.

«»'

\^

.

[

130 «ei^iO]

[- ]
oVJTiS

^'

[5]

135

^{'
[

]

\. )[ ( \! \
[

(

[
.

['

{)

«[. .]

.

(
.
.

[

:

.][

34

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

140

145 "

'-' €((€€' ( ''' '(
Fol. 3 recto.

€<:[.]^''^
.[.]..

..[..].
.
.

o-iyq

.,..'.....
.

8'€[.].[.](
r
.

.

.

.

.

\ L

i[.Jr
[
[

.[.]..

[

]€\[. ]€£'[ ?^[
J

].
.]
]
. • • .

..]ra{avTf[
]Toyairm5['

".

[.

.><r".[

"?
]eayovTfaov
]
.
.

«[•];'9?"
.
.

.'.'..
«?••• «W

[ [

[

150

[

KOvevX

.

.

]
.
.

.

.

.

.

ep
.

.

[.

.]

[

]

OU
.

iVjl
.

[

]•
]
.

.

.

.

.

.

[.

•]'
.

[

[

155

[

[

][ ]^^.

[.

•].

]

.

.

.

[[.JeJO

wa[

.

[

]

.

.\^.]>•
]
.

y

[

[

]76[

](
.

Fol. 4 verso.

160

.

.

[

\ۥ[.'\
.

.].[. €€>[.]('6€€()[
[.

165

[. .\ ('>'•]•'7
.

[.]vrjfiivaia
.]
.

.

[

.

.

^

[.

.

.]\^€([.]

.

«[.

.

.]8

>

1011.

NEIV CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fol. 3 recto.

35

140

, [] '
opfj

Tis

'

ovTos

'

'

{)
. .

','

epu,

'

rw

'.
.]
.

..[..].
6

6

6( [.][.'\
.[.]..

....?....
.

.

145
r

'
1

e(t)Xcoi'
e

ay

.[

«[•F

1 •[]••[

.

^[. ])^
]
.

rnvrj,
.]

«

]

]

.

.

]^

^\(
[

a„a,S'

.[..]••[
.... €'[
.
.

.]
[
]

[.]
.

oavovTfS
]
. .

...
ev\
.

.

.

.

«

.

[

50

[

.

.

.

fv

.

[.

.]

[

[

]
] ]

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

[.

.

.]
.

[ [

€tXe
.
.

.

[.

.juffie
.

155

[

]
]
.

evo

[
>

[

]

[

]

.

[

]

[

][
.

.

iXve


[
.

[]>

[

]

Fol. 4 verso.

160
[•]

.

.

yevos Se
1

65

([, €> \^ ?
SiKaios

([]

[]
.

[.]5
5*

[

.

[

[]€
[.

.]

[.

.

.](

Kfvos

[.]

.

e[.

.

.]

!

D

3

36

.[..].
oi[.
.

170

[.]€
([.]''•8€((
.

>
1

^ ^ .]
.]/3''[
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

'8([
[
.

[

a[.

.

.]

[.]5'

.'

[.

75

[

]•' [.]€
^'
1

[

...'.:.... ]^.•
]

[
[

8

[

[

](€([.]

[

]\(
,

]o^.r"ecrpanra^
[

'
[

185

[

[

]€€'/[[.]]7 ]••[•]•••^•[.].

^
]8€-\.] \,
recto.
.]
, .

]6€'
•;

]

-W
.
.

;,[
. .

[
.

,[.

.][.

.

.

Fol 4
]
. .

<\^. ...].. ]....[. .][.] ..,.[...
Trap
.

.

,

.

,

.

190

[

[...].
[.
.

[.

.]8€( _'[.]_'
. .

.]

) \.\.]
vS"
]

€\^. /]'[^,'^'\\(

(€'€€

iefl?]]

.

'.

.

.[..].

IV

.

<3[.

[.

J]tpa£aet7r[.]i'[.
.]_!'€»'[[€

.

.]j0aicr?;*f6£i'

.[..].
[.
.

170

' / [] ' [\]
1011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Se[

37

.]

oi[KevyTmv

, 8, {)
6
.

S\

navres

.

[

ne

*

[.]

.

[.

.,]

175

[

]«' '^« <^

,
ei7r€f,
]
ft/

\(\
[

.

([<]€
]ief.
]

[

[

[

Tis

1

8

[

(juepOe

[

[<] \\ ' €€ ^^
^

[^
"

€«€',^„, ^^^,) ^^„

;^;^;_jj^•

[

]>'
]

185

[

tKiivos,

[

]..[:]..

.

iylrv.[.].s

F0I.
]
.
.'

4

recto.

.

..(/)

,

...

CDS

([.

...]..

(\_,

.]

.

S{i) Kvplas

]....[. .][.] ....[....] ' []!
]
.

h

)5

'
]

ivl

Ka\uis

190

[

[...].
[.
.
.

«»'«[.]

'

/'«^[[|
ov8e

.

.

[]
[.
,

\ ]

.'

.

.[..]. IV

.

'4€
(V

.

[.]

ipais ehrev

[^ €

[\

38
195

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

•/^(^.

^[•1
.

•[.]••

|3

[

200

[

[.]...[...
[.]pviTTOt^.

[.]
.

.

et

.

205

' (
•]-•€
^'

• .

]'[.
.

.

[.] •\^[
.]

[.^
.
.

\{.6.

]

]

]

.]

([. .]€ >]'
. .

6\(([.]
.

.

.

aaeXyaiyiy

.

eiv
.

.

.

.

.

[.]]('[.
.

.

.]

'.

[.

.

.]

.

yapi

.

[.

.]''[
--^'

' '[.]
.
.

[••]

.

.

.

!^

.'[....]:;«[•]•[••
J•

...[.'..

[•/^^
210

?«/?[

][

ev^e[.]ev[

[.]'>([ '([ \6(([
KaXovjeSevSpol
215
vi>

(([.]6[
0%. .].
.
.

""

220

(\€ « '[.]\ '}
Fol. 5 verso.
9V[•
•]

' ^
[
*

1011.
195

[]
NEW
.

CLASSICAL TEXTS
e
.

.

.

[.]

ۥ

[.] ..[.]..

.

.

[.]

[

][.]
]
.
.

.

[.](
Oeovs

/
Movcras
'

39

[

]

.

200

[

]

.

.

[.]..•[...

.]
.

[.][•
[.]
.

.]

'} {) '
y
Oeov

.

(
.]

.

.

ftv
. .

.

.

205

[.]
.

'^
.

is
[.
.

.]

[.
'

.

.

.

[.

.]
.

7[

[•

•]

'

.

.

.

,

.1

.

.]

.

f.

.

.1

.

™[.]

...[...[
]

••"••[

2

^/5[
jj

[]

[]€

€[ '[

re

215

(ۥ[]
[.
.].
.

, {
tovs
.

vel[KOs

[ 6[ [
. .

[.]...

[.]

veov

.

[

Fol. 5 verso.

Spiarepos


Xeu/coy a>s

05

220 Tis
Tt's

oiKos

€ []
ev

[]

'

]\,

.

, .^ (

«iSos

.

;

;

2

25

''^^ >>[
'([.][ .] [.'\< \>. '€^^ (6€'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

«]

]

••[

[

230

'

235 [•

'[.]^ )(^< '' .]\^'^ .].6^^(''
.

' ^^^^
'[. .][.]([ ]\([
][. €[.]' [ \' €[
TOvprjnveouTl

..[....].?

240

/
[.
[.
.
. .

^ €
[.
.

.][

245

^
. .
.

<<\\
.

\^\ ][

'<[
.

f.vrr\Tfk(vTy]KVKV0(y\
.

250

.'\€() ^• .]7((''• [. .]€•€• <€((>\('
...

,]'€'

...[.]...

.

...€...

-55

]'[.](•''•

([.]]\

1011.

225 rovs

]

, ',

NEW
oh
6

CLASSICAL TEXTS

tovs Sk naiSas

[]•/
230
oi

, ?
r€

(

€[]

'

? [ ?
's

,[,
;

?

41

[]5 [.
toC
\^vo[s.

..[....].

/te

2

35

[]

' ' 6[]

€[']7;,

'

240

'

(V

?
)
.]

€[ ]€\[, { . [•[( ' ] [][.' 6[ , ^)
[][]

-,

. ,
is

, []
€,

5e

,
.

.

{)[•]
KVKVOS
.

[.']

.

.

245 eyw

*"
re

ods

" [
ey
fj

[

[

250

[] €[] [ 6]
[.

,
;

...

,

...[.]...

€.

..€...

4. '
'

oVei;

(,
255

{) [] {),

'

[]

'

].

(€€ ^'^ [.]>[.]>
'f8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

.

.[

200

' (''.
.

.

.

.

.

.

ۥ

.[..]...[.. .][

J

[[^|{;< €•€''€€

€€
[,]
.

Fol. 5 recto.
{[.
.

.]

265

^\'^8[.\

/}(( '\^[(5>
[.]8'€^
'€](('€\](7
>([
eyl•
.

270

275

]'''( .]8'• €[. .]\[.]
.
.

(\

.]

.

.

.

.

[.

.]ty[.

.

^
2']
2^1

\](>(.\\•• •]
.

6

277

278

\[.
[.

\'€\ -€ .]'[.
([.][.
.

^\\€€• >>(\
.]
.
.
.

.'\8\

.]

J

;

iyco

[eji/

'( ,^ []
1011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
ovre
erf

43

opviOes

(
.
.

.

.

.

.
.](j^

|

.

.

[

26

Tts

S'

;

yala .[..]...[..

a)S
ri'y

, ,) ,
Fol. 5 recto.

8,

5'

265 tv

[']
270

, ^? ? ?
(
Oeovs

^ .? ',
'

;

[[(

.(
;

'?.

[]
;

?
€[

€v[.

\
275

][]
ya/3
TTJs

.

•'

(

] . , ,
'

?,
]
.

€(
,

]?. ( ', '
. .
.

e?

.
ctXyety

tvpev.

;

[]

?. ))€[] . ' . ' '• ? ?
)
;

;

[ret)

y]ap

44
280
[.
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

.]([
]aTayovve
1
.

[....].
[

[

[

285

[

€'(]€
[

290

[.

295

300

'((]' ^' '[.]'] (€( <(.(.] (>]
, .
.

'^
[

[^ ](\\\
.
.

]8.

ef)

.

.

[

\\ ^'.
]
.

]01/7€7[.]'€•

.]€^(
.;.]..

.

'') ^

. .

_^

[.

.]ej/

.

.[.•]•
. .

.

[.

^

.

....

.

.

.

[

]

.

[.

.

.

.]\ ....

€i/e

.

.

.

[

Fol. 6 verso.

.

,

.]
.

.]aei

.

.

5
.

.

[

[

305
,

Vfovf
.

.

.

.

.

[

.]

.

.

[.]i'Otae[

.

.]'[

.]'][

1011.

280 [to
[.
.
,

]
.]
.

,
]
.

NEW CLASSICAL [€]€ /
[
e
.
.

TEXTS

45

\

'\
]

]
tp

ep

.

.

[

[

/
]
.

. , .

re

285

[

[

]
]
eiKO
.

ovVe

[]€5

[

^'?/''

€7€,
290

!
7i\y[qa\ev.

()€,
[.

.

eXe^ev,
'

2)5

(()€'
5*

,, • ^
.]

'

.[..].
. .

.[.]..?

.

.

.

[.

.]

,

kyOpai;

....

6

.

.

.

.'

300

, ,. \ [
aypi.\o\s

€€€
[

'
]
.

"

(inev

'

)

,

yap yeiToveva

y

[.

.

.

....

eve

.

.

.

.

.

.

Fol. 6 verso.

[

[

305

[.

.

.

]]« .]
.

.

.

.[

ypa
. . .

.

[

[

[

]

[

]€

^

.

.

[.]voiae[

[

[

]€

[

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
.

.](7/[.]^
]

.

.

[

310

.)^ .]'/3[
[•]*''f?

«

[

.

.\
.^
]
.

...][...].«/

[•
I

315

.

.

paf)[.
. .

.]..[..

.]

<^^

.

.]

.

.

[•]••• ^^•]/"^?

.]

.

320

325 K^l-y^VT^.R^i?^

'' [.
.

.]((
.]
.

.

.^
.

TayqiyquKaix^
. .

.

[.

.](•
.

.

.

.

.

.]'.]
.

.

.

.

??[.

.]

330

[ ([
.
.
.

\•[.]([

[
335

^
[
]
. . .

,...]. [.]

?''?f/?l??X'°*'/'9iiff
.
.

]

.

[.]}'

[.]

.

.

.jijfaK

.

[

]..[....].

.[..].
]

.\<(
.
.

,[

.

.

[.

^ .]
?*??!?
[•]."

]..'[. .]uS<oa-

Fol. 6 recto.

1011.
]o<i
.

NEW

[

310

[

[....] ovyl
[.
.
.

.]i;y

[.

.

.

.

[

! ]
]
.

[]
.

CLASSICAL TEXTS
.
.

47

[

[.]v

.

e

())
]

[

.[

[
.

..[...].
[.

315

[

jreprnf
]
• •

[

- '
.

.

[.
.

.]..[..

.]
.

]€
K[e]pSoi

.

[.]...

[....]..!/
[....].
[
]

ej/reXey

\.]
.

^^
.

ohov
Se
.

.

[.

.\

khvovs

320

[

]

as

at

.

.

.

[.

.

.

.

a\oiSoi

Kfpai

[

]
]

aotSal

[

S[.]

.

V

SovXou
ipei
.
.

325 KaJ\

'
330

as

335

[ . ([ ] '.
[

,
. .

,

[.

.]

{)(
.

]

.

6[]('![

]

.

\

[\'
. . .

.

[.]

oweK

.

[

]..[....].
]

Tfjs

[

.[..].
.

[

6[
.

]••[••]

"'

.

.]

.

.

.

[.

.]

6(

Fol. 6 recto.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
[
]
.

»/•7€«
.
.
.

340

[

]

.

]
.
• •

{.\
.
.

-[
. .

[

'
[

[
1/
.

] ]

345

[

'\ [.
iK
.

]

.

.

.

.

{
?fW?
eco

.

]^

^[•]?'??.''f[

.

[

.

[-Iff?"

W^l

[.](
.

35

'.]€[ [. [..]....
.]
.
I

[•]••[

oi[.]a

.

.

[.

•][•]^«[

.

.

[.]

.

.

.

[

§[3[ ^
[.]
.
. .

eiTOVVfT ..[.].

355 [•]

)

.

.

.

^ (8]
.
.

.

([

....

.

.

[][

[•]
.

?[[]]£ •••[•]
.

y

.

.

.

[.
]

.]

.[.].[..]..
]
.

.

.

[^\

.

.

[.

.

.]ay

....

[[.J
[

360
.

]'?«'

.

rfff^i•]

[

[

]
.

.

}\[
. .

]

.

evna

365

\[ ^
[
.

]

.

'.'' /'fF

"'
.

.[...].

..

.

/3[.

.

.]??

8([.
€€[.]
.

...[...].
.]
.
.

.

.

.

.

1011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
]
.

49

VIS
[.]
.

340

] [ '
]
.
. .

.

]

^-^
. . .

345

350

" '
U
itr

(
.]....
0%»/

[ .... ]
]
.

[

€([.

[](
.

]

60)

! ' [.
.

[.]€-

.

.

.

[

[.]

[] [(][]

[.]ve

.

.

ovf

[\\(
.
. . . ,
.

..[.].

'"[•]

/'W'
yovf €
.

[[ [
'
. .

iryeva-

.

[

(8[
[

355

f[•]
.

,

.

.

fiov Sf
TIS

.

[.]({

.,.,. [.

[•]

^

.

.

.

[.]

.]

.[.].[..]..
]

.

.

[.]

.

«[•

•]««'

.

.

.

.

[
[ ]
.
.

36
ovTfXX
.

]
[
]

1
.

.

€[.]

.

.

.

[

.

e
.

[
. .

]

.

«
365

^.( [.
[
]
,

J/

.

(

Xe[

],

.[...].

..

.

€/)[. .] ...[...]
. . .
.

\

.]

.

[.]

.

y

.

.

.

.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Fol. 7 recto.
]fy«/'[

'\€
]
.

370

...
.

375

8^\^\& [.
.

([ [. ([. [. [.
.
.

.][
.]
.

'/' .]€

ovpeafiXenei

.

[

]

.

]
]
. .

^[

,

[

]0;'//6»'[
.]
.

[

.

380 TOvyeKavTT]

]
.]./..
.]>"([•]
.

[.]('€'[

'([
.
. . .

.]

.

.

[.

.

.

.]7Tpqyateeai\[
. .

[
. .

[

](()([.

.

.]

[

[.
.

.

.]

.

[\•
.

[
.

.

.

.

[

385

J?[•

/[•

6

([ [.]\
[.]
.
.

.\8'

•[.]••

[
.
.

[

39°

^. .]((
.
.

.

[

.]

.

[
.

][
[

7{'[.

7[.]
(KTcrrja-

....
.

;([.];/6»'[
]
. .

[

TjtraXotrf
.

395

^
«[•]?»'

*:a/T07iiy[
• •

1

tr

.

[

[•

•I'?.''

[
.

.

[.

.^ve
.

.

.

€/3[
.

>\.
400

.

[.]

jO_iOT£/t_j;€ff[.]e
.]
.

[

]

_[.
i70'aj8oi'/i[.]

.

[•]/5

•••[•••!'•[
J7[

.

]

.]
.

3[

[

•[•].

[.](<}[

]
]

]](
.

)?[•]

[,

1011.

NEIV CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fol. 7 recto.

51

[

]"

ya/o

[

370

]
]
.

[

]X°vH-o[
]

[

[
[.

]

.]
'

(! [
[
[]55'
. . .

.

[

]

.

^
]
.

.

[

.

[

[
[.
.

375 Tcoy

[. / [.
.]
t

.]

.

[
Xiyuv
[ [

.

[

[.
rfj

38

[
,

.].(..

a>/fit[.]e»'
.

.y [.]
.]

.

.

385 [.
'[

390

" []^
})''

]
.

([
[.]
.

.[.

.

.

.]
.

[

.]

.

.

[.

(
.
.

[
. .

[

.

.]

ye ... y
[

.

[

.

[.]

.] '
1
.

.

[

(

.[.]

.

[
.

[

Zei{s]

[']

[.]....

(
ef.]»"'
.

.

[
.[
.

(€ [
. .
.

.

[

][
[

[]5

[! ] \
] .
.

[

[.

.]

.

[

395

.

[.

,](
.

.

.

,

«y

](
400

.

[.]
.

€[']
.

[
e
.

[

[

[.

.]

[.]

...[...]
.

.

[

]

[..]..

!
[\

[.]

.

[
[

[.]

[

[

]•] ]
]
• •
.

.

..

[.

,

52

([
'[
405
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(
[.

(•)^(\
.

...
]ai[

]

.

.

]

.

re

.

.

[

]
]

]

[

]*
.

.

[

]([.
[

.]'
[

.]([

V'"

'?'^'

]

\_

]"?'/'?

[

]»7/€'7•

Fol. 7 verso.

]_«'^[.]')'7•

^

[

][

4

\\^
]€
.

.

.

[

415

]

'[. ] [.]
]([.
.]
.

]

]( €
.

420

](' .] ^'([ ]
\a^pvoyfl'[,
.

^
i<0T[.]Sf
.

]8'
,]
.

^
] ]((
.
.

[

tf

.

j;cr[.

.

.]

.

[.

']i'Jiy%]^Xy^c
.

...

f .[.]..

'/

[.

]

.

.

.

.

[.]

.

.

.

425

]

]

.

'[.][•
.

.

.

]aTepeiySoT

[

]([

]

.

.

\{.
430
]

.

.]

.

.

\.'\8\\8\
]

)•)(^^.]
]

\ovyeveiovayvivuTpi.yoa\

][.];((/3'[.17

.[..]..

lull.

[

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

53

54

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
]";;..[•]•[••]••[•]•••[•'•]
]

.

.

.

435

.

i

A'"''?

.

.

3[

]

Y'^^vvC-'Pv

oi^i{

]

.

.

.{

]?[•]

[. (^.

?- •[• •]?<' ••?••[••]•

.

.

.]

.

.]

[...].[
440
Tt|[.]/iai[

'][

]f5

.

.

[•

-J""
?.«{•
•]

][
et

]•.'?••
]

i?f

«F^i•

•]

77

....

TO
.

.

7[
.

]

^

()
.
.

.

[

]€7/30^6

.

[

445 ^-J^rt.] .[•]••[

7;)[.
.

.

.](i)[.]re/)[

[.]770{
,

]

... ]6 8
.{
. .

« ,
]
• .

[•]

]

.

.

rew

.[
.

]

.

.

»7

.

.

[

]/t

[

]«[

Unplaced Fragments.
Fr. I recto.

Fr.

i

verso.

Fr. 2 recto.

Fr. 2 verso.

]vai
]
. .

.

.

[

]

.

\[
.

]

.

c[

]\[
[
]

]
• • •

Ff

]••••[

]<[
]?'«<^f.'7'[

].[.].

[

]€/3 ][
5

[

J?/."?"
]

]xefff<^?

[

5

]

.

[

][

5 ]?7

.

»/

[

Fr. 3 recto.

Fr. 3 verso.

Fr.

4 recto.

1011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

55
]•[•••] Toiay
[.

](
]

..[..].[

... V .[.].[..]..[.]...
]

.,
.

435

[

'
i'

A*"""

.

.

/

.

.

[.

.]ay

^[
e[

]

.

.. 5 ..[..]
.

'
'"

]

.

rjeiaai/
.
.

[

]7[.]

[. [.
.
. .

.

.

.]

.]

<•][
440 Tfi[o]a
fiK
[

]•[

]iS
]
.

.[. .]eo,^
.
.

445

[.] .[.]..[

....
mv
.

[
.{
.

j .

[.
.

.]

.

.

pos
,

ty0[.

.]

.

.

1

.

[.]

.

.

[

]^e
]

,
. . .

.[

at

„p^
.

{.
.

.

.]ce[.]Tep[

.

<

[]7

]
] .


.
.

[

]
.

.

.

[
.

aoS

[
.

]

.

.

.

.

[

]

[

][

Unplaced Fragments.
Fr.

]

.

[
\f[
.

I

verso.

Fr. 2 recto.

Fr. 2 verso.

]

.

.

]

]\a
[
]

J

](ts

5

]

]€
.

]

[

fin[
.

[
.

.[

Fr. 4 recto.

Fr. 4 verso.

]••[•]•[
]
.

]

\o

.

.

,

p[

jvae

[

[

56
\o...
[

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
If

]'?[• •>^

[

5

]

.

[•

-I'f

[

Fr. 5 recto.

Fr. 5 verso.

Fr. 6 recto.

Fr. 6 verso.

]....[
]yap»7X[

'\{

101].

j\£!V

CLASSICAL TEXTS
]'
o[.

57

.]

.

[

Fr. 5 recto.

Fr. 6 verso.

]«'?[
]

^

]aia

.

[

yo-P '/[

]..[

Fr. II recto.

[

]3([
. .
.

[•](

[

^
]([

Fr. II verso.

[

58

5

]
'];'•[
Fr. 15 recto.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

"^
]
.

]
.

[

]^*[
]'[

.
\

((

.

.

5

]f

5

]<[

Fr. 13 recto.

Fr. 13 verso.

Fr. 14 recto.

Fr. 14 verso.

]wioya[

]

¥v[

.

.

Fr. 15 verso.

Fr. 16 recto.

Fr. 16 verso.

](.
'\f^t^'C
]
.
.

](
.

.

€1'

.

[

]
.

^
.

.

/
[

[

]

ffTOC
.

[

]]'

.

[

]a§e[.]y

.

[

Fr. 17 recto.

Fr. 17 verso.

Fr. 18 recto.

Fr. 18 verso.

eX[

blank

Fr. 19 recto.

Fr. 19 verso.

Fr. 20 recto.

Fr. 20 verso.

]

[

]

.

.

[

]f

1011.

NEW
]y
]
.

CLASSICAL TEXTS
'AnuXXcofos
eiT€

[]\(
[a\vu
5

4

59

[

[...>.

[

Fr. 15 recto.

Fr. 15 verso.

(

.

ef

.

[
,

\

(5
.

[

]

.

.

[

[

vovs

;/[

^

6
'

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
"
.

1-9. and already the maid had been couched with the youth in accord with the custom bidding the affianced bride forthwith rest in a pre-nuptial sleep with her all-favoured For they say that once Hera " Cease, dog, cease reckless heart, thou wilt sing suitor. what it is not lawful for thee to speak of! Lucky indeed for thee that thou hast never seen the mysteries of the dread goddess, or thou hadst e'en begun to blurt out the tale of them. how truly is Verily much knoAvledge is a grievous ill for one who controls not his tongue
. .

:

;

he a child possessed of a

knife.'

the description of the sickness with which Cydippe was i. 10 immediately preceded by a long speech placed in the mouth of Acontius ; hence the words '; may well be the conclusion of the corresponding monologue, though Acontius there is nothing in the paraphrase of Aristaenetus reflecting these particular verses. up her is apparently expressing his regret that Cydippe had not immediately followed (unintentional) declaration that she would marry him after the custom of the maidens of her own island, who copied the example of Hera. Cf Schol. Townl. S 296 fir

1-4. In Aristaenetus
is

seized

.

.

.

(

? \ ''\ ^€('\( ^ ' \
roKjjas'
.

where, as W(ilamowitz)-]\I(oellendorflf) points out, the MS. reading is to be recognized as a citation of 1. 3 and emended as above. This correction was not made in his previous discussion of the passage, G'otting. Nachr. Phil.-hisl. Kl. 1895, p. 236. A rather different explanation is proposed by Murray, who thinks that the reference in 11. 1-3 is not directly to Acontius and Cydippe, but to the ritual Upoi at Naxos, having its technical sense of a youth with both parents living, i. e. haunted by no ghosts. But the lines seem to have less point on this view. AloXeHoiv Callim. Fr. 210, from Schol. Soph. Antig. 629 3. for but Schneider prints is confirmed by the papyrus, which backs up the feminine form by substituting Spaevi for and the latter, however, is distinctly the better reading, emphasizing The hne had already been bringing out the distinctive feature of the local practice. referred to the story of Cydippe by Buttmann, who was followed by Dilthey and others. is a new compound. he was about to make some such statement con4. The poet interrupts himself;

^,
.
.

(

TJj

Maass)

iv

Tcis

; .
=
cerning
6.

'

».
:

\

,

Hera
KOpff

and the or the first letter must be either Cf. suggests, cannot be read. remains of the fourth best suit which or y Sri i. e. 'have not been initiated into Theocr. xv. 55 the mysteries of Demeter.' began to tell ', but the is perhaps a just possible expression for 7. flffiVfiv
is

{)

as that in the

^
only

Townley scholium
fairly satisfactory

cited above.

.

!

;

',
.

.

.

,

W-M

'

construction

harsh and the infinitive rather suspicious, more especially as it has undergone some correction ; the first hand wrote eav€f. (itself a rare verb), formed on the 8-9. is an otherwise unattested form of analogy of does not occur. In the latter part of the pentameter a &c. ; but reference is to be recognized to the proverb
is

( ^ ,
'

.

In the morning the oxen were about to chafe their spirit in the water, having before them the evening's keen blade, when she was seized by a dread pallor, seized by the sickness that we send out into the wild goats, and falsely call sacred ; this it was that then in grievous wise wasted the girl to her very bones. A second time were the couches spread ;

10-49.

1011.
a second time the

NEW
:

CLASSICAL TEXTS

6i

maiden lay ill seven months of a quartan fever. A third time they bethought themselves of the marriage again for the third time a fearful chill laid hold of Cydippe. For a fourth time her father did not tarry, but set off to Apollo of Delphi, who in " A dread oath by Artemis breaks oft' the maiden's marriage with the night spake this oracle Lygdamis. My sister was not troubling Tenos, nor plaiting rushes in Amyclae's temple, nor, fresh from the chase, washing away her stains in the stream of Parthenius, but was sojourning at Delos, when your child vowed that she would have Acontius and none other for her husband but if you will take me for your adviser you will perform all your daughter's For I say that you will not be mixing silver with lead, but in accepting Acontius pledges. will be mingling electrum with shining gold. You the father-in-law are of the stock of Codrus, while your Cean son is priest of the rites of Aristaeus Bringer of Rain, one whose duty it is to soften on the hill-top the fierceness of the rising Maera, and to ask of Zeus the wind by which the thronging quails are stricken in the hempen nets." Thus spake the god and the other returned to Naxos and questioned the maid herself, but she hid all the tale in So he voyaged forth it remained to fetch thee, Acontius, to his own Dionysias. silence. And faith was kept with the goddess, and the maid's fellows forthwith sang their comrade's bridal songs which were no more delayed. Methinks, Acontius, thou wouldst then have taken for the maiden girdle which thou didst touch that night neither the foot of Iphicles speeding over the corn-tops nor the wealth of Midas of Celaenae, and all who are not ignorant of the grievous god would testify to my judgement.'
:

.

.

.

;

:

:

lo sqq. The poet suddenly changes the scene from Acontius to Cydippe at Naxos. be convenient to transcribe here the parallel passage in Aristaenetus, Epist. i. lo, which is often a close paraphrase of the language of Callimachus
It will

hifKfyiTo (sc.
/iOf.

^/^/
(Vfpyov

!, ((, '!, ' ', , ( *' , , ^ , '*? *€ ( ' , ^ (. , ( , ( '( ' , ( , , ,
TfKOi'Tfs

?), \

. ( -' ' !
ivoaei.

' (€ ' £( € ^^
tjdov at

€£
6

'}
6

:

frepov

?, \

biVTfpov

\ \
6

(\,

Trj

<'(

veov,

,

'

*

,'

(,

\
'

*

\

ptv

\ eh

^

\6

}, (^ (
yap

\

(

(,

,

€ ('

'

edoKti

rj-yilro

*

10-12. The meaning is that it was already the morning of the day on which Cydippe's marriage was to be celebrated when the sickness overtook her. is a Homeric ' phrase, A 243 The oxen were to exhaust some of their high spirit in a morning bath, in order to come clean and quiet to the evening sacrifice. 12. cf. Apoll. Khod. ii. I216 (\ : iii. 298, iv. I279; notes also the variant (so a papyrus of the sixth or seventh century, besides several mediaeval MSS.) for in 421.

'

^.

,

66

W—

''

62
13-14.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
The words
i.

/ifyot

h'

Upr)v

*
ad
init.
1

'Epivvas if iepav, as (= Callim. Fr. 276). Schneider's too confident reference to Ae/. i. 5 is now proved to have been mistaken. For the exorcism of the disease into wild goats cf. Hesychius alyas ayplac• ds

ApoU. Rhod.
EiptviBas

10 19

aiyas

€\
lie

,
.
.

€ (! '
if pa

are cited from Callimachus by Schol.

) &.

(, ,

\

Si
.

',

5e €is

The supposed connexion
where notice

to wear or
5.

with goats comes out in is taken of the popular belief upon goat-skins ; cf. also the references there to the

,,
' ;

Philostr. //er. p.

148 BoiSSOn.

and Suid. J. V. the Hippocratean treatise that it was harmful to eat
rpe^at,

* <(
alyas

n-fpi

Upas voiaov

goats' flesh

which a cure was sought.

though involving an emendation, well is wanted, and used for the frame of the body, e.g. in Apoll. Rhod. iii. 1395, Lycophr. 334 we speak similarly of a person's build '. The insertion of 17 above the second f of rrf|f is possibly due to the original scribe the t itself is untouched. 16. the diminutive is not otherwise attested. 1 8. objects to kotc as inconsistent with the context, since the preparations were made at the end of the seven months, and he would therefore substitute But is certainly not to be read in the papyrus, where is fairly plain, and that an original or should be replaced by kotc is not very probable. Hence the safer course appears to be to retain Kore, which may be excused on the ground that the marriage would hardly take place immediately Cydippe rose from her bed of sickness, would rather disturb the symmetry of 11. 16 and 18. aw[ts a horizontal stroke extending above av is apparently to be explained as belonging to a , which is sometimes so written at the end of a line in order to save space, e. g. in 844 but the stroke in this case is unusually long. 20. The letters at the end of this line are very indistinct and doubtfully deciphered. or is unsatisfactory because the regular form of the adjective is either while with which is the obvious alternabut the vestiges strongly suggest ; tive, the vertical stroke which is apparently the tail of the It is is quite unaccounted for. also a slight argument in favour of that Aristaenetus specifies the Pythian Apollo cf. too Ovid, £piy. 21. 231-2 (Cydippe to Acontius) o/ie qua revalescere possim Quaeniur a Delphisfata canente dec. 21. i> in fvwKlov is obscured by a blot. and it is therefore perhaps better 22—3. An impersonal object is expected with to regard as a bold use of apposition than with Murray to take . on the as directly depending on the verb and as practically equivalent to The Naxian rival analogy of e. g. Eurip. Androm. 103— 4 oi (cf. Callim. H. Dian. of Acontius is given a well-known Naxian name. Why the verb would seem 231) is chosen with reference to Tenos is not clear. The sense of more appropriate, but for this there is no parallel an allusion to some local incident must therefore be assumed. A cult of Artemis at Tenos is attested by the name of the month at Amyclae we hear from Pausanias iii. 18. 9 of a statue of C. I. G. 2338 Artemis The present passage points to carved by Bathycles of Magnesia. a common cult of Artemis and Apollo in the great shrine of Amyclae, such as is frequently found elsewhere. Artemis was prominent in Laconia. Reeds or rushes with cf. e. g. Theocr. xiii. 40. 24. For the confusion of would be appropriate to Artemis as a river goddess. cf. ApoU. Rhod. ii. 936-9 and Schol., iii. 876-9, Steph. Byz. s. v. 25.
epithet of
suits the vestiges,

An

&
is

'

.

and by

[](),

:
;

W-M

.

:

;

,

,

^

;

.

.

^
;

,
.

.

.

.

.

.

,^ .^^

;

'(,

:

1011.

NEIV CLASSICAL TEXTS
name
of ihe river Imbrasus in

63
Samos according

The iota adscript was added by a later Callim. Fr. 213 (Schol. Apoll. Rhod. ii. 867). (W-M) gives the required sense and suits the vestiges sufficiently well. hand, ^ 26. of. Callim. Fr. 30 ap. Steph. Byz. s. v. Aij\os 6 tls

!.

, . 8
[7]
may
:

!

Parthenius was also an older

:

This had already been referred to the Cydippe by Dilthey. With be compared Ovid, Epist. 20. 19 Adfuit (sc. Diana) et praesens ul erat tua

!

to

verba notavit.

28. The commencement of this verse is a crux. Some reference to the stratagem of Acontius would be expected ; cf. Aristaenetus, /. c. There is no doubt about and between this and the initial a, which is fairly certain, there are at most four letters, perhaps only three, suggests either an adverbial phrase connected with what precedes or an independent verb in the aorist, but I have failed to find an appropriate reading. proposes but this cannot be reconciled with the papyrus ; the may be preceded by , , or perhaps yp or but not . A faint mark is discernible above the ^, but it is not certainly ink and is higher up than a sign of elision would normallj' be. In the margin near the top of the supposed a short oblique stroke in darker ink has no evident significance. Murray suggests avei and avt is not impossible, but it is not really satisfactory as a reading, apart from the minor objections that it is usually correctly written in this papyrus, and that Svnv is not elsewhere used intransitively

,

,
,

, .

W-M

,

-

,

like aviftv,

30. There is a mark like a grave accent above the resembling an acute-angled rough breathing above the
evident.

first
:

«

of

and another
case
is

in neither

the intention

33-4. The meaning here doubtless is that Acontius was the priest of Aristaeus-Icmius, which showed his high lineage. Hence some term meaning 'priest of, or occupied with ', the difficulty is to find one agreeing with the testimony of the is required before ; papyrus. W-lM's suggestion Xijirot (cf. Callim. Fr. 123 X.yrfipat) cannot actually be read, but it gives just the sense wanted and involves only a slight alteration ; and the very slight vestiges of the first two letters of the word in question are consistent, so far as they go, with of unaccountably has the appearance of having been crossed through ; cf. is abnormal and influenced perhaps by connote on 1. 78. The genitive iepmv with For Aristaeus and the Cean rites alluded to in these and the siderations of euphony.

^

'

.

following lines

cf.

Apoll.

Rhod.

ii.

500 sqq. and
XiVev

,
KW.

*

Upa
ya'iav

or it may tc viv Ill — 15 notes that the spelling

'
34-7.

'

iv Se

Kc'o)

ev tpp€^iv €v ovpeoiv

^] .( /'
Kvvos
ayfov

^ € ,
especially
iSC.
11.

519-27

:

*.\\
.
.
.

€(

*
«»

properly an epithet of Zeus, is here transferred to Aristaeus, be applied to the latter in virtue of his equation to Zeus ; cf. Pindar, Pj/A. ix.
is

(=

'), which

,
or

!

,
is

,
.
.

''

.

toXs

'

that of the

sc. Upots,

may

on

fifV[i)]\fc,

may

refer to

be instrumental and constructed with which depends the plural being used, as often, because a class is

,

MS.

in Schol.

Townl. S

19.

,

.

W

64
meant
;

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
cf. e. g.

At the end of the line eV oipeos Xeyomm Se opfivoi coincides with a quotation in Etym. Magn. 81. 11 eV ovpeos (Schneider, op. cH. Frag. Anon. 70). The spondaic ending is \/\\ noticeable; cf. Ludwich De hexatn. spond. p. 19, Schneider, ii. p. 363. In 1. 36 is better treated as two words than as one, otherwise, unless be altered, there will be an awkward asyndeton. W-]\I would substitute for but in view of the traditional in the Homeric /. Henn. 44 and the v. 1. in Nicand. Ther. 239, where the Parisinus and also the statement in Cramer, Anecd. Oxon. ii 180 alone has \'\., 6
preferred

,/
Sia

40 by Murray,

5eo£
is

ei-fioi',

flpiv
easier.

perhaps the

.
t!j

The
. . .

latter construction,

which

is

.

,
. . .

ei

The

-,

to assert the impossibility of the

rising of the

dog-star

ai/f/ioi

north across the Mediterranean. But the north wind which brought the birds was the wind later on cooled the summer heats, and there is no reason to suspect the poet of having confused the and the ' av€Tois the papyrus, but this is plainly inconsistent with fKaXv^j/ev openly 39• concealed implies ' declared ', not Since therefore one of the two words must be emended, it is preferable, as remarks, to select the adverb, which could easily arise from rather than the verb, where a corruption is difficult to explain. form of such which is sometimes found as a v. 1. for cannot dubious credentials as be called in here. The transition to 1. 40, however, seems rather more abrupt if Cydippe uncertainty regarding refused to speak, though this consideration counts for little in the For cf. Etym. Magn. 3vems' 6 the reading of that line. 40-1. I adopt in this difficult couplet the ingenious emendations of W-M, though without full confidence that the right solution has been found. At the beginning of 1. 40 can hardly be avoided ' might be substituted for a, but that a verb is necessary, and is quite unintelligible, therefore satisfies essential requirements, but it was certainly not written ; must be inserted, and though the is probable, the remains of the termination do not suggest the final letter, at the top of which there is a spot of there are some darker ink, looks more like f than anything else. Above the preceding is indistinct traces which might represent an interlinear addition by the first hand, vaOy would not be probable as the first letter of the line, but is a possible alternative ; amiss, if a suitable continuation were forthcoming. More difficulties arise at the commencement of the next verse. If the meaning be, it only remained to fetch Acontius to Naxos,' some substantive like 8fpas on which may depend must be obtained, and

^ €- ,
/{
:

referred to in 11. 36-7 belonged to 68 C-d (Lydus, ed. Wachsmuth, pp. 19 1-2)

which

. .
'.

and

the

form here is rather bold. were midsummer phenomena, while the the period of early spring. Cf. Ps.-Geminus
fV Se

\€'

3 (Feb. 24)

.

.

.

(March 6)

!

It is in

March

that the quails begin to migrate

'

!,

W-M

\(,

«
:

,
' ;

A

.

:

-

'

not a violent alteration, for which some slight support may be found in the fact however, is far from that is quoted from Callimachus by Suidas (= Fr. 340). and they are preceded by being certain. The two last letters must apparently be ai, or ; is therefore indicated, and although the end of a horizontal stroke suggesting , -, or r; the preceding letter is not a satisfactory , if the initial t be right, there is practically no eV has to be attributed to Nor is the meaning which, with choice. quite a natural one. it would be expected to signify ' to go after a person ' Acontius would be preferable to a place rather than to fetch to ; and on this account might possibly be inter10 Cydippe's father as the subject of and preted it remains for thee to go ', but must then be separated from suppofed to mean Cydippe, which involves an awkward ambiguity, apart from the difficulty
for
is

(

«'

,

(,

,

(\(

'

'

(((.

6

(((

'

1011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

of such a use of ffiios: is not to be read at the beginning of 1. 41. If on the other hand the father be the subject, is straightforward enough,

\&'()

having a point, as

remarks, because on this occasion the ordinary practice was reversed and instead of the bride being brought to the home of the husband the husband was fetched to that of the bride. Neither the division suggested by Murray, nor the hypothesis that . seems to lead to any better should be read for result. For the name in application to Naxos cf. Diod. v. 52.
.
.

W-M

&

65

' ,,

The numeral
lines

below

this line

is

P.

on the page, though this as a matter of Brit. Mus. 126 (Kenyon, Classical Texts, p.

a stichometrical figure referring to the number of the fact only contains 39 ; cf. Fol. 7 verso, and
82).

is cited in the lexica, but the transitive use 42. No instance of the passive found in Schol. ApoUon. Rhod. ii. 257 tWi/our added above the line is in ink of the same colour as the body of the text and perhaps due to the original scribe. is undoubtedly right in restoring ijSov on the analogy of Aristaenetus i. 10 43. ivepybv eVt. For the interchange of ei and cf. 11. 28 and 122. Seems to occur only here, but has been proposed by Murray in Eurip. Hippol. 552, a conjecture which is now much strengthened; the form was used by is

€(,

!
9. 3.
Tijs

W-M

^,

Sappho
45.

!
(

ijyjfao

relative sentence.

But

Murray
vvKTos

.(,
46. Cf.

suggests,

'

critics

attributed

'
(^
;

,
:

,

if right,

=

rjs,

and

the antecedent

is

transposed, as often, to the

it is very questionable whether rijs should not be emended to rfj, as following its case as e. g. in Aesch. Ag. 1277 cf. Aristaenetus 1. c. where however Tjs is an emendation the MS. has 'a<ovtios
; ;

Cramer, Anecd. Oxon.

iv. p.


(=
'

Callim. Fr. 496). Schneider disagreeing with Gaisford and other to Callimachus instead of the grammarian and so produced one

^

329. 6 (Herodian
'eKtye,

ii.

p.

861 Lentz)
*

\ \(€^€
is

'

fragment instead of two, efTectually disposed of. is of course to be constructed with 49. o£ CKTfivat (!, Soph. 1 39 1.

\((

|

,.

,
;
.

\

^,'
;

but this view

now

not

\(

cf. e. g.

the familiar

'

50-79. 'From that marriage a great name was to spring: for thy line the Acontiadae Cean, numerous and honoured at lulis and this desire of thine we heard from old Xenomedes, who once lay up a memorial of the whole island's lore, beginning with how it was taken for an abode by the Corycian nymphs whom a mighty lion drove from Parnassus, wherefore they named it Hydrussa and how Giro dwelt at Caryae, and how the Garians and Leleges abode in the island, whose offerings Zeus, god of the battle-cry, ever receives to the trumpets' sound, and then Ceos, son of Phoebus and Melia, caused it to be called by another name and the tale of insolence and death by lightning, and the sorcerers the Telchines, and Demonax who in his folly recked not of the blessed gods the ancient put in his tablets, and the aged Macelo, mother of Dexithea, whom alone the immortals left unscathed when for its wicked insolence they laid the island waste and how of its four cities Megacles founded Carthaea, and Eupylus, son of the demigod Chryso, the fairfounted citadel of lulis, yea and Acae Poeessa, seat of the long-tressed Graces, and Aphrastus Coresus' town, and joined with them the old man, friend of truth, told, Cean, of thy sore love whence came the maiden's story to my muse. I will not then now sing
still

dwells,

;

.

.

;

.

.

;

of the habitation of the

cities.

.'
. .

66
52.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

€!

is

apparently novel.
is

highly interesting and also provides is occasionally cited by grammarians (Schol. Aristoph. Lysistr. 448, Schol. Townl. 328), but only in one passage is 6 xhs stands in a list he more fully specified, Dion. Hal. De Thucyd. 5, where of local historians prior to the Peloponnesian war. It is now evident that Xios should there be emended with to Kctor, and that Xenomedes is to be recognized as the Cean writer

54. This reference by the poet to his authority
historical information of importance.

some

Xenomedes

(8

W-M

who was no doubt among

the sources of Aristotle and, indirectly, of Heraclides in their accounts of the history and institutions of Ceos. Several points of contact with 11. 56-63 are to be found in the excerpts of Heraclides, Uepl ix, though with some

.
hk

discrepancies (Wiiller, Frag. Hist. Grace

'
is

fresh light

' .
is

.

ii.

p.

214)

:

c'/toXflro ^ei-

airas \iovTos

'

thrown on these early traditions by the recently published

8 / 8.
€, *

vrfaos' Xeyon-nt

inscriptions of Ceos.
KOTf

substituted for ttotc in this verse

Hymns
56.

the forms in

form

-,

For

making

on the analogy of 11. 4 and 18. In the are preferred, but the Ionic spelling occurs in some of the Epigrams. cf. Callim. H. Dian. 4 and Fr. 113 b, where the MSS. have the The Corycian the mistake which originally stood in the papyrus.

nymphs recur in Ovid, Episi. 20. 221-2 (Acontius to Cydippe) Insula Coryciis quondam cekherrima nymphis Cingiiur Aegeo, noinine Cea, mari. 57. According to the Heraclides e.xcerpt quoted in the note on 1. 54 the lion was the cause of the departure of the nymphs, not of their arrival. A colossal lion close to a spring of water (cf. 1. 72 is still one of the features of the site of lulls. 58-9. Who it was who lived at Caryae and what this has to do with Cean tradition problem. remains a Besides the well-known Laconian Caryae we hear of places so called only in Arcadia and Lycia, and there is no evident link between any of these and Ceos. suggests that the name at the end of 1. 58 may be meant for Kapvaros, which Callimachus might well derive from Kapvat. Carystus, son of Chiron, was the reputed founder of Carystus in Euboea, and it is noticeable that in the Heraclides excerpt cited above (1. 54, note) that town is mentioned. The suggestion is thus so far plausible, is not to be read and, in view of the mutilated condition of the passage and of but The following is the absence of confirmatory evidence, emendation is too speculative. very doubtful, but there seems to be no alternative to the preceding it. Murray proposes Kipoadas, and this would suit the papyrus well enough ; but no KipoaSas is known Brunck iii. except the king of the Odrysae conquered by Philip V (Anth. Plan. i. 5. 24 The remains of the first half of the pentameter would suffice to verify a conjecture, 182). but hardly to provide a clue of themselves. 60. as a relative occurs also in Callim. H. Del. 185, where some explain it as is equivalent to on the analogy of But in the present passage &c. masculine, as also in Nicand. Alex. 2, and the derivation from n'r indicated by the scholia ohhk ris noWois &8e on Callimachus is therefore confirmed. Cf. Epigr. 30. 2 is found as an epithet of Ares in Cornutus, A^a/. Deor. 21. 61. Hdt. i. 171 attributes certain inventions in armour to the Carians, whose wariike but they proclivities are also indicated by the tradition that they were the first ; the introduction of do not appear to be elsewhere specially connected with which was claimed by the neighbouring Lydians. The custom referred to by Callimachus (Hdt. v. 119, &c.) is belongs not to Ceos but to the Carians proper, whose Zeus here meant by Zeis

()

W-M

!

&: =

=

,

\

'.

|(

:,

!.

:

;

1011.
62.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

seems to be the word intended before though this was perhaps not originally written. The remains of the first letter might represent a , but close beneath them is apparent!}' another , possibly inserted by the first hand though the ink is darker than usual. An alteration is normally made above the line, but since 1. 63 is quite complete and satisfactory, it can only be supposed that the first letter of was somehow miswritten or defaced, and so repeated in this unusual position. At the end of the verse some emendation is required would be difficult and is a slight change which gives an
:

,

67

excellent sense.

Ceos is called the son of Apollo and Rhodoessa in Etym. Magn. 507. 53. 64-9. Cf. for this passage Pindar, Paeam iv. 42-5 ( (sc. Zeus and 841) Poseidon) € es (sc. Dexithea) Xiffon-ei and the passages from Nonnus, Dionys. xviii. 35-8, and the scholia on Ovid, Ibis 475, referred to in the notes ad loc. In three respects Ovid and his scholia are at variance with the version of the legend here given by Callimachus. The line in the Ibis is Ut Macelo rapidis tela est cum com'uge flamniis, and the ancient commentators thereon represent Macelo not as Dexithea's mother, but as an elder sister who was slain on account of the guilt of her husband, while Dexithea and other sisters were preserved moreover, the name of the sisters' father, the chief of the Telchines, is given as Damo, who is obviously to be identified with the Demonax of 1. 66. According to one of the scholiasts the authority for that form of the story was Nicander and Jebb (Bacchyl. Nonnus writes for p. 444) was justified in regarding it as of a later growth.
63.

(

, 8
in

^

(

=

,
cf.

(

;

;

(.
In

I.

66

r\K(a

There is, therefore, no need to substitute At the end of 1. 68 very suitable, though the supposed mark of elision is quite doubtful, and , e. g., may be read in place of . 70-4. The names of the founders of the four towns of Ceos are not elsewhere recorded, nor is the nymph Chryso, if that be the true spelling, otherwise known, unless she be the to whom Hesychius refers s. v. The papyrus apparently ?). has xpfiaovs (hardly an unlikely form in place of which suggests either or Kpiaois. In 1. 73 (W-M) is not very satisfactory, either as a reading or in itself. There is no example of this scansion of the word, though it may be supported by the Homeric shortening of the of ISpve (B 191, 57) and similar liberties of later poets (e. g.
Fr. 174

[][ (W-M)

\(

!.
is

is

an adverb, as

Anth. Pal.

vii.

639

^ ((•, ^.
W-M

«

also Callira.

, '

(

Anth. Pal. vii. 109). The initial letter may be a round one like € or ^; and the supposed &p are somewhat widely spaced. But no suitable alternative presents itself. The sense requires the genitive with for which cf. e. g. Soph. Ai. 1184 76. At the end of this verse the letters have been interlineated by the first hand, and if those below are rightly read, may be interpreted as a repetition of the final syllable of which owing to the length of the line (it is the longest on the page) may have been thought insufficiently distinct. The rr and are fairly satisfactory, and the scanty vestiges following are consistent with On the other hand, bos is placed somewhat farther to the left than would be expected, and it is not quite certain that nothing else followed moreover, and the first half of the pentameter are too doubtfully deciphered to afford Still, the purport of the passage is probably not misrepresented a safe basis for restoration. by the readings adopted. 78. The poet now turns to a fresh subject, a change to which the marginal sign (in darker ink) opposite this couplet may refer, though that interpretation will not suit 1. 277, where a rather similar sign occurs the connecting stroke between the two small circles is,

^.

((\,

.

:

however, in the present case a restoration.

That

F 2

)

was the word intended before

.

;

68
was guessed by
in the papyrus.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
W-M,
whose conjecture
suggest
is

probably

right, if

The remains

rather than

, and

just fits the context, But the and seem possible, and could well be read. lacks would be a better term than remarks, although as of There is a distinct mark, which suits an iota quite well, above the first support. though whether it should be referred to the original or a later hand is the syllable The itself has not been deleted, while on the other hand there is an appearance doubtful. of two diagonal dashes through oi ; but this phenomenon occurs elsewhere in the case of In the marginal note to essential letters (cf. 11. 33-4, note), and so may be disregarded. would not be inapposite and is possibly to be read, but the first the right of the verse two letters are very illegible. It has been supposed by some critics 79. The reference to Zeus of Pisa is obscure. (e.g. O. Jahn, Rhein. Mus. iii. p. 620) that the principal subject of Book iii of the Aetia was the origin of the Hellenic games, on the strength of Steph. Byz. p. 104. 13 iv and the present mention of Olympian Ne/if'ai, (bs lliVSa/jos opos ; Zeus may be held to support that view. The passage of Stephanus, as Schneider shows {op. cii. ii, p. 138), cannot be considered a very solid argument, but a fresh indication How the story of Cydippe came to be of a similar nature is not to be lightly dismissed. introduced into such a book would remain a problem, though that is no fatal obstacle to the The unfortunate that the papyrus is so defaced at this critical point. It is very theory. end of this verse is hardly hopeless, but 1. 80, it is to be feared, is beyond recovery. is perhaps a high stop after that letter 80. An ink spot near the top of the second two vertical strokes follow, which may belong to a jt, and the next letter but one was Some faint marks below the end of this line might perhaps be taken for or v. probably a stichometrical figure, but it is doubtful whether they are in ink. It is regrettable that the passage is marred by the Conclusion of the Aetia. 81-9. in 1. 83 is the deity to whom in 1. 87 is mutilation of the first three lines, addressed, but the identity of the deity and the connexion of this and the next verse with 85-6 remain obscure. A restoration more ingenious than convincing of 11. 81-3 is 11.

,

not very easily verified
if

that

made

sense,

W-M

'^

:

,

^5

/,

offered

'

ee'poTj, could doubtless stand on the analogy of such combinations as e 467 lacks authority, and the point of &c. ; but the neuter Theocr. xx. 8 aSca is hardly clear. rather than f ; perhaps -piv is for the remains of the second letter suggest 8 1 ]apii' after is extremely uncertain. -pfiv. The preceding letter seems to be a, , or . end of this line is a troublesome problem, pi after the second lacuna may 82. The before be a single letter, perhaps v, though this is less suitable, a is more likely than The supposed mark of elision after the , and the letter following it, if not o, must be a. might be read instead of '. is uncertain, though probable ; (eiVe?), in 1. 83 or to a substantive following 84. The adjectives may refer to (Murray) nor nor governs but neither which apparently Perhaps eme re e. g., is suitable. ..[..].[ ; or ftn-fs could easily be read, if a satisfactory combination with the context could be established. 85-6. sc. Hesiod, the legend of whose intercourse with the Muses goes back to

taste',

.

.

: , (8 \ . ]
by Murray

[^] piv [(](! €
;

ipfj

\ /</] [^

[in

,

which WOUld mean

^ :''
['
'

severe

.

:

:

Theogon. 22—3 cf. Ovid, Fast.
ais factum,

( '
:

a" vv
vi.

ii'iba^av

sequeretur oves,

13-4 Ecce deas vidi, non quas pracceptor aratidi and Fronto, Ep. ad Marc. i. 2 Hesiodum pastorem at enim ego memini olim apud magistrwn me legere
:

, '' /
apvas
.
. .

^

'

,

;

Viderat, Ascraeas

cum

dormientem poetam

1011.

\ ', ' '
Movaeau
passage
is

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
eV/iot or'

69

€'.

o^fos

to be Callimachus, and Bergk in referring the distich to the prologue of the Aetia, where from an anonymous epigram in Anth. Pal. vii. 42 it appears that the poet represented himself as having been transported in a dream to Helicon and there holding converse with the Muses. But the close parallelism between the quotation of Fronto and 11. 85-6 here points rather to some later imitator, e. g. Parthenius, as suggests. A reference at the close of the poem to Hesiod at Hippocrene is natural enough in the light of Anth. Pal. vii. 42 (cf. introd. p. 18), though the connexion of 1. 85 with what precedes is obscure. With regard to the reading, re or was apparently first written before and was corrected by the original hand. If is right an antecedent is

Magtsirum

in

this

later
p.

has been

commonly taken

Schneider, op.

cii.

ii.

789,

inclined to agree with

W-M

is very suitable the first letter is more like « than , but the is unconvincing and perhaps this also has undergone some alteration. 88-9. Cf. introd. p. 18. 90-1. It is noticeable that in this MS. the titles of the different books preceded as well as followed them ; another example of the same system is found in e.g. the Berlin Nonnus, Klassikeriexte, V. 2. 10. For the border of angular marks below the titles cf e.g. 850. 20-1, and P. Amh. 6. 3, &c. that above them is composed of a series of small crosses joining their neighbours at the top and bottom, such as are sometimes found at the conclusion of non-literary documents. 92-5. This opening passage from the prologue of the been rightly reconstructed by Schneidewin, Goll. gel. Anz. 1845, p. 8, and others from three separate citations (Callim. Fr. 92 BoDTraXfiov). 85 ft 90 Fr. 92 is quoted, as an example of the choliambic metre, by Rufinus, I)e Meir. p. 368, and Plotius, KXafo/icVioi, BoiiraXot pp. 270, 272 ed. Gaisf., in conjunction with another verse, (tc Bergk), and hence Kuster (Suidas, s. v. oh referred it not to Callimachus but to Hipponax, notwithstanding the express attribution to Callimachus in the Schol. on Aristoph. Clouds 232, Frogs 58. The futility of the criticism which arbitrarily sets aside such ancient testimony is once more demonstrated by the papyrus. It is of course still possible, as was held by Meineke, with whom Bergk, Poet. Lyr. p. 755, agrees, that the line was really by Hipponax and was adopted from him by Callimachus Schneider, ho^vever, op. cii. ii. p. 257, rejects this compromise. 93. oiKou was apparently written, but only the lower half of the 1 is preserved and the superfluous letter was presumably eliminated when the rough breathing was added, although The marginal notes on either side of these verses are there is no sign of the correction.

required, so that

,

;

;

,

,

,

,

,

,

\\
.

.

.

)

^

;

mutilated beyond recognition. 95. The word following Bo]uff[dX]etoi' does not seem to have been 96. A trace of ink on the edge of the papyrus slightly below this line to the right seems
to indicate

.

an interlineation.
the verses lost with the lower part of this leaf
ix. 5),
:

Among

98 d (Schol. Townl. S 172, Strabo prologue, and gives thus

\
The
connexion with the

!(

which Schneider,

^

may

have occurred Callim. Fr.
268, assigns to the

op. cii. p.

\(!.

reconstruction of the second and third lines, however, cannot be right, and their first line is very questionable.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
On the number of the leaf, which is as much a matter of inference as of eyesight,, is preceded by a mark which looks more The accent on pp. 19-20. rough Isreathing than a sign of crasis, and above them both there seems to be a short horizontal stroke. In the margin to the left some illegible remains of an adscript are perhaps The supposed iota adscript inserted above is very small and may to be recognized. be meant for a high stop. were coupled with the but the passage is quite obscure. The 98. Perhaps e.xact point at which this and the two next lines begin is not clear; 1. 97 projects by one was a proverbial expression used of persons who letter beyond 11. 102 sqq. airos Kpias• went to profitless expense; cf Cod. Coisl. prov. 106
97.
cf. introd.,

like a

»

hardly possible to determine without the aid of the context whether the letters The doubtful c of line are rightly read and divided. may be , and av could be substituted for ;, but the accent will then be out of its proper position ; the A dot just above the line between iv and may final letter may well be instead of . is not quite satisfactory, and there are represent a stop. In the marginal note There is a reference to Hecate in Callim. Fr. 82 d. perhaps two letters between t and a. 100. or 102. The coronis below this line marks the end of the prologue, for is is used by Pindar, Isthm. i. 63, 01. xiii. 91. found only here and in 1. 255 below, but is a parenthesis, of which the sense evidently is will not detain 103. oh you with a long story, for I have not much leisure myself. divdv seems to be a possible expression for k 105. and is satisfactory enough palaeographically, though several of the letters might be otherwise read may be and could be substituted for 8»•. Either hiveiv or hiviiv is possible cf. Callim.
99• It
is

at the

end of the

:

, !^, ^
6
8e

!

,

•(.

' :

iv

; !/
«

'

.

.

Fr, 51

ohw
is

107-8. Possibly was originally written, but the interlinear 8 is far from certain. The Ionic form is apparently an instrumental dative going with
109.
to

^
.

(

^ \\

and Suid.

*.

:

:

unobjectionable.
is

'When he reached old age' be the sense. in Etym. Magn. 64. 13 olw• 113. This verse was identified by (= Bergk, Poe/. Lyr. Fr. Adesp. 29). Lines in sqq. refer to precautions taken to obviate the designs indicated but the bearing of the passage on the story of the cup of Bathycles remains obscure. Before the rough breathing is 114. The first word does not seem to be clear and perhaps should be read is hardly suitable. The marginal note to the right possibly extended to a fifth line. or perhaps Tiji/. 115. 118. On the question of the extent of the loss between this line and 1. 119 see introd.
very likely
as
suggests.

seems

[

(({(.

6[,
;

W-M

.

W—

•,

?

/.

;

p. 20.

Arati Phaenom.
ad.

119-20. These two lines are quoted in Diog. Laert. i. 23 and also by Achilles Tatius, i, where the two preceding lines are added eV

he, considers

,

8|

that the subject of

'^
|

interval of

be the son of Bathycles (cf. 1. 131 below). two letters is left after 121. for was recognized by

[''•

[]

.

(Callim. Fr. 94)• Schneider, here is but it is much more likely to In 1. 119 owing to a flaw in the papyrus an
17

?7,

.

:

^^

W-M, who

suggests that the form

1011.

NEW
;

CLASSICAL TEXTS

71

may

be explained as a false lonicism but perhaps Callimachus favoured the derivation from which is noticed in Etym. Magn. 690. 11. o'ittj) means under happy
auspices'
jrpos

(Bergk, Poei. Lyr. Fr. Adesp. 27), and Callim. Fr. 173 S' iJXfoi eVi The masculine form is not attested, though the forms occur in Hesych. but may be defended, even if is feminine, on the analogy of e.g. Pindar, Pylh. iv. 40, where the MSS. have Traces of darker ink to the left of the line may be the remains of a marginal note.

.
'
S>v

( ' (, '. ,
;

cf.

Schol. Aristoph. Birds 704

/ios Se, iira

&

\((, 8(

'\

'

e'i

!
(sc.

opveov fie|ia

;

122.

€ '?
evpf,

124—8. Cf. Diog. Laert.
6

wrongly wished
de

(Excerpt. Vatic, p. 30) on
iK

'

follows (Fr. 83 a)

- , ; . ), ! "€, ^^, , . , ^ ^ .'
.

:

cf.

Hesych.

i.

24

\oyL,

. -/
.

'

.

.

.

.

tc

(((

ovTOS Trpojjyayev eVi

elpuv

to delete

)

\

\

^^
iv (sic)

(

a

iv TOis

(Schneider,

who
iv

!,
is

followed by Diels, and Diodor. . 6

«?7re TTtpi

\

eir

i^fvpt

'
as

The

reconstruction of these passages as printed by Schneider

is

:

'

'((

Te

'

((

(, [^
f-yet'ero,

Various other attempts which have been made are not more successful, except that Hecker and Brink prove to have been right in combining with these lines Fr. 91 oU a Suggestion which Schneider emphatically rejected. By is of course meant Pythagoras; cf. e.g. Diog. Laert. viii. 4. In 1. 126 is Strongly supported by the passage of Diodorus, in spite of the obscurity of the phrase and the accented (. To the right of this accent, moreover, there is the appearance in dark ink, which remains unexplained. of a small Line 128 is quoted by the Schol. on Pindar, Pyth. iii. 64

'

and the

, ^. '^, ('
8i

alteration of fVfpor
parallel for

citation is

((, the reading of the papyrUS, is preferable to of course demanded by the metre. The appositeness of the not very evident, and Bentley was probably right after all in regarding it as
is

, , . '
in Py/Zi.
iii.
1.

^

' '

merely a

62.

130. For the absence of aspiration letter following was probably or i.
131.
It
is

cf.

108

^,

uufio[s]

',
for

cf.
'

may

be inferred that no
as

more probably
132.

i.

28

preferred the reading

quotation from Callimachus.

,( ,.
than

^

Diog. Laert.
iv

i.

29

JJfpi

, ^

(^,

1.

135

,

1.

253

.

6

iv ivi'niu

name was mentioned by Callimachus.

i.

W-M

observes that

' .

The

remarked by

W-M, may

be supplied with certainty from Diog. Laert.
Schneider, Op.
til,

.

.

.

.

p. 246, here

and did not accept

^

as a

72

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
in 1. 135 are added exempli gratia for the former here and 133. Callim. Fr. 95 quoted below in the note on 1. 138. due to W-M. 134. The restorations are is most probable as the first letter, but 1; could is only fairly satisfactory, 136.
\

cf.

!/

well be read in place of straighter-sided than usual

and the
;

of

in the following line

must be supposed to have been rather larger and is however not dissimilar. The

or f. letter of the line may also be 137. The doubtful letter before (?) may also be /3, , p, or though broken at the bottom is practically certain, and in this context a refer138. ence to the sage of Priene is most natural. The form Biijs however, though printed by Cobet in Diog. Laert. i. 88 and sanctioned by Pape, Griech. Eigennamen, is abnormal and requires better testimony than that of the papyrus. It may be convenient to add here the four verses previously extant from the sequel of

second

.

the story of Bathycles.

They

Callim. Fr. 89 (Cramer, Anecd. Oxon.
«eti/off

*

are

:

ii.

p.

'

' /.
297):

Fr.

96 (Etym. Magn. 442. 10);
is

7J'

\('.

Fr.

95 (Diog. Laert.

,

i.

29):
^eStCi/rt Bis
aptcrrfiov.

pt

and a new Iambus has commenced; cf. introd., p. 20. (W-M) seems right and is perhaps possible, though the remains do not suggest cf. note on this letter. A flaw in the papyrus caused a slight interval to be left after 11. 119-20. is better interpreted with W-M as a term of reproach than as the man's actual name. Alcmaeon was a typical matricide; cf. the line ap. Dio Cass. Ixi. 16
139•

The

subject has changed

clear, but can hardly stand, and W-M's /3' ij seems the easiest possible that something has been inserted above the line over the i. should perhaps be recognized after the second and some compound of rather than 141. The faint traces suggest might have stood here ; a dative depending on is however more obvious, and may ' was deleted by a later hand. be right, than anything is very doubtful, the penultimate letter being more like 143. else. No verb in the present or aorist seems to be obtainable, and i^onaaSfis is excluded, the fc being certain, would not fill the space nor would that be suitable without suggests, or even a preceding verb. which At the end of the line is possible, and would be apposite if the meaning is those behind mockingly put out their tongues at him as he runs away '. or such a mistake might easily has perhaps been written for 144. occur. The remains of the supposed e could also be interpreted as a followed by the comma sometimes placed between two consonants, but there is no sign whatever of a preceding t. of seems to have undergone some alteration. 147. The last half of this verse is no doubt to be identified with Callim. Fr. 98, quoted as an example of varying gender in Etym, Magn. 502. 27, Eustath. p. 108. 22, Schol. A on Iliad I 312, &c. Schol. A has the infin. which was preferred by Meineke,

^

^\€

140.

,
is

:

,

emendation.

It is

A

mark of

elision

,

^.

-

€^
(/

.

,

W-M
-.

(',

'

«

,

1011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

73

Schneider follows ; Meineke was also mistaken in referring the phrase to the prologue of the Iambi. or perhaps 153. '\$( 154-5. Some of the letters of these two lines have been renovated with darker ink ; cf.
:

whom

\.

11. 357 and 395. The first letter may be , i. e. {)\(. i6osqq. On the subject of these lines see introd. pp. 20-1 animals are turned into men by Prometheus in an extant fable (Furia 320). Callim. Fr. 87 may well belong to this Iambus cf note on 1. 217. At the end of 1. 160 [ might be read, if it could be combined with what precedes the letters between (or re) and are very doubtful. 162. is an attractive suggestion of W-M, but is not quite satisfactory, the The slight traces preceding are consistent with S' being too cramped. might also of be read. If a faint mark above be regarded as an acute accent the restoration would become more doubtful, since the accent expected would be a grave on the f. 163. ipnerwu is essential, though the vestiges are not easily reconciled with a final v. is the right word, seems At the end of the line, if M's correction necessary, since a () would be superfluous. 164-6. The construction and sense of this passage are obscure. In 1. 164 pov may possibly be pev, i. e. another verb ; but the remains of the letter after though indistinct, in 1. 166 is clear, but a verb in the second person seems quite do not well suit an e. out of place, and [. .]' « is also difficult. There is perhaps not more than one letter between and e, which is preceded by a vertical stoke e. g. might be read. [yap] or oi [Se] 168. Perhaps there is hardly room for oi []. (W-M) is highly conjectural, the traces after being very faint and ambiguous. 171. Andronicus was presumably a friend to whom the poem was addressed (cf the Callimachus can hardly be supposed to be apostrophizing the tragedian of Babrius) of that name. is cited without the name of the author by 1 7 1-3. This passage ApoUon. Sophist, i. v. aeiSe. Lachmann referred the lines to Babrius, but Schneidewin, Go/L gel. Anz. 1845, p. 7, and Ahrens, De Cras. ei Aphaer. p. 31, prove to have been right in crediting them to Callimachus; Schneider, op. cit. ii. p. 272, expressed no definite opinion. Lachmann and Schneidewin also proposed to add at a short interval another anonymus mp\ verse restored from SuidaS S. v. «/, Schneider, /. C.) of which there is no sign here, though the lacuna at 1. 177 would be a possible place for it. aapSifji'cvs in the papyrus requires emendation. The object of the sign in the margin opposite 1. 173 is not clear; it was added or renovated by a later hand.

notes on

158.

;

;

.

:

([]

]

:

[]/

W—

()[

^

^

.

:

,

:

[

^
,

;

.

.

.

(/

'!
:

174. 175there or

'.

[(>](
is

,
cf.
:

Eustath.

p.

1759• ^7

(
for
is

\

(^)

Xeyei

i>s

(Fr. 34^)•

\(
i

the supposed

mark

of elision, the

e

and

barely

room

[].

There are

traces after Se

and the are all very doubtful, which suggest another letter
a.

(e. g. V

),

179. avT seems to have been accented, but the nature of the accent is very uncertain. 181. or conceivably in the marginal note is an abnormal division, and there are traces of 1 8 2. ink after the p, but perhaps was miswritten at the end of the first line owing to the narrow space and therefore repeated in front of . It is probable that the margin did not extend

] (((\

but this

inconsistent with the accent

on the

].

and that [ and v[ were the have been continued in one or two more lines.
farther to the right
.

last letters

of

11.

and

2.

The

note

may

74
185.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
is

seems to have been intended, though what precisely was written is open to nearly certain, but the supposed deletion and interlinear are unsatisfactory. Possibly there are more letters than one above the line. The speaker is perhaps Apollo. 186. could be read. The line with which it was to be 187-9. To what this note refers is obscure. connected was no doubt indicated by a marginal symbol (cf. 1. 265), and the marks opposite
question,

[\
:
[.
.

may denote its position, though they are at any rate partially in darker ink. which would suit the context. The supposed interhnear or perhaps 192. At iota adscript resembles that noted in 1. 97, and might be interpreted as a high stop. may be and it is uncertain whether the circumflex accent was the beginning of the line intended for the or the next letter, which would then be i, in some shape no doubt followed but it is useless to restore this without 193.
11.

2

1

4—1 6

,

,

,

the next word,

194.
identical.

.'\v

196. 198.
199. 200.

•(
The
.

breathing above of is hardly certain. 201. Only the tip of the supposed accent on remains, and this might be the base of an inserted (by a later hand). aafXyaiv{f)iv (W-M) suits the remains 202. [ the accent is again uncertain. of the letters, but is unsatisfactory owing to the rough breathing added above the initial than o; the termination may be -v^. letter, which is much more like (or apyos) es might be read, but 204. There is perhaps some corruption here, There is more suitable than y. the preceding letters are then unintelligible, and t after

^
letters
1.

is

might be read. presumably a participle, e.g. []/,

,

]

.'

.

.

if

the subjects oi dnev

and

(

were

inserted letters
:

may

the middle
cf.

form occurs only here apparently.

:

Hesych.

The smooth

(• ^.
ap.

also be read as

or

.

]7[

:

-:

may be two

between
:

and
.

210. {[.]««'([

or e.g.

[.];/«[.

211-13. At
o^^€'\
.
. .

=

211 begins the narrative of the quarrel between the laurel and the olive. Callim. Fr. 93 a, from Ammonius, De Diff. Vocab. afi/or (ori Xdyor

Other grammarians and compilers. Bentley was evidently right in attributing to the same poem the quotation in Cod.Oxon. Uep'i f Critics have arranged the words in various
.

ways, mostly vitiated by the fault that condemns Schneider's dpi, namely the presence of a spondee in the fifth foot. As the papyrus proves, Callimachus in his choliambics consistently avoids this ; the version adopted by Schneider dpi Meineke's eyih of Fr. 98 a is again inadmissible on the same ground. dpi would be nearer to tradition. is metrically sound, but 213. W-M's suggestion for the completion of the verse is printed exempli gralia. The only objection is the presence over the line between y and of a mark which does not
.
.

^
suit
its
11.

/. . &
. . .
I

^

?

;^' € .,
8
\

.

.

and
.

an accent on ya[p and might be taken to denote an elision, purpose is by no means clear, and unmeaning ink-marks occur a 214 and 215; moreover, Callimachus is rather addicted to

y
little

.

But that

this

is

lower down between yap: cf. e.g. 11. 104

and no.
214-15. The papyrus is imperfect and the form of the signs in the margin here is not There seem to be three strokes, a vertical one above and a horizontal one Possibly they had a conbelow, with something of the nature of a curve between them. nexion wiih the adscript at the top of the page.
quite certain.

1011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

21';. Df'oi» or yoCK will not account for the vestiges, might be read, Schneider agrees with Meineke that Callim. Fr. 93 should be conbut is not satisfactory. nected \Vith Fr. 87, in which case the latter three verses, if )[( in 1. 216 is correct, must They are have succeeded immediately here.

'

'

75

^')! '.
Keivos

ovviavTOs,

(Bt 6

6

But the
passage
verso.

first

may

remarks, the 1. 217, and, as be referred with more probability to the Iambus partially preserved on Fol. 4
of these lines
is

not to be identified with

W-M

"• the left white as a snake's belly, the other, which is oft uncovered, 218-239. burnt by the sun. What house is there where I am not at the door-post ? What seer, what offerer of sacrifice does not take me with him ? Yea, and the priestess of Pytho has her seat in laurel, of laurel she sings, of laurel makes her couch. foolish olive, did not Branchus save the sons of the lonians, when Phoebus was angry with them, by striking them with laurel and saying twice or thrice ? I go to feasts and to the Pythian choral dance, I am made a prize of victory, and the Dorians cut me on the hill-tops at Tempe and carry me to Delphi whene'er the rites of Apollo are celebrated. foolish olive, I am acquainted with no hurt, nor know I the path of the bier-carrier, for I am pure, nor do men trample me, for I am sacred; but with you whenever they are about to burn a corpse or lay it out for burial they crown themselves and also duly place you beneath the sides of the lifeless body ".'
'
• .

.

.

218-19. In
elision,

'•

218 above the

of

with

some

there

is
it.

lighter cross-strokes

through

a mark in dark ink like a large sign of ms above the first of vSpov has been

written through a circular
is

mark somewhat
blot.

like a

,

from the pen of the original scribe

;

it

perhaps nothing more than a

The reference in these two lines is obscure. It can hardly be to the olive, with regard which the distinctions of right and left would be inapposite nor do the ohve's leaves or fruit show any such variation of colour as is here indicated. Murray suggests that a person wearing an exomis is meant, perhaps Apollo, who is sometimes so represented, is a nevv compound the accent was carelessly placed between the and , instead of on the o. Sings of the laurel seems rather strange here, and 223. suggests aci'pei but it is perhaps best to leave the text as it stands. The is clear. ' 224—7. Cf. Clem. Alex. Strom, v. 8. 48 <JTi)(OVS
to
;
;

'

^ ? (\( (
/;?
'
o)S

cod. L),

papyrus has before but a anacoluthon. The emendation of who in 1. 226 further proposes

iv (Fr. 75)• ^^ ^• ^^4 the would leave suspended, an unlikely to oi and the restoration of are due to W-M, (cf Clem. Alex.), but this does not suit the papyrus. That is for (not ov) is apparently indicated by the accent, but is followed by a vertical stroke which is not long enough for and would suit <, , , , or v. Above the final letter of the line a later hand has added a curved mark which the printed text reproduces sufficiently nearly it is not much like a circumflex accent, though possibly ]ti might be read; ]/3t is unsuitable, must be right, though the remains of the final
ttjs

\(-,

8.

Xaof

,
:

?^{ ! . ! € , \, ' ^, ,
'

W-M

;

Xcyet

/'?
£)6e

yap

,

?* /^^, ^?,

*€,

relative

' [

^

76

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
;

The sense of the gloss on 1. 224 is evident, but its precise letter suggest ( rather than . form is not very certain if €/)[{/] is right the bracketed letters were rather widely spaced. as well as one on i. In fXmi; (1. 224) there is an (earlier) accent on 230-2. The allusion here is to the Delphic theoria sent every ninth year to Tempe, na'is. This solemnity comwhence a laurel branch was carried back by a after killing the memorated the purification of Apollo at Tempe (cf. 1. 232 Python; see Steph. Byz. p. 223. 2, Plutarch, Ae/. Gr. 12 (293c), Miiller, Dorians ii. i. 2. of is not otherwise attested. In 1. 232 a faint mark above Apparently the form

(

^^
to

!Hdt.

)

is

probably not to be regarded as a grave accent.
ft,

231.

as written originally,

is

233. The marginal ticularly apposite here.

234. The appearance of an acute accent (by the first hand.?) on oiS is possibly due to was restored by W-M, who also aptly the rubbing of a badly written circumflex.
refers
for

justification for the corrector's initial

!
'

mark

is

the commoner form in the iambists; cf. 1. 248. of the nature of a coronis, which however is not par-

Hesychius,
:

absolutely

e. g. in

Eurip.
:

/.

T.

815

«y-yif

^- ^. ,
<[]
+ on =
.

.

.

, €.

There seems
is

to

e. g.

similarly

be no used

235. 236. words as

The

cf. 1. 250. The correction of the dittography is by a later hand. sign of elision was eliminated by a corrector ; the original scribe took the

238. it\cvpa[: accident and

239.

\ ,

(.
the penultimate letter looks like a
is

doubtless the right word. W-M, identifying Callim. Fr. 327 ap. Etym. Magn. 365. 25 and Helladius in Phot. p. SS^• 36

\

, ((
. .
.

,

but

this is

\

attractive,

(\
:

though the would yield a

could well be dispensed with.
tolerable sense.

] may be

. (.•
3-

probably due to some

''"

fViis

This
]it,

read in place of

and

240-59. 'Thus boasting spake she ; but nothing daunted the producer of oil repelled " laurel, utterly barren of that which I bear, you have sung like a swan at the end her ... I help to carry to burial the men whom Ares slays and (am laid on the bier) of the heroes who (perish nobly) ; and when a white-haired grandmother or an aged Tithonus is . borne to the grave by their children, I attend them and am laid upon the ground. I nay, even in that matter of which more than you for those who bring you from Tempe you spoke, am I not also as a prize superior to you, for where is the greater festival, at Olympia or at Delphi ? Yes, silence is best I indeed say nought of you that is either good ".' or ill, but the birds have long been sitting among my leaves unwontedly chattering thus
.

.

;

!

240. suggested by

()['
W-M,

:

sc.

:

that

t;

=

is

less likely.

to

whom

also the correction

an internal accusative with
well be read instead of \. TCKoOaa 241. For

e. g.

ras l&ias cf. Callim. 26 is strongly sup242. The restoration of this verse is largely due to Murray. ported by in I. 241, and if be granted, should be some adjective with privative a. The identity of this adjective is the problem, is certain, and the remains of the third letter suggest a or is, to say the least, but cannot be read and Another possibility is if the very unsatisfactory. be supposed to have had as deep would be of vhpov in 1. 218, and of the few available words a fork as e.g. the first

[

[(,
,

but this

'
is

..
,

form here was could stand as due. v[ may precluded by the accented .
participial

The

to

'[

, [ €.
is
. .

'

.

^

;

1011.
consistent with

NEW
To
this,

CLASSICAL TEXTS
however, there
is

77

the papyrus.

the serious objection that in

is

H. Apoll. 53 the is short. But in a derivative of an irregularity of quantity or perhaps might be written (cf. Hesych. s. v. not incredible The oblique dash in the margin may be presumed to mark the commencement of the speech. thinks i. 6. your words are a presage of defeat. 243-4. e'u rfj TeXevTjj that the point of this allusion to the kukvcwv is the mention by the laurel of funerals, which is accepted as a bad omen. 246. Murray proposes i/f might be read, but the remaining vestiges, though very slight, scarcely suit the papyrus is broken, but there would hardly have been room for eicr. 248. f cf AristOph. Acharn. 688 249. SSov cf. e. g. Eurip. /. T. 620 els The 250. For the accusative letters are faint, but do not suit 251. -eiov followed by^' looks like a comparative, and TrXeW, though unconvincing, may The vestiges of the first letter of the line suggest is a possible reading. be right. n-Xeioi/, which Murray thought of e. g. , , , or , and the fourth is probably f or . may give the sense but cannot be read possibly Se oTfu is doubtfully deciphered and which proposes, is not 252. impossible ; but if the letter before was a, it was unusually upright, and that following is which may denote more satisfactory as e than as ; moreover, there is a faint mark after might be taken for an accent. an elision. Another mark above than as It is hardly is better interpreted with as 253. might be taken to mean in cf. 1. 130, (fee. With necessary to write ()£ ' (cf. the of 11. 265 sqq.), but since the reference clearly is to 1. 229, to this contest give aeSXav one sense there and another here would not be at all satisfactory. was originally omitted, 254. There are several blunders in this line: a and it also seems evident that (or which will not scan was vritten for With these modifications the sentence might pass muster, but there can be no is for unless, as Murray distinctly improves it question that W-M's emendation of to ' always was.' The remains of the y of y[a^p are very slight, suggests, we read in 1. 254 but with that exception the imperfect letters are fairly clear.
Callim.
;

()£
:

).
W-M

.

.

.

.
:

[

!

]

'/

.

»

,.

8.

^'.

6

'

:

^/. ,

W-M

W-M

:

,=

? = ?.

'

.

,

-)

,

and opvidfs, as is indicated There is a contrast between by a later hand after ouSev in 1. 257, and ai;ies must be taken adverbially The olive I neither praise nor blame ; it is the birds in my branches which chatter thus.' humourously attributes to the birds its unflattering remarks. An extensive use of the in the Vienna fragments of the Hecale, where a large part is taken by same motive is made Above the of opnfe a slightly birds; see Wilamowitz, Gotting. Nachr., 1893, pp. 733-6. curved stroke in black ink is unsuitable for an acute accent and is much more like a sign of opviSes should make oCpwfifs•, and though the space occupied by the is someelision but in was certainly not written after it, nor, probably, an i. what large, (or and the difference of spelling here may be 1. 258 is the Attic corruption, though in the case of an onomatopoeic form it is unsafe to assume this. due to also occur. The adscript written in coarse and indistinct letters and e. g. some comat some distance to the right of the line is perhaps a gloss on In 1. 259 bination with 6, though that would not be very apposite. or can be read, but it is difficult to find a suitable word to follow in agreement with it A vestige of the letter before (v suggests y, , p, or . The fs () would also serve.
256-9. Cf.
11.

277-8.

by the stop
'

inserted

:

;

-),

,

letters after eu are very uncertain
all

;

or

is

possible, but the

in either case

is

not at

satisfactory,

and the

final letter

may

be

.

Above

the line a small

in black ink is

78
clear, joined

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
on the
left

conceivably a third

letter

and by a horizontal stroke which could well belong to an f preceded. Another participle is not attractive, though perhaps
;

easiest to reconcile with the remains.

260-80.

'Who

found the laurel

.>

the earth (produced

it)

just like the ilex, the oak,

found the olive? Pallas, when she contended for the galingale, or other timber. Acta with him who dwells amid the seaweed, and the man of old who in the lower parts of the immortals gave judgement. That is one fall for the laurel. was a snake honours the olive, who the laurel ? Apollo the laurel, Pallas her discovery the olive. In

Who

Who

What is the laurel's fruit? For they are even, for I distinguish not between gods. But that of Neither eat it nor drink it nor anoint yourself with it shall I use it ? as an unguent one it is a morsel for food the olive pleases in many ways ., and with it second fall I set down to the laurel. Whose is the may dive as deep as Theseus (?). for the third and last time is the laurel leaf that suppliants hold forward ? The olive's how they chatter. Shameless crow, does not your beak thrown. Oh, the tireless ones The olive's, which gave a seat to ache ? Whose is the trunk preserved by the Delians ?
this

what

!

:

.

.

A

:

!

Leto.'

261

= 265, ^^

is

superior to the marginal variant

^,

which spoils the climax.
to the

The

wavy mark above the is a form of diaeresis. 262-5 = 261-4. These four verses, originally omitted owing
tIs
.
. .

have been subsequently supplied at the top of the page, their position being marked by the symbol in the margin. In 1. 262 (261) the corrector has ns, but ns ', as written by the first hand in 1. 266, is preferable. At the end of the verse [][( is restored with much probability by W-M, who also points out that this is the passage cited in Schol. f>o^!okes nep\ Trjs A on 54
TTjs

(,

homoeoarchon

26, by Schneider to Ae/. i. 4); cf. 384, wrongly referred by Meineke to vipBcv cf. e.g. ApoUod. Lc. For Apollod. iii. 14. I, &C. AristOph. WaSpS 438 ^ to was The correction of to is obviously right in emending by a third hand. fvpfv was added by a corrector. 267. V of is put for because the birds are supposed to be 268. Murray, speaking ; cf. 11. 277-8. 271-3. The general sense evidently is that the produce of the olive is good both as food and as an unguent, but a satisfactory restoration is still to be found. In 1. 271 there is a slight break in the papyrus in front of the two interlineated letters, but if a third had been written it would have probably been partially apparent ; underneath this, just below the supposed , a dot of black ink is visible, perhaps implying a deletion. But in a sentencewhich was apparently originally contrasting the internal and external uses of the olive seems written, would have a point, while the intention of the corrector is not clear unintelligible, may have the sense mouthful', 'morsel', as in I 324, Theocr. xiv. 39 cf. 1. 277. in both of those passages the word is used of birds and so is very appropriate here In 1. 273 the employment of oil as an unguent is apparently traced back to Theseus, ^u is followed at a slight interval by a short vertical stroke which may be part of the next letter,

,
.(

ttj

6

Trjs

' W-M

!\,

:

! !(, ' '.
i\aias

..
ttj

' ^:

8f

,

'•

/-

,.
(Callim. Fr.
:

,

'

'

;

:

e. g. V,

or possibly a sign of elision,

'.

.

A

verb

is

expected after

fjv,

and

therefore

eira

.

.

.

1011.
(or
?) is

NEW
is

CLASSICAL TEXTS
cV
(
.

79

with a verb supplied from what precedes. The remains rather suggest a at an interval of one letter from and is not impossible ; but a reference to one of the persons or animals slain by Theseus seems difficult to work in here, especially with the feminine Moreover, the letter next to than the succeeding vestiges are like is more like and both cannot be read ; probabl}',
Suitable
;

the alternative

.

.

,

(^

.

,

be rejected and if cna is right the two following letters could well be \t. At the beginning of the line the doubtful may be or , and above it is a mark like a grave accent. A mention of the eXam (Athen. 56b) is hardly likely; on the other hand some form or derivative of is not unattractive, and in front of the V there is a tiny vestige visible which, if it is really part of a letter, is quite consistent with . Hence it is rather tempting to suppose with Murray that the allusion is to the famous dive of Theseus described in Bacchyl. xvi. {[1< would satisfy the palaeographical conditions, but would be excessively harsh the use of the preposition is abnormal, a verb is still lacking and is not easily supplied ; moreover while if aV be emended to is barely tolerable. (sc, Possibly f .[...] is a verb governing and Or perhaps, in the last resort, refuge may be found in the hypothesis ; of a lacuna in the text. 275-8. This passage was written twice over, and the superfluous four lines were bracketed by a corrector. It may be suspected that the dittography is to be connected with the omission of the four verses at the top of the page. The scribe, or a predecessor, may have been led by the stichometry to notice that he was four lines short, and accordingly may have made up the deficiency by the simple method of repetition. It is difficult to believe that he could write out four whole verses twice in immediate proximity without There was some slip in 1. 275 after yap. being aware of the error. rpC cf. Eurip. Or. 434 not 276. &C. waS
therefore, the
is

to

( ^

=

) ^
: :

^(
:

\&

,

,

,,

originally written.

cf. 11. 256-9. SC. The olive keeps up the fiction that it is 277. who are talking. is novel. The marginal symbol (by a later hand) opposite this line was perhaps intended to call attention to the dittography. 278. The crow is singled out as the chatterer par exce/ience. For of a bird's beak cf. e.g. Eurip. Ion 11 99. ayvbv a 279—80. Cf. Callim. H, Oel. 322

the birds

; (

(

,
or
f
/xavrets•,

(,

,

(;
W—

fvpcTO
;

^
.

(\.

<[&]

(!

there

is

room
Ti.

for

and

the breathing

on ,
if

a slightly longer supplement, though probable, is not certain.

in 1. 280 is Suggested by might be read in place of ,

!

,
.
.

281. 282.
unsuitable.
if

]:
. . .

,

or

that be the reading,

may
.

of course be a single word.
eis

,

^

is

found in

286. It would be desirable to a verb were forthcoming ; but it 1. 221.

make
is

ovre

.

parallel to

(
for

viaj]v(is in the

next

line,

difficult

to avoid

which support may be

288. slight interval is left before the two last letters of probably owing to a flaw in the papyrus ; cf. note on 1. 119. or 290. At the beginning of the line the first hand wrote something like

A

which the corrector apparently wished
that

however, points out to convert into a rather tautologous expression moreover is the word which seems best adapted to the remains at the end of the verse, where neither nor nor is Suitable. He therefore proposes boldly to restore

)!
is

is

;

[\
which

.^
W-M,

8,

-

-,

([](

[(\

>(,

provisionally adopted.

8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

&€

but a partial restoration here is useless. possibly 291. Perhaps The 292. This line describes the tree which here intervenes in the discussion. seems unlikely. may be p, but doubtful is a necessary correction of 293. (W-M) is extremely doubtful ; it is not clear exactly how far the line extends. 294. Either is easily emended ; what follows is more open to question. 295. if correct, indicates a verb of may be read; and the accusative or however, is open to the objection that there which, proposes speaking. Hence it is simpler to read in this sense. seems to be no actual use of or, to avoid the asyndeton, after placing the note of interrogation either after are palaeographically quite nor As a matter of fact neither satisfactory, since the e is slightly separated from the letter before it ; and between them is would be attractive, if the a faint mark which may represent an elision,

( W-M
,

',

";

^.

^

^,

€'.
future
a'ly

^,^
.
.

^^,

were admissible here,
Opel,

oi

.

' '

e'poC^ec is logically parallel to
first

^

e. g.

oi

ave^fi

ro is followed by ; 296. The letter a vertical stroke which would suit e. g. a v, the final a is very uncertain ; the letter preceding may be , or . is apparently written in the form of a compendium, the second in 297. serving as the first of the . upright of the may indicate some interlinear addition; it is not of trace of ink above 299-

but an example of such a construction in the seems to be a round one, €, fl, or before

person

is

lacking.

A

an elision sign. your very 299-300. Don't you prescribe patience to me, as if you were one of us fvaTexros is unsupported, but seems a possible word in the sense of presence chokes me.' There might be another letter in front of the initial e, tolerant ; fCaropyov is unsuitable. which is not quite in a straight line with the beginnings of the preceding verses. A mark of jemveva. of elision should perhaps be recognized above the
quite in the right place for
' ; ' '

very light vestiges of the last letter are not inconsistent with a is hardly to be read. suggests the insertion of v; a tribrach however, though rare, does iio(0)rav 86. occur, e. g. Callim. Fr. The left hand portions of 11. 313-14 are contained on cf. 1. 366. 313. crease down the the detached fragment on which the preceding lines 303-1 2 are written. recto proves that the fragment is the upper part of Fol. 6 and also shows its relative vertical is correct. and position ; but it is not certain that the combination with ]
304.

The

309. 311.

\] W-M
:

.

:

]((

:

.

321. Cf. Eurip. Bacch. 743 ravpoi

8'

Kas

Callimachus is has been crossed through. 322. Possibly the supposed y below the overwritten which must be scanned as a disyllabic, with the Ionic short i, is not 325. need not be the article, and the preceding ; but very satisfactory, especially with is impossible both on account of the following , which seems remains suggest the verse then becomes too long, even if fpeta, which is very undeniable, and because may be caused by a low circumflex accent The appearance of a doubtful, is wrong. (though there is no other sure instance of an accent on this leaf) in that case the two next cf. 1. 73, where xpfiaous may be a For /joiffi ep 7 vr. letters might well be

corruption of

than

,. ! , (
and

perhaps

satirically alluding.

,
](
;

A

tO Avhich passage

,

.

=

through an intermediate would also be an inexact form

.

The

termination

is

more

like ffi

in this dialect.

329.

An

elision

mark should perhaps be recognized
At the end of the
line

after the
.

has been rewritten in darker ink.

{

of

«:

in that

word

?) is

possible.

1011.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

8i

the

333-5. Lines 334-5 are repeated on the recto 11. 348-9, and 1. 333 also begins with same word as 1. 347 while its conclusion apparently coincides with that of 1. 345; cf. Owing to 11. 275-8 a, where a dittography of four lines has been cancelled by a corrector. the imperfect context no reason can be assigned for the present more complex repetition,

nor can the right place of the verses be determined. When Callimachus says that choliambic poets should draw their inspiration from Ephesus he is of course again alluding
to

Hipponax

(cf.

11.

346-7. The combination of c on 1.313. 347-9. Cf. 11. 333-5 and note.
but the dittography
is

92 sqq.), whose native city Ephesus was. tc with what follows and
. .

is

uncertain

;

cf.

note

Of the latter part of 1. 348 only slight vestiges remain, and the central portion of 1. 349 would have been undecipherable without the aid of 1. 335
sufficiently evident.

,

352. Both aspirated and unaspirated perfect forms occur in later Ionic, and This verse is found in three MSS. in Hippocr. ix. 192. may therefore stand. offers a pretty certain instance of a tribrach ; cf. note on 1. 311. is a fairly suitable reading, and is a most likely word to be coupled with 353. which was suggested by W-M. is not possible. 357. The last letter (f, ?) before the lacuna in the middle of the line has been rewritten or altered in blacker ink. A s|milar modification has been made in the letter dividing the second and third lacunae in 1. 358. suggest a , but this gives no word. 361. The remains after 364. It seems difficult to escape pfvvrai, with which may be compared Theocr. xxx. V preceding the Herodas vi. 77 is almost certain. 32 The line ends with a vertical stroke, which 366. a\ivTi6i\s V ,: or would suit e. g. t or . and the in which case there is a letter between 368. The last word is possibly preceding a. 369-73. That the detached fragment containing the ends of the lines belongs to this column is shown by the metre, but the number of letters lost in the middle cannot be

^

;

\(\(6

8((,

('^.

,

.

,-,
,

.

.

estimated.

382.

385.

[(]

389. Perhaps 390. interchange of with
:

\[, \.]
cf.
1.

Something must be wrong in 1. 371. or Tf. With there need not be more than one letter before is proposed by W-M. The letters have been rewritten
:

.

as

W-M
The
cf.

395.
;

in darker ink. suggests but another adjective is also possible. form is best left unaltered in view of the occasional
;

in Ionic
de

Herodian
SoKfi

ii.

252
eixai,

= Etym.

(\(

Magn. 151. 39

Si opy/ievoy•

('

examples are collected in Smyth, Ionic Dialect,

^• .

.

.

.

Some

p. 296.

395 sqq• The latter portion of these lines is again on a detached fragment, the position of which is fixed not only by the metre and the appearance of the papyrus, but also by the fact that 11. 400-2 have been to a large extent rewritten, and this renovation is carried out at
the ends of the corresponding be measured.
lines of the fragment.

The

width of the gap, however, cannot

or yovv ? 401. 404-7. There can be no doubt, owing to the appearance of the papyrus, that the small fragment containing the letters ]ai[ &c. from the bottom of a column is to be placed here, though its relative distance from what precedes and follows is uncertain. It cannot be /ra km [ in 1. 404. joined up so as to read 406. There are some traces of ink above the line in front of ^v. 408. vrjos is the Callimachean form, but vais occurs in some Ionic inscriptions and so
:

)

G

82
may
be admissible.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
[£]'
is

combine with the following
error for anoWov), there

letters

] •

would not be
420-1.
raiirrj
. .
.

metrical.

W-M
rrj

&u
cVrl

Fr. 209.

might be read instead of 425. 427. Cf note on Frs. 2-8. Cf. Soph. Fr. 868 d' 429.
Fr.
I.

!

^ ^ ^^ !.
yivovTai

would be a possible reading, which it might be easier to there is an but since, as 1. 409 shows (unless a loss of two syllables at the beginning of the verse, fi[e]X\fflc
;

points out the parallel in these two lines to Hdt.

€)(

,
iii.
.

102
.

iv

.

be
cf.

For another probable reminiscence of Herodotus

Callim.

!

is

-/.

,
to Fol. 6
;

This fragment from the top of a leaf very likely belongs excluded by a difference in the width of the upper margin.
Frs.

Fol. 7

2-8 are likely to come from either Fol. 6 or Fol. 7, and Frs. 6 and 8 almost do so. The former might be placed so that immediately precedes arepuv in 1. 427; the second line of the recto would then coincide with 1. 387, but though there are several alternatives to a suitable combination at that point has not been established. Fr. 8 might be turned the other way up and 1. i of the recto (which will then be 1. 2) read as ] [. The letters of i of Fr. 7 have been renovated in black ink, and in 1. i of Fr. 3 also there was some addition by a later hand.
certainly

-,
1.

.

Fr. 13.

The

recto possibly gives beginnings of lines.

Fr.

1 5.

MS.
and

The

their formation in

should perhaps not be included here but referred to some other ink and the spacing of the lines is similar, but the letters are somewhat smaller one or two cases looks different.

The fragment

1012.

Treatise on Literary Composition.
Height 33-5 cm.

Third century. Plate IV

(Frs. 1-3).

The

following fairly extensive fragments of a prose treatise of the

Roman

period proceed from the same large literary find to which
and, in the present volume, also 1016-17.
is

we owe 841-4, 852-3,

How precisely the subject of the treatise
There
is

to be defined
:

is

not immediately clear.

a considerable diversity of

topics

an analysis of the characteristics of Lysias (A), observations on systems of Ethics (B), a collection of instances of omission and suppression of names
'

or facts in various prose-writers (C), criticism of

the orators

'

for belittling the

achievements of Philip (D), censure of the diction of Xenophon (F), a list of words having double meanings, which in Attic, though not elsewhere, were distinguished by different accents, and of other Atticisms and Hellenisms (G). This variety might be explained by supposing the work to be of the nature
'

'

'

'

1012.

NEW
At
for

CLASSICAL TEXTS
hardly
fail

83

of a commentary, but

if so,

this could
first

to be

view does not seem tenable. 16. 3 and 14 might be taken
aypoiKos,

\(,

and

some book, and the following fragment shows clearly that the writer was simply collecting Atticisms. Indentation of lines such as that in Frs. ai-2 is no doubt a usual feature in scholia (cf e. g. 853 but quotations of any kind and not only lemmata for or the Berlin Didymus) comment were thus distinguished, and the nature of the small fragments in question is too doubtful for them to be taken as the basis of an argument. There is no real indication that the remains are not those of a connected treatise. Its scope would be more evident if the upper part of Fr. i. Col. ii were in better preservation when, however, the writer there declares his intention of conXo'yos sidering what books (or parts of books) were good, and lays down that has four divisions (11. 5 sqq. cf. Fr. 13. 26 sqq.), the most natural conclusion is that he was a literary critic, and that his treatise related in a general way to composition or style, more particularly (though not exclusively cf. Frs. 18 and Discursive23) in prose, and perhaps with predominant reference to oratory. ness is natural with such a theme and the technical linguistic discussions of Frs. 14—17 are quite in keeping with it. With regard to the author, his date at any rate can be fixed within tolerably narrow limits. He refers to Didymus of Alexandria and probably to Caecilius Calactinus (Fr. 13. 34-5), who both flourished at about the beginning of the Christian era on the other hand, the manuscript is hardly later than the middle of the third century (see below). Hence the two termini for the date of composition are approximately A.D. 50 and 200. Of his qualities, these disconnected fragments scarcely provide the material for a fair estimate. He was sufficiently familiar with the classics, judging from the frequent references and citations, which include, besides the writers just mentioned, Herodotus (Fr. 9. ii. 56), Thucydides (Frs. 5. 3, 9. ii. 23, ^6 sqq., iii. 37), Xenophon, Helleiiica and
actually occurred in juxtaposition in
; ;

,

sight, indeed, ak^Ois
;

more obvious, and the in Fr. and

lemmata

but

it

is

hardly conceivable that

'

all

exemplifying the peculiar Attic accentuation,

;

;

;

;

Agesilaus (Fr. 14.
ii.

3,

9),

Theopompus, Philippica
(Frs.
'

(Fr. 9.

ii.

13),
iii.

Lysias (Fr.
46, 13.
ii.

i.

Demosthenes, In Androt. &c. Aeschines, In Timarch. (Fr. 9. ii. 6, 14),
20),
riept

&
;

i.

ii.

36,
'

9.

ii.

20,

17),

The

orators
9.

(Fr.
ii.

1 1. ii. 4),

Theophrastus,
6. 13),

(Fr. 9.
6.

ii.

27),

Heraclides Ponticus (Fr.

i),

Aristippus (Fr.

Epicurus (?Fr.
ii.

3)

Aristophanes (Fr. 23. 3), and another comedian (Fr. 9. and he shows good knowledge of detail (cf. e. g. notes on Fr. 9. ii. 6-7
11),

and 14-22).

Some

inaccuracies in

names
it

(Fr. 9.
is

ii.

43, 51, i^^ are

no doubt
(cf Fr.
i.

copyists' errors.

His brief estimate of Lysias

judicious, recalling the criticism

of Dionysius of Halicarnassus, of which

might almost be a summary
2

G

;

84
ii.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ao sqq. and note)
his
;

he had a correct appreciation of the greatness of Philip remarks on Xenophon's vocabulary, so far as they can be follo^ved, seem not unjustifiable. Modern critics too have fallen foul of

and

There is then some reason to regret that the treatise has been recovered in such poor preservation. Its fragments, which originally amounted to over one hundred, have been reduced by combination to nearly half that number; but efforts to find a connexion between the larger resulting pieces, designated by the letters roll of which the recto was already occupied A to G, have been unsuccessful. by a cursive document was used, the writing proceeding in the contrary direction, i. e. the beginning of one text corresponding with the conclusion of the other. That on the recto is an official account, portions of which are printed under 1045, dating from the reign of Septimius Severus,and apparently after his thirteenth year. The literary text on the verso is therefore subsequent to A.D. 204-5, while from the character of the handwriting it would be placed at no great distance from that date. It is written in tall columns in a medium-sized sloping hand, an elegant, and to all appearance by no means a late example of the oval type so frequently met with. A period of from thirty to fifty years will be sufficient to allow for the recto to become antiquated and useless, and the conditions will thus be well satisfied if the manuscript on the back be assigned to about the middle of the third century. Lectional marks are scanty. There are no stops, but the more important pauses are denoted by paragraphi, sometimes accompanied by a blank space in the body of the text (Fr. 13. 26). single instance of an accent apparently occurs (Fr. 13. 32), though not, where it would be most expected, in Frs. 16-17, where accentual differences are under discussion. The usual angular sign, which here not seldom assumes the shape of a comma, is used to fill the shorter lines, but with little consistency, and the ends of the lines are rather ragged with regard to their beginnings also the scribe was somewhat irregular, gradually advancing to the left and so giving his columns a considerable slope to the right. His occasional errors in copying have remained uncorrected.

'?.

A

A

;

In default of any clear indications regarding the relative position of the

main fragments, the arrangement adopted below is more or less arbitrary. A, which is much worm-eaten, is placed first on the strength of Col. ii, part of which seems to be of an introductory character but, of course, this may be merely the introduction of a fresh section, especially as analogous language occurs in Fr. 13. 26 sqq., which cannot be brought into close connexion with A. On the recto of A is part of an official letter in the same hand as the account, to which it presumably refers cf 1045. B, like A, has been damaged by worms, and possibly its first column is the bottom of A Col. iii the recto contains only
;

;

;

1012.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
The

85
third
;

a few letters, but these so far as they go suit that supposition.
portion, C,
is

the largest that has survived, including one nearly complete column
:

on the recto of this are beginnings of lines from the account cf. 1045. D consists of two small pieces, more decayed than the rest it has been put next to C
;

because, like Col.

iii

of the latter,

it

relates to Philip
ii

;

but the recto
iii.

is

incon-

sistent with the hypothesis that Fr. 11 Col.

is

the top of C, Col.

and

F

are two narrow strips, the former containing remains of two columns, the latter

ends of

lines

from another.
it

The shape
is

of the upper part of Fr. 13, which

resembles that of C, renders
of a column.

likely that this

fragment comes from near the top
lines,

F, on the other hand,

not improbably from near the bottom.

On

the recto of both there are slight remains of a few

some

of which in

each case seem to be of the nature of headings or correspondence. The linguistic criticism of F smooths the transition to G (Frs. 16-17), the technical details of

which may be suitably reserved for the final place. Fr. 17 probably succeeds Fr. 16, and perhaps belongs to the latter's second column. The recto of Fr. 16 contains a few letters from the tops of two columns, of which the second at any rate shows the same formula as the recto of C. In shape, the left-hand side of this fragment is similar to the upper portion of C and of Fr. 13. Perhaps A, on the strength of the contents of the recto, should be placed at the end instead of the beginning, and and F be grouped along with that section.

A
Fr.
I.

(Frs. i-s).

Plate IV.
ii.

Col.

i.

Col.

4•
5

>•
.

a

[.]<<»[

]
]
• .
.

.

[

[>
[
[.

]€
.]
.

?[
y

eypvTa
ev

( []( ([9 (][]
.][
ev
[.]€(Sei

^[[ (
Se

ev

[

\[] €[]
]'[.
.

ev

.

.

.]

.

[

]

]vs

\[ €[

(Fr. a)

86

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
[.]eioia[

{.
15 Tois

TOVTo[.]s
[.]
.

[
. .

virapy^^i
\>
]

.]«[

ivpioyiv

[
.

(?)

[
.

aval

] ]

.

io/cet

[

e[.]na[
[.]e

[.]lMeiO[.]i

2
\<]
a7ro5[et]|€0)y
[ifTTO/oei]

[]
Ke .[.
. .

\(•\_

]•

[••

\]\

y]a/j

]
]

25

[

]7[.

.

][.1
1
.

.

\ [] [] ] [ \ []
/i»?re

\_\\\<^

[x/jijai/ijcoi/

.

[.]

jois

][]

.

(?)

^]
]

aXXrj

]i/et

>

8

]/

.

[.

.]

[][\
35

]

[]
[]
[]

{] [
[
Col.
iii.

^ 8
.
. .

[\

[],[

]
.][.

[....' .] .[.].

Fr.

,

Fr.

3•

\'\
[.]

[
.

Plate IV.

yo[

[

.

.

.1

\

(?).

25

1012.
5
ei/c[

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

87

[
[

\[
[.]f)T<uv
[.

6[
[
.]
.

30

.]
.

[]{[.
[.

.] []

[

[....]
'5
[

[

[

35

5 lines lost
21

[
Fr. 4•

Fr. 5.

]•[
.

.]

.

yaX[.

.]ya

.]vis

7[

[
..].[
(Frs. 6-8).

][
Col.
ii.

[.]

[ [
.

Fr.

[

7.

Hp[
Col.
i.

5 ]ovs

.

[

Fr.

8.

eX

88

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
][.] [.
.]

Kovpoi

(?)

1012.

NEW
tLvai

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Se [e^enreiu

89

]?

2

[] [']8/
Of
Se

.

25

™[i']

30

35

40

[ (
'? €'

[ ^[\ ]7][ []
.

[ ]
?[
]
• [

[ ] ([] [] [' { ]€[] []
[
T01S Trep]t

[

[ [\ ( ]
Se
[e^c

\ \ [\
[
weKopvevKevai

?

(

[\

[]

ei'[epye]Ti;i

€7€

([]
ye

/y

fiKoa-i

[.

.

.

:.].[....
]

[
[

-

.

.][.]

ewepye

[\
i/jawy

[]€

45

5

( ([]

go

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

55 T01S avTitne

\\] ?
Ivrriav

[\(>

ev

AaKeSai

KXe

Col.

iii.

23 lines lost
f[

4

[(

25

[

[ ^[
V
.

[

30

€7[

9[
35 [•]

0\\

?

[ [
[

[

[

(?)

1012.
01
'

]

.

(
^

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

91

]
5

5

]<'[•]
J•••

[

\ \[

Fr. II.

Col.

ii.

[

[.

.

.

.]Xe

.

[.]

.

[.]

[•

]ios

pay
inep

[]€
5

^[
.

[.]ei,

[
.

[.

.

.

^'•

'

Tes

]

"

Speta
10

?[€[ ]
[8] 8[][]9

[ ([

]"
]
'

[(
.

[]

[
e

[

]

noXeis
.

[
(Frs. 12-13).

[

[.]

.

[.] [

Col.
Fr. 13.

i.

Col.

ii.

av]8pes

3[

'm
Fr. 13.

[
\
«

92

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

1012.

NEW
F

CLASSICAL TEXTS

93

(Frs. 14-15)
[r

]•[

'8,\
]as TO

5

^
TLS
]

]€

]7€ >

10

15

[] [ ] [
]
]va KaL

]

S[€]fo0[coi']

vo >

[

7[']7

[( [

]
]_<

]('

(?)

94

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[]?

[ ](
[oas

e]^oiaei

(9
ye

[
[

15

[]
([
Se]

aa\<p€i

a[.]peiov

[....].

] €€ []
)(^
[Se
ii?).

^ []
]

a^peiov

]
[ [

Col.

.
[

[

.

Fr. 17 (to Fr. 16, Col.

\][]
]
.

a.[.].[
Attikov

5

E]vc/^S
]v
]

][ ][
[.]v
[

]eaiv

[

[

Fr. 18.

1013.
Fr. 19.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr. 21-2.

95

Fr. 30.

5

[ «[ [ (9
[

\

yf[

••

],

nap[
5

](
]([.
Se

]

[
/3/3[

]

]

5

[
.[
,

(i\vayvoi>

[

'\
]([.

]70£

[
1*
.

[

ya/>

?•[

][
Fr. 23.

.

,

Fr. 34.

Fr. 25.

]
]y

]
5

[ '[9 [
«]/ti0a[

]
]/

erepoii

[

({][

^
Fr. 29.

.

[

Fr. 26.

Fr. 37.

Fr. 28.

][
]01'[
.

]7 [
]

[
]

]."[•]

[

PoA
[

yi/»'a[t/c

]y<»•
5

][ \()\

5

]5€^[

]([
]•[
Fr. 30.

'\[
(?)

]f?t

]..[

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Fr. 31.

Fr. 32.

Fr. 33.

Fr. 34.

]{.

.\v[

1012.

NEW
l'''"^

CLASSICAL TEXTS
'\ovo\^

97
]5ti[
.

])(
<ti-

]-h{

If «[

Fr. 47.

Fr. 48.

Fr. 49.

Fr. 50.

Fr. 51.

]..
]op

f3[
.

][
[

],[

]5e/[

](i[

][

^
>.,[

Fr. 52.

Fr. 53.

Fr. 54.

Fr.

.55.

]•[••]<5[

1

].[

...
Fr. 57•

l/'/?"^

]'?"[

]

]

Fr.56.

Fr. 58.

Fr. 59.

\ov

]'[

]a)r[

•]?[

It is not clear what exactly is meant by rou Cf. introd. p. 84. Xiiyos were According to Aristotle, Rhet. iii. 13, the usual parts of a and iniKoyos, and similar distinctions are made by later writers but are mentioned in iii. 2, the remains of 11. 10 sqq. here, even if Fr. 2 is though wrongly placed (cf. the next note), do not lend themselves to terms of that kind, and the "Kayos would appear to be of a more general character. 11-18. That Fr. 2, containing parts of 8 lines from ] Xay[ to \-[, is to be assigned The appearance of the papyrus on both sides is suitable, to this position is very uncertain. and moreover, on the recto, if the fragment be placed approximately as suggested, the may be at, and 11. 15-17 could be In 1. 1 6 the doubtful •word jrapaiji^jeadm results. 7r[pf7roc] Tois 7tpoaa>n\ots Kaipog (Wilamowitz) restored (?)] Toiiro[(]r. But the combination remains unconvincing. of f[.]7rn or between 18-19. It is not certain that any letter is lost between t and and I of vc^.y.

•, (!, ,
Fr.
1.
ii.

5 sqq.

X[o]you in

1.

8.

;

.

[•']

] [( €

11

98
20-35. 'And of

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
this,

Lysias

among

the orators

seems to have been especially

careful.

anything of value nor adding anything superfluous, but ever on the watch for the right occasion adjusts his words to the characters and the audience, and observing always propriety towards his opponents of the speakers and the judges or jury who are hearing him he above all aims at moderation ; he is at once the most persuasive of almost all the orators and the most difficult to imitate.'

For he excels

in the exposition of facts, neither omitting

20 sqq. This characterization of the method of Lysias is to be compared with the Dionysius of Halicarnassus in the De Vel. Orat., Lys. §§ 4-10, where very Set Acyitc, ware similar phraseology is used ; cf. 5
criticism ot

\

^
the
line.

Photius, 2?//. 202, speaks of Lysias' have little in common with Dionysius

5 ^
Some
[ovrj'/s]
:

io^ete


. .

^',\

yap
epya^ 8

Xi^iv

.

6

\
. .

ouSelff

,

iv

and our author.

has to be supplied, unless is a mibtake for 23• [fuffopti] Wilamowitz. 24. Probably jrfpi7To[«'] [], but only the smallest vestige
25.

' , .
5
rois

eyiviTO
Tols

^^
.
. .

eivai

In

11.

but otherwise his remarks 20-1, if ou is the relative,

,
g
.

'

.

,

«

such participle as or is to be restored. is not but suits the remains better than for which there is hardly room. the broken letter seems to be rather than . 33. may be an error for as Wilamowitz suggests, or might be restored, 34. iii. 1-3. 'These three lines are on a detached fragment (3), but its position here is strongly favoured by the peculiar colouring of the papyrus. The 10. Possibly [ya]p is immediately under that in the previous line, so that only one letter would be expected in front of it, but the scribe has a tendency
very
salisfactorj',

[]

is

visible

at the

[(\\\

'[:,

[

end of

,

{)

&[(.
[],

to

advance the
ix.

lines to the left as the

column proceeds.
it

of jTou is very doubtful and there would not be room for and

] could well be
would be

read, but [aa]ru

difficult to find

seems unlikely, and an alternative.

Frs. 4-5. The attribution of these two small fragments to Fr. i. iii is suggested by the occurrence on the recto of a junction between two selides, also found in Col. iii. If Fr. 4 belongs to the column, not more than two or three letters are lost at the beginnings of II. 2-4 ; in the case of Fr. 5 the initial loss would extend to five or sis letters. In Fr. 4. 1. may be read. 4

]( 7[
Fr. 6.
i.

6.

[]\([
in place of

:

there

is

barely
;

room
also
is

for
is

may
7.

be read

and

for

the

between the supposed very uncertain.
slight.

and

.

The

trace of a diaeresis above

of

?;»
ii,

very

Frs.
is

7-8 appear

to belong to Fr. 6.

Fr. 8 being especially suitable;

but there

no

direct junction.

Fr. 9.
3.

ii.

i.

Cf the 6—7. The
in

Cf. note on 11. 6-7. reference to Aristophanes in Fr. 23. allusion here, as was perceived by Wilamowitz,

( explained by the Scholiast as a reference to a story Timaeus about a woman of Himera who had a dream concerning the approaching tyranny of Dionysius cf. also Photius i. v. Valerius Max. i. 7. Moreover,
;

' ^,

^,

is

to

Aeschines

2.

10

\

;

1012.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
:

99

Aeschines says
ipw.

That the person there alluded to was Androtion is not mentioned and apparently has not been recognized, though the language of Demosthenes recurs, might, as speech against Androtion (21—3) where the word indicated by our author, have warranted the inference.
in the scholia,
in

,./
:

TertuUian, De Anima 46, expressly refers this story to Heraclides (Ponticus) scd el Dionysii Siciliae tyrannidem Himeraea quaedam somniavit: Heraclides prodidit ; hence the restoration of 1. I. None of the authorities, however, mentions the name of the priestess, which our author implies was known, and which is perhaps given in 1. 2. 9—14. This passage, containing a new citation of the sixth book of the Philippica, was utilized for the recent edition of the Theopompea in the Oxford Classical Texts (Fr. 64) but we there hesitated to restore the names of Antipater and Eurylochus owing to the apparent insufficiency of the space at the ends of 11. 1 1— 12, where not more than eight letters would be expected. But the scribe is not very careful in keeping his lines even, and there can be little doubt that Philip's three ambassadors to Athens, specified in the arguijyayov rpeU ment to Demosth. Fah. Leg. 5, are really meant The passage where the names were omitted might be e. g. Aesch. 2. 55. The supplements of 11. 8—10 were suggested by Wilamowitz ; in 1. 8 is very uncertain, the vestige at the beginning of 1. 9 not suggesting an f, though it is not inconsistent with that letter. 14-22. The identification of this reference to Aesch. i. 165 is due to Wilamowitz.

, . ]
oZ»

:

,
Tivis
,

<(

els

('

yfyf'v^ai

"Kiyeiv,

i>s

'^"

yap

€\6(

yaaeov
.

^

.

\•^

the

23-56. 'Or suppression of facts, as in Thucydides. For he says that Themistocles came to Corc3'ra because he was a benefactor of that people, but he does not say what the benefit was. Theophrastus, however, in his book " On Occasions " states that the Corcyraeans had a quarrel with the Corinthians, and Themistocles being made arbiter decided that the people of Corinth should pay to the Corcyraeans twenty talents and when he describes the Corinthians as enumerating the benefits which they had conferred on the Athenians, in voting for the punishment of the Samians and providing the Athenians with ships when at war with the Aeginetans, he does not mention the greatest benefit of all, namely that when Cleomenes was restoring the tyrant Hippias to Athens it was again the Corinthians who, after the Lacedaemonians were already as far as the Thriasian plain, were the first of the allies to desert, and so caused the abandonment of the expedition and the failure of the restoration of Hippias and that vhen at Lacedaemon the Pisistratidae were asking to be restored, and Cleomenes was supporting them. Socles
in his flight
. . . ;

the Corinthian opposed him, as

is

narrated by Herodotus.'

23 sqq. After considering instances of the suppression of names the author now turns to suppression of facts, of which he gives some cases from Thucydides. The first is from
is 136 20 sqq. The restorations are largely due to Wilamowitz, account in Plutarch, Themisl. 24 (fC.
i.

27-8. Citations of the now lost treatise of Theophrastus otherwise called (Harpocration, s. v. simply (Parthenius 9), and is said to have consisted of four books.
II

\ ^^, '

^ . )

' )
tiv

who compares

the similar

\

Koivji

\

are scarce.

It is

or TO

2

loo

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

in 1. 37 of course means the proposed 36sqq. Cf. Thucyd. i. 41. between Athens and Corcyra which the Corinthians were opposing (i. 31).

40.

1.

!.

43. 44.
1.

cf. Hdt. V. 92. 55. 1. iii. 37-40. The reference appears to be to Thucyd. ii. 22. There is no mention in Thucydides of any other Phrygia than the Attic village. Lines 4 1 sqq. perhaps described its position, on which cf. 853. xiii. 16, note. 48-55. This passage evidently relates to the three serious wounds received by Philip during his campaigns, on which subject the principal authority is now Didymus, De Demosth. xii. 40— xiii. 7 'Kfp\ yap
TrXrjyfi'f,
.
.

, ]
8

[

alliance

here and in 1. 51 is an error for as Wilamowitz remarks.

;

cf,

Hdt.

v.

73.

.

\

De


ev

^],
Virt. I. 9

Alex.
is

('\

rightly restored in

^^^
1.

: !\
ftf

( !\ . ^"?,
ev 'iWvpioit
ev

ItKcvpaTov

^^ (
Cor. 67
iv

Cf, Scliol.
6c

DemoSlh.
iv

^
De
to

St

^

,

.

.

.

[]>

us

and Plutarch,
If
virep
,

ttairapevTos.

46

the allusion presumably
xareayoTa,

(,

was

De

Cor. 67

-

perhaps

as another case of suppressed facts.
Frs. 10-11. These fragments were found folded together, and are distinguished from the others by being much decayed and discoloured. Probably they belong to the same two columns, but their relation to each other is wholly uncertain. The recto prevents their being combined so that Fr. 10. i. i supplies the of a\y^pua in Fr. 1 1. ii. 8.

imp so apparently the papyrus ; 1. omp. repeated charge brought against Philip of bribery and unscrupulousness finds strong expression e. g. in PaUSan. viii. 7. 5 ayadov fit
Fr. 11. 4 sqq.
:

The

KoKetTdev

iii. 37 Sqq. Demosthenes, however, at least gives Philip credit for personal bravery ; cf. the passage quoted from the De Cor. in the note on Fr. 9. iii. 48-55. 10. is rather speculative, but seems more consistent with the papyrus than
;

^Fr. 13.
ii,

, (, ^^
oft
5s ye

opKovs dfiiv

ae'i,

(\

and Diod.

xvi.

54-

('

4 V"


cf.

Wfipac

((, on .

e.g. DcmoSth. Phil.

(or

-).

Frs. 12-13. It

is

and therefore, the gap between them is
Fr. 13.

probable that not more than a few lines are missing at the top of if Fr. 12 is the top of that column, which is far from certain,
slight.

restoration of the name CaeciHus here, i.e. Caecilius Calaclinus, seems fairly secure. He was a contemporary of Didymus, and the titles of his works, which were largely concerned with oratory, include

24-5.

The

. .

AqpoaOevovs
Xoyoi

\
;

Trolot

He

^, ,

Ilf

'
Ilfpi

and

'

,'

:oevos

,
\
X

',

To'is

is

cited several times
cf.

832 E, 836 A, 840 For ev Tois

irepi

by Plutarch, for example, in the Vi/. Oral., e. g. Dion. Hal. Ep. ad Cn. Pomp. 3 epo\ A]uoevovs cf. the title at the end of the Berlin papyrus of

\

.

1012.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

loi
OV the like

Didymus,
31. Either

be supplied before

OCCUrs ill Xeil. Ages. 6. 8 no\ueis apparently unnoticed in the grammarians and lexicographers. If ]pos is another unusual word fiom the Agesilaus this (i. 5), which is the only example of the comparative of may perhaps be and occur in //e//. i. 6. 5 and 12; the verb was also used by Cassius Dio, but no other writer is quoted for it in the Thesaurus of Stephanus. looks like another citation from Xenophon, but he does not appear to 16. have used the word in an abnormal sense, nor to have employed any strange compound to of it. Our author can hardly be referring to the occasional equivalence of
Fr. 14. II-15.
St
It

^! . !. (
;

-]5
T!(p\

,
what
Tin'.

(

y'.

In

1.

24 wr

may

refers to is obscure.

or

The

(, ((!,

«);

'\((, [•.
which
is

i8. Possibly
i.

24, Fr. 16. 22.

De

Sublim. 41
23•

1.27.

(
In
1.

.«! \,
or
as

!
15.

6 8e cf. e. g. Pollu.X iii. 51 regular the form ntpiTTos would however be e.xpected
;

some

Wilamowitz suggests,

,
\

other part of

fits

Demetr.

De

Eloc. 189

will

make

a suitable opposition to

^.
,

!•


i.

;

cf.

Fr.

.
ii.

9,

in with the context

;

cf.

Long.
in

\(
^

27-8. Cf. for the suggested supplements Demetr. 26) (11. 24, is possiby a , i. e. 28 the doubtful
. . .

De

Eloc. 299

Se

;;?

-/[.

.
its

Fr. 15. Similarity of appearance makes the bottom of the foregoing column a suitable position for this fragment, and it may even be placed consistently with the recto so that its first line conicides with the last of Fr. 14, ]€['].
Fr. 16.
cf.

1-3.

For the

] ([(^
Ammonius
|

S.l'.,

:
:

variation in the
aypoiKos

may

roir is due to Wilamowitz, who also suggests that on the analogy of the passage in Ammonius be restored in 1. i

.
it

^. ]!

meaning of

aypoiKos according to

ay

,

accent

by the accent
like

but acute accent,

' €,
3-14.
;

is

a graphical error.
this

word

also has

(!

just in the

, ..'
thus

when a man
utters
like

when he

in Attic, the meaning being distinguished is stated by somebody he will say aXijies he will pronounce the first syllable with an interrogatively The Hellenes in general, however, are accustomed to say

two senses

assents to what

same way

as

*

3 sqq. Cf.
4.

.
12.

^. [?]
1.

was restored by Wilamowitz. Instead of writing the word with its to appropriate accent, our author compares another word having the same accent, cf. also 1. 1 7. as above in 1. 8 to indicate indicate 14-19. Wilamowitz compares Arcadius, p. 116. 17 (ed. Barker) Authorities differ as the Opposite of interpreting was the for while elsewhere Arcadius states that concerning the accentuation

,, ( (

[

.
:

Ammonius
cf.

6

((, (!

. 15.

(^(

,

:

(.

^^

\

I02

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
269,
TO according to others, e. g. Schol. as our author says, the Attic accent varied with the sense, account for the conflicting evidence on the subject. It is unfortunate that the
it

Atlic accent (p. 87. 6 «xpeios

Ven.
this

was

axpfins.

If,

,!
meaning
;

/),
:

would word in 1. 19 giving
suits
(

the second

is

mutilated

the vestige of the letter before

or

J•.

is

That the small fragment containing the beginnings of 11. 16-17 is rightly placed haidly to be doubted, but there seems to be no proparoxytone word a[.lpfioi, and Spews
17.
sufficiently
fill

does not
Possibly

the space

the

first letter

might be

,

was written again by mistake

for apuov: there are

but that is equally intractable. two other errors in this

column.

This fragment cannot belong to Fr. 16. i on account of the writing on the recto, come from the column succeeding. The subject at any rate is similar. is less likely, .[.].[ is probably the word characterized as a Hellenism ; since the fourth letter is unusually long for an (. 6. A stroke is drawn above the final i, after which there is a short blank space. An abbreviation of is presumably intended, unless the stroke is to be regarded as accidental, in which case the t would be the last letter of the line and followed at the beginning of the next.
Fr. 17.

but

it

may

well

I.

[]['

Fr. 18. In colour and texture this fragment from the top of a column resembles Frs. 14-15, but the recto is inconsistent with the supposition that they come from the same column, and their subjects are also quite different that of Fr. 1 8 appears to have affinities to Fr. I. ii or Fr. 13. ii. 26sqq.
;

Fr. 19.

The most
is

blank recto,
Fr. 20.

probable place for this fragment, on account of the upper part of Fr. 9. iii.
Fr. 36. 3

its

dark colour and

10.

cannot be combined here.

lines

on a detached fragment, but its position here is practically The reason for the indentation of 11. 5-7 is doubtful. Perhaps the above and below are quotations, which were commonly distinguished in this manner, e. g. 220, 418, 853 or 11. 5-7 may be the heading of a section. In either case it is likely that there is no loss at the beginnings of 11. 2-4, and that not more than a narrow letter at any rate is missing in front of the two doubtful iotas in 11. 8-9 if they are read as etas no loss need be assumed.
Frs. 21-2. Lines 1-3 are

assured by the recto.

;

;

Fr. 23. 4.

The cramped manner

of writing ya[ suggests that the fragment contains

ends of

lines.

Frs. 24-5. These two fragments both come from the bottom of a column and should perhaps be combined, Fr. 25 being placed to the right of Fr. 24, but with a gap between a[ and \iTov. The recto of Fr. 24 is covered with a strengthening strip of papyrus which it is undesirable to remove. In Fr. 24. 1. 2 between ^i and erepois there is a short blank space in which a letter may possibly have disappeared.

Frs.

31-2 may well come from

Fr. i.

ii-iii.

Fr. 31, in which
iii ;

a junction of two selides, would be especially suitable in Col.
Fr. 35. Similarity in colouring suggests that this

cf.

there is apparently note on Frs. 4-5.

fragment

may

belong to the upper

part of Fr.

i. iii.

;

1012.
Fr. 42.
2.

NEW
again.

CLASSICAL TEXTS

103

Probably

p]')ro/j[

Fr. 43. 3. If the
Frs. 54,

second

lelter is really

a

(or

),

this line
is
.

protruded considerably.
Fr.

57-9. That these scraps belong to 1012 should perhaps be turned the other way up and read Ji-e

somewhat uncertain, and

58

[.

1013.

MeNANDER, MliOYMEMOS.
16-7

X

13-9 cm.

Fifth or si.xth century.

made by
and the
the
value.

,
it

Important contributions to the remains of Menander have already been the Oxyrhynchus papyri in substantial pieces of the (211)

^(409), and to these are now to be added the following fragments from
which, if of much more modest compass, are Their identification admits of practically no doubt.
still

not without
is

A

clue

at once

provided by the occurrence of the
principal character in this celebrated

name

Thrasonides, which was that of the

comedy.

The name of his

slave

was Getas

345, Arrian, Diss. Epict. iv. i. 19), and his father apparently also figured in the play; Getas and the father of Thrasonides duly appear in the papyrus.

(Kock, Frs.

^;^^,

These, however, are not the only dramatis per sonae which here occur; three others
are mentioned, Crateia
(II. 32, 39), Demeas (11. 13 sqq.), and Kleinias (? 11. 12-3). But we know from Simplicius on Aristotle, Phys., p. 384. 13 (Diels), that Crateia (a rare name) and Demeas were characters in a play of Menander. The passage
:

is

Mevavbp<a Arj/xeas

Kpareiav,

was the correct reading, but C. Keil {Philol. i. 552) proves to have been right in defending Kpareiar,' which Kock (Fr. 939) needlessly prints with a small That the play alluded to by Simplicius was the K. was not known, but this is now evident, and the passage may henceforth be rescued from

.
and the

^ /,
Meineke thought that

or

^'
plot

the position
are

has hitherto occupied accord with what

among

the

"/ ^.

Finally, to

clinch the argument, the phraseology
in

situation disclosed in the

papyrus

striking

Thrasonides was a soldier of an overbearing and repulsive type, in love with his slave (Crateia), who, as we may now add from Fr. 939, was also his captive cf. Libanius iv. J12. I ay
.
.

.

is

known of the

of the Mto-o^Vet'os.

;

' Wilamovvitz refers to Kaibel's vindication in Hermes xxv. pp. 9S-9 of Kportia r\ as title of a play of Alexis against the suspicions of editors of Athenaeus, the name Kpareia having been found on a Theban vase.

the

between the two was thus the same as that between and the resulting situation is closely analogous and seems to have had a very similar d^noucvtent. Thrasonides' despair
relation
in

( ' ( -, '
]$ .
Fr.

I04

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Mivavbpov
(Is

et

rii

&pavbv,
©paaoivibov

olbev

aijbiav

yeyovev

Kock,

^^S

evT(\(s,

()77.

(^
.

eiy

The

Polemon and Glycera

the

({,

, \(
and
'

'

at the aversion of Crateia

is

described in Arrian, Diss. Epict.
. .

iv. i.

19:

First

he goes out in the night, when Getas is afraid to do so. Next he demands a sword, and is enraged with the man who out of kindness refuses to give him one, and he sends presents to his disdainful mistress, and implores and weeps then a slight improvement elates him.' Now this is just the attitude of the Thrasonides of the papyrus ; cf. 11. 40 sqq. You will now prove me, father, of all men living the most happy or miserable for unless this man will accept me fully and give this woman to me, it is all over with Thrasonides which heaven forbid This man is doubtless Demeas (evidently the father of Crateia cf. 1. 39), who, as has been seen in Fr. 939, unexpectedly arrived on the scene and effected her release {\.(•5•, cf. 1. 21 Hence it is clear that our fragments come from near the conclusion of the play. Further points of contact with the extant citations from the are pointed out in the notes on 11. 18 and 19. Whether the recto precedes the verso or vice versa is not immediately
;
:

'

;

:

!

'

'

'

:

).

Recto.
Fr.
I,

Fr.

2.

]irJ7i'</ca[

Fr. 3.

5

'\[
]

.[.].[

]

'\\
.

:

]5]5(

1013.
evident,
straight
for
is

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
margin
of

105

the extremity of the right

the

recto though fairly

not cleanly cut, and the appearance of the edge might have been caused by a break ^vhere the crease in the quire came. But internal evidence provides a less equivocal clue. The verso is occupied by the conclusion of

a dialogue between the soldier Thrasonides and his father (11. 34, 40), the former, as has been seen above, being very eager that Crateia should be given
to

him

(in

marriage)

was now

in

by her father, i. e. Demeas (11. 39, 43-3). Hence, since she her father's keeping, the rescue had already been effected. On the
is

recto her release

the subject of a discussion between Cleinias and

Demeas,

a parent demands her freedom (II. ai-a). This scene must therefore have preceded that on the verso and it is natural to identify Demeas' interlocutor Cleinias as the father of Thrasonides.

who

in the capacity of

;

The papyrus
date.

is

no more than a tattered

leaf,

of which only the lower part
is

has survived, with four small detached pieces.

It

of a comparatively late

a rather coarse semicursive, which must be referred to the fifth Alternations in the dialogue are denoted as usual by or even the sixth century. paragraphi and double dots the name of the speaker is inserted to the left of the column at 1. 38, while at 11. 10-13 similar entries have been added in a ruder

The hand

is

;

hand and darker ink in the right margin, as in the Cairo Menander. Stops in both the high and middle position occur, and accents, breathings, and marks of The accents are elision are plentifully supplied, mostly by the original scribe. in 1. 44 of sometimes rather carelessly placed, e. g. that intended for the
really falls over the second

.
Recto.

Fr.

I.

]^^[ •(.[
]
]

Fr.

a.

[

Fr. 3.

5

(.

\[ .
]

].: ..[

oaiW ^

[.]

.

[

]

.

9 €6[
rha,

]

?)

10

() >']8

]«y,

:

io6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

\'[.''<\

]/3)
]

:

15
]
. . .

]8
]8' €£[.

]'

.]( .^ •€€
]•[.]
.

.

[.]€
;
:

(

.]

.

.]

.

.]€€)(,
Verso.
.
.

:

Fr.

I.

.]

25

.

.]

.

[ [
. •

•]'
Fr. 2.

]
[

.

.

.

[

Fr. 3•

30

;

]!

[

[.](€' [
[.

.]1
. .

.

[

.

[
,

€€[
[

[

35

([ ([ /

[

1013.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

107

()
(.)
15

\[\(
]"
]

(.)
2
(Ahjw.)

, [] ,
(/\.)
]
• • •

],

. () ]
oiSe

,

fp*y ^7'"
Aeyet
ouos

]•

]

.

\,
'

[.]

.

.

[.]

]

(([.

[\

]/

,
.]
.

.. « ()

. .

51 ye

Verso.

Fr.

.
2

]..[

5

[ ].
]

-^.

]

.

.

[

Fr.

2.

]

.

.

.[

Fr. 3.

[

]
.]5

.

.

.

[7]€7'5//£'.
30
[.

(.
[
.

?)

[

€/

[

.

.

[

(.)
(.)

(.

?)

35

((5{?))

,, \(.\ \ ([ [
[
ev

[
[

e

.

e[

io8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
7raT^/3/f/jaTeiacr[.]of[.

40

[^[ 8(^ )(^'8[
.]'0[

((>>'>'('[
•,'€(•
.

[•]<(y[

¥.

4 recto.

Fi•.

5 recto.

7[ ]8][
]fi
• •

[

IrVi
,

^^

,

Fr.

4

verso.

Fr. 5 verso.

]([

]([

]i']

]Acai[

Fis. 1-2. Corresponding dark-coloured fibres on the verso, and the tip of a stroke on Fr. 2 which may be the base of the of «« in Fr. i, suggest the combination of these two fragments, and similar fibres on the main piece make it Hkely that Frs. 1-2 are to be

placed at the top above Fr. 3, perhaps immediately ; the letters -would then be the beginning of the line and on the recto probably the end. 9. yera is followed by some traces which may be ink; possibly there has been an erasure of a colon or a . The identity of the speaker of this line is quite doubtful ; since it is addressed to Getas, the previous line is likely to belong to him. 12. seems to be the most probable expansion of the abbreviation KXfif. No name beginning with these letters is attested for the New Comedy, but KKemiat {K.vavia{s) codd.) occurs in a fragment of Polyzelus (Kock, i. p. 791). ]\ may be ] W or Tov]ri or

/()
fxSpas
is
f.

]'.
like
is

1
1

3.
6.

The supposed double

dots

may be
is

the extremities of a

.
letter is

just possible, but the

unsatisfactory
letter after the

and the preceding

more

lacuna suggest If 1. 19 or 8. intervene either at 1. 16 or I. 17. 18. cf. the passage quoted from Arrian, Oiss. Epkt., in the introduction, hoapa Tji Si'iTat \(. Zvos "Kipas occurred also in Menander's (Kock, Fr. 527), according to Photius and Suidas, who add fi' Sms \vpas
rightly assigned to Cleinias,
:

or

\, )

than

The remains of the first Demeas must

;

,

8(!

1013.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
[.]ov[.

109

40 vvy

Sei^eii

(

\\^ ([, ([6(. 5[• 8( ''• \' '•

' ,^ {
tj
.

.]

0[

[•jffi

Fr. 4 recto.

Fi•.

5 recto.

€[ ] [
]«...[
]
1

]t

...

[

Fr. 4 v^rso.

Fr. 5 verso.

]p Sa>^ei[

]v[
]

](\[

].
this is

[(B)

iyKOve

\!
is

Ss.

\eyeTat

()

fVt

obstinacy
19.

the quality apparently conveyed
:

[(»/]-7

probably a reference to the restlessness of Thrasonides,
;

which is emphasized in Kock, Fr. 341 though of course Fr. 341 is not from the present scene.

number of letters lost on the hypothesis that 20-r. These two

attempt to indicate the at the beginnings of the preceding and following lines is based
is

/ , &
by the saying.
correct.

[
&€

].r.[

(,
'

The

[] (Wilamowitz)

verses ought to be restored without much difficulty, but the text (cf. introd., appears to be at fault. Wilamowitz is surely right in emending in spite of the p. 104) to anoXvrpovv, and in supposing that a change of speaker occurs at

tips from upetv is unlikely, and ? single point in the papyrus ; but what is which is not easy to for tpeaSai is Only an Ionic form ; there remains f'pijyuc the letter before may well can hardly be read otherwise manage. The t after

((([

=

(,

'(
t

,

HeedleSS

;

be

K,

,

or

.
letter
;

30.

The
:

following
[.

seems

to

be

a,

not

,

and the accented

is

inconsistent with

a subjunctive
31.

but
or

,

.]fcffi is difficult.

but not

.

The

first letter

of the line
lines,

may

be

n.

34-6. There

is

no paragraphus below any of these

but a change of speaker must

ltd
have occurred in speaker at 1. 38.
37. 38.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
their course, since
1.

34 evidently belongs to Tiirasonides, who

is

again the

The
of

circumflex on eO precludes the restoration oi has apparently been converted from an f.
2.

€[(.
be accidental.

Fr. 4 verso

Fr. 5 verso 2.

Some blurred marks above the first three letters may The supposed has apparently been corrected.

1014.

Historical Fragment.
15-6

X

8-8 cm.

Third century.
It

A
is

fragment from a

historical

work, apparently not extant.

contains part

of a description of a battle, which took place on the sea-coast and seems to have the identity of the combatants, however, been attended with much loss of life
;

not

made

clear.

The language

suggests a writer of the Hellenistic period.

Parts of twenty-six lines remain from the bottom of a column, written on the verso of the papyrus in a not very regular sloping hand of a medium size and common third-century type. Stops and other lection signs, except the diaeresis, are entirely

absent; a second hand has made a correction in 1. 14. There is no complete In the transcript line in the fragment, and the extent of the loss is uncertain. below, 11. 8-10, where the supplements suggested are plausible, have been taken
as the basis for an approximate estimate of the number of letters missing. On the recto are the beginnings of eighteen lines from the top of a column

of a survey-list, drawn up in the second century, and giving the position and The writing proceeds is mentioned. value of certain plots of land a in the same direction as that on the recto, relatively to \vhich it is, therefore,
;

upside down.

[
[.
. .

]^r-[

[.

.

\ ^[
.]ai

TO

7[

5

5 (
[.
.

€]€6[

[ [

8
ivwi
Se yet

re

\\

({(
yap

\( -^

[

1014.

NEIV CLASSICAL TEXTS

III

15

4.

Some form
is

f^a^Bev or eaaPffv
7.

Possibly

10. 7f[>O/iecot Kara Wilamowitz.

].

11. [: or hp[. is commended by the conte.xt, though oi8eIw does not seem to be applied 15. and Arat. 908 elsewhere to the sea ; cf. however is not used in the active sense, otherwise the division 1 6. The middle of efTiieXuftro might be adopted. could be the termination of a name, e.g. 17-18. Perhaps or

^[ ! [[ [ 9[ ^ (( [ ^& / . , ],
TOVS
.

•\ [
Se

rey

^ (-'([
Si[

S[e

'^^ [
[

€(
Tais

( [.

Se

[

20

[

ye

[

Se

[.

.]

.

rjTOS

.

.

.

[

])
S]e

25

[

]9

[

....

([,

of or probable. but the narrative

is

to

be restored.

At the end of

the line

is

too mutilated for satisfactory restoration.

'[
.]
.

], »
y,

23.

[.

ijTor:

ft

preceding

letter

satisfactory.

\]9,

suits

may be , or

read in place of 17, but is less i» better than or , and as Wilamowitz suggests, or

The 7\]! ^!
likely.

vestige of the

not therefore (Hesych.) would give
is

a good sense.

1015.

Panegyrical Poem.
17

X

23-6 cm.

Third century.

This short poem of twenty-two hexameter verses is described in the title written both at the foot and in the left margin opposite to 11. 8-9 as an has, however, in both the name Encomium on Hermes
;

;

112
places been

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
washed
out,

and higher up

another endorsement,

ets

The first nine lines are, indeed, devoted to Hermes, who, an elaborate invocation in which some of the principal attributes of the god But the person really to be celebrated are recited, is called on for inspiration. of was the youth Theon (1. 12) who in 1. i is referred to as the
purpose of the piece.
in

,

in

the margin the
is

same hand has entered

Avhich

a more exact description of the

Hermes, and to

whom

the poet returns in

1.

10 sqq., Avhere he

is

described as

honouring the god in having supplied a fountain of oil for his fellow-citizens, apparently a poetical way of saying that he had made a benefaction to the gymnasium. That gift, however, and another of corn (1. 15), had occurred previously, and he was now making to the youths a further presentation of a kind which could only come from one 'learned in the lore of the Muses' (1. 20), and did
still more credit, e. some endowment of the arts, which the allusive method of the writer does not allow to be further specified. Probably, as Wilamowitz suggests, Theon was a young man whose wealth had led to his

the donor

i.

early appointment to the office of gymnasiarch

(cf. 1.

13

but he

is

not recognizable
is

among

the

known gymnasiarchs

,
but

and the

title)

of Oxyrhynchus.

The poem
sloping hand

written on a well-preserved sheet of papyrus in a medium-sized
similar in style to that of 223 (Part
;

somewhat

, Plate

i),

though

not so well-formed and regular
of the third century.
plentifully supplied,

it

may be

assigned to the middle or latter half

Accents, elision marks and stops (high and medial) are marks of long quantity are also sometimes inserted, and there is one instance of the use of the curved stroke below a compound word Whether all these signs are due to the (1. 14) as e. g. in the Bacchylides papyrus. original writer is not evident ; a second hand has undoubtedly been at work on the text but since the ink employed by the latter did not differ appreciably
;

cannot be accurately determined. In one or two cases accents have been amended (cf. note on line 11), which suggests that the accentuation was original and was revised by the corrector, though The accentual system resembles this of course is not a necessary inference.
in colour, responsibility for single strokes

that found in other papyri of the period
loosely employed,
e. g.
1.

5

been eliminated. The alterations introduced by the second hand at 11. 6-7, 10, and 19 are curious, and may even have come from the author's own pen, if an amanuensis was employed for the body of the text. In any case the poem is that effusions of this it is unlikely probably little older than the papyrus class would be long-lived, the subject and the style being alike undistinSome specimens of guished, though the versification is correct enough. panegyrics, with which this may be compared, of a later period and more
;

,

(cf.

223 and

841),

it is

somewhat

besides the above-mentioned errors which have

1015.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
I. 3.

113
xi,

ambitious design, have been published in the Berliner Klassikertexte, and the inscriptions offer other parallels.
auroy


\
Se ev

S"

Kaues€/y

5

Si

(

^^^

^^

[[/)]]

(• (
£01

avvpveiovaiv

^• •
€£
[[«»'«]]

(•

(
15

(
veov

([]6

(

' '•
'
Kcvcauxea

• € •

^/'']]

20

• ^^
thyself hasten to sing for
;

• • ^'

!

.

me of thy young interpreter, and help the hand the seven-stringed many-toned lyre, which thou thyself first madest new-dropped at thy mother's feet and gavest to Apollo in ransom for his oxen therefore do latter-day bards celebrate thy service of the Muses, and herdsmen in the fields proclaim thee as pastoral god, while athletes in the stadium call on Hermes ruler of the games, and cities hymn thee as warden of the gymnasia. And here too this youth, King,
'

Hermes, do thou

bard, striking with thy

I

ri4

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

honours thee in thy hallowed folk, pouring a fount of oil for the citizens. For it is not newly that we know thee, Theon, holding chief office among thy youthful comrades, but of old, whether anointing ourselves with oil-distilling flasks, or partaking of the gifts of chaste Demeter. Such blessings didst thou of thy favour bestow on the folk and blessings on blessings here givest thou now to the youths, yea more precious still. For those in truth a rich man too might bestow, since vainglorious are the gifts of vain wealth but these come from a man learned in the wisdom of the Muses. Therefore we honour thee more highly for these than for them, because they were taught thee by thy father, and these by
;
;

the Muses.'

I.

Theon may be addressed

as the

of
is

Hermes

in

virtue of his office of to his musical

gymnasiarch
3.
1.

or literary tastes.

.
Cf
:
.

(cf.

11.

9-10), though very likely there
the converse interchange of
^ojos

a special reference
in
11,

Cf

4-5.
syllable of

I/.

Herm. 17
is

yeyovun

follows the
there

Homeric usage, A 14, &c. cf 11. i perhaps in this word a deliberate reference to
with or

which connected
Tis
.

.

etSar 8e (sc.

7•

Cf. e.g.

, ;
20.
2 1.

Pindar, Pyi/i. ii. 10 ivay^vLos Nem. 52-3, &c. ; the patronage of The initial e has been corrected from i. With not a Homeric attribute of Hermes. regard to the partially erased title in the margin here and below 1. 22, Wilamowitz thinks that these entries refer not to the present poem but to an encomium on Hermes pronounced by Theon on the occasion of his entry upon office and of his gift to the state, and that the same event is alluded to in the epithet teoi' in 1. i. The more obvious view taken in the introduction, that the title was intended to apply to the contents of the papyrus and was recognized to be erroneous, seems to have advantages. in 1. 14 seem to be otherwise unattested. II. here and The acute accent on is written over a circumfle.x ; similar corrections have been made in 1. 17 and 1. 2 1 yepaipopfv, while in 1. 14 a circumfle.x is replaced by the second grave accent in is evidently temporal, in antithesis to veoi'. Cf. 13. 253
8.

Cf

.

Hermes)

H. Hcrni. 570—1

, , ,
ToC

' (.
and
;

1.

The lengthening
g
the fanciful
8e

,

e.g. Bekker, Anccd., p.

hibuiKiv virtp

elpua

,

752

.: ,
of the

first

etymology

'

cVi

.

;,

.

sport

is

(! ^
.

.
ii.
. .

Oppian, Hal.

495.
:

For the genitive with

^!

cf. iu.

487
91.

SO Apoll. Rhod.

.

1016.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

115

III.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

1016.

Plato, Phaedrus.
Third century.
Plate

28x57-5 cm.
Six columns in very

V

(Cols. v-vi).

fair preservation, containing the proem of the Phaednis a-230 e). A coronis is placed at the bottom of the last column, and a broad margin follows, which shows that the dialogue was not continued on this sheet either, therefore, it was for some reason left incomplete or a fresh roll was begun.

(pp. 227

;

As

with so

many

of the literary papyri belonging to the

first
is

large find

of 1906, from which both 1016 and 1017 are derived, this text

of a cursive document,
in this

volume
(a. d.

(1044).

unnamed emperor, no
Severus
205-6).
is

of the third century
is

on the verso a register of landowners, part of which is printed later on The document was drawn up in the fourteenth year of an doubt either Marcus Aurelius (a.d. 173-4) or Septimius date near the commencement or in the earlier decades therefore indicated for the MS. of the Phaedrus, and this

A

would naturally suggest. It is a mediumupright, and written in a rather free and flowing style. The employment of iota adscript, though frequent, is irregular. Alternations of the dialogue are, as usual, marked by double dots, accompanied sometimes by paragraphi but for the double dots a single high stop, which is
the period which the hand
itself

sized uncial of the oval type, but

;

also used for purposes of punctuation,

is

not infrequently substituted

(e. g. 11.

95,

and conversely the colon sporadically appears where the single stop would be expected (11. 53, 153). at the end of a line is often written as a stroke over the preceding vowel. Accents (11. 218, 227) and marks of elision Another occasional sign deserving remark is the comma (11. II, 59) are rare. placed between doubled mutes (11. 199, 232, 261), a use of which there appears to be as yet no instance earlier than the third century. That all these lectionmarks proceed from the original scribe is not certain, but he no doubt was responsible for the majority of them. There is, indeed, scanty evidence of a second hand at all. In one or two places, however, alterations seem to be due
115, 124, &c.),
I

2

ii6
to a diorthotes,

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
who may
also

have introduced,

for instance,

such accentuation

as occurs.

The

text

is

not uninteresting, showing a

number

of small variations from

the mediaeval

doubt the scribe was liable to make mistakes (cf. 11. 40, 85, I54> 187) and sometimes seems to have had a difficulty in reading his archetype (cf. notes on 11. 160 and 329). On the other hand good readings occur which have hitherto rested either on inferior evidence or modern
conjecture; such are
1. 1.

MSS.

No

21
;

-,
ov

1.

74

239

hi ye (so editors

ye

BT,

&c.,

;

(so

Schanz

;

Par. 1812),

1.

-,
253

ns MSS.),
1.

258

These lend a certain colour to the variants the value of which is more questionable. As between the two principal MSS., the Bodleianus (B) and Marcianus (T), the papyrus shows, as usual, little preference, agreeing first with one and then with the other. The appended collation is based on Burnet's Oxford edition, of which occasional references and are the foundation to other MSS. are taken from the edition of Bekker.
TTpoaiiovres.
;

\\ []
[

]€
€1

Col.

i.

8
Ke
Se npos nepi

:

327 ^

[]/
5
[f'ff*]

^

^ony

SuTpiyjra
€^

^
; :

/iffelli/f/JOf

[vos]

Se

e

[]
[€\(

[]

Tovs nepnraTovs
eiuai

[]
[iv\

'
e

227

^>

[ \(.

[]
15

[]
[]]

fv
€«/

:

[]

[]
[]?7
ei

aKoveiv

1016.
[tl

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
S\ai•

117

20

[] ^^ [] [ []€
ovK av out

TIlv

\6\

\

vweprepo

:

;

Xeyoiy

;

izy c

25

[]•
[

S(>>]KpaTes

ye

[ ]
['\

30

[ ]' [ ]
[/uecjof

[]
[

[yei

35

] [] [ €] [ [
["«S

[evv]aos•

( ]€
]?
eiOe "€»"?''

€( '•

Aoyoy

eiev
:

9
\e

(

:

40

[
45

[ [
[
rey

] [], ] \ ] ^
e

Te

tois

227 d
eyu

]

[

Xoyoi

'

[

tav

[ey6£s•

]
Col.

]9

>

^]
ev

50

^ ((
oui

.
228 a

ii8
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
a>v

vevaeiv

€€
:

;

ye Sea
55

y

ei

(('
>
yeveaOai
eu

Co

[6\\\

€(
65

[] [] \ €'['\[
e/c€i[i^]os•

70

75

8

[] [ €\ [ ][ €\\ [] ] ] [ [ []][][ ] [] [] [] ?

[
[]
[\

e

228 b

5[e

e7r[e

(

u\i\

0)9

[

Tei)(^ov[s
[.
.

(

238 C

[]

1016.
8g

^
7[]!
([
:]

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
Se
eXeyei/
Tty

119

.

(

8
»;[/

>

go

€? []'
[

]8

[

7[)? e]av

](
Col.
iii.

Xeyeiy

[]
(

95

ye


ois

?•

\\
100
[fv]

€ [] []
[€]€9

105

[]
[y]e

(

^ ^
01

338

ye

\( (
:

iei^as
(V

[]6 «
[[/]]'
ei

ie

no
[]

[]
115

[] []€

( (€ []9
6eiKvve•

[«] []

( (
(•
e/f/ce

(

328 e

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[\5
120

[] [\
eav

[ []

])
coy

(XniSos [/]


eis

ev

Sevpo

[]'

125 ^^ eoiKev

• ^
re

[€]7€

229 a


130

^
;

aei

tovs

?
:

i'e

re

€[$:]

:

opas

135
Tf

(
229 ^

eav
;

Col.

.
fv

140

€7€

,
:

[(\
;

Bopeas

145

aaive

1016.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
:

150

^ ^
:

,
329 c
y

8

(
ev
eivai

Bopeov

:

eiwe

ae
155
ei

((

1

6 8

€€
229 d

yeyovevai
165

Xtyerai yap

evOevSe
Se

170

/ '
Se

,
[]

eKeiOev
eycu

175

'
180

329 e

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
«i?
ei

TLS

fiKos

are

nvL
t'oi

Col.

.

Plate V.
S]e

185

((• \\($
Se

[

[£]'

ToSe

8
yeXoio
e

igo

8

23°^

195

^
pfiv
eiTe
Tepoi'

Se
Tvepi

iXeyov

200

^
eTaipe

'
:

eiTe


Oeias
[[^11

205

To8e

(
2
;

(

(
%^>\>

1016.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
T[e]

123

\€
215
'^^^


a>s


€j(€i

toy

ev

trapiyoi

220

8
2

?

ye

25 '^'^

''€

upov

Col.

vi.

Plate V.

[
eoiKev et[vai
et

]
Se]

230 c

[]
230

?

[]

235

«

^ '\ []
'

[]

[/)]

noas

ev

v(


240 ye

e^fl

e^eva

124

^^
TLvi

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
e/c

245

?
^

!€ ,
eoiKas
oire ey

33°

'^

Tei\ovs

250

'•
e^ievai
:

SoKeis

255

^
Tey

26

265


0L

'

33°^

^^
e

4.
5.
[f /cei]

:

MSS.
;
:

The

deletion of the

11.

y

(

or perhaps
Xe'yfi

yap

MSS.
MSS.
:

12. ejratpe

:

15. [tV 16. f8]i):
1

8.

[^

soB: om.
it
;

.
e'L

^
[eifjft

(,

was probably due
is

to the corrector.

which, however,

not a

known

variant.

tj)

MSS.

TTevarj

MSS.

19.

from

a.

21.
:

25. Xoyos

28.
in

\:

:"
]
so
:

1016.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
;

125

SO

corn, Vat. 225, Ven. 189

Sc

BT
:

;

(

SO Burnet with Par. 181 1 ; G, which is accepted by Burnet.

^
18

and other MSS.

e

of ^e was converted

BT.

MSS.
Xf'yei

cm. MSS.
:

before which there is not room in the lacuna, omitted in the ordinary text. 40. The insertion above the line (apparently by the first hand) brings the papyrus oSv. eywye appears here in place of into conformity with the usual te.xt, e.xcept that

31-2.

Af• 7fi

MSS.

1.

32 and before

.
; ;
:

yap, for

in

1.

33

is

41.

]
:

•/

:

om. MSS.

so 55. 6o. ev b: so
72.

(-/
11.

74.

:

:

the

om. ' . MSS. have

.

'
:

without crasis.

78-9.

(

MSS.

(vv.

81. or a particle like 85. cXcycc
:

ns MSS. SO Burnet with Schanz lS6>v and the majority of the SO corr., Hermann, Schanz ; and SO Burnet. in the papyrus (cf. 1. 158), does not fill the space. Possibly there was a flaw

18

,

)

,

87. 92.
96.

:^: & . [\:
A
stop
is

hrj or y( may have been added. MSS. eJLifXXf which is required by the may be lost after epuv. MSS. For (]av cf. e.g.

following ipfw.
I

1.

23.

MSS., which agree with the corrected reading MSS. There is but a tiny vestige of the

.
,

but this combined

with the short space

(,

a suflScient indication. ow here implies the removal of the usual punctuation after 103. ovv: om. MSS. is Biavomv must depend, upon which verb, with the papyrus reading, omitted in B. apa apa B, 106. o'. Burnet. 112. SO which 116. was Originally written, but was altered by the first hand to in the next line. is required by Vind. 89, of BT ; is also the reading MSS. 119. TToi:

:
:
:
:

.

;

,

^ (
is

Stallbaum.
123. 126.
:

ev

so Ven. 184.

MSS. 8 BT,
MSS.
BT,

&C.

132.

133• Plato in Theaet. 146 139. 144.
145.

(: (8€

MSS.
:

&C.,

Par. 1826.

a.
:

SO

BT
;

;

Burnet.

has

om. MSS.
;

/

USed by

for

^^.
MSS.

of The SO Ven. 1 89 has been converted from a , i. e. the scribe presumably began to write is HOt f Bratuscheck). The L•" Bumet SO BT, &C. 150. certain, having at first sight rather the appearance of an ; but this is probably due to the
Other
:

;

(

"

.

scaling of the ink.

151.

The
of

interlinear

T,

.

may have been inserted by the original hand. (i.e. has apparently also been altered from a

Ws Burnet with

was

originally

126
written),
deleted.

THE OXYRHYl^CHUS PAPYRI

of ns as though that letter was to be and there is a diagonal stroke through Perhaps the corrector, whoever he was, intended to rewrite the whole word and then changed his mind and inserted r.
152,

ae was due to or neidei. MSS., with 154. ae active instead of the middle. 158. Owing to a flaw in the papyrus the syllable
:

(:
:
:

j/fi/ujjKa

MSS.
TreiOei

having been taken for the
are

and
note on
1.

separated by a

considerable interval. 160. is apparently due to a misreading of
165.

;

of.

229.

163. Bopeov TtiC Bope'ou MSS. of AfyfTdt was converted from a 175. 176.

original scribe.
(TTippd
:

:
TrXijfoi
.

y.

:

e

MSS., more correctly. was first written in place of
is

;

the
in

alteration
1.

may

be by the

The
.
.

Ionic genitive

a vulgar form, like

92, &c.

Koi inippf'i INISS.

179.

BT,

&c., Burnet.

In addition to

The

inserted

also deleted

185.

187. 191.
199. 201.

8: soBT;
:

. .
t
:

SO Par. 1811, i8i2 corr., Athenaeus was written at the end of this line is rather a mystery. the dots by which the word is cancelled a stroke is drawn through the p. is placed after the , and if it was written by the original scribe he no doubt
:

(=

')
.

;

Why

^

.

.

.

,

:

1.

«e
;

Vind. 80.
&C.

((( ,
SO
:

(Burnet),
;

SO

Burnet. ye 22 3• at the beginning of the line is blotted. 225. 229. TO is oinitted before (vitvow, before which word a short blank space was left. cf the scribe's failure to read Presumably the archetype was defective or illegible in 1. 160. Burnet. so 230. ; has (om. 1. 232. The first three letters of the word are smudged. SO 235• oi Se' ye BT, &€., Par. l8l2. Cf. 1. 253. de ye SO edd. 239.
:

SO Aristaenetus and

vulg.

^
;

vulg.

>( ye BT,
;

\\^.

^ ( . :
:

,
;
:

:

:

MSS. 244. aoTews: 248. The third y of l•yyyl'e was apparently intended to be cancelled by the dot In 1. 269, however, a similar spelling remains placed above it; cf. 11. ii6 and 179.
unaltered.

«
; :

.

).

BT, &c. Cf 1. 239. so Par. 1809, edd.; 253. 254. ye: om. MSS., but Par. 1809 has ye above the line after
:

doKsts
:

'.

SoKfiff

so

;

om.

^ .
: :

.
j

.

258.

so Vat. 173
Xoyouf

"poawvTes

BT, Burnet. SO Coisl. 155, Ven. 8, 184, and others; Burnet; oSv B. so &C. SO T, Burnet; which is the reading of the 267. oTojt was originally written for by a different hand. alteration seems to have been made
:
:

259. 263• 264. 266.

e'^ol

!

,

( ,

BT, &C. MSS.

,

MSS.;

the

1017.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

127

1017.

Plato, Phaedrus.
Plate

Height 27-5 cm.

Late second or early third century.

VI

(Cols, xi.x-xx).

The
to
p.

following remains of a fine copy of the Pkaednts extend from p. 238 c

251 b, with considerable lacunae, a gap of as
vii.

much

as eleven

columns

This text and 1016 were found together, but they are two quite distinct manuscripts, and differ markedly both in the quality of the
occurring after Col.
materials and the character of the hands.

In 1017 the papyrus

is

thinner and

of superior texture (in several places supporting strips were added at the back),

and the recto only
His script
inclined,
is

is used, while the writer was a calligrapher of no mean order. handsome example of the oval type, regular and graceful, slightly and rather above the medium size. A few accents, breathings, and

a

marks of

elision occur,

but these are mainly,

hand, which has

made

certain corrections

if not entirely, due to a second and inserted a number of alternative

readings either in the text above the line or opposite in the right margin.

In

one case at least (xxxv. 5) a third hand is to be recognized. The punctuation, however, for which stops in three positions are employed (a low point, e. g in xxi. 9, 27), is original. Paragraphi seem to have been used only where there was a change of speaker, in combination with the usual double dots a coronis
;

marks the end of a

section at xxi. 29.
of
last

Iota adscript

is

irregularly written

;

compounds the evenness of the column the
usually appears in

,

{-

, not
some-

in Col. iv. 8).

In order to preserve

two or three

letters of a line are
final
is is
is

times considerably compressed, and for the same reason a
represented by a stroke above the preceding vowel.

occasionally
so skilful in
rarely called

The

scribe

his spacing that the angular sign used for filling out a short line

into requisition. This MS. is probably rather earlier in date than 1016, and may go back to the end of the second century. The text is on the whole accurate and good, and the double readings, which have been referred to above, give it a particular interest. One of them supports a conjecture of Heindorf (iv. 3), some reappear in the MSS. (cf. i. i, iii. 6, iv. 24,
vii.
vii.

I,

XX. 31-2, xxii. 31, xxvi.

9),

others are

new

(iv.

6,

16, 25, 31, v. 15, 16,

32, xix. 29, 33, XX. 5, 29, xxi. 17, 23, xxii.

20, 34, xxvi. 14, xxxii).

New
much
2,

readings without variants are also not infrequent, and though seldom of

importance they
last

may sometimes

be correct;

cf.

e.g.

vi.

9, vii.

30, xx.

11,

xxi. 26, 29, xxii. 18, 23, xxvi. 10, 29, 31, xxvii. 4, 29, xxxiv. 13,

confirming a correction of Cobet.

xxxv. 3, Moreover, the papyrus shows

4, 12,
its

the

good

128
quality

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
by frequently preserving the superior reading when one of the two
chief

and T, goes astray, sometimes (e.g. xxi. 4, xxii. 13) against them both. As in the commentary on 1016, it is to the evidence of those two MSS., as given by Burnet, that the collation appended below is for the most part confined some additional information has been supplied from Bekker's edition.
authorities,
;

Col.

i.

Opposite Col.

ii.

5.

]

Col.

ii.

\
€'
5

? [][( []
238 C

:

[ [^ [
Col.
iii.

238 e

• ([
[ovp

\

[]
ere

avTiT[uvov

evpoia ris

5

[6\

] [ (]
[]

[:

OS [io]iKeu

[!

yap
eivai

[(] (.
[tos

[ ][]
[]

[][] ]
[]
Xeyeiy
:

[\
>
;

238 d

[] [\
aei

e•

«39 a

([][] /[]?;?

[^(][] []

[€\([^(

[] [ ] []
Col.

[]
iv.

.


15

«yx[[e]]'[['']]

(
['\['\
[[«]]

[€](

[] €
[\

evov

Col.

[\

•OlS•

(

1017.
[ie

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
5

129

5

\(.(.• [(]
(})](

[05

/
Se

8€

[etvajf

\

\\ \

[] [](('

[]9'

[]

15

[ ]•^
\TTaiS\LKa

[

]]9 ]
deia

( ([] (
239 b

^^
^39•^

yiyvoi
etvai

^
1

5

[][
20

( ]( 1]
01S
[oi/Jra•

[(

[]
[€]
20

€]€
[]

[]

• ]'
iv

«

<
5
e

ev

re

25

30

€[ (\ ] [[ ]€ ( 6

] []
[eti

[

][
'

>

010S

[

(][]]•
«-

>

[

25

• (€
239
rcai

€[ ( [] ~ €][ ] ~
Se
[

[

]
239 c
30

'[][/

^•

^

re

[]

[)]

(€<(

ye
7r/5o[[y]]

^*«v"

Kvpios OS

a\ya6ov]

130

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Col.
vi.

\\
<p\a\vov

\op

r

\a'\v

etvuL

5 ivyYev[cu]v

[] ^?
["""]!"]]
aecc{s]

[]

10

$] \[ [ [] [
[8
eavTov

[] [( 8[ ] €[
TLVOS

€[ [ []9
[ev^at

5 [^6

[ 6].[ € [(]• ] 5]•[ \• [ ]
o[is

[€

240 a

;]£'

6'7[

[ [ ][ ] [ ] [ [ ] [ ]
Col.

.

[cij'ai

[

240

c

[;•

[ [ ][] (
ovTe
Se

€[>]

[[
15

[ \[ [ ]
[\ [
[6
lines lost.
[j;5]ora[y]

[

15

2

( [[ []( • [ \[] [ [ ^] [
€]/€[€£

^€[] []
[7£]5•

[
coy

[] [
[]•
[]

[

^

[] [ [] [] []
TofTfT]

[ [][ 3 [] [ ] [ [] /[
[] [][
] [[
[]( [ 7]<'
][.]

240 d

]

jf^o

25

[ [ [[
•[ []•

€[

24ot)
ev

35

[] [

[5

]

30

€(^€

[\ [] [
rj

1017.
Tiva
oi'[/c

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

131

7[.

.|9 ([raipay

?

\\re^f:[L(v

[:'

Col. xix.

Plate VI.

[] ? []
[roi/y

[]
5

[](
[v]os

• ? ?•
avev
coi

€7]'^€'['?

345 a

nei
5

[]? ( [ ^] []
[][]^[]-? [€]

Col. XX.

Plate VI.

[]

[a]reX?;y

[7;]
10 [to]s

[](
[]>'
[vi\as

[][
15

• ?
(

? ?

re

[
245 b

[]]- [][]

[7] [][? ] []

[€]

10

[]•
[]

]
Sei

[] []? [ '[\ []
€[[€]]]
e\ii

[] [€]( ] [?]
[]•€7'
eai'[ro

]

Kfivovv

ye

&[] []
Se

[\?

[€]€ []
20

[]€ ?
[]•

15

[€\

[
[
25 [eK

[] []
6]

]' ? ]([ ?
Sei^a?

?
e
e

e

? • []
KeivfiTai

[](

[]
e^

? \[?
245 d

'/?

20 Se

\\

\ ]\] ?

(
]

(

evoi•

[ei

]
[

[e|

.]5 [\•

([] •

«Tret

[

25

(
a

€[]? €

eivar

132

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
^

[] [ ](
[pa 30

eK

[] ovre

a\
'"'^

[8]• 8e 8 [|? ][]

\

(
245
c

eKeif^fi y]€V7]ae

[]?

[]? (

[Set o]vy

? ? ^? '
Se

30 ^«

] >€[] ] [> (
ein[fp

«/'['/] ^f'

^t"

'^'^

eavTO Keivow

XT

'"^'- ^^''^'^

63

[]

[]

ovre

[ ^\] •
Col.

.

re

245 c

yiveaiv

5

(

',
TIS

(€ ?
Keivet

€(• []

€[](

[ [( ^[
Col.

.
24^ b

([
OS

5

[(
Xo[y

a[i/]r[<»

[( ]]€[ [
[(

] [
re
re

(

[]
( (6[€
15

9 []?• [

0)5•

??
(

[] €[][]

(
[]
ev

15

[ ]5 €
[]
[]

[]€[ €
20

[]

] € [[][] []
'[]
e|

[/]? []

[]$
et

eje]]"

'

[ €[ [ [][ [][] ] € [[ []([]•
[]?

?[
[]
[\[
7€/[]€£•

^^^^

346 a

20

[ [][] []
[]

€\

^ ?

€6[ [] [][][]

24^ c

[

]?

^
25

[
^
eoiKfu.
[re]

lOir.
nepi Se

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
tScas
25

[tj/]? I'Seai

[o]iou

[/][)$•]

'

[]
\\

]
[eij^ai

XeKTeof

[7|£[

[\
[
[^']

[

[\'
-)[ \(
re
5e

(.\
"1']['7
7ra[ye]i/

^ ] [
^\.\

i33

[

[

-{

[ۥ

\\\[
[]
[e]e^'

\

((0

3
yovs re

[]''
e^

re

[]

[][]

[]

[

/€ []
35

£777"[] re

[
Col. xxiii.

[y]a[s

[

5

\\ ]\\ '^ {\[{\ [] [/ [ [][•] € ] [] []
ecoy

] [ \ [
Col. xxvi.
re
etj

[
347 d

ec

Zeus

246 e

\ ] ['\
e[v

6[]

[•\
5

[]
\ [
5]e

[••]•

• \.

[€]

&]
y[e]

[ [ [[][ []] [ \ []€[
[
[
[]€
'
S\€

\ []( [ . [
Col. xxvii.

[€]•

[

pev

'\

etie

[] '

ie

[(

134
i'eatjy

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ovSe

(]

(repa ef erepcoi
ov

'"
2476
'5

\\ 7;[ (\{]•
T?jy [eT]epa[y

ere[pa

348 b

.

(

\
.

.

.

]^

][/6)/?;

( \]• [ \\ ]\) €]]€([' [\ ][
]['];[€']•

€]£'

e

[^ [(] 6 [
20

[

7['
npos

€ty

oiKaSe]
Se

25

novs

30

5
^

] [^ \ •[ ] ]
Tovs

] '\
]

ۥ

([
25

[] [] []
[€

[ [] [ [ ]
( 7![ \^(^

[

• [ ]7 \^^
[]?

Oeai [anep

[

[po^(f)

\ \
\

([
[

[
(

[

ypv^ai
\

[? ([
[e]iy

248 a

[

[ ] [} [
''[*]

^'7

[
(]
Col. xxxiv.

3\

[

eKei

Xa[v'\ei

[] [ €

248 c

Col. xxxii.

Opposite Col.

xxiii. 17.

Opposite Col. xxxiii.
]

19.

[.]

]

[]//[]
[]€

[0]€

[ [ >[

Col. xxxiii.
fvecrTi

250 b

[

[
[

ev

[ [

iKtLvcav

(]€5

] ' ]
\

6

[€\

250 d

e

1017.
5

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

[
eiKOfUi

[
£
15

[^ [
Se

{[
£'['€
4
Xeyeiv

ewi

?

5

yeiOS

[
[
Te[y

[[
lines lost.

ereXowTO

[! ]6^^ (]< [ €] ] [ ^] [ [ ]^ [ (] [((
[cos

135

Sfivovi

[piL-^ev

ei

]

2

[!(

[

(


5

[
[
ev

[ [
ei

Col.

XXXV.

251 a

. []
(

( []

15

TOS

[€ [ - [

\\• \(.]
2 3

[icJaXXofy

\\

re

(

eiTa

[]
()

[

[
yav

[]

[]

\[ [ [] []
[^]

\

251 b

[

Unidentified fragments.
(^)

[

]8

[

136

1017.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
tlie

There

is

a similar confusion in

MSS.

regarding
is

the previous sentence.
iii. 4.

The

division

(\\

however unusual.

«

137
antl
in

just

below

so T, edd.

6.

Se,

which

is

om. B. ; here entered as a variant,

is

13.

The

alteration in the spelling

and

division of

found in Vat. 225 cf. iv. 6. is by the second hand.
;

V. 1. Tois the original reading, is that of iv. 3. within brackets. conjectured by Heindorf. Burnet prints 6. 8f for does not occur in the MSS. is peculiar to the papyrus. 16. The marginal
:

,

,

BT

and Stobaeus

;

tois

was

8

[][
;

'\\af pwTcpos, the Paris MSS. The margin
24.

alternative reading,
after this

is

that of Vat. 225,

word

is

lost,

but the line

is

completely

Ven. 185, 189, and four filled, and it is

av is omitted in BT. (so B) is still more unlikely to not likely that av or 5 followed have been added at the end of 1. 23. ow, but none is 25. The marginal entry seems to have been some variant on known ; ] av would not be satisfactory. The object of the short horizontal strokes at the end of this line and the next is not evident. In the second is perhaps a later

^

(

addition.
26. It
is

not at

all

certain that the detached fragment containing the letters

][

is

rightly placed here.

31. 32.

No

variant
at the

A
I.

^^^
end of
for

this line

occurs elsewhere, nor can it be defended. has apparently been crossed through, by which
is

hand

cannot be determined,
v.
3.

:
so

found

in

Ven. 185.

8f

:

MSS.

has the haplography Burnet with Hirschig. ;

.

^

at

5. There may be a high stop the end of this line.

II.
15. 17.

!7
:

after

((,

but there are several accidental ink-spots

SO

MSS.

;

)

for

The MSS.
is

not Otherwise recorded. support the reading in the te.xt,
is

&\

;()7'

Plutarch.

MSS.)

;

new.

'(
for

two Paris

1 9.

31. 33.

: ;
:
so
Te
:

:

MSS.
ye

.
:

MSS.

vi. 4.
9•

[\! «»

[MSS.

so
;

Stobaeus
either

;

om.
right.

.

may be

to

II. seems to have been originally written by mistake be sure which hand made the correction.

19.
2 2.

/.
I.

.

It is

impossible

The

deletion of the superfluous

is

perhaps to be assigned to the second rather
is

than

to the first

hand.
letters ]v

23-4. The hardly certain.

[

and

]

fcr[

are

on a detached fragment, the position of which

32. Tis: TITOS
vii.
3.

was possibly written

originally.
is

The

variant in the margin

and Stobaeus have

^,

presumably
the marginal

for re

,

as in Ven. 8

and 189.

(so Burnet).

138
7.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
There would be room for two or same length as in 11. 5-6, but there
three
is

of the

more letters in no known variant,

this line, the

for

lacuna being is not

a very satisfying remedy.

Burnet with Stobaeus and Aristaenetus. is conjectural it is not at all clear that in 11. 12-14 ayo[, &c., are beginnings of lines, the margin being lost. seems to have stood in place of 30—1. is certain, and the vestiges ]MSS. suit the following av[ and in the previous line ijS of a letter has been written (by the second hand ?) which can 32. Above the hardly be read otherwise than as , and after it another letter may be lost. No variant occurs herCj and the insertion is not easily accounted for.
8.

yap

:

so

MSS.

;

yap

11-30.

$
6eias

The

division of the lines

]

.

! !
;

;

^/ : (]: :(
xix. II.
23.
/ijfi'
:

35•

[Tojiijffet

:

the scribe

began

to write

instead of

f.

so

or

Xcia

29.

the

MSS. have
re

33-4. According to the insertion
variation in the
2.
fibrj
:

is

no

MSS.

,
:

Arisudes, Burnet;
there

.
for

would be room
in the

only the marginal reading,

.

before fpms in either case.

which

is

margin the order of the words was to be intelligible though not Convincing. There

XX.
5.

om. MSS.
not a

but

it

suits the vestiges

and
II. t^ajuTO 22.
[fl

in
:

known variant on and is in itself likely enough Hermias, ad Phaedr., pp. 115 sqq.
is
;

,
cf.

which here stood

in the

tu airo

in the ne.xt

margin, sentence

MSS.
SO BT Simplicius Stobaeus; Vind. 89 and apparently Cicero. Proclus and edd. ; SO
:

\•.
?);
:

?ri

Burnet with Buttmann (and

lamblichus
24.

,

29.

31-2.

,
: :

V.

1.

the

MSS.

all

Stobaeus, give the article.
8,

.
for

The

best

MSS.

as in the

margin here,
:

support the reading in the text (with is however found in Par. 201 1 and Ven.
;

cavro)

;

^

184.

Cf. xxi. 17.

xxi. 2. yeveciv SO 3. avns: the MSS.
4.

((
fif

6.

Syrianus Stobaeus yrjv t in marg. have the regular Attic form. Cf 1016. 175. BT. exew so Stobaeus, Burnet Alexander Stobaeus om. B. so
all
;

BT

;

Only the
distinguish the
15.
17.

preserved, and it is therefore difficult to is tail of the over-written hand the has not been crossed out. The MSS have the correction is likely to be by the second hand. Se en was Originally written For the variant cf xx. 31-2 ; the I\ISS. are here unanimous except that some have
; :

.
is

for eavTO,

23.
2 0.

29. []>;

!:
The
:

jMSS. support the adscript

iSeas

ordinary reading as a variant. 30. 5[] so rightly t Hermias Stobaeus, though of course it ?} be certain that the scribe intended the words to be so divided ; eoiiti foiKe fOiKf Vind. vulg. £' 80 Bumet 34•
:

(
:

om. MSS.

MSS. The

.

crossbar of a

in the

margin points

to the insertion of the

impossible to
foi/ce

,

>;

,

&

.

\\
:

9,

8

,

;

' €!

.

II.

so

,

Burnet

;

om.

.

1017.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
:

139

yuj> SO Burnet with Simplicius ; 13-14. •[;] Eusebius. •[?) amply fills the line. Vind. 109, oZv Herwerden, seel. Badham. 16. SO BT, Burnet and many It seems likely that the papyrus agreed with 18. T(\ua: TfXf'a MSS. other iMSS. in omitting (, Burnet) after ^, which sufficiently fills the space, though would not take much room. ovv if written 20. /ifTewpo[wo]Xfi Tf, the marginal adscript, is the reading of Syrianus, re BT and the majority of the ]MSS., v. 1. XfiToi is new ;

,

\/

, ')

['\•.

;

21.
22.

1.

and it om. MSS. Only the barest vestige remains of the letter preceding 23. seems inevitable. would be too long does not particularly suggest , but since arepporipov 24. The I\ISS. support the marginal ep€o (the usual Platonic form It is probable that the second rather than the original hand Tim. Locr. 101 a), not
:

:^ .
SO

,

Bumet

;

.

.
:

(([\[\-

substituted
29.

for

.

.
SO
;

:

?

31.

[
A
I.

supported

fragment containing the letters in the margin was doubtless in Yen. 8, Par. 201 1.

xxvi.
8.

[^) \(^

(([]:
:

B;

SO

indicated by the writer of the adscript, is found in g. The'reading Coisl. 155 and was considered favourably by Heindorf. The letter before is represented docs not occur in any MS. 10. [...]. by a vertical stroke which would suit , , or , and it is immediately below the second may be restored; cf. Farm. 133 d Perhaps [0 in upright of the
13. ouSe
14.

&,

^ ^

,
is

rather doubtfully placed here. which is found instead of the better

.

,

Burnet.

, ',
[].
(so
is

€]
;;

b
:

r;

SO

(')

;

,'

vulg.

(V (Tcpai

in the text, but there

stood MSS.) in the margin shows that something other than there remains only the top of the no known variant. Of the of
]\ISS.

second upright stroke.
17.
'

ov

29.

;

:

om. MSS.

31.

eeo[i]s:

([(:
lacuna
at the

beginning of the

/
'
'}.

( MSS. (
\
:

(

Coisl. i^s).

MSS.

One more

letter

might have been expected

in the

ne.xt line.

((

MSS. 4. ' ' was presumably due to the influence of 1. MSS. ' instead oi 8e. 27. The papyrus of course may have read -; with ' fi'fx' for 5 MSS. 29.
XXVii.
6.
:

-!
:

8.

[

' (

here has

concerning the gap between the remains of this column column of this papyrus corresponds elsewhere to approximately fourteen lines of the Oxford text; there are sixty-five printed lines lost between xxvii. 33 and xxxiii. I, giving an average of only thirteen lines for the five columns, which would therefore appear to have been written larger or to have been rather shorter than their neighbours. This irregularity makes it the less easy to explain the remains of the two marginal adscripts is [€ In the second of them ] which are all that survive of Col. xxxii.
xxxiii.
slight difficulty arises

and Col.

xxvii.

A

|

I40

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

a possible reading, with a reference to p. 250 a 6 aJrni &e, {y. I. is somewhat straight for an o, and the words in question would but the stroke before be expected to have occurred two or three lines lower in the column moreover m-av Se, which would imply the omission of is quite unsupported. On the other hand there is nothing else in the neighbourhood suggesting and that 11. 14-20 of Col. xxxiii, which are on the same fragment as the two marginal insertions, are rightly identified can hardly be doubted.
;

)
:

.

,

-,

xxxiii.
imperfect.
14. Tf,

I.

This hne

is

most probably the

first

of the column, but the margin above

it

is

which was
I.

originally omitted,

was added by the second hand.
1.

xxxiv.
13.

€ifapy€s

€,
:

om. MSS.
'.

XXXV.
4, Ti
5•

3.

I)

(=7):

((8(

^

was added above

^
6
ii.

Possibly T(e) was omitted in

3.

eavrrjs ivapyei

MSS.

MSS.
:

(0(
by a hand

1MSS., omitting
difterent

.
which the majority
at

the line

from that

to

any

rate of the insertions are due.

The MSS.

agree with the original reading.
;

12. eSeSiet confirms the correction of 23.
Fr. (i).
:

Cobet

SO

and edd.;

.

,

debiu

.

This fragment cannot be referred
Neither Col.

to Col. xxii.

7—9.
to

Fr.

(t-).

10-12 nor Col. xxxv, 18-20 seems

be the right position

for

this fragment.

Fr.

(i/)

possibly belongs to Col. xxxiii.

Fr. (/).
Fr.
(X').

The
It is

breathing over the

is

doubtful.

hardly certain that the fragment belongs to 1017.
ii.

Fr. (;«).
Fr. (;/)

Col.

2-3

is

an unsuitable position
xxvii. 8-9.

for this fragment.

cannot be assigned to Col.

Fr. (/).

Not

Col. xxvii.

19-20 or 22—3.
with Col. xxii. 5
is

Fr. ().

The combination

unconvincing.

1018.

Xenophon,

Cyropaedia

i.

25-Cxio-7cm.

Third century.
i.

Two
The

columns, containing part of the sixth chapter of the Cyropaedia, Book
is

recto of the papyrus

occupied by a second-century money-account
in rather coarse

;

the

literary text

on the verso, written
first

and irregular
Stops
in

uncials,

may
;

be

attributed to the

half of the third century.

the high and medial

position are inserted, besides double dots
lOie, a single point
is

sometimes used where two would be

marking a change of speaker as in in place, and vice versa.

1018.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

141

corrections

Accents have been added occasionally. These lectional signs as well as a few may all be due to the original scribe. Textually this papyrus is of considerable interest, standing in very close relationship to the family of MSS. represented by D, the Bodleianus, and Stobaeus. Witness to the early influence of this family had already been found

in

conclusion

and the same (ed. Wessely, Mitiheiliingen vi) and in 697 emphasized by 1018, whose agreement with DBod. is still more marked. In fact, there is here only one noticeable discrepancy from those two MSS. to set against the considerable number of coincidences, namely at 1. 39
a Vienna papyrus
is
;

where instead of
Editors

their

riz'es

the papyrus has the

commonly accepted

rik) elai.
;

may

be right

in

regarding this as the generally inferior family
it

but

there can
tradition.

be no doubt that

embodies an ancient and strongly established
able to supplement the information given by

In the collation below

I

am

(Oxford, 1857) with that of the apparatus to the edition of the Cj'ropaedia about to be published by Mr. E. C. Marchant, who has kindly allowed me
the use of his proofsheets.

Dmdorf

C

=

Parisinus, Bod.
iii.

=

Bodleianus Bib. Canon. 39

(Marchant's D),
those of Dindorf.

=

Escorialensis

14

;

the other sigla correspond with

Col.

i.

\^] 7( '\\(•
[7]?
[]€9•
5

70
e
:

6.

3/

35

[ [(\(( [
7r]at

\
:

Xeyeij
8eiv
;

avSpa

[ [[) [
Col.
ii.

[[.]]

olds


aS

40

[]
[\
10

]^€^9
TTCBy

[]

[]
[
[ye

]( 8(•

45

^
:

[]

]

[€ [ [ [ (([
[n

- [\
\[(
e

[

e

39

ye

142

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[]
[Se

Toi{[s•

^•
rroiuv
eycoy[e

ye]

rovs

[\
[']€
[ray
[/foiipyliai
:

^[ [
€(['
y\e

\^ 7[]
55
:


re rouy

[( (] [] [>]£
[jOy

fveKa

To^eviiv-

25

\{\

[

30 [€

[ ]• []5 [ (] [ ][]/

]
{)
:

e]veKa

(.
[]
tl
e

eo'e/f[r]e^'

6

^[( [ 6[\
[5e

[ [ [
ei

[\•)([
(

[

yevot

]•
i'jaov
:

[5] [(
piois•
e[v

[]
ei

[]
Se]

[ev

6

[iTTOiTe

65 [e^oy
[5e

(] [

[

[] €^(• [(
6.

us

[],

]'^['

Hug, JMarcliant. was converted from a p, i. e. was first written. on the analogy of the preceding and following lines not more than three 9. [eir;] letters should be lost, and hence it is likely that the papyrus agreed with DBod. and Stobaeus
Heillein,
8.

.

!
for

jrXeoji'e^iay

the second

in reading

!.
:

The supposed double
is

dots might possibly be the tips of a

a-,

but

some kind of
14.

stop at any rate

expected.

The papyrus

evidently had ye before n]pos, agreeing with

DBod.

;

om. other MSS.
is

15. Tovs TToXfiTas 16.

SO Stobaeus

;

npbs Tovs
is

clear whether the removal of the dittography

8[](

DBod., Other MSS. It due to the original or another hand.
Bod.).

not

suits the

space better than
;

20-1.
2 2.

SO DBod. ; ei/exa Other 24. cji/fm: om. C. SO most MSS.; -SoXovv HR. 25. 26. SO DBod.
cveKa
:

33.

(.
deletion

35. aei
is

: ^ (
(\
:

eyu>y[e

(:

8[]( (CAD,
other ftlSS.

SO

DBod.

'; ?/6

:

:

(-) CAGH.

;

)

'

MSS.
The
original reading of

D

is

doubtful.

Other

MSS.

nifi

CAGH. The

letter

also placed over it;

following aft is covered by a blot and a dot signifying perhaps the ink ran when the scribe was writing the f of

;

1018.

or as in DBod. 36. an]™ is the reading of DBod., and no doubt the same order 37-8. yiyviiaKeis was indicated by the marks above 1. 38, the oblique dashes showing the number of letters the desired arrangement; cf. e.g. 16. 26. The and to be transposed and the figures Sn other MSS. alteration may be by the first hand, 39. DBod. have nves for () fiVi. Kvpos: so DBod.; om. other INISS. 42. other IMSS. D and a later hand in G ; om. so Bod., 48. eVl Other MSS, SO DBod, 51. fjrt
:

, '

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

143

-^
;

A

blot covers the a of

[ ^» .
:

:

(
(
a

58. [8f

:

so
:

65,

[(

DBod.; om.

CAGRH.

AGH,

1019.

Chariton,
17

CJiaercas

and

Callirr/inc.

X

i7"5 cm.

Late second or early third century.

Two

fragments of the Cliacrcas and Callirrhoe have aheady been obtained

from Egypt, one a
later

Fayum papyrus
i.

of about the end of the second century

(P. Fay, i), the other a

vellum palimpsest bought by Wilcken at Luxor, of the
pp, 227 sqq.).
is

Byzantine period (Archiv
of
Chariton's

Fresh evidence for the early

popularity

romance

now

supplied

by

papyrus

from
the

Oxyrhynchus.
chapters of

This contains parts of two columns, from the third and fourth
ii,

Book

written in a clear semi-cursive hand
i
;

of,

apparently,

much

same date
at latest,
in
1,

be assigned to the close of the second century, or, to the opening decades of the third. An oblique dash is used as a stop
it

as P. Fay.

may

55

;

cf

e,

g.

413 verso.

and Callirrhoe, apart from the two small fragments upon a single Florentine MS. of the thirteenth Compared with this, 1019 shows characteristics very or fourteenth century (F). similar to those of the Fayum papyrus, except that the latter is more accurate.
text of the Chaereas

The

recently discovered, depends

As would be

anticipated in copies so much closer to the author, both papyri sometimes supply what is evidently a better reading. Thus, e. g., in 1019, F) in 1. 35 the sense, which in 1. I confirms an emendation of D'Orville in F is obscured, was rightly given, though the exact wording is uncertain for eii'oi and in 1. 54 the omission of on are other patent gains. There are also a number of small variations with regard to which the choice is less easy, though naturally the older authority deserves every consideration and On the other hand, confidence is is likely to be more often right than not.

(

;

144

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
11.

disturbed by such errors as those in

^^, 3^, 44, and 48-9.
is

A
in

noteworthy
1.

agreement of the papyrus with

F

in a

probable corruption

found

aq.

\ []
[i/ecof

\ •0] 8 [6 [] ?;
Col.
i.

ie

.

3

5

[8

[8
[

15

20 [pes

]. 6\ [ []] [ '€ []
[
[
[/
\•<^

\. \ (] ( (\ '€]
[775•

\ ]
eiXecoy
e]ir

[e

(
Se

[ [
o[w

>

(f)a\yiL

[

'
]
yvvai

^6[ /

\/

25

[ [

[ ] ]»;?
[

] ] [] [ €]
?
[roty

]^ ^ (
]

Xeyeiy

[ [€

ye

[

(] ]\
[](
o.[v]tt]s

ovSe

1019.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

145

30

TOVS S

( € (€
Col.
ii.

ej?

I'Seiv

35 vet

(
40

8(

^
anavTfi

yeivov

(

eveipaTO

45

50

( (€ ?
(
tis

! € € ([ [
T01S
Toty

[
[

[

.

4

ne[pi

neTj[ai

eanepav

\av6aveiv

[

[

[

[ [
[

56

'[] (

/

[]
is

.
F,
2.

:

D'Orville's infelix conieciura {Cdb&i, Alitcmos. 8, p. 256)

confirmed;
i

]7

Cobet.
:

was accepted by Hercher.
this Is the

regular spelling in this text as well as in P. Fay,

and

in

Wilcken's fragments.

L

146
4. 8.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
eCKfas

12—13. In
1

( ( ((! (
:

F.

(!

is

superfluous.

:

om. F.

F

precedes
Since

8.

There

19.

restoration of

seems certain and gives a preferable reading. previous editors. 20. SO the Didot edition and Hercher 22. Nine letters will hardly fill the lacuna, which is of the same length as in 11. 20 and Hercher restores the usual 23, and the papyrus therefore seems to have agreed with F. re Beoi. reading in 485 which has been generally recognized to be defective. 25. F has ro yoOi/ which is obviously needed, and this was of course The papyrus has the name yoiv but there is not room for so much as preceded by some such verb as emev or as well, and how the lacuna should be filled remains doubtful.
:

[
:

is

not

room
:

in the lacuna for
cos

F.

|^)'
;

which precedes

.

in F.
fill

alonc does not

the space, the

26.

Dionysius did
29.
30.

[ ((
:

,
ii.

.,

'

;

this is

clearly superior to F's ehai

the papyrus.
34.
35. 36.

33. Tous
fv

37. 38. 42.
44.

!\ ^:
is

think so, but only pretended that he did. Jacobs, whom Hercher follows. SO F; cof ycyovos which om. F. On the other hand after Acwras F has
110/
:

.

Callirrhoe's point

is

that

is

omitted in

an evident
F.

clerical error;

Tore rightly F.

:

om.

The

divisions
:

here and

)caXXo|ws in

1.

37 are very unusual.

om. F.
1.

:

om.
F.

F.

1.

45.
50.

(!. (\
:

Cf. P. Fay. i.

with F. 17 and for the asyndeton ibid.

i.

16, note.

48-9.
51
.

:
:

for n[>;]8f rightly F.

[]/
om.
:

F. yap:

oio'/ifi/oj

F,

doubt correctly.

[]/3
eiTTT)
:

/365 F.
F.

F.

53.

eiVijTc

The papyrus

is

length and

,

.

it is

unlikely that -re followed.

54.

.

.

.

but on can well be spared altogether.

:

.

.

.

.

broken away after the , but the line is of full The 3rd person singular is quite correct after

Hercher

inserts another

on before the

first

1020.

OFFICIAL

147

IV.

DOCUMENTS OF THE ROMAN AND
BYZANTINE PERIODS
(a)

OFFICIAL.
Imperial Rescripts.
10-8x20 cm.
A. D.

1020.

198-201.

fragment from the bottom of a column, giving two short rescripts of the Emperors Septimius Severus and Caracalla, directing that the praefect should
the persons to whom the rescripts are addressed were under the well-known In iiitegrtun restitutio, regularly allowed by Roman law to minors cf. Cod. Just. 3. 3i, Dig. 4. 4. The only novelty lies in the phrase used to express the praefect's procedure, ayZva inbiKeL• as is remarked

A

hold a new
full

trial if
is

age.

This

;

:

by

Professor Mitteis, to

whom

I

am

indebted for some suggestions on this

papyrus,

here apparently has the sense of

cases related to release from an obligation of

there was an accusation of fraud

{).
official
is

One of the two in the other some kind These rescripts are preceded by the
who The papyrus seems to
all

^. {€),

remains of two

lines

from another

response referring an applicant,

had complained of some

injustice, to the epistrategus.

contain a collection of such decisions, though whether they were

concerned

with the lu integrum restitutio

not clear.

Perhaps they were here cited by

a petitioner as precedents supporting his claim.

[

Jay

.[...]...

^[(
fipols

5

.!
d

' ^[ [ ^(

^.
[

AovKios

](^ ^-

'?

[,]
ev

[(
[

5

([(.]
L a

[€{)]

^{)

148

)' ',
7.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[]
:

. [\
name
is is aetatis

e/

(

[
8.
ei

'\^'\

(8\\. [€€(])
of

(V 'A\f^avS{peia,)

([\( corr. from .
'

of

C01T.

from

the

preceded by a marginal cross.

of c^vo^s] blotted.

11. 3-8. The Emperor Caesar Lucius Septimius Severus Pius Pertinax Augustus Arabicus Adiabenicus Parthicus Maximus and the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Pius Augustus to Varus son of Damasaeus. If you can claim the assistance due to immature age, the praefect of the province shall decide the suit for release. Published in Alexandria . To Procunda daughter of Hermaeus through Epagathus, freedman. If you can claim the assistance due to immature age, the praefect of the province shall decide the suit for .' fraud. Published in Alexandria
.

.

.

.

1-2.

These two

imperial rescript.

]

lines

seem
i

to

in

1.

may be
in

might be read.
5.

auxilium, for which cf. e. g. Cod. Just. 21. 2 Eo tempore, quo soror iua auxilio iuvabaiur aetatis. cxeis means 'is rightly yours', i.e. if your years justify the restitutio. i'Svovs (cf. 1. 8) as a For synonym for praeses provinciae, cf. e.g. Cass. Dio Ixxix. 18, and for the use of eSvos, Archiv iv. p. 380. This line is somewhat short as compared with 1. 7, but the sentence appears to be complete. 6. was no doubt followed by a date.
Mitteis.

^]\

:

be the decision of a local official rather than another the termination of a proper name or ] f e. g. «Jn-f,
; . ,

^,

•)/[(

6|'()

1021.

Notification of the accession of Nero.
13-5

X

5-9

cm.

A.D. 54.

The

following unaddressed notice of the decease of the emperor Claudius
to

and the accession of Nero seems
a public proclamation.
It
is

be a rough draft
in

for

an

official

circular or

written

a small cursive

hand, and several

corrections and modifications show the absence of finish. A closely analogous document is B. G. U. 646, a circular from the praefect to the strategi of the Heptanomia enclosing a copy of his order to the people of Alexandria for

the celebration of the accession of Pertinax
letter,

;

cf.

also the fragmentary Berlin

quoted

in

the note on

11.

14-16, announcing the nomination of G. Julius

Verus Maximus as Caesar, and the curious Giessen papyrus published by

1021.

OFFICIAL
v. p. 349), referring to

149
the accession of

Kornemann
Hadrian.

in

Klio

vii. p.

278 [Archw

i.e.

The papyrus is dated on the 21st (?) of the month Neos Sebastos (Hathur), November 17, thirty-five days after the death of Claudius. Oxyrhynchus
in

was thus considerably
shows, the news was

advance of Elephantine, where, as Wilckcn, Ost.

i.

13,

still

unknown on November

\
avTOvs
5

Oeos

5e

,
[]

(e/s

Oeh
SeiKTai,

\&.
The Caesar who had

(-

1

5

, €^
28.

[/]
Sib

re

20

( . {)
{eTovs)
8.
e

7. (5 added above the line. above the line. 15—16. 1. added in front of

of

^

.
above the
. . .

Ne(ov)

^[) .
10. 19.
1.

line.

.

to pay his debt to his ancestors, god manifest, has joined them, and the expectation and hope of the world has been declared Emperor, the good genius of the world and source of all good things, Nero, has been declared Caesar. Therefore ought we all wearing garlands and with sacrifices of oxen to give thanks to all the gods. The I St 3'ear of the Emperor Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus, the 2rst of the
'

month Neos

Sebastos.'

and in 8-13. Perhaps there is an intentional antithesis here between is clumsy, and 11. 8-13 look like an but the repetition of and For ayaOos as applied to Nero cf. alternative version of 11. 5—8. -yaios Dittenberger, On'entis Gr. Iliscr. ii. 666 [//] (Wilcken). oh The reading in 11. lo-ii is very uncertain, but probably does not misrepresent the sense, for which Wilcken compares the prophetic papyrus discussed by him in Hermes xl. pp. 544 sqq.. Col. ii. 6—7 tnav in the OCCUrs three lines above) cf also the final letter is more in 1. 10 is not at all convincing inscription already quoted. and [. moreover in 1. 11, instead of supposing that the like V than , could be read; it would be possible to regard the deleted letters as writer began the word A participle, however, gives a less satisfactory a mistaken repetition of the syllables construction and sense, and no suitable substantive ending in seems to be obtainable is not Satisfactory.
1.

7

;

-

(

^ •
;

:

:,

{-

.

.

.

.]

,

.

.

.

[]

-:

:

-.

-

;

I50

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
14-16.

['
similar
1

The

construction

word and not
iariv,
\Si

6((
may be

is

were written.

confused, the accusative being employed as if Sfi or some Cf. for the phraseology B. G. U. 646. 19-24
[5]uo[i']ros
.
.

&vhp\(s 'AXe^arSpfis,
It

convenient lo add here the text of the letter in the Royal Library at Berlin, published by Parthey in Jl/emon'e deW Inslituto di Corrisp. Arch. 2, p. 440, and reprinted with improvements by Deissmann, Licht vom Osten, p. 267 tVel 7'[]([75

•^€ \ '^ ^^ ^ ,
euai/yfXftolu

nevTeKaiSf[Ka.

},

tos Seas

are probably to be very cursive letters just below the line in front of which was originally omitted. The words have been interpreted as 2f/3ao-ToC too is very cursive. transferred in the text to their proper position. or f. 20. the second figure is very uncertain ; it could also be
9•
:

Some

^.

;(?

^ ^ '
.

^ \ ' ''
. . .

^
:

1022.

Enrolment of Recruits.
36.8

x9

cm.

A.D. 103.

Plate

I.

This

is

a letter in Latin addressed

by the praefect of Egypt, C. Minicius

Italus, to Celsianus, praefect of the third Ituraean cohort, announcing the addition to the cohort of six recruits, whose names, ages, and distinguishing marks, if any, are given. At the foot is a note of the receipt of the letter and of
its

entry in the archives of the cohort.
is

The document, which
:

is

in

excellent
after

preservation,

written

in

a

clear

cursive

dots are

placed

usuallj^

abbreviated words and in some cases also after numerals, rarely elsewhere.
ce

[C] Mmiciiis IialH[s Cyisiano
tirones sexs probatos a
5

stio

sal\ti\tevi.

me

in

coh{orte) ciii praees in

nume-

ros referri tube ex xi

kalendas'Martias

:

nomi-

na eorwn
10

et icon'j\svios

Iiuic episttdae stibieci.

vale frater karissim[e.
C.

Vetnrimn Gemellnm
a7inor(rim) xxi sine i[conisnio\

C.

Longiuni Priscitin

annor(um)

xxii, i{conismus) siipercil{io) sinisir{o).

1022.
15

OFFICIAL

151

C.

lulium Maxiiimm ann[oriim) xxv
sine i{conismo),

[

.

]

Lucvitn Secimdum

annor{tini)
C.
20

xx

sine i(conismo),

Ijiliuvi

Saturninum

annor{uin) xxiii, i{conismus)

maim

sinistr{a),

M. Antoninm
ann(prum)

Valenteni

xxii, i{conismns) frontis

parte dextr{d).

and hand.
25

accepta vi k{alendas)

Martias ann{p) vi

Imp[eratoris) Traiani n{osiri) per

Priscuni singnl{arem).

Avidius Arrianus cornicular(ijts) coliiortis) Hi ItJiraeornni
scripsi antlienticam
30

epistnlam in tabnlario
cohortis esse.
15.

maximum-

Pap.

30. epishdam•

Pap.

C. Minicius Italus to his dear Celsianus, greeting. Give orders that the six recruits who have been approved by me in the cohort under your command be included in the ranks from Feb. 19 I append to this letter their names and descriptions. Farewell, dearest
' :

brother.

C. Veturius Gemellus, aged 21, without description, C. Longius Priscus, aged 22 ; description, a mark on his left eyebrow, C. Julius Maximus, aged 25, without description, [.] Lucius Secundus, aged 20, without description, C. Juhus Saturninus, aged 23 description, a mark on his left hand, M. Antonius Valens, aged 22 description, a mark on the right side of his forehead. Received on Feb. 24 in the 6th year of our emperor Trajan through Priscus, orderly. I, Avidius Arrianus, adjutant of the third cohort of the Ituraeans, have written out the original letter for the archives of the cohort.'
; ;

1. The meaning of these letters in the middle of the upper margin is obscure. The second is pretty certainly e, the first c or i. There is no sign of anything further, but the papyrus is at this point worn as well as broken, and it is possible that one or two more letters followed. Ce\_pi'\ on the analogy of 720. 15 (if that be the right reading') is not very

sads factory. 2. Feb. 24, A.D. 103 (11. 24-5) is the latest date so far known for the praefecture of Minicius Italus, who was succeeded in this year by Vibius Maximus. The papyrus
' Wilcken's suggestion Icgi {Airhiv does not seem to be g.

iii.

313)

is

hardly suitable; the

first letter

may be

/,

but the third

152

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Amh.
64,

found

word may have its ordinary sense if in 1. 14, &c., some term otherwise it must be supposed that the proper ; here passes into that of the features constituting the description, sine iconismo being practically equivalent to Cf. olos wep, 245-6
8.

^ (. , , ,
of B. G. U. 908. 9,
4.
f (fi"")' '^^

confirms the view of the date of Italus expressed in P.

and

the corrected reading

Probaius

is

Archiv ii. p. 137. the technical term for 'passed', 'examined'
(e.g.

by the
i.

praefect, corresponding

to the

Greek

1023. 5);

cf.

B. G. U. 696.

28

tirones probali

and Mil.
is

d'arch. de l'ecole/raii(aisc de
in inscriptions.

Rome, 1897,

p.

:^ proiyiio

in iii Gallica.

The

spelling sexs

iconSJ\smos
'

:

the
'

signifying a

mark or

scar be understood

meaning
fV

description

!.

On which

the

Scholiast

remarks that

5

recurs forty years later as a veteran in 1035. 2. unexpected, though it may stand. The letter could be m, but this is no cannot be read. 27. Arrianits: or perhaps Jraianus. 28. The third Ituraean cohort is mentioned as being in Eg)'pt in the year 83 in C. I. L. iii. p. 1962. From the fact that this letter was found at Oxyrhynchus it may be inferred that the cohort was at this period stationed in that district. That a son of one of the recruits subsequently appears there (1035. 1-3) well accords with such a conclusion.
II.

This

man
is

25. n{pstri)

easier.

aii(gusii)

1023.

Arrival of a Veteran.
8-3

X

7-5

cm.

Second century.

Oxyrhynchus no doubt, of a veteran upon the praefect's list. The document is unaddressed, and is no more than an occasional memorandum. It is inscribed on the verso of 1035, and presumably belongs, like that papyrus, to the reign of Antoninus, in spite of the formula of 11. 8-9, which was probably taken over from an earlier document. Lines 6-9 supply a new date for the praefecture of Q. Rammius Martialis, which is shown to go back to the first year of Hadrian.
soldier, with particulars of his entry

A

brief note recording the presence, at

5

!,
'!,
Oels

KiXep

KoeifTov

'-

1023.

OFFICIAL

153

[\
'

.

{(()

to

Publius Petronius Celer, discharged soldier, now for the first time residing, declared have been placed on the list by Quintus Rammius Martialis in the first year of Hadrianus

the lord.'
4.

record of the place of residence chosen by the veterans was kept in the U. 113• 12 [fV (sO too 265• 19) 7^°• "4)1 ^nd for C. g. P. Tor. 8. 13 iv the subject of the epikrisis of the A'eterans see P. Meyer,
:

epikrisis-listS

;

of.

B. G.

.

: ^
i.e.
fifth

^=
M.
Rutilius
A.D. 129.

Heerivesen, p. 125. 6 sqq. The earliest date hitherto recorded for the praefecture of Q. Rammius Martialis was Pharmouthi 28 of the second year of Hadrian (23 April 118), in C. I. G. 47i3f Dittenberger, Orieniis Gr. Inscr. ii. 678 ; he is now shown to have entered upon his office before
the end of Hadrian's first year, Lupus, was still praefect on the

before 29 August, 117. His predecessor, of January of that year (B. G. U. 114. 5).

1024.

Order for a Grant of Seed.
30-4

X

6-5 cm.

An

authorization from the strategus and basilicogrammateus of the

nome
is

to

a local sitologus for a grant of seed-corn to a cultivator.
parallel to P. Brit.

The document

closely

Mus. 256 recto

(e)

[Catalogue

ii.

p. 96).

an earlier authorization
in

of a similar character, though diifering in detail, conveyed from the strategus and

basilicogrammateus by a son of an imperial slave
it

;

and

one or two places
Cf.
p. 10.

helps to establish the text of that interesting but imperfect papyrus.
iii.

Wilcken, ArcJiiv

5

.' {(9)

^^ ] ()
pp. 236-7
;

Goodspeed, Papyri from Karanis,

154
T09

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
SieXeovTos

'ASptavov
els

15

[.]{) '(') (^) ()
{),

'Sdueia
els

^ ^
{)
et'y

{(tovs)

20

,^
()

yecojoyet

{)
-

25

6

-

,
ei'y

, ^
&

^

{) {)
€-

,

els

35

,

,?

(vmv

40

. '
)(
.

]

()

2nd hand.

{) [\, - ^?) {()
[[.

1024.

OFFICIAL

155

.]]

45

24•
'

1.

.

[]^
32•

[]
/^
]

[

{" '
})

,

ws

6{(].
began
to write it or 5.

of

coir.

from

,

i.

e.

the scribe

Asclcpiades, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite

nome,

to Heraclas also called Heraclides,

INIeasure out, with the authorization also of Hierax the basilicogrammateus, from the best sample, of the produce of the past 13th }ear, for the sowing of the present 14th year of Hadrianus Caesar the
lord, as a loan of seed

sitologus of the district of Pakerke in the eastern toparchy, greeting.

for Apollonius son of Heliodorus son of Apollonius, his mother being Thais daughter of Chaeremon, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, aged about 78, with a scar on the right eyebrow, whom you are to recognize at your own risk, as requested by him for the li arourae of land which he cuUivates near the village of Ophis in the holding of Apollonius of the Althaean deme with those of Pyrrhias and Lysimachus, one and one quarter artabae of wheat, pure, unadulterated, unmixed with earth and sifted, according to public measure and regulation measurement, total i|- art. wheat, without any deduction for debts or any other purpose and he shall sow it on the land in good faith under the observance of the usual officers, and shall repay an equivalent amount out of the new crop and you shall take from him a proper together with the government dues upon the land receipt in duplicate and shall give one copy to me. The 1 4th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Hathur 17. From Hierax, basilicogrammateus and deputy-strategus measure out the one and a quarter artabae of wheat, total ij wheat, as above.'
;
;

:

I.
11.

The

authorization

is

43-6 shows,

the basilicogrammateus
1.

Some

traces of ink above

i

nominally issued by the strategus although, as the signature in was discharging the duties of the superior office. near the edge of the papyrus are perhaps due to accidental
(e)

blotting.

6-7. Cf. P. Brit. MuS. 256 recto

f'(pay^\_t\!/o^t 22. at this period the name of an Alexandrian deme was regularly accompanied by that of the tribe (cf. Schubart, Archiv v. pp. 83 sqq.) ; the absence of the latter dates from an earlier time. here is of course due to the fact that the name of the uyiSs 32-3. This passage makes it clear that in 1. 7 of the Brit. iNIus. papyrus ... is to be read instead of The possibility of y in place of had already been observed by Grenfell. vyim is equally certain in P. Flor. 21. 13. the officials meant probably coincided at least 33-4. partially with those specified in P. Brit. Mus. 256 recto (d) 1-4 as concurring in the the grant to which 256 recto (e) refers, namely the nfv[ot authorization of (?)], the

'::

0[]/\ ^('5\ (^f^aKevo^s

2-3

[)]

rois

O'iaKos

. (
^[]!
:

[].

.

.

.

[]

toparch, the
38.

comogrammateus and
I.

the scribe of the public cultivators.
in
1.

The papyrus confirms
c.

10 of the

Wilcken, Archiv,
i.

in place

of

e.

43• There seems to be some correction in front of the writer began the word
40.
[

/

]

() "

^^.

.
Brit.

:
/i

Mus.

text,

as

restored
is

by

Perhaps a

deleted,

:

Or perhaps simply /

'.

156

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Engagement of Performers.
25-9

1025.

X

7-2

cm.
of Euergetis

Late
to

third century.

An
a

order from

the

municipal

officials

an

actor

and

Homeric reciter to come and perform on the occasion of a festival. The document is analogous to P. Grenf. II. 67, in which the president of a village council engages the services of two dancing-girls, and which belongs, like 1025, to the third century cf. also 475, 731, Brit. Mus. 331, P. Flor. 74, and 519 and 1050, which record payments made to a mime and a reciter, no doubt on some such occasion as the present.
;

" {'9)
e|i?y(ijT^y)

evapyos npvTavis

apy^iepevs
5

res kv
eoprfj

,'
kariv
rfj

} [ ( ,.
EvepyeTiSoi

}[
....[.

15

€ !

yeviBXici)

[]
[('](
Tas
iOovs

20

.{>).
[\

[],

2nd hand.

ei{)
€().

3rd hand.

4th hand.

25

9 .

1025.

OFFICIAL

({()

^)

157

€[).

exegetes,

'Aurelius Agathus, gymnasiarch, prytanis in office, and Aurelius Hermanobammon, and Aurelius Didymus, chief priest, and Aurelius Coprias, cosmetes, of the city of Euergetis, to Aurelius Euripas, actor, and Aurelius Sarapas, Homeric reciter, greeting. Come at once, in accordance with your custom of taking part in the holiday, in order to celebrate with us our traditional festival on the birthday of Cronus the most great god. The spectacles will begin to-morrow the loth and be held for the regular number of days; and you will receive the usual payment and presents. Signed. I, Hermanobammon, exegetes,
Similar signatures of

pray for your health.'
3.

Didymus and Coprias

follow.

Hermanobammon is a compound of and Ammon. are and
15. 3, &c.).

the names of three deities, Hermes, Anoubis. already familiar (B. G. U. 332. 9, P. Leipzig

4-5. The order in which the apxiepeis and here stand is the reverse of that assigned them by Preisigke, Slddt. Beamteiiwesen, pp. 31 sqq., and the signatures in 11. 22-6 prevent any supposition of a lapse on the part of the writer. In P. Flor. 21. 1-2, on the other hand, the cosmetes is given precedence. Apparently the rank of was liable
to

some
6.

fluctuation.

^
it

Euergetis

is

mentioned in 814, a papyrus of the

first

a considerable place.
7.
:

p.

970) TO \aKeiv

the

same as
1 5.

'!,

! &! ^ »;
this

word occurs
;

in

an epigram found

at Aquileia (Jacobs,

no doubt

cf.

519. 3-4 and 1050. 25-6, where a

!.

century;

was evidently
An/A. Pal.
iii.

It meant much and a

stand in close proximity.

19-20.

and a

made

a receives 496 appears from that papyrus that the municipal oflScials considerable contributions towards such entertainments.

The remains at the end of the line do not suit or The scale of payment was high, as is shown by 519, where
448 drachmae.
It

:. '!

1026.

Attestation of Agreement.
28-8

X

17-8 cm.

Fifth century.

The compact recorded in this papyrus is not very clearly expressed, but the main points are sufficiently evident. The principals are Gerontius and John, the
latter effects

apparently being in Gerontius' debt. It is directed that certain personal should be sold and the debt paid and that any surplus should be given
;

to John's children.
for

the articles

appended of the property, with the prices obtained already sold as often happens in such lists, some rare or
list is
:

A

158

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
occur.

unknown words
seem
1.

to have been to

The document was drawn up by two some extent mediators as well as witnesses
fix the period fairly definitely.

-,
;

who

cf.

note on

2.

No

date

is

given, but the character of the handwriting

and the nature

of the

sums mentioned

Mera^v
(popiois

5

8

/ \\

7
10

^ \[]
6()
,
,

, .]
Ac[a]t

..].[.. K•^.^.]
^

[] '[]
Se

SoDvai

';,

,
, ,

Imavvei

eis
<Se

15


,

() () (, () () () () () , () () .
oi/Tcoy

!'

2

[. •
•[\,
,

'!
\.
1.

. ^^^.
2.
'

[]/>;/ Pap.
II.

;

1.

[]//.
;

.

lomoi/ Pap.

SO in

1.

^ .. ,
3•

.() (€) .
Pap.
4•
1•

1 8.

1 2.

I.

"].

:

.

1.

.

J.

Pap.

21.

John shall take the have mediated between Gerontius and John to this effect cloaks and the linen with the veils and the kerchiefs to be sold, and shall pay the loan of the three solidi j and we have given them to Gerontius to be sold for their value, as to the
:

We

;

1026.

OFFICIAL
(?)
;

159

amount of which an oath
matian vest
a
.
.

shall

be taken

and

the remainder shall be paid to
:

the expenses of his children.
at

The
;

articles sold are as follows

—-an

John

for

onyx-coloured Dal;

,

another likewise of the Xoi'te kind at 30,000,000 33,850,000 denarii linen cloth with a common kerchief at i solidus; a kerchief at 7,500,000 a towel
linen cloth at

and a

unsold articles are as follows: i small hide, I ony.K-coloured veil, i Xoi'te veil, i veil, a woman's box, a little shrine to hold unguents ; these are to be sold through Tlieodorus and Gerontius for their value. Expenses through Gerontius amount to 18,600,000 denarii. We, Andreas and Triadelphus, presbyters,

15,000,000 denarii.

The
. .

;

.

are witnesses.'
1. 2.

the two should be regarded simply as independently arrived at ; cf. e. g. C. P. R. 19. 7-8

eVl opoir Mitteis, Ai/l. Bell. Akad. 23 But the whole form of the present document, as well as 11. 5-6, may be 1905, ii. p. 56. taken to imply a more active part in the negotiation; cf. P. Brit. Mus. 113. (i). not is the usual form in Byzantine Greek ; see Du Cange, s. v. 3. 4-5. doivm TO Saveiov might mean to lend, not to repay ; but the whole transaction seems more intelligible if the words are construed in the latter sense. 6. the meaning appears to be that an oath was to be taken by Gerontius as to the amount realized, but the construction of ri is harsh and the asyndeton awkward. 10. On the numismatical peculiarities of this period cf. the data collected by Wessely in his article on Philogelos, Sitzungsbcr. d. k.Akad. d. Wissensch. in Wicn, Phil.-Hisi. Kl. cxlix. The thousands in 11. 10, 11, and 14 are denoted, as is usual at this date, by oblique strokes at the bottom' of the figure. The symbol for is a semicircle open at the base and having a dot beneath it. 11. is formed from and some speciality of Xoi's or the Xo'i'te nome is meant cf. B. G. U. 927. 6 ipiaiv 12. is difficult, but the alternatives seem to be no better; or could be read in place of the , and instead of {-mv is unlikely), villaricuvi, but that form does not occur. cf. 921. 18, 1051. 22. 14. 16. Sf^pOTiov but perhaps should be read. is unknown; the syllable suggests that the word may indicate 19. a local product like Sofriov. 21. The novel navStiompiov was evidently a casket of special shape, modelled perhaps
.
.

( ,;
:

((
There
. :

are vestiges of a short heading, apparently not
cf. e.

g. P. Tebt.

433

€ .,

(( ^

,
.

/xy.

who
.

witnessed an agreement
tVi

.

.8
Perhaps

:;
=
;

.
P. Brit.

,=,

/()/

on

that of the

Roman Pantheum.
cf.

24.

Mus. 113. (i) 104 sqq.
'

ay/as

(i. p. 204), where two Subscribe to a deed of arbitration, and

,

C. P. R. 19. 7-8, quoted above.

i6o

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

{b)

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS.
1027.

Denial of a Claim.
8•7

This document, of which the beginning and end are missing,
tion,

addressed no doubt to the

was threatened. Money had been lent some house-property. In default of payment the creditor desired to foreclose upon the property, when he learnt that in order to prevent this the father of the debtors had sent in a declaration that the property had been mortThe applicant seeks to prove that this declaration was gaged to himself.
the security of
fraudulent.

,
X 6•7 cm.
UeKvaios

First century.

is an applicafrom a creditor whose security to two brothers, Theon and Pekusis, on

The papyrus may be

assigned on account of the character of the handwriting
first

to about the middle of the

century.

Si

[^ .['\ [] €[] []
.

[>]

[5>

5

,

[]'

7€/3[£€]'

[]
10

8(8[(]

. ' ^
.[
aWais
'n'[e]pl

.](f>[

',
eSo^ev

\
Se

-

ao]\[fjs

'-

e^

[[« .]]

[]
[

re

, []
'

((^(')(?).

letters

5. corr.

1.

[']'

als.

6.

from

and

corr.

Second from

f

.

of

(

]e<^[

COrr.

from

lO.

of

(

1

1027.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

i6i

' ... of my debtors Theon and Pekusis sons of Ammonius, Theon of the half of a one-storeyed house and court, and Pekusis of an eighth part of another house and courts When and yard, with the other conditions contained in the memorandum of transfer. I therefore pursued my right of entry upon the transferred property, I found that the father of the debtors, Ammonius son of Ammonius, had presented to you a memorandum by means of which he hoped that my execution might be prevented, wherein he vainly relates that he was ignorant of the securities which had been given to me, and that he has had

hypothecated to himself

.'
.

.

'.
I.

The

construction

5.

p. Strassb. 40. 14
7•
:

(Manigk, than to Z. Savigny-St. xxx. p. 289; cf Eger, Grundbuchwesen, p. 47, Rabel, Ver/Ugungsbeschrankungen, p. 29). At the end of the line the scribe perhaps began to write
23•

The word

!

?f is evidently a slip for als;

('
cf.

als

Flor. 55- 25. 56. here seems to be closer in

.

^ [ \. ^
may have been something
cf.

like

^--^
'
oh

or

(\ ' ^

e.g. 286.

12

1 1

meaning

to

-, . ('^
{(.

( .
G. U.
1

,
32.

?,

1028.

Selection of Boys
24-4

X

7-3 cm.

a. d.

86.

their fourteen-year-old son in the

Application from a woman, whose husband was dead, for the registration of list of privileged persons paying a reduced

poll-tax of 12 drachmae.

The document, which

is

written in a very cursive

hand,

is

directed to a board of officials resembling that addressed in 714, not,

like 478, to the

and hand(?).

5

^ ( . -{')
rfjs
Ta)[f]

> {() {)
nepi

( {) {) () {)
;

cf.

besides those two papyri 257-8.

X

\){')

{)

(€))

^^)

i62
eiy

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

{8(((?) €' {^
Tovs
1

(

(()

5

'8
yovtwv
etVtV,

2

25

30

{) {) ' {){) ^) ) (() ,
SoiTOi

'[
SotTOS
kvea€

viof

•^{^) tn

{()

(

(-

\((\{()
(-

(

()

{)

{()

(erei)

35

((-).
4
.
[.1
. .

([
(erowy) e

(3rd hand).
. .

40.
'

1.

.

L]

.

^)

Claudius Macedonius, strategus, and Gaius, basilicogrammateus, and Dionysius and Philiscus, ex-gymnasiarchs, and Apollonius and Theon, city-scribes, from Taorseus

1028.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

163

daughter of Thompsemis son of Thoonis, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, with her guardian Thompsemis son of Thoonis. In accordance with the orders concerning the selection of boys approaching the age of 14 when their parents on both sides are residents of the metropolis rated at 1 2 drachmae, I declare that my son Chaeremon son of Onnophris son of Soi's, pastophorus of Sarapis the most great god, registered in the quarter of the Hippodrome, has reached the age in the present 5th year and that he is a person rated at 12 drachmae, and that his father my late husband Onnopliris son of Sois, pastophorus of the said god, registered in the same quarter among those rated at 12 drachmae, died in the ist year of Domitian the lord, and that my father Thompsemis son of Thoonis, registered at the ThoSreum (Theneplon) among those rated at 12 drachmae, died in the 2nd year of the deified Titus; and I swear by the Emperor Caesar Domitianus Augustus Germanicus that Date, and signature of Taorseus. I have made no false statement.'

presumably some official mark. Mus. II, index) is the nominative correspond and is indicated by P. Tebt. 311. 29; the two genitives from Opa-eDs and 'Opacis. and to the two masculine forms cf. P. Tebt. 292, where application for priestly circumcision is made 17. for a boy of only seven years ; in P. Gen. 260. 22 (Nicole, 1909) the age is still earlier. would be more usual, but there is no doubt about 18. anoypa{\j/upevof) the reading here or in 11. 26 and 31. (is Tuiis the age is similarly omitted in sc. ] 19.
I.

A

large cross or

in the

6.

That

(or TaopaeOs) not

P. Fay. 27. 9, P. Tebt. 320. 8. cf. 43. verso 31.

more

closely

at the beginning of this line, but there is hardly room 41. As Taopaos shows, a for so much, and it is difficult to recognize the indistinct vestiges. misspelling is quite probable. The signature is in rude uncials.

: : !
:

(, ^ !
upper margin
is

(P. Brit.

:

{(')
iv.

14, 16.

;

cf.

478. 15. would be expected

^^ is

another name defining the locality

1029.

Return of Hieroglyphic
31-7

Inscribers.
A.D. 107.

X

10-9 cm.

A
at
list is

list,

addressed to the basilicogrammateus, of the carvers of hieroglyphics
in

Oxyrhynchus

the

nth

year of Trajan.
;

according to the district in which they lived
art.

are classified These and they declare on oath that the

Few

exhaustive and that there were no apprentices or strangers versed in their (cf P. references occur in papyri or inscriptions to the
i.

Leyden U.
;

2,

iv.

3,

C.

I.

G. 4716 d 14, and the Cairo inscription edited

by

Spiegelberg, Die demot. Inschr. pp. 69-70) and little is known concerning their position but it is evident from 11. 15-16 below that some of them were definitely

attached to the service of the temples, and there
present return and the
lists

supplied to the strategi

a close analogy between the and temple-revenues annually or basilicogrammateis, on which cf. P. Tebt. 298.

()

is

of priests

'i

104

5

^ [] ^ !^ '([^ . ^, , €(,
.8
re

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

TaaevTOi

-

[-

(\8( ([]

(•

('5•

15

y
'Am;8os?)

2

!- €[ - . (. 6( []( (•]
6

deov

avS[pis)

{.

e^ vyiovi

5•

the line.

, ' € . () . (\ ^
eivai

(^'"

25

em^ivovi

)({\

els

Nepova

^
[]
of

Pap.

;

16.

Second

so in of

11.

6 and

7.

The

final

and

(((

added above

above the

line.

To Claudius Menandrus, basilicogrammateus, from Teos, younger son of Onnophris son of Teos, his mother being Taseus, and Asklas son of Onnophris son of Osmolchis, his mother being Tesauris, both of the city of Oxyrhynchus, hieroglyphic carvers, who have
'

1029.
been delegated by

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
:
:

165

their fellow-carvers the list of ourselves and the said fellow-carvers of hieroglyphics for the present nth year of Trajanus Caesar the lord, as follows In the quarter of the Tenth, Teos son of Onnophris, the aforesaid, Onnophris his brother, Asklas son of Onnophris, the aforesaid, Osmolchis his brother, who is also a hieroglyphic carver of Osiris the most great god. In the quarter of the square of Thoeris, Ptolemaeus son of Petosorapis son of Petosorapis.

And we swear by the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Total 5 men. Germanicus Dacicus that we have honestly and truthfully presented the foregoing list, and that there are no more than these, and that we have no apprentices or strangers carrying on the art down to the present day, otherwise may we be liable to the consequences of the oath. The nth year of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Ciermanicus Dacicus, Phaophi 29.'
eojj/uSos in 1. 17, must be the- name of since it stands parallel to or Xaipa at Oxyrhynchus ; it has not occurred previously in the local papyri. eoij[piSos. This special description of Osmolchis 15—16. Cf. 579 of Osiris seems to indicate that the other four occupied a more or less as a independent position and were not connected with any particular temple or cult. In the apparently intended margin opposite this line there is a dash and, just below, the letters

II.

AfKiiTiji,

an

'^

&

,

supplement in some way the statement of the te.xt. Perhaps the meaning that Osmolchis was associated with the cult of Apis as well as that of Osiris.
to modify or

is

1030.

Notification of Death.
26.2

This notice of the death of a slave follows the usual formula (cf. e.g. 262), and its chief point of interest lies in the address. The report, which is dated in of the first tribe and the second the year 212, is directed to the circuit showing that at the beginning of the third century the inhabitants of
'

',

which were subdivided into from e.g. 86. 11 and P. Leipzig 65. 7-8 that the municipal reorganization introduced by Severus included a tribal division on the Greek model but the present is so far much the earliest allusion to this arrangement, and the Trepioboi seem to be novel.
O.xyrhynchus were divided

^
X
9-6 cm.

A.D. 212.

numbered

circuits

().

off into
It

numbered

tribes

was already

clear

;

2nd hand.

Aioyivov^

.

5

^^

{) > {
a hand)
TepfDrui
TroAecoy.

{) (()

.

i66

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

?
09
10

SovXoi

'
)

(€?
67'

\{?)

\{()

)
iv

(•

[\
15

^ [' []
^?

20

(
1st hand(?).
2

. ? ?^ ? ^ ? [?)
Xtpfjvos

[]'

,
.

5

.

{
.
'
:

[!(]

(4lh hand).

(-

No. 85.

Serenus, district-scribe of the first tribe, second circuit, from Diogenes son of Papontos son of Spartas, his mother being Tereus, of the city of Oxyrhynchus. The slave belonging to me and Thaesis, my full sister on the father's side, Historetus, who was past age, had no handicraft, and was registered in the quarter of Pammenes' Garden, died in the past year I therefore present this memorandum begging that he be registered in the list of such persons, and I swear by the fortune of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Date, and signatures of Diogenes and Serenus. that I have made no false statement.'
;

cf. B. G. U. 1062. 3, P. Brit. Mus. 935. I, 936. I, and P. Tebt. 2. All these instances date from the should be read. 436, where no doubt earlier part of the third century, at which period the office would seem to have been cf. P. Leipzig 63. 7-8 For instituted. There are different hand continued the document from the name 3. some similarities in the first line and a half to the signature of Diogenes in II. 21-3, but

$>{() )8(>)

A

{
e.

().

.
out.

probably the writers were
8.
ujrtptTijs:
i.

distinct.
cf.

past the age of 60, after which liability to poll-tax ceased;
iii.

P. Brit.

Mus. 259. 64 and Wilcken, Archiv
2
1

pp. 232-3.

The name

22.

(.

of the

month has

for

some reason been washed

:

SO e.g. 251. 30.

.

1031.

PETITIONS

167

{
1031.

PETITIONS.

Application for Grant of Seed.
15-4

X

9-4

cm.

A.D. 228.

A

request for a grant of 30 artabae of corn as seed for 30 arourae of
land, of

government

which the applicant was the sub-lessee.

addressed to two members of the senate of Oxyrhynchus

commissioners for such grants.

Cf 1024 and

^^
€?
5

(

86
el?

^ ^^
eyearuroi
-pos

The document is who were the local

P. Flor. 3

1

-

(iVofy)

Xfjvac

SifXeSfTOS
TOS

{()

. -{() (9)
roTriapyJas)

{)
rjf

eh

wepi

(8'
Savna
els

eXaT-

6{)

eK

15 'fiSeov

,

() {){) () {), ep
<^

-

^^)

{)
€(
eh
ve-

) [) ()
,

tS>v

et'y

poeyeeva>v
ray
TOis

e/c

20

'

'/ 4 tpe eeer),
Tois

..'!
(eroi^y)

[]

6:

.

;

i68

25

[^ []
[(eroi/y)

[]
[Biaio]s
7•

]9'[](. [\\ ^^^
'(^
([](8[
II.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

.

(and hand).

15.

1.

neStfWf,

/

Pap.
16.

Pap.
Pap.

13•

"

Pap.

14•

1.

.

Pap.

To Aurelius Demetrius also called Alexander, exchief priest, and Aurelius Dioscorus, agoranomus, both senators of the city of Oxyrhynchus, elected by the most high senate to superintend the distribution of seed of the present 8th year in the upper toparchy, from I request that Aurelius Biaeus son of Biaeus and Taiolle, from the village of Episemus. there be assigned to me as one of the loans of seed from the wheat crop of the past 7 th year for the sowing of the present 8th year, for the public land which I cultivate at a rent of not less than 2 artabae near the village of Sko in the name of Lucius Aurelius Apollonius and his son Lucius Aurelius Matreas also called Heraiscus, in the holding of Odeas 26^ arourae and in the holding of Pedieus ^^ arourae, total 30 arourae, a loan of 30 artabae, which I will clear of barley and darnel and plant upon the land honestly and in good faith under the cognizance of those appointed for that duty, and I will repay out of the new crop an equivalent amount with the accompaniments at the same time as the regular dues upon the land for the present 8th year by the public half-artaba measure and according to the measurement ordered and I swear by the fortune of Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexander Caesar the lord that I have made no false statement.' Date and signature of Aurelius
'
;

Biaeus.
5. 8.

{)
21.9

Cf. P. Flor. 21. 2—4,

P. Fior.
1 1

cf.

and is nature of the distinction between Wilcken, Archiv v. pp. 248-9, Mitteis, Z. d. Savigny-Si. xxx. pp. 400-1.

The

(
must
less

70()

els btivaa

or where 1. should perhaps be restored on may Safely be read.

.
this

analogy in 518.

4.

In

-

still

doubtful

12.

refer to

was

in

no case
6.

seed for land
1

\€

than two artabae.

and the meaning be that the annual rent per aroura There may have been some restriction on loans of

of inferior quality.

occurs in the glossaries of Dositheus Magister.

18. Cf.

1024. 33-4.

are in the case of loans of What exactly these cf. e.g. 513. 12. not clear; it is unlikely that the additional payments mentioned in P. Brit. Mus. 193 In P. Flor. 54 of a. d. 314 loans of such loans ; cf. P. Tebt. IL p. 342. are on account of cf 1040, introd. seed are to be repaid P. Amh. 86. P. Strassb. cf 740. I4 21-2. here no doubt included the rent; cf. 133. 18, 1024. 36-7. The yvij^ia 2. 13. might also be read, but cf 1. 12.
20. fVo/iiVotr:

seed

is

:(
•))[]

(\•.

(!

:

'

;[',

,

1032.

PETITIuNS

169

1032.

Petition to the Epistrategus.
38-8

X

14-2

cm.

..
and

102.
sister,

A

petition to the epistrategus Vedius Faustus from a brother

asking for a decision in a dispute which had arisen out of some irregularity in The case had been delegated to the epistrategus the registration of a vineyard.

through the dioecetes, and the facts are recounted in a copy of a long petition to the praefect Volusius Maecianus (cf. note on 1. 5) who had been appealed to in
In A. D. 147-8 a small piece of land owned by the (11. 5-42). had been converted into a vineyard, in accordance with a permit which it now appears was requisite in such cases, and a certain sum of money was paid to the government for the right to make the change (cf. note on 1. 8). were omitted, But some formalities of declaration or registration and nine years afterwards the praefect Sempronius Liberalis ordered these to be According to an entry made by an assistant of the carried out without delay. strategus of the nome, this order was communicated to Diogenes, a deceased brother of the petitioners but they assert that not only was there no evidence of the communication, but Diogenes had died long before the order was made, and accuse the assistant of bad faith. At the end of June or the beginning

the

first

instance

petitioners

(?)

;

of July A. D.

161 the praefect referred the matter to the dioecetes Vonasius
43-8), who, in the absence of the accused assistant, sent the epistrategus
(11.
(11.

Facundus
dealt with

(11.

it

on to be

by

the document

48-54). An endorsement at the bottom of 58-60), dated at least nine months later, declares the readiness

of the latter to hear the case.

Some

of the

short blank spaces.

main sections of the document are marked off by means of It is rather difficult to read in parts owing to the dis-

colouration of the papyrus.

8

5

/^ ?.

The

verso contains 1049.

([]

[]/ [>
^[^]
\\

]
Aioytvovi

-

^.

(eVot/y)

^^
['\
[-

\( '

I/O

lo TO,

?
15
[.
.

yeyjrav

20

25

^[^( 8, ,\ ( [] '(? ( ^, [] \ {) ^ ,
THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

>

Aioyivovs

an

6((\] [,(>
If'^A'

(-

nepl

(]€
.[

.'\

re

( ( [^]
[] (

]...€.[.

(]1

[6

\\-

9

$

^-

(eVei)

{)
{(()

([]6(6

^^ ([^ (
'

eav

ivTos
]

-

(

[] ((

30

[]
(

.

[[(Tovs)]

[(](\[(] ', € [ (]^
(

[(]

-

[ \^], [(]
35 [fov

[(], (]

[ [](

40

' \ [] ^ / , {) {) ( [^ ?
([]

?

((((
5,]

?

\])

[]

\

Tjj

],

tols

[ , (
€-

-

\\

'

j/-

1032.

\]( .... []£ 8
45

OK

,

..€[....

\( [] 8
.

^.. ,
PETiriONS
,]

171

//[€>

^(«^[rjy^ei.

(rTv^ere

((.

-

Soirei

[(?)

50 [07€

\\] \\ [\ \] '(1
'(:]^6(

55 ["«^/

2nd hand.

3rd hand. (eVouy

^ ] ? ^, ,[^ ! ^ ?. !
.

«

cvf,

,

Su

ae

[(9)•
[]
Sia-

'

[ ][\•, ['](€|^], ^, " '
oy
?)

(^(

evTuye

Tr[tp\

^^ (([(],
'^}

]

[^^\(.
eras

[

?]

6
9-

() ^• ;]

51.

1.

/.
:

.
.

'Hmv Pap.

;

so in
55.

1.

15.

19.

added above the

line.

26.

ioy(ypa(va. Pap.

if

Pap.

' To his highness the epistralegus Vedius Faustus from Ammonius and Martheis, both children of Diogenes, of the city of Ox} rhynchus. The following is a copy of the petition which we presented to Volusius Maecianus, ex-praefect, and of the endorsement upon it which

" To Lucius Volusius Maecianus, praefect of Egypt, from Ammonius and received Martheis also called Heracleia, both children of Diogenes son of Diogenes, of the metropolis of the Oxyrhynchite nome. As long ago as the nth year of the deified Aelius Antoninus we converted out of our own ancient plots which formerly belonged to our deceased paternal grandfather Diogenes, whose mother was Sepsarion, near Senepsau in the said Oxyrhynchite of an aroura of vine-land, on which the sum owing as nome, as was conceded to us, apportioned was paid, and concerning this the local comogrammateus reported that the registration had been carried out accordingly out of our own plots Whereas then we have now discovered that in the time of this comogrammateus and another a report was made whereby it is declared that the owners concerned when warned in writing to do so had not sent in a statement, and that the land was planted (because Sempronius Liberalis the ex-praefect in the circuit of the nome held in his time in the 20th year of the deified Aelius Antoninus had made an endorsement If they fail to present a statement within two months they shall be liable to the prescribed penalties '), and since

we

^

.

.

.

'

;

172

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

from the remarks which we have now seen appended to the report in tlie hands of the basilicogrammateus of the nome we have learnt that a certain Dionysius, who was assistant of the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome in the 23rd year, has made an endorsement that he had given information to Diogenes the grandson of our aforesaid grandfather, and this Diogenes to whom he says he gave information and who was our brother died in Thoth year of the deified Hadrian, so that from this fact the mahce of the assistant of the Dionysius with intent to defraud us is proved, for he could not in accordance with the order produce the acknowledgement of the recipient that he had in truth given the information, but, as stated above, our brother Diogenes died long before the endorsement which therefore, lord praefect, we have perforce taken refuge with you, the has been made saviour and benefactor of all, begging you, if your fortune sees fit, to write to the strategus and basilicogrammateus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, in order that, on our presenting the statement originally required, we may suffer no damage in consequence of the endorsement wrongly made by the assistant, and so may obtain relief. Farewell.'' And of his endorsement this is a copy " Let those who have presented these documents, ten in number, apply to his highness the dioecetes Vonasius Facundus, to whom copies have been sent. Make this public. The ist year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus Published Epeiph and the Emperor Caesar Lucius Aurelius Verus Augustus, Epeiph 14." Since therefore, sir, his highness the dioecetes, being appealed to by us and learning that Dionysius was not then present, referred this matter also to you in the following terms " Vonasius Facundus gives sentence You accuse the assistant and the case must be investigated in the presence of Dionysius; apply therefore to his highness the epistrategus, who, when Dionysius appears, will give judgement in the case," we request you, if it seems good to your fortune, to decide about the case, so that we may obtain relief. Farewell. (Signed) Ammonius and Marthion, both children of Diogenes, have presented this petition through one of us, Ammonius. (Endorsed) The 2nd year, Pharmouthi 20. To the administration he shall be heard.'
.

.

.

:

:

.

.

.

:

:

:

4.

\(8:
'

regular term for displaced it. The 1033. 14. cf. 11. 44 below, 1065 introd., 1070. 32, and, for Lucius Volusius Maecianus occurs in 653, B. G. U. 613. 9 and P. Gen. 35, but the 5. It is now fixed precise date of his praefecture remained uncertain (cf. Archiv iii. p. 392). vith probability by 11. 45 sqq. in the year a. d. 161. P. Brit. MuS. 92I. 2 sqq. «Vt 8. cf. 707. 23
'

was the pp. 262 sqq., where Wilcken shows that and petition till the end of the third century, when papyri of the present volume, so far as they go, bear out that result
cf.

Archiv

v.

&

!,

(•.
.
. .

avayayflv

,

.

.

present passage does not necessarily
p.

(^) come
.
.

,

., f [mfi;]roCf

el

into conflict with Wilcken's view {Archiv
that
in

^ .
The
iv.

548) that

avayeiv in P. Brit.

Mus. 921 cannot be used absolutely and

some phrase
1.

like f[ir

must be restored, since here too the descriptive genitive

11

serves to define the
clear

seems is not to be altered to meaning of the verb; that from the order of the words. Wilcken was however mistaken in assuming that

Apparently even in the case the land in question necessarily belonged to the domains. a special permit was necessary for turning of private property (cf. 1. 9 as in P. Brit. Mus. 921); and any part of it into a vineyard (cf. 1. 11 is indicated by B. G. U. a was exacted for the privilege. The scale of this

929 b 2—4,
is

am

where a

() {^) .
[e'|]

thus thrown Upon certain other instances was imposed on land, e.g. P. Amh. 31 (b. c. 112), where a woman who

), / ^)
^
eis

vfia[v

.

.

.]

(!)

()

new

light

is

1032.

PETITIONS

173

had planted palm-trees on a piece of desert is mulcted in the sum of 1200 copper drachmae. It may now be suggested that this money was held to be due not so much on account of the enclosure of the land as on account of the nature of the crop cf. B. G. U. 563. ii. 6-8

(\ {)
{>
like

11. . 19 palms no less than of vines was as such subject to special ..)... restrictions, the theories which have been put forward with regard to P. Amh. 31 (cf. Archiv ii. p. 119— 21) would need considerable modification. 10. 2f cf. 503. 4. has not previously occurred; it is not The village
.

, ' ()
.
.

.]

({(!)

.

(erovs)

.,

and

If the planting of

(5) {) () 8— {) ]
;

)
[.
.

.]
.

.

:

likely to

be the same as
TTfpt
i.
.

16.

than
18.

17. [^]v^ai e'Sof

fvfinjvoxl^ivai^^

(sc.

'))
19.
;

Toiis 915. 7 "' passages indicates that oi in hand. The neuter in P.

( ,
[
:

Sfc/jirn.
.
.

62
\pfia,

or

y€ii[ofi€w

:

cf.

P. Tebt. 287. 12
cf.

:

P.

Brit.

IVIus.

cvfa

.

had HOt made a proper declaration, or registration of the change cf. e. g. 713. i, note, Archiv i. p. 196, Eger, Aeg. Gnnidbiichwesen, p. 135, Lewald, Grimdbuchrecht, p. 38. probably qualifies rather than TO kt\. is added to explain the ground of the ii&ns. 19-23. The was ordered by the praefect and the d&os noted that the order had not been complied with. 1—2 iav For iav (vros cf. e.g. P. Amh. 68. ev tos napaSfi^fis ev^vi\:

((
.

^ ', , (! (
?

The

first letter is

more

like

y than

, but the
the note
T^as)

third

is

more

6]

Tt(p\

fi&os

p.

Amh.
TJj

68.

Tovt

hi

((('\!

and

ad loc.

Trapahe'i^fis

359•

4*~5

"^^^

G. U. 39°•

7

(((
i.e.

^

comparison of these are the persons involved or concerned in the matter Brit. Mus. 974 and 1008 is best translated relating to.'
'

8. 9"!^ ( (().

974•

.

4~5

fihaiv

rot?

((\!

.
; .
.

•, €\1.]
26.

.
.

"J

.

The

of the

is
fie

probable on account of the short space. would be expected but cannot be read; the letter before y almost certainly a. Perhaps there was a clerical error, though cf. 488. 29-30
30.

by producing the receipt of Diogenes. Cf. e.g. 485. 41-2, where an acknowledgement of receipt is endorsed upon a document of which the had been duly authorized. There is not room for f[m] Trjs. 41-2. If or followed ,[] is right something like might be read, but this does not combine with of is doubtful, but a seems impossible. which would appear to suit 43-5. Cf. B. G. U. 613. 4-6 01 (?
the

. !
;

28 sqq.

[]

The
is

serving of official notices on the persons concerned was one of the functions cf. e. g. 485. 49, 712. 16-17. oblique construction is illogically continued.

31.

[]7}

:

]
2

33•

The meaning

appears to be that Dionysius could not prove his assertion about

'

] \() () (^ [(^ [(({) ..]... (. . G. U. 1085. . 25-6 should be
1.

the space better)

[( ,
The

' '].

!]
f'nl

.

lines,

seems

with than [ rather to be right.

\.
the

(\{)
is

figure of the year in

56. 59.
35•

9—10

( ! (!.
:

in

11.

and 6

means

the official

name was given as department concerned;

.
cf.

restored on the

same

1.

45

not clear, but a

e.g.

1042.

15,

and P. Fay.

174

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

1033.

Petition to Ripakii.
28-3

X 8•9 cm.

A.D. 392.

A petition to two riparii of the Oxyihynchite nome from two who complain of the dangerous character of their duties and request either to be allowed proper assistance or to be relieved of their responsibilities. On the office of riparius, who was a police magistrate not met with before the fourth were an earlier institution The century, see note on 904. 3. this is the first definite mention (cf 33. 24 and note ad loc, Archiv i. p. 479)
;

>

^/^,

of

them

at

Oxyrhynchus, and
is

it

is

evident that they occupied a comparatively

subordinate position.

On

'
)?.
]
TOVTOVS

the verso

an account (1048).

\{) ''

5

(veKtv Trjs

noXXUKeis

^ '^! (( ( ? } ,( €( ^
.
Tyu

(6

'

(,
eh

(

{\

? ^^
?

(({) ' ((9.
Tovs re

Tois
5

,'
.

(
8.

?&((
(. .
.
tovs

eavTois

«'

re

^ ? 6.
of

.

Pap.

(
4-

af.ofpv F Pap.

6.

7(

Pap.

'-

1033.
'

PETITIONS

175

In the 2nd consulship of our sovereign Arcadius, eternal Augustus, and of Flavius To Septimius Paulus and Claudius Tatianus, Rufinus the most illustrious, Phaophi 21. riparii of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Gaius and Aurelius Theon, both nightBeing entrusted with the care of the peace we are irreproachable strategi of the said city. We in our obedience to public orders, and also intent upon the guardianship of the city. are often called upon for the production of various persons in accordance with the command of our lords the superior officials, but having no assistance either of public guards or inspectors we often run the risk almost of our lives because these assistants have Therefore to been taken from us and we go about the city on the watch all alone. safeguard ourselves we present this petition requesting either that we should be given the proper assistance of the public guards and the inspectors as aforesaid or that we should have no concern for the guardianship of the city or the production of persons who are
wanted,
in

order that

we may

not incur

risk.'

a curious form there is no doubt about the reading. 897, a declaration addressed to two riparii denying knowledge of the whereabouts of a person whom it was required do not seem to be mentioned elsewhere in the papyri. and flirf'iv. 1 1 (8)> fht(i)i' apparently a mixture of
5. 8.
<iVaSfSoii)/j€'iOt is
;

Cf.

.
.

(

:

(8

.

(^)

CONTRACTS.
Draft of a Will.

1034.

•8
Commencement

13 cm.

Second century.

of a will in draft, giving the proposed provisions, but not

by the word th or simply omitted. and a third There are three heirs, a daughter, her foster-brother person, and the property devised, so far as the papyrus goes, consisted of houses. On the verso is part of an account, of which the first few lines are well
specifying names, which are either replaced

(),
»/
«ti

preserved

'

{ () (
hovi
(1.

:

^?)

^,

[)()()"
ir(apa)

ttvai

(^ as
''^'

[[? 6]]

({et[s}

above
-roy)

[bav)

')

(1.

() ($)
[[''••?]]

(( ^
',

ibcDKfV

above the line)
(corr.

from

^{) )
{bpav)
above
eiy

-)

eis

1

176

.

{)
lines of

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
«Vi

{

?)

five

(^)

().

another paragraph follow, beginning

in

the

(

?)

€.
:

Parts of

same way

()

^ ,
5

\^

([

]
. .

yvvaiKi

6[)
T^y]

•{)

[]

[
[

[]

Si

[4{) ']
leave as court in the
'

)

I
.

(

, [)
[ohi
^

\

^ ([

\

\6()
.

Se
?>

[

and her foster-brother >' and z, 2 of the house and previously mortgaged in security for the (dowry) brought to him upon his wife (in accordance with) the contract of marriage drawn up between them, and my daughter and her foster-brother jointly in equal shares of the two .' quarter and the other in the one in the quarter, houses owned by me
heirs

my

my

daughter

quarter which

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2. For this use of ns cf. e. g. 509, P. Brit. Mus. 1 157 verso iii. €7 avrfj 3—6, Cf. 907- 18 TTpovTTtiKKayeiffas ovttJ and the note ad loc, G. U. 970, 15 sqq. The construction of 11. 5-6 is [. must be supplied after and this should be confused and incomplete ; airoir followed by something like 9- 0. The lacuna may be filled e. g. [fivo
. .

*,

(

'

.

(

(^])

\

.,

.

1035.

Lease of a Weaver's Implement.
8-3

X

7-5 cm.

Fragment of a lease, for a period of five years, of a ^iCyos an iron instrument of some kind used in wool-combing or cloth-weaving, perhaps a pair of shears. The lessor was the son of a veteran, C. Veturius Gemellus, who is
no doubt to be identified with the
firo of

,

a.d. 143.

1022. 11.

1035.

On
soldier.

the recto of this papyrus

'

CONTRACTS
is

'77

1023, which relates to another veteran

Overovpios

vibs

kwi-

overpaiOV

5

\[(\


vby
15

] ^ '? ^
nevre
TeXeiof

aweXevOepco

-

[eTo]vi

( -[]
11.

.
'

yaios

Pap.; so in

1.

2.

Pap.

['
14.

Pap.

Gaius Veturius Gemellus son of Gaius Veturius Gemellus, veteran, has let to Epagathus, freedman of Ptolemaeus son of Ptolemaeus, of the city of Oxj'rhynchus, a Persian of the Epigone, for a period of five years from the first day of the next month Phamenoth of the present sixth year of Antoninus Caesar the lord, the combing-instrument belonging to him, made of iron, in perfect condition, new and with an even edge, at a monthly rent .' from the said month Phamenoth
. .

12.

Both

and

in

!.

14 Seem to be new.

1036,

Lease of a House.
33-2

911, 912.

POS

- 6( )A lease of a house
for

X

8-7 cm.

a. d.

273.

two years

at a yearly rent of
i.

400 drachmae

;

cf 502,

For the date see

P. Strassb.

pp. 33-34.
25
TJj

178

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ivos Sep-qvov

5

[]>
Mo
TOS
.

[.]

.

TTJs

noXecos

^Sapand

' ,[\
30

kv

()
\'\
?)
TTJ

\

, ) ([]
[] [(]
(
""/

[\[6

(

[\
15

-

35

.
40

. [] ^
(«Touy)

[]
6[][],

)»/

,
eVoy

[9]

[^]'

20

,\(,'\
'

[] [.]...
2nd hand

77;[]' []!

[]
45

[] [] ^!

[][] []\]

^

.

[]![]

^7•
Pap.

. .

Titus Manlius Serenus and Titus Manlius Alexander, both sons of Titus Manlius Heraclas, through one of them, namely Serenus, have let to Aurelius Heracleus son of Sarapas son of ., his mother being Stephanous, of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, for a term of two years from Thoth of the present 4th year, from his property in the said city in the quarter of Pammenes' Garden a house and yard and court and all the appurtenances with the exception of one room beneath and the plots on the east of the house, at an annual rent of 400 drachmae. When the lease is guaranteed the lessee shall pay the annual rent in half-yearly instalments of half the sum, and shall use the aforesaid house without hindrance for the term, after which he shall restore it free of filth and dirt of all kinds together with such doors and keys as he has received, right of execution lying against the lessee, as is just. The lease is valid, and we have put the question to each other and consented to each other. The 4th year of the Emperor Caesai Lucius Domitius Aurelianus Gothicus Maximus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus, Phaophi 13. (Signed) I, Aurelius Heracleus, have leased the house and will pay the rent as aforesaid.

Mo

.

.

.

.

.

1036.

CONTRACTS
my
consent.
I,

179
Aurelius Serenus, wrote for

and in answer to the question have given him, as he was ignorant of letters.'
17.

33.
is

The The

vestiges hardly suit
T€
is

[.

anticipatory of the usual adjunct

\
cxhedra.

here omitted.

,

which

1037.

Lea.se of
21-6

an

X 6•6 cm.

a.d. 444.

Lease of an exhedra or
34,000,000 denarii
his piOperty
(cf.

hall of a house for an indefinite period at the rent of 1026. 10, note), the lessor being empowered to resume

when he chose

to

do

so.

'(
5

15

^[] {) .[] [\ [/ . ?^ ]? ]€? [? [][]$ [ ]'9 .] {^ 6[ ?, ^ (<) ^? ? 6[ ? \ ?, €? ? \\? ( [] ?, [.
x[/^]r•

[]77• Trjs

]
(. Trj

[]

.

'(.\\ \^'\['\[\
e^rjs

[]

[-]
[6][(]

[?

?
[][5

'

^[€\

[ [.]?
the verso

[?

On
20

[? ]?. ).
4.
1.

3

i8o
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Paterius. the

The year after the consulship of Flavius Maximus for the 2nd time and Flavins most illustrious, Mesore 18. To Aurelius Philoxenus son of Doras, seller of phorbium, of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, from Aurelius Hierax sen of Anastatianus, of the said city. I undertake of my own free will to lease from the first day of the next month Thoth of the present reign and the 13th indiction, which is in the said city of Oxyrhynchus in the hall belonging to you in the house called the quarter of the Cobblers' Market, complete with all its appurtenances, and I will pay you for rent 2,400 myriads of silver yearly, and I will perforce pay the rent with no delay, and whenever you wish I will hand over to you the hall in a clean state. This lease, of which a single copy is made, is valid, and in answer to the question I have given my consent.'
.
.

.

I-

xf/^jy: cf.

is the right reading, is for a seller of phorbium or perhaps, more generally, a seller of fodder, is mentioned in Galen, vol. xii, p. 152 (Kiihn) npot Arcadius. p. I20. 9 (Barker) cf and the latter form perhaps occurring in P. Goodsp. 30. xxxi. 22 (Cronert, Slud. z. Palaogr. iv. 99). 9. The reign was that of Theodosius II and Valentinian III. v. cf. 1038. 23. 12. should evidently be read in P. Strassb.

4.

) 77€
if

),
(•.

940.

I,

note.

that

:

', (,
aS in
1.

,
common

4. II.

17.

or e.g.

',

!/};
For

12.

!

cf. e. g.

1038. 31.

1038,

Lease of Part of a House.
30-5

X

10-3 cm.

A.D. 568.

A

lease of a ground-floor

room

()

in a house, at the annual rent of
is

10 keratia, the lease to be determinable, as
pleasure of the owner.
are P. Brit. Mus. 113. 6 (a)

Other good examples of

1023, P. Flor. 13 and 73, P. Strassb.

+

(
Trj

(roiroy), (d)

(

at this period, at the

late leases of house-property

bvo in a house), 871

()

and

4.

5

eVoi/y

(.)
evS6^{ov)

(^:) .
'6^{)

1038.

CONTRACTS
rfj

i8i

{])
10
avrijs

[) [) {)

6{)
rfjs

15

()

.

[6) 9 {9)

^

3

((6)

8{)
€{€)

^)

}

25

€7

3

35

^ ^ ^{) '
[

() () (€), '4 ^ {). ( () {) () {) [) €(6) (-),
+ di emu
On

{) [, {(),

^
6{)
+

^
.]

+

)

'[{)]

(). () [) ()
[]

[]{).

loannu

the verso

([) ({)
4•

^^) [)

).

Pap.

1 8.

Pap.

1

9.

'"S

Pap.

2
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

The 3rd year of the reign and consulship of our most godly and pious sovereign To Flavia Flavius Justinus, eternal Augustus and Imperator, Mesore 2, ist indiction. Euphemia, the honourable daughter of Musaeus of honoured memory, landholder at this illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, through you, Flavius Anastasius, her noble agent, and you, Jeremias, her admirable collector, Aurelius Stephanus, baker, son of Heraclammon and Nonna, of the said city, greeting. I undertake of my own free will to lease from the first
day of the month Tholh of the coming D.V. second indiction, from your honour's property out of a house facing south situated in this city in the quarter of St. Euphemia, a complete room on the ground floor also facing south with all appurtenances and the rights attaching to all the house, and I will pay annually as rent for this ten carats of current coinage, total I carats current, which rent I will pay every year in half-yearly instalments of half the sum, and whenever you wish I will surrender my possession of the room just as I received it. This lease, of which one copy has been made, is valid, and in answer to the question Signature of Stephanus written for him by the scribe John, I have given my consent.' signature of John, and title on the verso.
1-6. Cf.
1.

199

=

P. Brit.

Mus. 778, which
is
°'^''

is

dated on Mesore 4 of the same year.

In

3 of that

papyrus the 2nd indiction

specified,

and

since in
it

1038
is

still

suggests,

probably unusually

current (cf. also 11. ''i* a change of indiction-year was just taking place when 199 was written, and The month of Mesore is 1. 3 there should be read lvh{iKTiwvos) a apxirjs) late in the year for the commencement of an indiction, though cf. P. Grenf. 100. 4. cf. 133. 5, &c. •yVouxfoJCi'Ti looks probable in P. Strassb. 40. 7. 9. ei/oiKtoXoyou (e.g. B. G. U. 3. 7); cf. 1043. I, P. Strassb.15. I, and the 13. cWxoXoyou

18-19

^^9 Seurepar ii'8(iKriWos•))

the ist indiction was evident that, as Kenyon

.

7{()
fis

analogous
20.

, !: ,
:

=

&c., for
cf.

P. Brit.

and
31.

are similarly

this misuse of the optative is common at this period. The formation of reading at the beginning of this line is rather uncertain. must be followed is inappropriate here, the first letter suggests 7 rather than , but by a substantive meaning possession ' or something of the sort, and it ends either in There seems, however, to be no suitable compound, and or, conceivably, in with or simply with a lipography of hence the choice lies between SSikos iniusta possessio, and For cf. e.g. P. Tebt. 286. 7 a dittography of o/xi;. Slud. z. Paldogr. i. p. 7. the fifth-century contract of sale published by de Ricci in Wessely's . p(povs ... 18—19 37• loannu was most likely followed by eteliothe, but this is not easily reconciled with

(!:

e.g. p. Goodsp. 15. 3. i'f[il]oi'To[f] eh Mus. 1023. 12 used, e.g. P. Brit. Mus. 113. 6 {a) 14, (i) 20.

[-]

.

.

.

. (!

(Is

32.

The

-

-. ('
'

{)

=

.

.

(((

^^,

the strokes that remain.

1039.

Contract of Deposit.
33•2

X

Acknowledgement of a deposit demand cf. e.g. P. Tebt. 387, P. Brit. Mus.
;

()

•6 cm.

a.d. 210.

of

600 drachmae repayable on

943, B. G. U. 729.

The name

of the

emperor Geta has been deleted

in

the date formula, as in 54, 56 and elsewhere.

1039.

CONTRACTS

/
5

[./47]'?

'\^

[
.

^-

-

183

10

15

20

25

[ [ ^ ^ [.[ . [] 6[ [ [ ([ %[ ] ^
woXews

. [9 [€
[

\\-

kv

^[,

kav aiprj

[S[e

€[ ]

[]

€[],
re

([-

[][]

,]

[

, \[

[-

[€-

[

(eVouy)

II.

1.

(..
.

6.

1.

for

.

'ApoUonius son of Sarapion son of Sarapion, his mother being Sintheus, of the city of also called Chaeremon, his mother being Apia, of Oxyrhynchus, to Theon son of C I acknowledge the receipt from you from hand to hand on deposit the said city, greeting. of 600 silver drachmae of the imperial coinage, which I will restore to you whenever you choose without any delay or excuse, otherwise I will forfeit them to you in accordance with the law of deposits, and you shall have the right of execution upon me and upon all my property. This deed of deposit, written by me, ApoUonius, in duplicate is valid whenever produced and whosoever produces it on your behalf Date.
. .

i84
4.
7.
is llie

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
'A7n'[as
:

cf.

fv

:

76. 2, 249. 3, 1046. 8. SO P. Brit. INIus. 943.
in this sense.

5, P. Flor.

31. 4, P. Slrassb. 54. 4.

commoner term

1040.

Loan of Wheat.
31-3

X 20 cm.

A.D. 225.

An

acknowledgement of a loan of four artabae of wheat, to be repaid with

This addition is to be regarded simply as accom.modation, as in P. Flor. 54, where government loans of seed are to be repaid juera rijy cf. 1042. 28, where bopov practically
interest for the
;

an addition {hLopol') of one-half.

Amh. 147 the should probably be similarly explained rather than as fines incurred in conne.xion with previous transactions. The deed is written out in duplicate 1. 31) on
means
interest.

In P. Tebt.

no

$
and

P.

a single sheet, in
is

two columns, of which the second, being the better preserved,

(

printed

;

cf.

988.
Col.
ii.

^
repoi
5

Aecoy

)(^. Tepoi{s} (

4

wn

^
e^,

Ilavaeipios

SiiOevTOS

ttjs

(.]•/.

fiVat

15 [7']/3[]' veov

[]

, (!-'
«
[eTovs)

?-vibs

-

(€-

€72

Sca-

[ay ds]

[]((,
20

[]
['^

/
1040.
€^

CONTRACTS

185

\\
[]?

Se

.([
e-

-

-

[6]
25

[ ]£ '
[{]\
[
[o/<oi]<Joy

e^,

{{)\

^
cos

-

] []^6
30

[]7;€';(»'
eav

e/y

'€
iv

re

[], [ [](
[]

35

^^[^ []€.
.

4

^^ ? {)[9
(erony)
e

,€

.

(

()

KaXSis

(and hand.)
vibs

kl
45

? ,
(
9
ttJ

]

50

.

ay

[ -

i86

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

.
On
3rd hand
4•

'
i

eiSiuai

()
28.

COrr.

from

of
1.

1. lo Collated with this text Col. i shows the following variants 1• 6 12 7roSflfl', 1. 14 -/jei/ being corrected from 11. 23-4
:

' ^.
the verso of Col.

{6)
7•

-//.

corr.

and added above the ;6[€']'€. 1• 40
'

( , . , €((. .
32•
\.

Pap.

"'''"

>•

of

rewritten•

34• \. 52- " of «Sfrai corr.

;. [(}(((.
of
1.

.

from
^1.

line.

1.

25 om. 1. 49

33 Perhaps

?

,
f.

29.
COIT.

,
34
fVf-

45•

(lacuna).

1.

Aurelius Pekusis, son of Pausiris and Soeris, and his son Aurelius Petenouphis whose is Sintheus, both of the city of Oxyrhynchus, to Aurelius Theon son of Didymus, of city, greeting. acknowledge both equally that we have received and had measured out to us from you of the crop of the past 4th year four artabae of wheat at the interest of one-half, making a total, with the interest, of six artabae of wheat, which we will repay to you on our mutual security in the month of Pauni at the threshing-floor of the village of Teruthis, in wheat that is new, pure, unadulterated, without earth or barley,

mother

the

said

We

sifted, as measured into the public granary, by your own receiving measure by which measurement has been made to us, the measuring to be done by your agents. If I do not repay according to our written agreement the aforesaid six artabae of wheat including the addition, I will forfeit them to you with an increase of one-half and interest for the overtime also of one-half, (and you shall have the right of execudon) upon us as mutual securities for the payment or upon whichever of us you choose and upon all our property of every kind, as in accordance with a legal decision. This bond, which is written in duplicate, is valid as if publicly registered, and in answer to your question whether this is rightly and fairly done we have given our consent.' Date, signature of Pekusis and Petenouphis written for them by Aurelius Petronius, and title on the back.

and
the

7.

ia)0yevai

10, 21.
26.

^
;

Col.

i

shows

For

:

cf 988, 1041. 9, 1042. 28, P. Leipzig 97. xix. i, &c., 102. the termination is assured by the duplicate copy.
SC. t^s

T6

(

the

same

spelling.

.
X

i.

i.

1041.

Guarantee for a Loan.
27-7
15-7 cm.
A.D.

381.

for the

(?) takes upon himself the responsibility repayment of a loan which had been made through his intervention to a friend, Philonicus. The transaction was connected in some way with another

In this deed Aurelius Plutarchus

.

1041.

CONTRACTS
the reference to this
(II.

187
9-10)

agreement
is

rather obscure.
['

\ ^ ] [ ]9
in

which Plutarchus was concerned, but

[]

5

15

20

2nd hand

\\ [ ] [] ^ - () {) ^ , €{^ [], ' [] {) ' [ ] [] ' []^] [,] . [ \( [] ' [ ]^ ]^[) . 6[ \
eh
apy[v\piov
a[.]e[

8[.]) \\ '[] ')]^ € [] ' '[] \ ]6 8[ \ [] ' )[] [ \ '(
[

e

^'?;['

.

.

.]

.

[\ .
te.

^
6]

6\

['

[])(^\

[\

y/

,

(

kv rrj

Trj

<^

€6[€ (

7['

25

[ [
[
[

[[] ][ ] ]
([]
[]
Tjj

ts

[ ]..[.
.]

] .[

].[.].
]
.

28 letters
5•

(

.
'

\.(.

xa'pfiPap.

6.

Pap.

9-

of

ois

.

from

5.

15.

Pap.

In the consulship of Flavius Eucherius and Syagrius the most illustrious, Pauni 1 5 Aurelius Plutarchus, son of Psenamounis and Ted[.]me, of the village of Phoboou in the

l88

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

5th pagus of the Oxyrhjnchite nome, to Aurelius ... us son of Heraclas, of the said city, Whereas owing to my persuasion you have drawn up an agreement vith dyer, greeting. Philonicus son of Besammon, of the said city, for the repayment of four thousand two hundred myriads of denarii of silver which have been lent to him by you on account made by me, in order that you of extra payments in accordance with the contracts of may have security from me until the repayment of this sum I acknowledge that I owe and myself have the said four thousand two hundred myriads of denarii of silver, total 4 2,000,000 denarii, on the condition that I restore them to you on the day specified in the agreement made by you with the said Philonicus, that is the first day of the month IMesore of the present 14th the 6th the and year and the current 9th indiction, and that I shall recover from him the agreement for this sum made by you with him and shall hand it over to you for annulment ; and you shall have the right of execution upon me and all my property. This agreement, of which one copy has been made, is valid, and in answer to the question I have given my consent.' Signature of Aurelius Plutarchus.
. .

.

=

=

3.

the

end of the
4.

\\
line
:

of course
a.

is

Uncertain, but

it

was a

common name
;

at

£])5 for ah[i^s cannot be

read

the

initial letter is

Oxyrhynchus. At perhaps 6 or ,

and the second may be
though perhaps revision in Archiv

name shows that is the right reading in 973, should be restored, since P. Leipzig 116. 2, according to Wilcken's supports the spelling of 1041. p. 485, 6. is commended by the sense and the size of the lacuna. cf. 1040. lo and introd. 9. In 10. []{.]([ could be read in place of but there is hardly room for the previous line the relative has been corrected and it is not quite clear what was originally
the occurrence of this
iv.

:
\\
T17
:

[•

,

[][][.

written.
14.

which is expressed in 1. 25 below. regnal years are those of Gratian, Valentinian II, and Theodosius. 26-7. These two lines very likely specified the writer of the foregoing signature on behalf of Plutarchus.
sc, of course,
16.

The

(,
1042.

Loan of Money.
31 x8-3cm.
A.D. 578.

An

agreernent for a loan of one-third of a solidus, to be repayed on
is

demand

with some addition as interest, but the rate

not defined.

+

\()
5

evepyeTOV

\([\ [\5
i\ov

1042.
eVouy ty,

CONTRACTS

189

^ 6() '4 , {)
StvTepay
Kaiarapos

15

(^ / ( (() &()) '{) ^ $ (.){^) {)
16

.

Trjs

veai

20

^^.
tv

{)
rfjs

)^•€

()
'

Xpeias
25

{),
avrfj

{)
3
:^

(\) (()[) {)[') (). ([) ({5) {). {)
+

{) {6), {) () () [) ({?).
{()
emu Serhnn

(h

{)

[) .
'

Sipfjvos

di

ctcliotJi.

On

the verso

35

+

{) {)() {) {) {). {()
vtov

igo
4.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Pap.; SO in
Pap. 13. so in 11. 30, 35.
11.

17, 35.

6.

-y

12.

'ivh'ia
;

Pap.

25.

Pap. Pap.

l6.
;

Pap. Pap. 7. Pap.; so in 11. 19, 30, 35.

8.

18.

so in

!
Pap.

1.

35.

The 1 3th year of the reign of our most godly and pious sovereign and greatest benefactor Flavins Justinus, eternal Augustus and Imperator, the nth year after the second consulship of his serenity, and the 3rd year of Flavius Tiberius also called Novus ConTo Flavius Phib, the stantinus, our most fortunate Caesar, Pachon 15, nth indiction. of most esteemed assistant in the praefect's office in the province of Arcadia, son of illustrious memory, from the new city of Justinus, Aurelius John, millstone-maker, son of
'

Anoup and Kuranan, an inhabitant of the said city, greeting. I acknowledge that I have received from your magnificence as a loan for my pressing needs one-third of a gold solidus on the private standard of current coin, total § gold solidus, private standard, and this I agree to produce to you whenever you choose, together with the extra payment,
This deed, of which one copy has been made, is valid, and in answer to the without delay. Signature of John written for him by Serenus, the question I have given my consent.' penned the contract, signature of Serenus, and title on the back. scribe who
8-1
Trjs

14-15•
17.

8 .
1.

Tiberius was appointed Caesar in 574

\

;

\

cf.

Chron. Pasch.

p.

376 a

\

Scn-rff»-

= subadhivae. On
cf.

the province of Arcadia, which corresponded to
hist.

the earlier Heptanomia,

Gelzer, Leipziger
left for

7rfJ

blank space was cf 126. 5.

A

the name, which

Abhandl. xiii. pp. 8-9. was never filled in. For «aj

solidus on the private standard was slightly inferior in value to a solidus 25. public or the Alexandrian standard ; cf. 154. 13, note.

A

on the

1043.
6-6

Receipt.
X
33-5 cm.
a.d. 578.
oil.

A
writing

receipt,
is

dated by the eras of Oxyrhynchus, for three sextarii of

across the fibres of the papyrus.

+

86{(') [,
6{)) []{)
ecoy

Tpeii,

1st

hand

{)

{) {() 5 {).
.
Pap.

{) () {) (()
(),

) ) {)
5']f/J'j»'0u
le,

The

evoiKo\6y(ov)

'\
()
Pap.

[)

{) // /
2.

().

(2nd hand)

•{)

([]?.

1043.
'

CONTRACTS

191

Received through Serenus, collector, by Macarius and Elias and Kamoul, assistants attending on the honourable house, on account of expenses from the i6th of the month Phamenoth to the 30th of the same month, 15 days, three sextarii of oil, total 3 sextarii of The 254th the oil, and no more. (Signed) Total three sextarii of oil and no more.

=

223rd year, Phamenoth
1,
2.

19,

nth

indiction.

eVoiKoX(iy(ou)

;

cf.

1038.

13, note.
is

The

fvSotof

of the Apion family

probably meant

;

cf.

P.

Oxy.

I.

p.

206, and

133.

8, 16,

135. 16, &c.

{e)

ACCOUNTS AND
1044.

LISTS.

Taxing-list.
28x57-5 cm.
A. D.

173-4 or 205-6.

On
the
first

the verso of this papyrus are the six columns from the

commencement

of the Phaedrus printed under 1016.
is

The

recto contains three columns^ of which

well preserved, of an alphabetical register of landholders, with the
their holdings.

amounts due upon

The second column
;

is
i,

the third only the beginnings of lines remain

but Col.

much effaced, and of which follows below, is

a sufficient specimen of the whole
later part of the

some few points of interest occurring in the document are incorporated in the notes. The date is about the end of the second century; the reign, of which the past 13th year is mentioned in 4, is perhaps more likely to be that of Marcus Aurelius than that of
;

1.

Septimius Severus.

The
payable.

personal names are accompanied by various items of land and wheat,

those of the latter being added up at the end of the several entries as the

times, however,

someand another common category is i. e. land paying a tax of i artaba on the aroura. similar combination of and is found in P. Brit. Mus. 604, and from P. Tebt. 576 it is known that a tax of i artaba per aroura was paid by catoeci cf.
is
;

In a number of cases the land
it

(),

is

described as

, ()
it is

amount

assigned to no definite class

A

;

ibid. 346. 5, note.

In the present case

noticeable that the amounts attached

192

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

to the land specified as

()
;

are reckoned not at

i

artaba but at

1

1 per

5 a fraction of ^-^ aroura is ignored, and in 11. 24 and 27, a^choenices In one or are treated as 3, but otherwise the rate of i| is correctly calculated). two instances (11. 9, 27) the land is stated to have been purchased.

aroura

(in

1.

Besides the dues coupled with definite plots of land,
infrequently an independent item called
), i.

amount being usually 3 choenices in one case, however (1. 11), it is 6 choenices, and a second charge of 3 choenices is made under this head to the same individual
e. olKoiiebov

(
;

there

occurs

not

or -hmv, the

(1.

occurs in a few papyri of the Roman 390 cf. P. Fay, 42 («)• • ^5< B• G. U. 761) and is supposed to have been levied on incomes derived from building-sites,^ a kind of tax on ground-rents. But that impost is regularly paid in money, whereas the here are in kind moreover, the property concerned in payments for 1044 is clearly agricultural and the constancy of the amount shows that it can
I a).

An

impost

TTpocob{oiv)
i.

';•)
;

period (Wilcken, Ost.

p.

-()

;

Perhaps we have to do with in no very exact relation to income. a single tax, which was assessed in money upon land that was built over and in kind upon agricultural land but it will be well to wait for further evidence.

have stood

;

An

interesting point resulting from the arithmetic of this

document
;

is

that

the artaba in which the calculations are made contained 40 choenices cf. e. g. An artaba of 40 choenices is found in the Oxy12 and 21, and notes. 11.

rhynchus metrological fragment (9 verso 8), and the survival of this measure in the Roman period had been inferred from the occurrence of fractions of fifths
clearest

and tenths of an artaba (cf. P. Tebt. 61 example of its official use.

{b).

386, note), but the present

is

the

1

[

20

letters

2

[

3

[

, '[]() {) ' () [) () () , \) {) '8[]€ {)
?)

]

]

[

{)

5'[ ]
,

18 letters

[8''

4

[
[

(?) {:)
L•
]

5

$
,]

) {)
.

-'

{ '{) []^ {
]

.]

.

"

JJeraeipios

.

,

8ieX{66vTi)
ttjs

{()

[]6{(5:)

6{)
.

]s
,

( {)

•'

yiivovTai)

{$)

8$ [) () ' () () {(5)
[/li\oyivovs

6

7

[{)\ {) [] {)

8

()][ .] {) () (^) ''' {() [) () "! {€!) [) (^) [{) {)] .' ' {) ^' {) () {) ' {) () \{) () ()
Xipiyivovs
lB'-t]' (oipovpaC)

1044.

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS
.
.

!
,
,

193

(
aL•

x{oiuiKis)

[...].

Mevepaypv

{
.

.

.

.),

.

.),

e

.

.

,

{}..

)((^owiK€s)

9

11

^\ {) [) () " {) {) [) [)^() [)() () () '{) [) ^{) {)
Seipiwvo?

.5 [](9)
,

'

^ ?
L•
L•

{)' ()
)({()
•,

9 [)
e,

L•,

yiivovTaC)

)
()
,
,

.

{)

,'

aL•'

,

Mev€pa\ov

12

13

14

[ [) [) €
viKesi)

{() () () , () () '
,
L•

L•'

.

15

1

6

[) € € [)(€) [) [) [) [) [) [)
,

€[) [) [) )(<[) , [) [) [) ' ' [) [)[) [) [)
Wevapouvios
\[oiviKes) ",

[) [[))^[€) [) [) [)) ' .
/.
<^.

.'

,

'

'

L

.

[€) , [)

17

8

(5 [)

( [) [) ^[) '[)[){[ [) () [) [)
Mevf
,

'

'

'

[)

Meve-

,

.

?)

Xepiyivovs

•.

194
19

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
IlfTafipti

2
21

6^

{) [) | () ^) , (^>) () () {) [) . )({() () {) () {) () {) {) {>) ^) {)
L•

^) {)[<)\ () {/)()
5()
yZ-S

aiprav)

aJ(vTOv)

^

L•'

S'

I.S

,

,

<(;)

(5)

,

,

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

[) () ()'[ [) ^) [) {) [) ''() {)() {) () ' [ () {) {) (() [) () /! () {) [) ' € [) '[) ^)] [) {) [) [) [)[) [) [) ][) [) () [) [) [) [() ()] ^) [) [) () [) [) € [) [ .{\ [)[) [) [) [) [) . )([) [) /. ^[() [) () ,
)

[)

^{) .

L

aL•

"
,
,

y{ivovTai)

()
,

[•

.]eeauopos

x(o£i't/fey)

,

()]

Meretriecos

"
'
,

L•

yiivovTai)

L

,

L.

L•

y,

!
L•

,

,

/..

[L

[)

)"
.

e

L•

y,

,


iL•' ,

-

e

€/.[?;'.]

\[o]iir[ai)

.

8.

after

above a

.
is

i6. Final

[) (()

2. (K

column
5•

«

[) 2;[: ()
The
total

covers also the preceding , but that was doubtless It is exceeds the sum of the items by f (8f + J+ sf 123)• in the lacuna at the beginning of the line, since neither «] unlikely that these f occurred ]t is more likely. nor * can be read before f ;

The

stroke over the fraction

.

corr.

from

sc.

.
.

>(?).

9•

^-

Pap.

written immediately below

.

10.

of
22.
ii

'

!
corr.

added from a.

A

holding mentioned in Col.

but not in this

unintentional.

=

(6!)

.

.

.

1

1044.
6.
K\i]pov6{jioi) is

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS
iii.

195
At the

'

6!An amount
:

supplied on the analogy of several entries in Cols, ii and end of this line an amount of artabae is missing; cf. 1. 7. bpiov and 1. 12. 7. [fipuoju cf. 1. 8 The word is unknown: is

()

it

a form of

?

x(oiviKes)

cf. 1. 6. It is doubtful what of artabae is again missing before ; followed y(ivovTat) neither The meaning of the aZ. after nor suits the papyrus. y{ivovTai) is also obscure. In Col. ii aZ occurs in connexion with
:

{apovpat)

appears that is to be supplied and a category of land paying i^ art. is meant ; cf. the Ptolemaic (P. Tebt. 5. 15, note). 8. At the beginning of the line either must be wrong, and since the latter or which should figure is corroborated by the addition, the fault is shown to lie with Another mistake occurs in the number x{oiviKts) (, for this exceeds the later be total 7 art. 9 choen., and it is evident that the t should be omitted and that The cf. 1. 23. x(oiw«r) ( is another way of expressing the previous number ; final total is then correct 7 art. 9 choen. 5 art. 4 choen. (1. 7) + i§ art. 5 choen. + ^ art. That the artaba contained 40 choenices is confirmed by U. 12, 21, &c. in one place in Col. ii the word is written in a less abbreviated 9. form, vmoov(^fvv) \. (()

which

it

(^{) ()
:

()

(')

/3,

'()

aL•

(^) ( () new

&
=

-

:

., from

.
1
.

8

,

()

()

{()
The
27.

:

«7•()

;

i.

e. f /£

() .

12.

in

I.

items in 11. 10-12 add up to 6| art. 31 choen., and the total is given 12 as 7•^ art. 6 choen., i.e. 25 choen. are reckoned as f art., implying an artaba of

40 choen.
14. x{oiviK€s)

should no doubt be x(oiwwr)
oiVo7r(c8ou).

y,

regular
as in

amount for 11. 8, 23, and

With

this correction the

which, with the exception of equation 5 choen. \

17.

'<():

7(

)

nor does
sense
is

21.

amount

obscure. An artaba of 40 choenices again follows from the addition of the items, which to i"}^ art. 38 choen. The total as given is 18 art. 8 choen.; therefore 30 choen.

^
e
.

cf.

.[.

1. 22 and also an entry In both these places the

in Col.
is

ii

clear

seem

suited to the context,

and however

is

certainly cannot be read, an unknown word and the

! {!)
1.

12, is the

=

art. results,

= I

art.

22.

'{
The
total
.

)

:

Other
art.

uncommon names
is

occurring in Col.

ii

are

and

Tltvirav-

(fem.).

23.
25•

|

4 choen.
art.

the

sum

of the two preceding items, 5 choen. being

( ^]{)() ()

reckoned, as before, as |

ii| + | + ^+i| + ^+i| art. and 10 choen. 15^ art. and 10 choen., 15^ art. [L two similar entries occur in Col. ii, e. g, L Fay. 33• 18-19, note, cf. On and Eger, Aeg. Grundbuchwesen, p. 188, Lewald, Rom.-Aeg. Grtcndbuchrechi, p. 79, who both support our view. It may be suggested that in P. Brit. Mus. 604. 3

\
26.

:

.

.

(()

.

.

.

should be restored in place of

' 8[/

].
=

.

()
=

<[

196

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1045.

List of Dues.
About
a.d. 205.

Height 33-5 cm.

The

following

much

document on the

recto of 1012.

mutilated fragments are given as specimens of the C contains part of a list of property-owners, of
several are

whom many

bear

Roman names and

women

;

their property

is

frequently stated to be in the territory of Alexandria, and the sums mentioned are large. The column printed was preceded by another of which only one or

two
the

letters

remain.

A

is

occupied with some
list,

official

correspondence, written in
refers,

same

large

hand

as the

to which
is

it

no doubt
;

way
1.

of general preface or otherwise

uncertain

and 49 may well refer to the amounts detailed in C. Two other fragments, the former F, appear to contain matter of a kind somewhat similar to that of
]s

^
8eV
TJj

though whether by
in

mentions

b[.
y[

A

;

[( {8) []
\/]{) [()
[.
.

C

(Fr. 9), Col.

ii.

.]

5 [Sap]ania>p

[!] '[
reOeiaas

'(^{) >{.)

[[
)

{
)
) )
[

kv Tjj
)

[()
[

[{

( [

Twv MeveXaov

MapKos
15

[ {8 { { { ?' ' { '[]'
[

)

{) € f
TJ]

'

[

'[

e

.

[

)

[. ...].[..

.

.][

'AvT(i)uio[i

({<)

.

[.

.

.

•][

)

1045.

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS
la

197

20

Ma[.

25

30

!
[5]
)

[ ([]\ [) { ^ [ {^ ( {)[ { (^
rj

[] ^('
]

.

[

)

[

.]aS[

e]/c

npo

.

[

)

eh

[6{?)
)

)

)

'[
«""
)

KXavSios

[

)

nt^

[

(eroy)

6

[
\

)

[

'[]/<(€'(»')

[{

ev Trj

[\{) (){() "
)]
'
.

[

{
[

)

()
[

(?

TiTiav[bs

(Frs. 1-3).

4

(] {
]

Remains of
.

[.

.

.

.]i?s

]

)
[.
. .

[] [ . []
3 lines.

tovs

{>)

eav

.][
[.
. .

]


.

]

.

[....]
[

]
.

]

] [. ...]..
]
.

]evT[

45

^[] 6[]$ .[]$ ]](
7r[°^e<o]s
. .

go

^ ](
(\\(

]6[ ^ ] €
]

[]( [
[

.]

.

[

.[...]. [.]^[.

.]iit[

]

.]vtj[

^[
[
[
. .

[ [
[

«

€[. .]
[

6[](

igS

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
\
](7[

^\
15.

.
cf.
1.

32.
3.

For

[\]^{() [()

edict of Julius

cf. 11. 6 and 1 8. Wilcken reminds me that according to the Alexander (Dittenberger, Orientis Gr. Inscr. 669. 59-60) the in the was free of land-tax, so that the plots mentioned in this papyrus may have
:

^
IS

Pap.

probably to be restored before cf. e. g. B. G. U. 8. ii. 15 sqq.

!
letter,
;

here and in

11.

6 and 12

;

belonged to some other category. 44. This line gave the date of the foregoing

2/]
The

(rrout)

.

2[i]ouijpou

48. Probably
also possible.

],

., i.e. A.D.
as
is

I93— 198.

!
]
is

one of the

but the division

of course

sense no doubt vn(p^f]aii> cannot be read.

50-1.

that neglect of the instructions will

be punished

:

but

1048.

Taxing-account.
24-5x9 cm.
A.D. 218-219.
for various taxes

Conclusion of an account of payments
verso contains a letter (1064).

and dues.

The

{) ^)
6() 768{)
5

(.{)

{) ( () (/) ,('/) [) {^)
(o/SoXoy)

{

{) ()
Tr\s

,

10

€{)'() {.) ^() {) -, () (){) () () . () () , / ()

(

)

a,

(/<) ,

{) ,

^

;

1046.

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS

199

/
15

€7(£

to avTo)

TTJs

\{9:)

{\) .

{iTOvs)

.
.
Ti/iii(s)

EvTvyovi

'^
.
Brit.

&{) (\{),

{)
5.
9.

a receipt for 36 drachmae paid to on 2^^ arourae on some temple-land, Line 4 below records another payment for are well known under various names, but this particular form 3. Taxes on (Wilcken, Os/. No. 276, A.D. 186which recalls the Wilcken in Osi. i. p. 310 regards the impost imp 187), appears to be novel. a

(^)

{)•.

cf.

StoiKrjcr{eas)

^ {)
5•
1.

!.

Mus. 171

(a),

'(() >().

({)

.

{), «(1)
13.

as an income-tax For the priestly

aroura of B.G.U. 915.

{/) ^^!,
:

(
cf.
I.

\{

however is uncertain, which is here appropriately placed next to p. Tebt. 302. 5, B. G. U. 707. 10, Otto, Priester und Tempel, i. pp. 366 sqq. also occurs in an unpublished Hawara papyrus. is calculated at a rate of 10 dr. per in P. Brit. Mus. 195. 9-10 a rate of 5 drachmae is also found in and 5 dr. per aroura
;

:,
that

1({)

;

:

cf.

e.g.

B.G.U. 552 A.

iii.

5,

553 A.

iii.

lo.

1047.

Account of a
25-8

Praepositu.s.
Fourth century.

X

1

2-8

cm.

A
in

short account of two payments to a praepositus {castrorum), one for

stipenditim, the other as a donativum.

At

the other end of the papyrus, written

the opposite direction, there are lo lines of a calculation of days according to

the

Roman

calendar, preceded

]^
?ojs

''

"]]

;() aavbv

[ {

corr.

. ^ ()()
'?
Ib&v

by a heading

from

) (, () .
6/3^]] Ib&v

-

]

.

,

e. g.

11.

(), ({)

7-10

[

d-nb

(.

.

.

above the

line)

€/8
5

^)

•,

//

(5)

[) . ].
[

200

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
:

'Account of my lord the praepositus for the stipend of September a present on July 25, 2,500 denarii, making together 38,500 denarii.'
3.

i,

36,000 denarii,

The

abbreviation of /i(uptaSfs) here takes the form of a large uncial M, above which

the y

is

written.

1048.

Account of Corn-freights.
28-3

X 8•9 cm.

Late fourth or early

fifth

century.

of freights of corn carried

and

,

The

following account

is

written on the verso of 1033.
are classified as

It is a list

{)
{hisoriae)

by boats which
vii.
it

with the names of the owners of the boats and their captains.

For

the hisoriae see Cod. Theod.
iudiciariae

and agrarienses, and

17 de lusoriis Damivii, where they are styled is also ordained that quaecuntque ex veteribus
speciei

fuermt reformatae
Novel. 23.

transvectioni

annonariae secernanttir

;

cf.

Theod.

presumably to be connected with the embola. Lines 8-15 are in ink of a diiferent colour from that used for the first seven lines and were probably written at a different time, but the hand is perhaps the same. ObHque dashes occur in the left margin against 11. 2-7, and there are some
freights here are

The

obscure marginal annotations.

— Cf.

P. Flor. 75,
"B

&c.

5 }^°'^

\

.

];(

)

]?.'(

)

{) () , \{) {) , <{5 {') () ^, {) ,{) \() \{() {) , {) ', {) {) , {) {) {) \{() ( )' {) ,
Xovaatfiia)

()

) ^8 {
[)

\{)

{(.).

Sapand

vuL•,

?)

?)

.

/

1048.

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS

201

{)
]••?«
]-V
15
8.
1.

{>)

)
'

.
:

()

(')
of

8
(
COrr.

)

e^

.

1 5•

1•

this expansion of the abbreviation 7roX( ) is indicated by a fragment and containing the which was found along with this, headed in the same position as titles and loss before ) &c. 5• The margin does not seem to be quite complete, but the For naviw{vos) of. C. P. R. 34. i in the marginalia on 11. 5-8 is in any case small. looks the letter before 8. was doubtless intended, but cannot be read most like another a. 10. is suggested by the fragment mentioned in the note on 1. i,
2.
7roX(trei/o/icVou)
list,

of a similar

(() ())
( )/
€!

{)

(€). (

)

.

() ^, {) ^, () , () ()
L•.

<^,

.

;

occurring there.

which 12. is apparently the name of a tax, and may and iviarardas ; that papyrus, occurs in P. Brit. Mus. 1 107 in connexion with Xtpdvos however, is of the third century. is brought down to a level of its base The top of the s of 13. This line is obscure. and followed by two oblique dashes and there are some slanting flourishes between t' and is written <# ff probably stands for cf. e.g. P. Brit. Mus. 1107, where is unsuitable. after its first occurrence ; but t^s
be the same as the

.

:
3 ob.

!

»

:

;

()

104.

Account of Transport.
30•6

X

14-2 cm.

Late second century.

An

account of expenses incurred

in

connexion with the transport of
is

to the village of Ophis.

Hire of donkeys

at the rate of a

drachmae a day,

of donkey-drivers
in

i

drachma 5 obols and
dr.

2 dr. 4 ob., of
is

workmen employed

tying up bundles 3

The account

written on the verso of 1032.

[.4]()
ety

.
5

(^)

() 6\() 6() (^)

(') 6()

{$) () '({5) ' {) , / {) \() , () {) () ,

",

() ()

8.

e

(),

202

15

(), ()) [) 8(•{( 8{) () {). {) (^) [). . {) 6{) {) , / (>) () {) {) . [] {) 6{) {) {8<^^) () (), {) /{) {) {8$) () {). () \ , / {) ]() . . () () () () () 6\() 6(() () () (),
(5/)//)
epy^UTaLs)

)

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

y/

ovo{is)

[<]

"

{)
[-,

^,

[,]

oVo(i)

oi/o(iy)

[].
20

{) {) () () ((). () (). () () () , \/ ]() () () () () [6]() () [() (),] (() [() [() ] ((). ()
\[\)
y/
6vo(is)

(. ()

[,]

6((!)

()
after

),

[t<r.

[,]
e

kpy(aTfi)

/
5.

ktti^i

")})

()()

n[e]

[()
was

c^6.

The

sign for

()

was inserted

written.

Lines 1-13
'

:

Account of

the transport of

hay transferred

to the threshing-floor of

Ophis

in

Pachon.

The 1 8th. 9 donkeys, 8 loads, making 72 trusses from 43 bundles, 24 cart-loads. Wages for 9 donkeys at 2 drachmae, 18 dr., likewise for 3 drivers at i dr. 5 obols, 5 dr. I ob., likewise for another driver 2 dr. 4 ob., for 2 more workmen binding trusses 3 dr. 3 ob.
Total 29
dr. i ob.

The
for 12

donkeys

workmen

Likewise 12 donkeys, 8 loads, making 96 trusses, 32 cart-loads. Wages 24 dr., likewise for 6 drivers at i dr. 5 ob., 10 dr. 2 ob., for 2 more binding trusses 3 dr. 3 ob. Total 37 dr. 5 ob.'
19th.
at 2 dr.,

the constancy of the figures with ) can hardly be anything but 8 thrice, 9 once, indicates that they represent the number of journeys to the SKas are and three performed in the day. These are equated to and reckoned as an Cf. P. Brit. Mus. 131. 585 sqq. where

{),

3.

{

.

();

,, ,&

1049.

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS
Oxyrhynchus ostracon

203
referred to in the

are found together, as here, 1166. 12-13, ^^'^ '^^

note on 935. 19.
5.

The drachmae are

throughout on the
:

silver standard,

seven obols being the equivalent

of a drachma.
7.

((6)
is

/jof8(a(fas)

cf.

P. Brit.

Mus.

24. It
suitable.

doubtful what followed fV(l
letter after
2.

).

^.^26 (pyhe(ovyaKa'!{^rtv>o'\ov).

expected to be given here, but neither

apyv{fiiov)

The
cf.
1.

may

well be

,

[{) (

The

total of the ayayia

would hardly be

nor

ay<a(-yi)i)

[()] (\

and perhaps some form or

derivative of

'
is

occurred;

1050.

Account for Games.
20-4

X i5'5cm.

Second or

third century.

A
games

fragment of an account of expenditure for the purposes of the public

at Oxyrhynchus. Cf. 51, part of an account of the same character, where several of the items that are found here recur, and 1025.

Aoy(pi)

NeiXm

5

{) '
^€

{)() {)() () 6{) {)
v.
[
[

Col.

i.

, , ,
.,

{5) 7«'['(') ())
[

({()

15

{)(]) >[!
.

[
[
.

[

^ {>)
BeWapeivo)
Pap.
5•

20

\\

[

UpoS\ov\ois

[

[

(^\vy{ii)

Col.

ii.

25

^{(

[)
[

2.

'"" Pap.

6, First

of

corr.

from

i'e.

21.

'ifpoB[

Pap.

204
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
to Nilus
. .

Account of 400 drachmae. To the priests 60 dr., dr., the master of the games dr., a herald grooms
.
. .

dr., Severus dr., boxers armed with the ball dr., a pair of pancratiasts dr., umpires Bellarinus Cophus the boxer dr., guards of the theatre dr., to dr., another pair of pancratiasts an dr dr., temple-slaves conjurer dr., flute-player dr., dr., sprinklers
.

dr.,
.

20 Horion
.
.

dr., for
. .

a chair 20
.
.

dr.,

dr.,

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

actor

.

.

,

dr.,

a

Homeric

reciter

.

.

.

dr.'

3.

Cf. 519. 10,
:

where 20

dr. are

paid

NeiX(ov).

10. BeXXapcii/o)

or possibly

/JeXXapfiViu,

from bellaria;

but bellarinus does not occur,

and the word would hardly be
15.
1 7.

in place in this context.

(not Goodsp. 30. iii. 26 vm B. G. U. 185. 10 /SediTijf, and Wessely's note in Siudten z.PalHogr. unfamiliar derivative of yyavov seems to have occurred here; 19. which would be expected, cannot be read.

[5 An
:

cf.

P. Tebt. 283. 8, 406. 26, P.

:

cf.

^,
ii.

.).

25.

1051.

Inventory of Property.
1

5-3

X

5-3

cm.

Third century.

A

list

of articles, chiefly of dress, belonging to a
;

woman whose name

is

given at the end

cf.

921,

where the vocabulary

is

very similar, and also 741,

P. Tebt. 405-6, P. Gen. 80, &c.
a,

[

XlIvovv

8>
5

,

\-

,

, ,

[•)({
[,

,

[\-

[]
10
[.

,]aiOv

[,]

6[ \[> ,
[,
.

/ '
,
klv,

Xtvd

, ,

,

()
]

e,

2

[

a.

.

yos XevKos a,

[\>6
4iVi/fi'

,

Pap.

12.

!/
.
.

{)!.
Pap.
:

1.

i)/iiXiTpt(o)f.

14.

1.

yu>'a()f(f)io[i'.

16.

1.

I

I

shawl, Dalmatian vest, i linen Dalmatian vest with vegetable-purple stripe, i double stripe, i with vegetable-pule stripe, i band with buckle, i linen tunic, half a pound of vegetablelinen shawl, worn, i shawl, i band with buckle, i cambric,
'

I

.

.

.

shirt with

.

1051.
shirt

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS
.

205
. .

napkin, a saucer and of false purple, i linen Dalmatian vest, i purple, i woman's The property of Cyrillous.' plate, 5 silvered napkins (?), i white blanket, i towel.

a new compound cf. 1. 1 3 cf. 1. II. \t \ i\\t ILdXm fibulaiorium. occurs also in P. Gen. 80. 3, e.g. 7. i. e., presumably, dyed with 15. pamv may be for but I']. It is doubtful how the letters should be divided, is puzzhng. At the end of the line above a there is no sign of the horizontal stroke which usually accompanies numerals in this list, but it may have disappeared with some of the fibres of the papyrus, or have been omitted, as was apparently the case in 1. 3. But is an Unexpected epithet. 1. Cf. 1. 1 7. 19. 20. The upper fibres of the papyrus are missing where this line would naturally have stood, but possibly this had happened before the list was written and there is nothing missing are below the lacuna caused by the detachment of the fibres, The letters before aayos. and their position cannot be accounted for by the mere slope of the line. But it is curious the word should have been begun at this point. that, if there is no loss,
3. 6.
:
;

>\\>\•.

.

:

.

,

:

?
:

22.

'/'

cf.

1026.

I4.

1062,

Account of Revenues.
27-7

X

•2

cm.

Fourth century.

A

list

of amounts, which are associated with various Oxyrhynchite villages,

of balsam valued in money, and of wool and
Several names occur

woad

()

estimated by weight.
therefore later

among
is

the villages which have not previously appeared in
written on the verso of 1057, and
is

the papyri.

The account
A. D. 362,

than the year

(9
SevfKeXev
5

{) ^[\ () {€) ,
p(vpiaSes)

(70()

Mep
epiov

,

.

s

{) [()] -, () (6!) , () () () , () (9) . () ()
() ,
\()
,

Bfl[0([cu]i'

.

2o6
l4ycu)

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

{) () 2€€
15

e,

(€€5
20

{) ^) , () , {) ^) , ^) {) ,

{)

,

{
)

{)

.

\^\€<
[S]ei'eKf\ev

(

KevT{r}vapia)

)
,
a

,

[].9
25
[.
.

['\(\\{<)

€{) () [)
() , {)
,
e,

,

.]
left

.

In the

margin, at right angles

Svpmv

('{)
.
1.

{)
occurs in

'AXe^ovTos

\(')\

{) .
20.

?{) ^
() \
() ,
COrr.

,

KepKevpmv

() , ({)
3•

.
7•

and the other vestiges suit cf 1. 12, where the abbreviation ; ) is more natural if the same name had just occurred. On the other hand there is no other instance in the list of the name of With regard to the the only a village being repeated under the same heading. instead of preceding them as would be objection is that these consistently follow the expected; cf. e.g. P. Brit. Mus. 1254, where the normal order is observed. But it is or even '(), may be read difficult to perceive what else can be meant, and in 1. 10 with a wavy flourish after it. in the other cases the word is written simply as 20. In the abbreviation of the is slurred, so that there sometimes appears
third letter of the
is

^]

.

» .
Not

|3/[)].

of

«

from
in

(»).

. G. .

953• 6 and

. G. U. 34• .

The

name

most probably a

(

,

,

{),

;

(>{)

to

be only
2
1

kit

:

the

which consists of
(?)

and a waved

1. The preceding abbreviation, 27 after flourish, is obscure. appears to be a village-name, the amount corresponding to which has

is

clearest in

\(.

not been

filled in.

1053.

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS

207

1053.

Account of Work on Dykes and of Expenditure.
24-4

X

27-8 cm.

Late sixth or early seventh century.

This papyrus was briefly and not quite accurately described in Part I, 191. Both recto and verso contain accounts connected more or less directly with the dykes. That on the recto refers to repairs carried out on an estate at Tarousebt (cf. 998), and is important as showing that the naubion, or as it is here called vaoviov, was at this period a cubic ^^, thus confirming our restoration of 669.' The Ptolemaic naubion is now known to have been a cube of two royal cubits (Comptes Rendus de Acad, des Inscr. 13 Juillet 1906), and since the contained three cubits it is clear that the naubion, at any rate in the later Roman and Byzantine Fifty such naubia are here valued at one solidus. periods, had gained in size.

The account on

the verso gives particulars of the expenditure of 227! solidi, which were received from a superintendent of dykes and disbursed for various Both these documents most probably belong to the papers of the purposes. Apion family (cf. P. Oxy. I. pp. 206 sqq.), with which several of the villages named on the verso are known to have been connected.

+

Aoyo^

{){)
]

]

Tof}

5

{) {) \()] {) {) () \{) {os)
^^()]
iv\{a)

3(ta)

(/)

[) {) L , (5)] () [) ' {) , <^)] {) {) [) , {ps) ^\() {5)] ,
y
els

() {)) ' {)[) {) [)
{?:)
e

('({5)

^{) // ^() {$!)
iv\{a)
ivX[a)
]

{
y
els

{5)
?)

'($•)•

-'

els

{) \,

eh

els

yi{veTat)

]

10

]

/

]

{) {) {) .{) >{) {) .
{) e
els
els vaovi{cC)

)
,

ptL•,

KeL,

y{iveTai)

6{)

'

adjective in

read /3ae(os) ?',

Dr. Kenyon informs me that P. Brit. Mus. 1785, of the Byzantine period, shows that the mutilated 4 is Ua^'\v. With 1053 recto cf. now P. Giessen 42 (ed. P. Meyer 1910), where in 1. 5 i. e. J

.

^\.

2o8
Verso

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

+
L

15

88{) ( (^{') 6{) () (') () (') [) {)
5()

20

^

25 Tois

()
30

{) ' {) {) , ^) ^) [) , () [) , (^) {) () 8' ^) () {) €() () {^) () (€) {) {) {) {()\ y {) (){ ) ( () {) {) () {)
{) ({)
{)
MeaKavovvems
Secpai

()•

,

,

{) {)
(Siv)

,

y^

y'

6{)

Tols

et'y

UjTip)

(()

[
.

^
.]

.

{) •)([)€{)

,

, ,
9j

?)

Sl.

()
)

tovt{ois)

k^L•,

y/

6{)

Toty

Tern

,

-,

.

[.]

.

[.]«[.

2.

«Z

in

1.

9,

Pap. 3• <" o^er an erasure. are over an erasure. 14. i Pap.
21. ef

8.
;

Pap.
II.

The

figures

and

p»Z,

and
of

so in

15, 21,

and

27.

19.

rewritten.

Pap.

22.

Pap.

23.

UpaKiavos Fa.p.

cf. e.g. B. G. U. 14. ii. 19 sqq., 295. 8, 11, P. Reinach 52 it's. Line 11 gives the valuation i solidus for 50 naubia. In 1. 8 the ratio would be identical if the total of the naubia were 5525 instead of 5528 the odd 3 naubia were thus

3.

{):
iv. p.
:

8.

ignored in the calculation.
12.
:

cf P. Brit. Mus. 1 246-8, where, as I had already pointed out should be read. analogous forms occur already in the Roman period, e.g. 121. 23, B. G.U. 261. 31 B.G.U. 38. 19 SO B. G. U. 326. i. 16 &C. the analogy of 1. 27 points to this reading, though the abbreviation is 20. rather differently written. Only one is mentioned in 1. 12, and the plural here is perhaps a slip.

(Archiv

^{) <({/)
() ',
557),

;

13.

[)

:

^!

';

,

are other possibilities.
28.
)

brought down just as e.g. in in used with many of the other abbreviations.

{!) .{
25.

1053.

For

6{()
Teas
:

seems

to be another
cf.

. G. U.

SO apparently rather than
1.

? { '
form of
;

ACCOUNTS AND LISTS
809. 10

/{),
;

;

cf.

^!) (^)

the Ptolemaic

-

209

26, but there

is

not only is the crossbar of the also a dot above, which is

(/)
1054.

ORDERS FOR PAYMENT.
Order for Delivery of Wine.

8•5 9-8
An

cm.

a.d. 263.

order for a payment of 65 keramia of wine. This papyrus was found with 1055, which is from the same person, but written in a different hand. For the date cf. introd. to 1055.

Trapa8o[s\

( . {)) my
.

O»'fx[.]
5

S

. ()

(V

'.

€{)
.

^

<

'

Pecyllus to Polydeuces, greeting.
jars

from the 10 1 Pauni 24.
4.

the remainder

Deliver to Theon, agent of Satyrus son of Onech ., of the wine in 65 jars. Farewell. The loth year,
.

Owx[.] f seems to be a proper name. 01/- might be for oiV (cf. 1065. 2 no likely word, and the spelling in the document is otherwise correct. third letter may well be instead of f, but is unknown.
.

but

this gives

^

),
The

;

2IO

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1055.

Order for Delivery of Wine.
9-3

X

12-2 cm.

A.D. 267.

Another order from Pecyllus (cf. 1054) for a delivery of wine. The document is on the verso of the papyrus, the recto containing the ends of 8 lines of an account of payments in artabae, preceded by parts of two lines of a letter
mentioning
of Gallienus.

-?

Septimius Severus.

and dated in the iSth year, probably of 1054 and 1055 therefore apparently belong to the reign

,^

JleKvWos

[/] (. []] [€][]

5

,
(eVoi/y)

, \\>-^
eis

€-

(),

(Soy

. {) (
Pap.

hand)

1st

hand

-•

.
6.

.

Pecyllus to Theon, greeting. Deliver to Heraclides, wine-merchant, 203 jars from the fourth vat, and 100 jars from the fifth, of which the price has been agreed upon at the rate of 1,100 drachmae for 10 1 jars and the cost goes to make up the five talents of Embetion. (Signed) Pay the 303 jars of wine. The 14th year, Pauni 17.'
'

cf.

has presumably dropped out after owing to the homoeoteleuton 8-9, and the figure pa in 1. 5, which suits 303 but not 300. 7. The signature is probably in the hand of 1054, which will then be the autograph of Pecyllus ; hence the absence of signature there.
3.
11.

86(

1066.

Order for Delivery of Aracus.
12-7

X

21 cm.

A.D. 360.

An
denarii,

order to deliver 40 artabae of aracus, which are valued at 72,000,000

and were

in

payment

for

500 pounds of meat.

The date

is

by the

eras

of Oxyrhynchus.

1056.

()
recoy

S{ia)

5

2nd hand
1st

hand

On

the verso
10
ely

3.

added above
'

(
«;

(erovy)

^

, ,??? ??,
{)
??
'(.

ORDERS FOR PAYMENT

}^ . ^
({•).
y^
1.

211

/ {5) [) ,

dvat

() {(?) ^.
4.

(eroir)

{(?)

?.
added above
tepovtKov is

abbreviated

,

?.
is

.

which

crossed through.
8.

tfpoiK.

^^.
'

S(ia)

^)
:

From Ptoleminus to Thonius, steward of Nigius, greeting. Measure out to my brother Dorotheus, who is about to collect payments on my account, hitherto paid (?) through Hieronicus, for the price of 500 pounds of meat, forty artabae of aracus, total 40 art. aracus, a single artaba being reckoned at one hundred and eighty myriads of denarii, making the order seven thousand two hundred myriads of denarii, total 7,200 myriads of denarii.' Endorsed on the verso There is one God Signature and date. aracus, Phaophi'.
SO P. Brit. Mus. 984. 5, &c., also of the fourth century. 4. oblique dashes against this line, and a single shorter one against 1. 5.
:

' ()

There are two

1057.

Order for Payment.
10-2

X

27-7 cm.

A. D.

362.

An

order for the

payment of 7,500,000
writing
is

denarii

which were owing to the

writer for a hide.

The

across the fibres of the papyrus.

The

verso

contains 1052.

?
(eVoi/y)

; ((?) (?)
1.

<-

M()^eip
2.

.

^? ?, ? () ? () ?
^aipeiv.

'&

(€?)
3•
'•

le.

{().

yj/v

{).

?

(Wilcken).

Pap.

^-'».

3

212
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Pay to Papnoutius, the assistant of the Papnoutis to his brother Dracon, greeting. from the money which you owe me for the price of a hide seven hundred and myriads of denarii of silver, total 750 myriads of denarii, and no more.' Date and

strategus,
fifty

signature.
2.

A mention of the strategus at
297 sqq., Gelzer, Leipziger
signature was

this late date is

noticeable

;

cf.

66, and Wilcken,

Hermes

xxvii. pp.
4.

The

more

hist. Abhandl. xiii. pp. 51-2. rapidly written than the body of the text, but does not

seem

to

be by a different hand.

(^)

PRAYERS.
Christian Prayer.
9-2

1058.

X

1

1-9

cm.

Fourth or

fifth

century.

A

short prayer, inscribed in large rude uncials.

words, written in different directions, apparently to try a pen.
6(eo)y

5

/77»'.

,.
So.

On

the verso are a few

[

.
'

Pap.

3•

"

added

in front of the line.

God

of the crosses that are laid upon us, help thy servant Apphouas.
is

phorical use of

.

1-2. 5f05

God

is

a curious phrase, though of course the meta>/ is aS old as the Gospels, e. g. Luke ix. 2 3 apparentl}• thought of as at once the sender and mitigator of trials.

/

Amen.'

'

1059.

Christian Prayer.
6-1

X

12-2 cm.
illiterate

Fifth century.

A

prayer written

in
is

a rude hand and in

Greek, across the fibres
first

of the papyrus.

This

on the verso

;

the recto contains the

four lines

1059.
of a
list

PRAYERS
e. g.

of
. . .
.

with their values,

\karihLov

{<) .
{()

[
,
"So.-

213

•(/7')]

e,

()
avTTJis),
5

? ?, €

,
cKiris.

,,
2.
1.

(

rots

Avvrja

(

, ,
.
.
t

.
4.
1.

/?
-e

KQi/'Pap.

].

eeKXaii

of

tois

above the

line.

3.

.'?

Cf. e. g. P. Brit.

Mus. 250.

24.

Lord my God and my hope, look on Thecla and her children, look on Anna and her servant, look on Apphous, look on Sakaon, look on Dionysius and his children, look on Helladius, look on Ptolemaeus, look on each one of them.'
'

2.

is

apparently for

Ps. xxxii. 18 oi

for the imperative form.
7.
'

'

' «
in

from
Toiis

^, '! .

is

familiar
all
'.

the phrase

severally

',

'

each and

^

'look upon' implying 'protect'; cf. e.g. But there seems to be no parallel

'

;

it

practically

means

loeo.

Gnostic Amulet.
9-2

X

6-3 cm.

Sixth century.

charm against reptiles and other ills. The first three lines are occupied by a formula showing the gradual diminution by cutting off letters which is frequent in texts of this class (cf. e.g. B. G. U. 956), then follows a mystical invocation of the familiar kind including the names (Jehovah) then the petition proper Free this house from every evil reptile and thing, and finally a reference to St. Phocas. Cf. 924 and P. Tebt. 275. quickly, quickly

A

^,

'

',

+

.

\

214

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
5

Seyoae

tou

{)

^ \. [\
'{,<)
1•

, (
o'lKOf

3. nji' 4.

in this line appear 5. be meaningless. 9. Since the amulet was designed to ward off reptiles this Phocas must evidently be the Syrian martyr who is mentioned by Gregory of Tours, hi Glor. Mart. 98, and whose tomb was the resort of persons suifering from snake-bites si in quempiam itt his locis
is

: '
Tiji»

3•

"
cf.

Pap.

4• """

Pap•

&.
:

.

iV5

Pap.

should be
p. Brit. suitable in a

V.

Mus. 121. 684-5, 658-60. the other ^vords charm against

to

:

coluber

morsum

slritigens vefietia diffuderii extcmplo
.

qui percussus

est

ut ianiiam atrii quo

But the date given in 1. 10 does not quite correspond with St. Phocas' day of celebration, which is Mar. 5 (cf. the Acta Sanctorum under this Phamenoth 1 3 corresponds to Mar. 9. day)
martyr
;

qiiiescit attigerit

.

.

salvatur.

(//)

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE.
1061.

Letter of Diogenes.
29 X

6•4 cm.

B. c.

22.

A

letter

asking for assistance with regard to the measurement of certain

unirrigated land and the

early type, and the 8th year in

Augustus than of Tiberius.
idtoy€i'[7j]i

yaitpHv)

'

payment of the dues upon it. 1. 26 is more likely

The hand

is

of a quite

to refer to the reign of

3)

vyiaiveiv.

-

1061.

8(
5

>
€0)$• €0)5•

cvvTvyjiL

^
(]'
kav

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
'iayov

215

Atoyivei

. 1\\\
15

()

kv rais

[6)

, ']
€[.

'[] , ,

{) - ^)
yap

[)
-

(({)
Sea

(.{)

irepi
e'cos

2

,. .' ,
,'

\

25

{)
the verso
of second km from 1.
'

. -.
hyi\a{i.vr\if\^
u.

'

-

'4{}.

() [1

.

On

^
corr.

^^) [9) (:).
ii. a of
corr.

3•

from

from

8,

22.

of

corr.

Diogenes to his brother Dionysius, many greetings and wishes for good health. I have written to you at other times and you have not brought about an agreement between us, and also to your brother Apollonius, I have now been obliged to urge Ptolemaeus the younger, son of Ptolemaeus, to meet Dius and Diogenes son of Demetrius until the unwatered land in the seven arourae and the government dues on it be measured through Dionysius and the remainder paid over to Ptolemaeus. I therefore beg that you will interview Ptolemaeus, both you and your brother Apollonius, until you effect this for
Since

2i6
me,

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

for you ave superior to Ptolemaeus in experience, and if it is necessary to meet the other Ptolemaeus, the elder brother of Ptolemaeus, about this, that he may meet him and do If then it please you to reply to me about this and about the his best until it is effected. other subjects which I asked }OU about by letter I shall be obliged to you ; and do you write I have written also to to me about anything that you wish and I will most gladly do it. whom you will meet. Salute all your houseDius, the son of the agent, about this Take care of your health. hold ; Athenarous and the rest of the children salute you.
;

(Addressed) To Dionysius also called Good-bye. The 8th year of Augustus, Epeiph Amoi's, son of Ptolemaeus and brother of Apollonius the comogrammateus of Tholthis, who is staying near Theon son of Ischyrion.'
.

.

3.

in the imperfect
16.

/]
:

and

The

third

would be the normal form, but since the single augment is used an analogous form of the perfect causes little difliculty. person was employed perhaps because the writer was thinking primarily
aorist

of Apollonius.

1062.

Letter of Marcus.
27•!

X

13-2 cm.

Second century.

A

letter referring to the

purchase of some fleeces which the writer was

expecting 4iis correspondent to procure on his behalf.

Marpeat
yaipeiv.

vepi tS>v iroKCuv

\

7€[]//€
,
[] [|]•€^6[]
kiTive[y/j.01

5

15

,' ' , , / () . !, ,
Si

['][
[.
-

....[.].

Toy Se ovSiirore

[]

[..]...-

<Se

et

1062.
Tovs

,[
]

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

'[.

6\

.
.
1.
.

217

]

20

On

the verso

4•

Second

of

COIT. flOIll

.

TrpoaieVTor.

1

6.

. ^
;

Pap.

Marcus to his dearest Matreas, greeting. About the fleeces, since you offered to buy some good ones, adding that the summer ones were the best, I bade you buy them whenever they were good, and I wrote to you that they had not brought any to me up to Mesore, and you afterwards wrote and said you had bought some and sold them again, and you wrote me a letter, and I was never ; 1 will send you the very letter by Syrus in order that you may read it in a sober mood and be self-condemned. If it is troublesome and you have not yet bought them, give the money to my fiiend Zoi'lus if however you have bought them, deliver them to him under seal, in order that they may be conveyed to me. Good-bye.' Date, and address on the verso.
' .

.

.

.

.

9.

sale; but

13. uvayvois

['^ []
[]
:

would be a possible reading, would be expected.
form of the subjunctive
is

[rjcui

[\
.

referring to the

this

common

in the

1063.

Letter to Amois.
19-6

X

12-2

cm.

Second or

third century.

The writer of this letter, who does not give his own name, commissions his son to deliver a message to Herodes, the son of a gymnasiarch, with regard to an appointment to the office of pohos. Herodes himself seems to have held
no
official

position,

concerned in the matter.

, ).
€|
eroi

and

it

was presumably as

his

father's son that

he was

ore
5
ei'y

-

2x8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
av
rfj

els

^

[]

[6\.
2nd hand

,,

'
(-

AeovTos []'''[]

1

5

[] []).
6[
!

. .

'

^.
. .

On

the verso

.

.]

.
'

/
. :
.

[.]

[.]

Pap.

Apion the gymnasiarch, say to him " the other day I gave you three names for the ofBce of archephodus, and the next day when I asked you what you had done you said I have not given in any of them for the oflBce but the man who told you of them, that is, Antas son of Dionysius.' So keep this name Harsas son of Leon son of Leon, his mother being Tabonphis ". I pray for your health. When you have read the letter do not give .' it to Herodes. (Addressed) Deliver to Amoi's
Creeling,

my

son Amoi's

Go and

see Herodes, the son of

in

my name and

'

.

4.

;
but

is

the imperative of eha.

That

is

not to be taken

literally is

shown

by

1.

6.

II.

The

writer apparently wished the
is

name

of Harsas to be substituted for that of

Antas

;

rather ambiguous.

1064.

Letter to Didym.\s.
24-5x9 cm.
Third century.
therefore later than A. D. 318-9,

This letter is on the verso of 1046, and is though probably not later by very many years. The writer requests the good ofhces of his correspondent on behalf of a local revenue-collector.

•. ^
npos

1064

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
nepl
5

219

"^ ,
eiScos
ottcos

kv

Trj

.

Se

],

. .
1.

6

added above the

line.

Diogenes to you and he said "
'

may

assist Apis,

so that on his

Didymas, greeting. I went to Achillas and inquired about ". So knowing your goodness I write to you that you Takona, and may show him hospitality, Good-bye.' return he may bear witness of it to me.
his brother
is

He

at

Psobthis

who

is

collecting the revenues of

3-5.
10.

(€:
:

.

.

.

:

this village

a mixed construction of a common type. must have been in the vicinity of Psobthis.

1065.

Letter of Hephaestion.
9x9-5 cm.
Third century.
of a

The

following

short letter

is

written on the verso
strategus
(1.

fragment from
bi

a petition, addressed probably to the

^[()

4

and complaining of injury by a brother

in

-

L•

connexion

with a division of land at Kerkethuris.

', '
vnepeiy

5

},

. ((
[]/
€-

220

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

^]
2.

/[]

ovtcos

0'[]/.

[€/].
Pap.
3•

'^^^^!

Pap.

Stephanus from Hephaestion. On receipt of the letter from my son Theon put off everything and come at once to me at the village because of what has happened to me. If you neglect this, as the gods have not spared me so will I not spare the gods. Good-bye.'
'

owe (
1

These three passages illustrate the tendency in the popular religion to regard the relationship between gods and men as one neglected their duty and afflicted their devotees, the If the gods of strict reciprocity. sufferers retaliated by turning their backs on the gods.
el

,
A

7-8. Cf. the letter published by Vitelli in Aletie Sfovs (cf. 528. lo) [£]£
to Wilcken,

e

Roma,

who

further quotes an unpublished

.

Bremen papyrus,

,'
vii. p.

124,

11.

a reference
8e

11-13 ovr\f which On oi

1066.

Letter of Nemesianus.
26-8

XII cm.

Third century.
size

letter

concerning a

and other

articles

file, which was to be procured of a certain which the correspondents were forwarding to each other.

5

(\[] ][] ? , -. & [][] ( . (, .'
JV[e]/i[eir]£ai'o?

[^

€7[]'7;

XenroTepav.

(-

[]

(-

)?.

'

1066.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
[]

15

, []
Se

,
eiVa

(

tipos

-

20

'\ [^]), ]
[
[,
)

e^e-

[

]. 7]
],

21.

8

Pap.

Nemesianus to his brother Sarapammon, many greetings. You did well to send me So I send it to you by Apollon with but you sent me one which is too fine. You write to me in the letter " I send you the pattern in order that you may go by that. a boy's linen cloth ", and I have received nothing. Apollon told me, " He gave me nothing.' and if you want anything reply to me by the said I send you the tripod by Apollon Apollon, so that I may send it you, and do your best to get me the file, and send it by and indicate Apollon and look for a file which files not only wood but iron tools
'

the

file,

;

I

pray for your lasting
7.

a rather early instance of the sigmatic form which is occasionally in Hesychius, j. v. -npoi^tvos. found in writers of the decadence, e. g. of 19-20. The supplements adopted are in the main due to Wilcken. is and may well be an i. At represented by a vertical stroke which is somewhat tall for a or and the doubtful a at the beginning of the end of 1. 20 t'^c- is perhaps 8e KaXcSJs. 1.21 could be , e. g.
12.
f
:

{ ^
;

.

.

.

.

.

.

health.'

= exemplarium.
this is

/]«

(|[/

(^(

(,

1067.

Letter of Helene.
22-3

X

6'7 cm.

Third century.

A

very ungrammatical letter from a wfoman reproaching her brother for

neglecting another brother's funeral, and giving
father, in a postscript, asks for a present of fish.

him sundry commissions.

Their

' . '
Oew
5

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

20

,

€1

Sev
15

(
1.

-? .' . ( , ,
.( ,
yivov
eiwe
irepl

,'
olSes


{).
[-

25

-

[
,
.

30

[.

,

[.]
4•
1•

.

[

1.

;

.
.
'
'

UfTcxavn.

6(!.
;

7•

.
15-161.

8(!.

2-1

3.

(. [
Pap.
20.

.

added

above the line.

Helene to her brother Petechon, greeting. You did not do well not to come on you have allowed his burial to be neglected. Know then that account of your brother Go to Theon and tell him about his cellar, that a strange woman is made his heir. it has been sealed up although he owes nothing ; and say to Petechon the son of If you Polydeuces, " Come if 3OU are coming, for Dioscorus is labouring on 3OU behalf. know that you are not coming, send me your brother Castor." I pray for your health.' Buy me a little fish from I also, your father Alexander, send you many salutations.
the sea
5.

and send
:

so 1. 20 olbes, 903. 30 bi&mKCS, &C. There is no change of hand, and it is employed an amanuensis. 30. Perhaps [];£'[>'].
25.

^

it

by a man

.'
.
.

likely that

both Helene and her father

1068.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

223

1068.

Letter of Satornilus.
24-1

X

9-9 cm.

Third century.

Satornilus, the writer of this letter, was engaged with some assistants in the conveyance of a corpse from the Arsinoite nome to Alexandria. Delays occurring in the Arsinoite nome, his companions had temporarily gone away, probably back to the Oxyrhynchite nome, and Satornilus now asks his correspondent to give them any assistance they needed.

SaTopi

/

5

fl'ya

^avSpiav,

/€
10
Sis

^^.
kv
e'iva

8( - ()Sv-

' .
'
{)-

(')((
evpoy

Tj]

1,5

eis

.

,?
kv

' 8€ Apaevoei-

-

'.

eSo^ev

avayKias

,

yeviaOai

^€

20

€,

ei

,,-,

«»y

!.
avTOis

Kvpe

etva

-

,

224
25

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
8h
i'iva

avToh

TLv

€!

II.

1.

' . ,. .? . .
xpouois.

( ?
1.

.

686i',
1•

On

the verso

30

(6'. flK
o( Pap.
;
'

.

.

;

SO in
7•

30•

3•

SO in

1,

12.
f

6.

I.

or
COrr.

g.

ei/ey

Kavres Pa.p.

of
\.

coir,

corr.

from . from a.

l6.

arayVfoi Pap.

1.

20.

of

22.

corr.

from

.

23.

1•

-.
;

added above the II. 24-5 are

!. .
fXa/Sai/

from
1.

.

I'J.

line

;

blotted.

my lord Apollonius, greeting. Finding no boat available in the Arsinoi'te wrote to my lord Clematius the chief priest that he might send me a boat and so and he sent me a skiff of sixty I might be able to carry the body down to Alexandria The brethren who brought it received letters also from Clematius to the artabae burden. So on going up to intent that no one in the neighbourhood should trouble them (?). the Ai-sinoi'te nome they found the body not yet ready to be buried, and I have a delay of some days. They therefore determined on account of a pressing need to go to Toou. So I urge you, my lord, to supply them with the marks of your good will, that on their return they may testify of it to me, and with anything else they may need from you I beg for Simias' sake (for you sent for the ass and they kept it), until I come to you.
Satornilus to
I

nome

you
road,

then,

and so

health.
13.
I'J.

them a letter in order that no one may trouble them on the I pray for your lasting be able to bury the body and come to you. (Addressed) Deliver to Apollonius from Satornilus.'

my

lord, to give

I

may

/ :

is

for

:

SO P. Tebt. 423. 12
in

(.

this

name occurs

Hermopolite papyri, e.g. B. G. U. 892.
of the dead man.
is

8,

P. Leipzig

99• 1921.

apparently the 23. Wilcken suggests that
:

name

for

{}).

9.
A

Letter of Troilus.
2 6•6

X

12 cm.

Third century.

which was to be letter from a man made for him. The writer was a man of some means, but this letter, which is in for pbs a large uncultivated hand, is in the vulgarest of Greek the form
to his sister, concerning chiefly a tunic
;

ai,

and the use of

for

are especially noticeable.

1069.

KaXcos

/! / . []
Trj

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

225

8\\

^aipeiy.

5

>
tav

(^^
{}!

\evfv-

e[t]va

I[ea>/]]

HpaKXeiSfj

)!
10

€(.


15

^
eav

20

25

(€

,! , .eiSov

. .
eiSeve

.

()^

eiSov

e'i[y]a

[]

-

>

ttZs

anovSaSeis

5e

[] []-

els

.

[]

\

)

-((

€<(

,

[-

. )
(^€('
5e

(Ttvas

. ()
Q

,

€ (().

226
In the
left

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
margin, at right angles
35 iiSov
rrj

On

')'
The
.

Sfj

(8•)(^)

.

the verso

7(/)

.
Pap.
bimvaiv.

1.

1 6. . Pap.; so in
\.

\\.
1.

'. .
1.

Pap.

;

so in
3.

elhivai

(().
'

22.

\.

28.

\.

^,. . . . ^. ^. . .
1.

36.

first
.

stroke of
II.

1.

.

5•

.

.

.

1.

]. . -.
in
is
!.

twice written.
6.
1.

.
1.

2.

g.
. .

13.

Kflrni

1

8.

1.

ig.
\.

1.

23•

2.

Pap. 20. . yepeaSai.
^6.
].

' .
1.

yep-

.

3•

1•

S'fi^ifii'•

fi.

^2.

\.

.

2'J.

You will do well to have my white tunic made Troi'lus to his sister Maz, greeting. I have written to Heraclides quickly in order that I may find it made if I come to you. also so that you may receive my tools (?) and the wages of the weavers ; and I wish to know how you are hurrying on the making of it. The purple is put with the tools. Be careful to send the letter to Thermouthion at Alexandria, for we may be able to load two camels with wheat for you and to send them to you. ]\Iake my slave-girl be properly industrious; and if Tamoun bear a child make her be assiduous with it. Be careful to have my tunic made properly, and let them put good measure into it, and be large-handed in the Buy a donkey for Nicetes in order that he may be able to accomplish your colouring. I pray for your health. I salute Heras. business; and reply to me if you want anything. (Addressed) From I have written to Heraclides to give Tamoun 3,000 drachmae. P.S.
Troi'lus to his sister

Maz.
1.

6.

aev: cf

18,

and
latter

(=

in mediaeval

Greek; the

period as the papyrus.

The

occurs e.g. in C. dropping of final

5)
=
1.

in

II.

19 and 25.

aev ande/uf" are

common

I.

e.g. P. Strassb. 4. 18. Mayser, Grammatik, pp. 205-7, and for aviiepya seem to be implements to be used in the weaving of the 8. waiSeurtitu Du Cange quotes a similar use from Damascenus Studita, Homil. 25
avvfpya^
9-

.
V is

« -,
on
1.

if right, is

\^.
may be

,

G. 3440, which is of about the same is common from an early period ; cf

for yepSimi'dJc (cf

10

not very satisfactory and

Cf. note

so e.g. p. Amh. 144 iav €\\\. is equivalent to 16. /loi For the converse use of the future indicative for the subjunctive cf. e.g. 1068. 19 seems to be the verb intended, but I can At the end of the line find no other instance of it. 21-3. This may be no more than a warning against any neglect perhaps however, as Wilcken suggests, the meaning is that the child was not to be exposed (cf e.g. 744. 10). the feminine would confirm ycpCevcov in 1. 9 and the meaning 27. If /xfyaXe is for = sc. otherwise must be generous ', unstinting
'
'

&(
27.
is

a

,

and a

,
letter

.
and

.

.

.

1.

32

xp'/Seis)

;

but the supposed

may be

lost

between

&(:

(\
this

.

;

'

28.

a

[Se is lost at

doubtless for the end of the hne.

!;

;

^^

cf the adjective

, ,

(.
e. g.

1051.

3.

Perhaps

1070.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

227

1070.

Letter of Aurelius Demareus.
22-1

X

12 cm.

Third century.

This
dria

is

a verbose and rather pompous epistle sent apparently from Alexanto his wife

by a husband

whom

he addresses as his

sister.

The

writer

expresses

much

solicitude for his

home and

reproaches his wife

in

an ironical

strain for neglecting to write to him.

-}} /
5

^.
Oeois

^[]

\\)

(

'

nepi re

rfjs

15

2

nepl

, '[] ' € ( ,€ ^[ [\ ([] [\ ( [] ,
[]
[]'
kv

6[5 ]€]

)
[-

-T^fj

'

-

.

ev

^'^-

[]

{\

6[]-

[].
Q
2

'-

25

',

//€

228

.
kv
TTJ

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Sia

...[.]..

h
]

[.]
.

oiKias

30

)
ya/^IT•

[ ']) (
[.]
(
[]6 €

[

[] . -'
[]} ^
nepl

Sei-

35

•]1/3

ev

40 kav In the

left

margin, at right angles

Ti
oi[o]s

,

nepl

, .
.
. . .

« >]
nepl

(.
.

^6[]/3

{}\

e'yerero.

[.

.

[
(..

On
45

the verso
kv

6((
50

. ,(
^\

'

[]

[]

[] .
(

,

,

[]€/[)

'
', ()'

[

.]
-

-

€-

1070.
55

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

?
[]€'

oXas

[]
.
20.
I.

6()
.
of

intended
18.

37—8.
'

-/ (hi

.
Pap.
.
.

corn from

.

Pap.

,( ] . . .
{)
An
fif
1.

229

((^6(.

15.

f is

added above
2^.

of

fim,

i.

e.

the writer perhaps
16.

\&\>.
45.

inserted above the line.
47.

corr.
1.

from

f.

36.

1.

/.

Pap.

Aurelius Demareus to his sister Aurelia Arsinoe, greeting. The prayer which previously made to all the gods for the preservation of yourself and our child and your brother and father and mother and all our friends now goes up to them with far
I

.

greater force in the great Serapeum, and I beseech the great god Serapis for your life and that of all our friends and for the good hopes that are held by mankind. I think it superfluous to vrite to you about our business and affairs concerning which I have written to you often before in many letters and have equally given you instructions in person ; for

you yourself as the mother of our child will be more eager than I am that those affairs should be studied and advanced with unsurpassed sollicitude. But before all study the care and regard of yourself, as I have often written to you about this also, sparing nothing that we have. I send you by Dion\ sius, who either in or in the the neighbour of the house of ApoUonius, six cotylae of Siretic (?) oil in a half-chous jar, and one basket full of sweetmeats. Two petitions which were presented by Xenophas from ApoUonius son of Scopas and his son-in-law Stephanus, who is at the city, against you father and mother of these too I send copies in the bundle of letters. If therefore you meet and come to any conclusion about them let me know quickly, and anything that I thought I could do, being here, I will not neglect (?). Nothing has happened up to now about our affairs. I pray for your health. Do not at present send me any supplies until I let you know or write to you about this. Greet and salute all our friends severally. I thank you very much for this that, although I have often written to you, you have not written at all nor remembered me in regard to the safety of our house, as I often by notes and letters and when with you in person enjoined on you to do. Do not neglect this, lest indeed you choose to hand over the keeping of the whole house to Herais, who is unworthy, along with yourself, and, what heaven forbid, we find ourselves at sixes and sevens. The slave of Ptolemaeus, the brother of Hermogenes, has been journeying to Alexandria and has often come to me, but you have not been willing to give him letters and have not sent him to me at all, but Eudaemon parted with him saying " At present we are not at leisure and are visiting others." (Addressed) Deliver to my sister Arsinoe from Demareus.'
. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

8. Toi/ /ic'yav may belong to both verbs. In any case a conjunction is wanted. cf. 529. 4 ''• The adjective 29—31. •))[]>' apparently indicates the place of manufacture. 41-2. If the decipherment is correct the construction has become very much confused. It seems difficult to avoid ia[v] would be possible instead of a, but these give no or suitable word. The vestiges appear irreconcilable with e'v[«], so that on ().[] is excluded. In 1. 43 there would be room for two letters between oi[ and ]s oi[o]t is not at
. .

"
,

18

:

2(
.

;

.

.

[]

:

,

230
all

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

can perhaps be connecied with but more probably this likely, where would be expected, or we may write a case of the use oi is only partially preserved and was possibly deleted. 43• The superfluous if the letters are rightly so interpreted, seems to be a phrase 52. f'l meaning out of harmony,' one person doing one thing and another another. 'AXciavSpoi/ cannot be read, nor, if it could, would it give a satisfactory sense.
is

(')
'

,

,

() .

1071.

Letter of Pambechis.
15-6

X

31-6 cm.

Fifth century.

Letter to a captain

(1.

10) requesting

him
is

to give orders concerning the dis-

posal of 100 artabae of corn.

The

writing

across the fibres of the papyrus.

+

^

(( () , .
/ceXeveis

>
Tots

5

, , ,
kav

-

,
((

$
On
10
-\-

•' ^ .


[]1
ray
.

(
eh

the verso

{)

, .?
7f[apa)
[

6
4.
1.

5.

of

8(

of ev(Kev incompletely formed, 3of rewritten. Pap. ; so in 1. 6. /os Pap.; so in 1. 6. 1. written as a monogram, through the tail of

!. .

.
1.

6

aWos Pap.

.

.

.

.

vairais.

10.

1071.
'

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

231

in person by me and by my lord the most distinguished Cyrus, on account of the hundred artabae of corn from the old produce, vouchsafe to perform this favour and write to your sailors what they ought to do. If you order them to make the bread here and send it to the village of Ibion, write to them or if you order them to send the corn to Ibion, again write to them. For Anoup has already taken his fifty, and the other man his fifty. Vouchsafe then to write to them by the letter-carrier what they ought to do, sir. (Addressed) Deliver to my lord and brother Askalas, captain, from Pambechis

As you were urged

advocate,

;

.'

.

.

I.

7

:

cf.

941.
is

I,

note.

3.
cf.

best regarded as a proper
I,

name

since
xiii.

precedes in
p. 34.

1.

2.

For the

902.

note, Gelzer, Leipziger hist. Abhandl.
is

4.

a parataxis like

(\(•.

1072.

Letter of Philoxenus.
2

9'9

X

5-3 cm.

Fifth or sixth century.

A
was
in

short letter, written in a very narrow column, relating to a

pond which

process of construction.

.
^€$•
8€\6€
2-3.
1.

«1/

Upiav,
1

5

5

nepi

20

ih

.
'^ Pap.

.
Martyrius, elder.

'[).
14.

'

Philoxenus to

Apa

to the

new pond which

is

about to take an oath Good-bye.'

my letter hasten to give heed being made by the help of God in the priests' estate, for I am of them as to the expense, what they have spent upon it.

On

receipt of this

on the analogy it will be better to vrite 19. oTi Ti: 937. 22, as was preferred by Wilcken, Archiv v. p. 272.

than

-t

in

.

INDICES
I.

NEW LITERARY

TEXTS.

(a)

1011

(Callimachus, Aeiia and Iambi).

ayauos 84,

1

9 7.

'.\8 51

avoKpivfiv

323•

ayanav 3 20. .Vii/ 103. aywuv 251. ayKOiv 114. ayka . 389.
. .

ayveieiv

43 1,

! |0
aXe'yeiZ'

26, 30, 4°' 44•

92, 211, 3^8.

«"

.
1•

231, 33°. 264. 242.

4(?)•

88, 375. 44 201. 82.

ayraf 235. ayvos Fr. 2 recto 3. aypias 1 3.

dXyeiv 278, 290.

(
^

Sypios 297•

254•

&
dXiT/)os

6.

€€ /
128,

238.
68,

271.
35•

65.
1

45
13•

niaig.

1

/ (/'
lii/e'pXfa^ai

'AvSpoviKos 171•

68.

aif(f.

(\
aei^<i)Of

See

oeiSiif.

'AXk/xcW 139•
28,

aetSftv 5, 94,

229, 253. 173,

3°)

8,

39
29,
yhp

381, 437• 265.
257.
36• 69.

«/ 43,

223, 244,
78.

312,

240, 252, 255. 257. 351. 368.
92.

«W
ai€t

27,

295) 4^7•
62,

60.

285. aivos 211.
aiVilw

^
«'
=

46.

' 7
1

! (
85,
ai/ty^(5ff

!
45•
2 4,

103,

66,

Pap.) 39• 245. 264•

95. 107. '24, 140. 203, 235, 425•

14.

296.
32

88.

32 2.
32

392•

(iotSos

m|

13.

97.
12, 153•
alpetv 20.

' ^ !
1

335. 349•
19.

146 marg.

35"• 429•

!

24.
165•

257•

34-

95•
57. 98, 23

309•

»

121. 102.
I

7•

36.

»

!

'Afiu/cXatof 24.

.
3•

!.

aTTOKTetVe/i'

302.

33; 264, 289.

90.
8.

48, 200, 380. 272.
1

... 72.
aiOyKa^cif

43• 88.

3. py(la 198.
OTroTri'tyeii'

'

232, 267, verso 3.
158.

97. 174. 224 marg., 4°9j F""• II
13.

,

234

( (
3

INDICES
(?).

'!

45, 356 293• apyvpoi 30•

/
r

2 00.

((
Sij

6,
48,

274•

1

33) 195• 8, 2 2, 50.

24533•
2 1 8.

(!
2

"/' 4, 23, 30, 51, 78, 9^, 112, ii4niarg., 104, 156, 206, 213, 222, 235,

,

^ !

6, 17351, 129, 211, 299, 357•
279•
26,

66, 28.
66.

2 47• 255• 103.
(1•

),
6.

236, 252, 254, 268, 275, 279, 293, 300, 317, 319, 369, Fr. 5 recto 2. 2 1 8, 35°•
5, 32, 79. yfiTovnv 300.

268.

"! «'

,( ! ! ! ! ^
2'J.

200,318,413.

^; ^,

2 2.

54. 263, 351. 433•

ytXais 155.
yeveiov

?
/

132, 133, 193. 382. 12 2.

263.
62.

1

aafXyaipeiv 202.

ytfor 164.

69.

yipmv 66, 122, 249.

4^•

20.

'
yi?

((,€ 105.

43 1.

5 227.
((<5

41

123 niarg.

57• Fr. II verso 2.

123.

'J^.

102, 107, 229, 232, 295• 233, 378.
9, 1 44.

44, 3^8. 15.

423• 241.
2'J']•

42 2.

'

32, 38> 72, 89. Pap.), 42• 3 3^1
75>

1 8.

(
2
1
.

,)

64.

?

1 1.

136, 43°•

123, 125•

3242 1 8 marg.
1
.

/^
•yi;i„7

;^^

141. 179, 238, 250, 268, 328. 240.
15,

°4>

(,
67-

02.

26

23.
353•
2 19•

256.

yu/ji/afcij,

147•

6/3 384•
^yx"" 355•
28, 8y, 133, 220, 221, 228, 230, 235, 244, 245, 248, 253) 256, 279, 302. 408. 53, 65, 299•

391-

4°1•
128.
2

!
/
/3[

74•

224, ^33'

57•

03•
38, 3^9• 140.
2 2.

;
Sl'tv

'

2.
400
(.'),

212,

222, 223,

220,
274,

1

26,

205-7) 269, 276, 282, 288, 297-

€\(1
"'

34• 28.

350,

43•
234, 332•

SfieXlvos 12,

elSevai

Bins 138.
1 15,

180. SeXrof 66.

28
etVeii'

marg.

44 1•
144•
26,

197, 298, 37°•

6 1.
85• Fr.

verso 3• Fr. II redo

231, 255. g8, VJ2. hcvhpov 214, 293•
3•

(
€|
1

20.

elXe'w
f'rai

48,

49.

79,

105,

:

BovnoKeios 95•
II, 93•
Bptiyp^os

.( . 8(
93•

224.

(

(), (
68.

174 {), 200, 203, 235, 236, 293, 324, 377, 409 412.
127, 172, 194, 227) 289, 298. 265, 299•

1 1

ciVilv 74, 84,

112.

325-

30 1

/.

NEW LITERARY
cVifii;/Lioy

TEXTS.
^""
9. 27
(f'ie>i>"")'

235 °7.

ftre

351.

26.

'

«

50, 93. 252, 392exaoTos 141, 330.

i-jTievai

89.
48.

gg.

eV/SaXXfii'

395•

€'€ 411
eKiWfv
(Kflvos

(?).

1 7 I

^, €€^
185.
Cf.

(=
gg
46.

.) 8.
niarg.

44,

130.
99.

Kc'ilfOS,

^
eiror

(
7
'5

112, 128, 105, 169, 392,

403•
141, 295•

239•
Zfus 36, 61

(((), 79

('^'/""'

82
270.
2

marg.
26.

1

fKKOWTfiv 163.

(^

21, 39>
17, 133-

140

(.?),

1S7,

202,

221,

246 (?

Tf

.).

(
c'XatJy
e/io'i
ej»

fKnXf'iv

145.

12 6. epSy 114 marg., 224 niarg.
epyoi/
fperi/

227, 228, 237, 249, 251, 254. 255, 29°, 399, 40•
8,

fKirXcKeti/

352. 102.

(or

e'/j-yurijs)

405.

140, 325.
38.

V
fi

=

'
,

3•

3^•

€\[
2 21.

212, 224, 233, 262, 266, 271, 276, 280, 283, 331• 234.

120.
78, 109,

epevyetp 7*
f'piffii/

26(?).

262. 163•

(. 92,
66.

3•

146,

94•

ipvKetv

363.
87.

eXXeiViic 69.

23, 48, 81, 131, Fr. 15 recto 2.

242,

€/)
e'f

12 7•
10, 24, 37, 64, 122, 194, 211, 222, 243, 254, 255, 258, 263. eW 55. ivaifiv 191. fvaieaSai 345» 349•
evfKa 6.

(
75.

|
ig,

3•
42.

13, 20, 41, 77, 204, 228, 231, 248, 269, 321. 270.

?(

41 (.?). 271, 4°8.
42.

! !
1

29•
'J'J.

94•

.

202.
174. 248, 383•

€((
ffl^ei/

l8o.
76. 22.

Cf.

III.
evticXai'

.

fVioi/ 9•

ETtpor 128,

35

I^S-

".
4•

"

28, 139, 307•

(!
evos
fvTiXijs

6o. 21.

( ( 4((
|.[
130.

407• 317•
66.

184.

136.

i^tvtntiv 7.

^6( 43•
'J.

124.

(

fnftra II

232.

34 6)
88,

114! 228, 250, 284.

6,

187,

( ! ; • ( (
7

( ! ( ( {
? 5•
.

76.

87•
72.
1

.

.

50•

.
73•

42.

1

121,

26,

202, 267.

iipir 372•

3^0•
1

/ !
fl/j/l

\05

,

1

68.
(?)•

134
36•

283.
64•

dea 6, 380•
ifos 38, 42, 49, 65. 108, 198, 268, 346. Fr. II 203,

recto 4.
2 4.

273•
1

24•

49•

381.

110, 431•
24zg. 98.

334. 348.
3
1

(fViW.) 108.
1 7

5

5//

5.

289, 35°•

.

.

236
32
1.

INDICES
KOpveiV
2 2 1.

' '

91, 94•

« ^
.

7

234•
7

^
Kplveiv
/os

62.

353•

269.

laveiv 2.

6,

75•

' "
Upas

! '
[

! €(
ig.
KTeivetv

444• 428. 160.
2 26,

34•
47•

lb€h 6.

4•
22 2.
^3•
'P°'s

164. Kapuat 59*
23•

;;

379"
1 9.

59•
126.
55•
KVKro; 243• Kimeipos 26 1.

445•

6, 14, 33•

61,

94
Kf

232, 236. Fr. 15 recto
34•

45• 5°,

3•

KfiTOS

^^fpos 53•

'
tvif

6386, 4°2, 447• g2. 112.
y.

" £
KeW
KrjSeiv

85,

319•

Cf.

!

187.

eKctzOs.

32, 53, 74.

/6/

4,

44•
12 2.
56.

250, 276, 4(•')• KeXamri/i 47•

8,

KfXeveiv 2.

KCKOS 166.

' !
;^€^

Kcpas 321.

^
\tyeiv

278, 403• 1 6 1,
2 77•

259• 278.

4•
2.

Kepmvwi 64.
KepSos 316.
4,

52,

46-

63.
23.

86.

352• 170.
Fr.
1

225.
1

362.
4
1

119,

1 5 verso 4• 161, 213, 293,

09

(.')

... 58.

259•

.
213,

2

8.
yiip

104,

2 2 2.

^^
263.

133' 228. "7" 3°7•

«"
253• 165. 273•

40

(?).

2 39•

286.

KaUiv 237• 8, 12, 298, 4^4•

/
90,
77•

42.

- &! ! ^
,
156,

$(
3^^•

'
/;

367 (?)
1 6.

53• KXiffiv 25.

112.

250, 284.

2 20.

\5
?
Kore
KOTTTCtl'

33^• 32.
93•

^ \ ; /
>
'5, 39•

295, 377• AeXeyes 62.

28,
183.

248.

33 (0•

28.
37-

!)!/ 294•

235•

"""

273

(•

238, 246. 236.

€/

/ (( ;
328.
272.

^^
Pap.),

^
4,

201. 3^^•
74*
18,

39°•
278.

"'
54

^
]
30.
1

57•

37(?). 432(?)•
4°, 291.
2 3.

212.

25.

{"OTe'

Pap.),

42 2. 298.
87.

62

211.
KoC 254.

^.

112.

'^';
43°•

214, 3^4, 44^' 173, 88.
39•

15, 39• KOVpOS I.

;

39°•

35• 65•

2^. 96•

67.

03•

NEW LITERARY

TEXTS

237

! €

241. 221, 286. 205.
2'Jl.

;!
(24,
'),

39^•

42

21, 39, 7°, III, 127, 43169, 2X0, 219, 240, 2

\
flf\€tV
MeXi'i;

297, 375•
296.
vaUiV 56.

g,

,, 3•
5•

(relat.).
'"is•

124.

45• 57•

''85.

1^X1 94•
MfyaKKfjs 70.
fii'yarSO, 57, 105.

'•"f

52.
38.

SSe 9, 54,

240, 268, 298, 3 29,

290.

vaof 408.

!
/:iev

'
40
(?).

381, 415• 250.

34, 76• 63.

50.
veiKoy

^'" 334, 348. olSf'tv 290 (?).
oiVfii-

^
,348.
/icVpoc

10,50, 113,237,334,

212.
85.

vcKpos 236.

59, 168 78.

(?),

181, 42

32 2.
1

8,

252.

«

OlKOf 88, 2 20.
oLvos
oi'of

10, II, 70, 136, 163, 187,

217, 35^• Cf. (vepBe. 264.

318•

210, 2X8, 222, 228, 240,

vivetv
ff^i'X,;

205•
37•
2.

277• oKoios 234.
oKov 93. X9.

( ! ! ( (( ((
409.

245, 256, 3i9,368,42o(.?), Fr. 15 recto 3. 20.
105, 37 02.
1
I

49.

(( ,
/, ,
191.
44.

55, Fr. 6 verso 126.

;(
88.

438•
89.
12.

")/£ 385•
2 50.
o^tXfiv

8 2.

40.

56, 436.
27.

'
'

1

30.

254.

327•
2"].

334. 348, 362. Ff'xP' 354• Mf'W'S 15• 137, 239, 294, 295, 299, 328, 355, 349.
17.

62.

132, 200.
6.
(J^ur 1 1,

!
( /
/lie
/iiVpi;

270.
67, 190.

3•

'8);

47•

382,

&! , ^
6, ^,

75, 86,'258 marg.

(?)•

54.

oms 79•
284.
236.
26.

^fVof 323. ^vyKipavvvvai 7 5•

123. 268.

225
39• 29.

(•

ivetv 34 '•
58, 60, 129. 45• 55• 30.

!
Wi";

(.

283.

iKcVni

2 2.

!
! '
/iufeix

68, Pap.).

8 1.

,
153,

31"

(/iowr

'! 6.
130.

275• Pap.)

(.
TrjTcpii

Spveov

2

marg.
ovpos 34, 370.

85,

89, 204, 357,

36,

400•

^^, ^,
35• 34•

oii/iof 131. 234• 184. oirepos 1 2 8.

o>if 257• Spot 231.
opjJT)!

215.

97•

or

99•

325(?)•

>(05 2
,,
73•
58.

232.

163.
1

37. 07, 14, 34, 47, 54, 68, XX5, X28, x88, 219, 2 25,

8.

fiu^oXffyor 55•

(demonstr.).
(

38.

tijc

77, 86,

12,240.
7)

= therefore)
°
f'"',

(

245, 247, 267, 273, 2 92, 324, 400,^428, 443.
2 20.

OS Tf 36.

97•

93•

" ^^

5.

1

238
8,

INDICES
49,

124,

132,

172,

252.

44•
OTC 68, 8 1.

,

23, 27, 3°. 43> 44, 46, 49, 65. 1^> ^3< 9^, 103, '28, 157, 62, 94, 104, 73, '74, 220, 221,
5, 6,

^
wefor 89.
1

2 94•

56.

TicBe pas 32.

313) 366.

!
129.
2

2 go.

75•

12

1.

TTfp 5,

220.
237•

125• 421.
72.

444•
wfpiCTTc'AXeix

.

224, 226, 235, 253, 268, 278, 293, 294, 3°', 313, 233, 326, 3V3, 388.

(
^•"

^2.

,57
4
pe'ffii/

274• 229.

201 marg.
233•

!' .
17, 191, 334, 348• Fr.
1 1

2 22.

3"•
oiSe 24, 47, 104,
8e'),

162

(

.

.

.

malvdv 287. 98 marg.
*?!!; 144, 270.

191, 234, 375, 409•

recto

3.

ouSfi'r

257•
20.

282, 35'•
oiceKn 329•

50, 02. 34, 37°•
oi-Ve

""* 231•
333,

256,

287,

347,

36(?).
21, 139, 145, 164, 171,

/
noie'iv

? € '
TTiTiTeiv 2

93•
10, 265.

,^'

364.

79•

397. 102,

82

rnarg.,

289,

7«•

318. 120, 339•

25
24•

2 (•)
',
11/

359-

399•

6.
88.
72.

238.
99•
37•

"^
215.
26.

253, 258, 296, 325, 352,
447•^
1

63.

264•
1 1 5-

^
. .

239, 350• 100.
179, 227, 299•
73•

///
,.-

o-iVtt; (-tijs ?)

12

1.

125.

34•
39 1

389•

TraiSiueti'

196.

/
73

!
3, 9,

249;

43°• 39°, 395• 212, 259• 3^4•
262, 267.

6, 40,

22, 20,

76

224,

! 7€
.

70 369 28 1.

().
8.

(/), 78

(,
389,
52.

;(/'
jaTipeiK

,
132
5,

1

93•
1
1

9•

427•
1 6.

38.

85, 219, 271, 391, 398• 41 1•
2 20.

38,

"

!
-

54, 86, 97, 105. 36.

32 7•
25.

45•
1
,

1

1 3•

57• 29, 39, 54;

84, 107,

128, 169, 242, 404• 307•
2 35•

20, 131.379,

384

! ! !
!
ffour

202.

26,
1

425•

2 5-

44, 88, 133, 137, 175, 236, 251, 252, 254 (""''')? 256, 299, 366, 367, 412, 436• ^M^'f 132,

75

(^-

31,

32. 40
83,

(),

4

1

70.

52•

Cf.

.

433•

2 79•
'j6.

35•

'!

1

15•

201.
2.

^ ! ^
54•
.

184, 373•
. .

\\( \({ vyvvva
353•
3,
1

302
.

(?).
.

.

86.

333, 345• 353•
28.
1 1

87, 246, Fr.

recto 4.

92.

1

.

NEW LITERARY
366,
46.
1

TEXTS
120.
2

239

marg.

23.
I

(?), 285, 286, 350, 357, 382, 46(?), 448• 211.

28.

5•

242.

102, 255•

» ! •
re

ToKas 294•
3•

145

rnai'g.

!
Tpcis
T/)e\e(i'

Tore 14.

380.
1 1

68, 312, 3^7•

^
|
6.

124.

263•
2'jg.

258, 275•
1

41

(''^).

5

276.

»,,} 169•
87, 88, 432•
5•

2 97•
(?).

237, 248, 378
(5s Tc), 58, 60,

36
70,

64, 65,

214, 226,
2.
'JO,

238,

246,

_

284, 392•

!
rpi'r

. 2

77 (fipnff)•
8, 35, 49• XdpiTff 73> 82.

4^3• 227.

8, 207

«
<5

143

(•'')•

iiiiirg.

278.
2
1

rfXfiK 108.

(\(
rcXevTTj
TcX;^ri/ef

(7
23.

39°• 328.

^" 372•
54•

84•

rfXtuTaj/ 29•

443• Tuyxdi/eii- 393•
S/Spif 64, 69• vSpos 218.

228, 443•

,
(
;;
(/0£
nfleVai

243.
65230.

46•

252.
'JO.
I

Tfoi 53•

,
((5 5
;)
26 1,

58•

26g. 256.
Fr. 2 verso 4•


«xi-ijeif

Terapraios

7

20.
un-ijKT)

43• 27•

/0
223, 239•

241, 272. Fr. 2 verso 429•
31, 420.
71
(?)•

2.

"""? 47•
389. 248.
15•

Tij/zoCros

44•

35^•
23•

28,

195,

213,

274,

! €
2.

135•

)
'
1

($ 292.
(8( 83
48.
99,

335. 349•
(?).

44•
2g'j.

30• 31, 129,

4,

139, '45,

^
85•

(&(
298,
7

14.

167.

.' (^'),
374

445•

26,

2 49TiWii- 241, 335. 349, 440• 2 66.

>

288, 324, 379• 88, 37^• 327, 38*^• 422•
249, 3 '9, 39°•

'(
409•

242,

! !
6,

'(
387.
1

>'94, 231,

.
294,

47•

3 ''•
6.

'6

258.
relat.),

' '
7 '!
47•

97. 174, 224, 233•

277,

29•
40.

&(

29•

?;

158.
2, 9,

14, 58•

220, 221, 269,

195, 354• 167.
2

260, 262, 266,
(reC),

275

2 20.
1,

56, 5^, 6, 7°, 142, marg., 218, 253, 144, 261, 272, 299, 331, 357• 289.

82

279

("•')•

63, 183, 225,

3°>

1

64.

52,

139. 179(0, 207

326•

.

.

.

.

;

240

INDICES

{b)

OTHER TEXTS.
in thick type refer to papyri.)
yap 1012.
ii.

{Numbers
1012. C ii. 16. ayvoi 1015. 1 5. nypoiKof 1012. Fr. 1 6. I. ayporo/ios 1015. 7. ah{K<^6s 1013. Fr. 4 verso 2 aei'Seii/ 1015. I, 9. 1012. C ii. 45. 1012. C ii. 38. 1012. C ii. 40. 1015. 8. ai/ia 1010. 17. 1015. 15• aipc'w 1013. 31. 1012. F 13, 1 4. alViof 1012. C ii. 4S. 1014. 2 5. 1012. A ii. 2 7 1013. 6. 1012. A ii. 30. 1015. 14. aXijflijf 1012. Fr. 13. ii. 30,
ayi/ofii/

" '' ^/
\((

!
( ((
!
ii.

;

1015. 2. 1015. 6. affof 1013. 35, 41. 1012. Fr. II. ii. 8. 1010. 19. 1012. A ii. 2 2. 1012. C ii. 3 I. 1015. 5. 1013. 2 I apeiof 1012. Fr. 16. 17 (?). 1012. i. 1 3. 1012. Fr. 23. 3. appo(eiw 1012. 12. iii. Sprt 1015. 5. aprns 1010. I 9. 1015. 4. 1015. 13. 1015. 1 1 1012. C iii. 40.
dotSoTToXoff

^ ' /

ii. 21, iii. 13, C 24, 36, iii. 38, Fr. 16. 7, Fr. 21.8, Fr. 23. 4; 1013.

A

i5,42;1014.io,23; 1015.
12, 18, 19.
ye 1012. Fr. 16. 12. yurwv 1013. 2. yepa'ipeiv 1015. II, 21. TeVat 1013. 9,10. 1012. C ii. 30, 49, F19; 1013.41,44; 1014.

A

^
Sarjvai

^

9, 10, 20.

-7-iKos

1012. Fr. 2 0. 4 1015. 13. 1012. C ii. 15, 21. 1012. Fr. 13. ii. 2 2. ypi 1013. 14. yvpvatTiov 1015. 9. 1012. Fr. 27. 4 1013.
;

1012. Fr. 16.

5,

15,

Fr. 16.
18. 6.

3,

8,

II,

13, Fr.

Fr• 17• 3, 5- 7. 9• aieahia 1013. 10.

1015. 20.

1013. 34, 44 1015. 13. 1012. A i. 6, F 15 1014. 22. aXoyos 1012. Fr. 13. ii. 29. apapraueiv 1012. F 14. 10X5. 17• 1015.
; ;

1010.
2,

1

6,

17; 1012.

6e4 1012.

A

ii.

12.

C

ii.
ii.

Fr. II.

25, 54, 7, i3,Fr. 24. 3;

iB, 22,

.

oi'ayi'[1012. Fr. 39. 2.

. (!
-' '8>
airrfindv

1012. Fr. 20.

/

6.

1013. 19; 1015. I, 4. 1012. C iii. 43. 1012. C ii. 48. 1015. 1 8. 1014. II. axpews 1012. Fr. 16. 14, 15,
17•

&
;/'
ii.

1013. 41. 1012. i. 8. 1012. C ii. 53. 8evT€pos, eK 1010. 2^^. 1012. C ii. 20. 1015. 15• 1013. 13, 15, 22. 1012. C ii. 33; 1015.
Sfi/ci'iii'ai

^
1012.

"Va^ 1015. 10.

10, 16.

1012. Fr. II. ii. 8. 1012. C 19, 21. Fr. 12. I (?); 1015.
1 1

1012. Fr. 16. 17.
20,

A

ii.

36,
ii.

C

iii.

46, Fr. 13.

17,

25•
/Si^Xio./

18, 20.

1013. 1012. C ii. 55. 1013. 1 8. avTiSiKos 1012. A ii. 29. 1012. C ii. II. awpviietv 1015. 6. 1013. 20.

1012. Fr. 1 6. 1 6. 1012. A ii. 6, Fr. 13.
I.

!

(
ii.

27, Fr. 18.

8(

1012. i. 4. 1015. 7. 1012. A ii. 35. 1013. 36. (SoOf 1015. 5•

\(€

1012. Fr. 4. 4, F 21 1013. 32. 1012. Fr. 11. ii. 5. 1012. C ii. 30. SiaKiieiv 1012. A iii. 7, C ii. 49. 1012. Fr. 16. 4. 1010. I, 13. 1012. C ii. 28.

: (

;

.

/
;[

NEW LITERARY
1015.
2 2.

hMvai 1013. 44,

Fr. 4 verso

!
;

I

1012. Fr.

1015. 17. 1012. Fr. 13. ii. 25. 1012. A iii. 10. 1012. A ii. 30. s 1012. Fr. 27. 3.
16. 4.

" '
19.

TEXTS
12,

1012. Fr. 16.
1012. F 13. 1012. Fr.

2,

1 7.

2,

(' (>[
iv

4, 6, 8.

' «:/2. 8( ^ /

^
(
(yeipeiv
4,

1012. Fr. 16. 15. 1010. 20.

1014. 8 (.?), I 7. 1012. Fr. 23. 5. 1010. 3, 8, 10, II, 13; 1012. A ii. 31, 37, C ii. 6,
13, 20, 28, 51, iii. 53, 54, Fr. 13. ii. 25, F 12, 17, Fr. 18. I ; 1015. 8. hi

1012. C ii. 26. 1012. A ii. 14 (?). 1012. C ii. 12. 1012. Fr. 13. ii. 24. i'xdv 1012. A ii. 6, 7, C ii. 29, F 25, Fr. 16. 4, Fr. 18.3. 1012. Fr. n. ii. 11.

(

( (
1012.
8
(?),

241

(

>013.
V

37, 41.
ii.

A

ii.

17,

F

15.

A

30, Fr.

13.

ii.
;

/

1013. 42. 1012. i. 2 (.?). 1012. Fr. 1 6. 4. 1012. A ii. 34. 1012. Fr. II. ii. 7. 1015. 15, 1 9.

29

(?);

1013.

40

1015. 10.

1015. 21.

1014. 12. 1015. 9, 23. (ya> 1013. 16, 19, 21, 41, 42 1015. I. Wfiv 1012. Fr. 16. 13. « 1012. Fr. 13. ii. 30; 1013.
42. dbivai 1012.
iKocrt
elvai
i.

;

9.

1012. C ii. 33. 1012. A ii. 8, 9, 35,
i.

iii.

5,

8,

10,

C

ii.

II,

18, 19, 25, 47, iii. 41, Fr. 10. i. 3, Fr. 13. ii. 29, F

1013. 21, Fr. 4 verso 1014. 23. 1012. C ii. 6, 23, 43, iii. 48 (?). iiV1012. Cii. 25, 45; 1015. 4. 1013. 44 1014. 8. 1014. 13. ( 1010. 24. 1012. A ii. 25, Fr. 13.

(
3
;

18

;

1015. 1015. 17. ivTe\i)s 1012. C ii. 5 (?). ivTvy^aveiv 1013. 2 2. 1012. A ii. 28. 1012. Fr. 13. ii. 30, F 20 1014. 24(.?). 1014. 4 (?). 1012. C iii. 28. enapfjyeiv 1015• 2. fVi 1015. 16, 21. 1012. Fr. 18. 5. 1014. 1 6. i. II. 1012. 1012. Fr. II. ii. 7. 1012. A ii. 7. 1015. g. 1014. 4 (?). 1015. 3• ipav 1012. C ii. 8, Fr. 13. ii.
(v6ah(

'

ivayavios 1015. 8.

.

€015.
1012.

15.

C

ii.
i.

46.
12.

! (
C

57012.
24.

1012. Aii. 26. 1010. 22; 1012. Cii.

^

(

;

€( ! ( (^ (
((((
23, 28, Fr. 24.
8, 23.

: !
17X109

€!
ii.

1013. 8. 1015. 14.
I.

1012.

1012. 1015. 1 8.

C

ii.

56.

!


46.

( «
ii.

33(.?), Fr.
I, 3.

16. 8,

^
23.
lepfia
(1.
ii•

1014. 17. 1014. 23. 1012. C . 24. 1012. C . 1 3• 1012. C . 2 7• 1012. i. 1015. 1015. 12. 1012. Fr. 5- 3.
;

•j.

C

iii•

;

/€

1015.

2.

1015.
9.

()

37 (1013. 37) 43• 1012. C

,

.

26.

fKUvos 1016. 2

1

.

Kelvoi

1015.

16, 18, 19, 22. fKTonos 1013. 7.

(
cKTos

1012. Fr. 1 6. 1010. 1 5 1015. 1 6. 1015. 12. (Tepos 1012. Fr. 13. ii.

'
('-

{().
8, 33,

Fr. 24. 2.
6, Fr.

1012. C 1012.

ii.

14.
iii.

A

1

6.

II.

i\aiopvTos 1015.
f'XaioxvTos

1 1

1015. 14.

1015. 13. (V 1012. A ii. 1013. 37. (ifpyeuia 1012. fiepyere'iv 1012.
(Ti

5,

7,

8,

II

;

! ") ! ('
1012. Fr. 1012. C ii. if pot 1015. 10. 1012. C 'I/if'pa 1012. C ii.
43. 51•
7• 7.

16.' 2.

iii.

53.

1012.

C

Pap.) 1012.
13, 56.

C C

ii. ii.

26, 42.

Cii• 43, 51.

38.

1012.

C

ii•

R

.

242
1012. A ii. 1012. A ii. 1012. Fr. 1012. A ii.
ii.

INDICES
36.
21.
13.
ii.

Fr.

16. 8,

13, Fr.

23. 2

;

24.

15,

26,

C

(

28.

,

1012. F 17. 1012. Fr. 18. 6. ii. 5. 1012. 1015. 4' 1012. A ii. 10,

A

1013. 17. 1012. F 2 7(.?). 1012. Fr. 16. 12. 1012. F 1 5 (?). 1010• 1,13) 19• 1012. ii. 8, 28. 1012. C iii. 54 ; 1014.

(demonstr.) 1015. (relat.) 1015. 4-

2

1

;

A

[7
6[
. .

12, 20.
i.

4,

1013•

C

ii.

15, 20, 21, Fr. 16. 9

KOTayfiv

1012.

C

ii.

44, 50, 52

i8; 1015. 1012. A ii. 20. 1015. 5.

3.

1012. C ii. 1012. Fr. I3.ii. Kfivor 1015. 16, 18, 19, fKUvos 1015. 2 1 1015. 19• Kivfos 1015. 19. 1012. C ii. 25. Kfp/(upnioi 1012. C ii. 29, 1013. 1 8. 1012. F 2 2. K\eifiv (:= 1015. 6, KXfiw'as 1013. 12, I3(?). K\eis 1012. C iii. 53. 1012. C ii. 43, 1015. 7. KoXaffiK 1012. C ii. 39. 1012. C ii. 30,

37 14
22

1014. 14. olSe'iv 1014. 15. otos 1012. F 25. 1013. 43• oKvelv 1012. C ii. 17. 1012. C iii. 31. 1012. F 1 7. 1012. Fr. 16. 3, 13, 19. 1012. C ii. 6, II, 16. 1013. I 8. 1012. Fr. 16. 10.
1012. Fr. 35. 2 (.?). 1010. 12. Of 1012. A ii. 20; 1013. 44. 1012. Fr. II. ii. 4. 1012. F 22, Fr. 16. 6, 9. oTt 1012. C ii. 24, 25, 43, 51. oi, 1012. C ii. 16, 42, Fr. II. ii. 8, 10; 1014. 26 ; 1015. 12. oiSe 1013. 14. oiKcri 1013. 26 (?)• 1012. A ii. 7. ovvcKa 1015. 22. 1012. A ii. 17, 33,

1013. 40. 1012. Fr. 2 1. 3. 1012. A ii. 20, 32 1015. 21.

;

32.

1010. 1014. 6.

.

1012.

C

ii.

42.

)

Mfflwi/i)

7•

-\€

€5

53.

1012. C iii. 51. 1015. 1 9. 1010. 2 2 ; 1012. C ii. 17, 1014. iii. 50, Fr. i6. 16; 1015. 6, 16, 10, 18, 23 18. pev 1012. A ii. 6,
;

Fr. 16. 6.

32,

€[

45. 55•

1015. 14KpOTfia 1013. 32, 39. Kp'iveiv 1012. C ii. 31. 1012. A ii. 30. 1012. A iii. 9. Kpoieiv 1015. 3. 1013. 42. 1012. i. 6. 1014. 5. ii. 3. 1012. C

: : ! '
[
AoKf

1012. A ii. II. 1012. A ii. 8. 1015. 12. 1010. 12. 1012. A ii. 32, F 32 (?). 1012. C ii. 50 1013. 42,
;

C

ii.

27, Fr.

16.

14,

Fr.

9; 1013. 20, 30, 33, 1015. 10, 17, 20, 22. 42
19.
;

1013. 171012. C

iii.

5 1.

44, Fr. 4 recto 3 (?). 1012. Fr. 1 6. 12.


II.
1-17

(
(9[ 1012.
1012.
\eyeiv

1012. C iii. 54. 1012. A ii. 2?. 2, 23, 24• 1013. 2 2. 1015. 20.

1015. I, 10, 12, 17. 1010. 23; 1012. C

ii.

[

8 Q), 45•

Fr. II.

ii.

C

ii.

2.

1012. C ii. 46. 1012. C ii. 5 1. 1013. II, 12;

1014. 26. 1012.
13,

1012. C ii. 41. 1015. 6, 13. 1013. 8. 1015. 7. 1013. 40 ; 1015.

7•

A

ii.

27,

i.

5,

C

ii.

2, 17,

22,

iii.

36,

3(

1012.

F

3, 9•

1013. Fr. 4 recto 2. 1014. 1 5. 1014. g (?). 1012. C ii. 9, Fr. 16. 4 1015. 4. 1012. A ii. 23. 1012. C ii. 41. 1012. C ii. 12. 1010. 7 ; 1012. A ii. 31, 34, Fr. ii.ii. 6; 1014. 16. 1012. A iii. 11, C iii. 50; 1013. 29.
;

.

;

1013. 21, 34, 39, 4o; 1015. 22. Ttt&iov 1010. 9. 1012. C ii. 52. niXuv 1015. 19. Tt(pl 1012. i. 3, C ii. 28,
46, Fr. 13. 35•
5•
ii.

'
ii.

/.

NEW LITERARY
1012. A 1012. A iii.
iii.

TEXTS
3.

243
1012. . 33• 1014. 26. 1012. C . 55•

2.

pofpevsl01Z. Fr.

16.

!

{)

1,

18.

23,

25, Fr.

' ! »
TToXe/tfli/

1012. A ii. 24. 1013. 3. 1015. II. 1010. 8. 1012. A iii. 4 (?). 1012. A ii. 34. mnreiv 1010. 4 1012. F 23 1015. 5. 1014. 6. 1012. A ii. 37. 1012. C iii. 54. 1015. 19. 1012. C ii. 37, Fr. 11.

1012. A ii. 28, 29, C ii. 40; 1014. 7, 21. 1012. A ii. 16; 1014. II. 1012. A ii. 9. 1012. Fr. 16. 9,
16.

!05

1015. I I 1015. 12. 1010. 2 1 1012.
;

C

ii.

;

;

47,

F
4.

13,

Fr.

16.

10;

1012. C . 33• 1010. 2 2. 1012. i. 8. 1014. 6. 1014. 9. re 1013. 43• 1012. i. 12. Tfos 1015. I. 1012. A . g. 1015. 13. 1012. . 31.

1015.

nW1015.
TiKTeiv

.

1012. Fr. II. ii. 6. 1012. A ii. 21, 33, Fr.
4. 3, Fr. II.
2, Fr.
ii.

4,

Fr. 31.

4, Fr. 23. 4.

32. 2.

1015. 4. 1012. . 7, Fr. 13. . 32 ; 1013. 30, Fr. 4 recto ri 1013. 32. 3. 1012. . 5. 23, F 7,
Fr. 16. 7.

!
II.
ii.

.
7.
ii.

1012. Fr. 1 8. 2. 1012. C ii. 41. 1014. 8. 1012. C iii. 5 1, Fr.

2a/jioi

5; 1012, Fr. 11. 13; 1015. 9. 1012. C ii. 1 8. 1012. F l6. 1012. F 12. 1015. 31012. Fr. 18. 3. 1013. Fr. 4 recto 4.
'HpaKXfi6T;s

! !

](([

1012.

A
1 6.

ii.

39.

|1010.

€8(

01/0?,
1012.

«015.
(5 1012.

^
23•

.

C

ii.

I.

5, 1 6,

18.
1 6,

1012.
ii.

C

ii. ii.

2 2.

Fr. 13.
8.

32.

1012. C 1015. 4. 1012.

A

ii.

2 2,

C
ii.

ii.

1012. Fr. II.

3,

(( {((

6; 1013.33. 1012. A ii. 1$ (?), 31 1013. 37. 1012. C ii. 10.

;

vpfv

1012. F 28 (?). 1012. Fr. 26. 7• 1012. Fr. 1 6. II. 1014. 24. 1012. C . 37• 1012. C . 48• 1013. 1 9 ("). 1012. 54• 1012. F 24. aDi/rieeW1012.F 26 (?), 31 (•• 1010. 5•

(» !

, (61012.¥.
;

1012. Fr. 16. 8, 14. 1013. 8. 1012. Fr. 1 6. 6. 1012. Fr. 13. ii. 12. 1012. Fr. 20. 2. 1015. 20. 1015. 2. 1015. 8. 1012. C ii. gO. 1014. 19. 1010. 3, 5, 7 1013. 20 1015. 6, 12, 21, 22.
1 6. 7•

1012, F 15. 1012. Fr. 1 6. 5• 1012. Fr. 16. 10. 1015. 6. 1012. F 23(f). Tpareiv 1014. 21. ji'peV't 1012. Fr. 20. 3• 1012. C iii. 54• 1013. 46. 1012. . 5. 1012. Fr. 20. 1012. C . 44•
TOTf

.

[012.

.

II.

1010. 21. 1012. i. 7• 1012. . 13. 1012. Fr. 1 6. 7. 1015. .

(

1012. Fr. 34• 2. 1012. C . 28, Fr. 1

1.

.

.

6, Fr. 16. 15.

(€

1012. Fr. 35. 3• 1012. C . 25. 1012. C . 14.

R

2

244

!
[

INDICES
1012.
ii.

C .

9,

. 48,
io(?).

1015.

3.

Fr. II.

5.

]({ 1012.
ii.

Fr. 20. 9.

(
C
ii.

1012.

C

ii.

39.

012.

1015. i6.
Fr. II.

1012. A ii. 20, 32. 1012. A ii. 25. 1012. C iii. 39. 1012. Fr. 10. ii. 5.

1012. A ii. 24 (?). 1012. Fr. II. ii. 9. 1014. 3•

a 1013. 38. 1012. A ii. 34,
Fr.

i.

1 1,

13,

13, 23, 56, iii. 37, 16. 8, 14, 17; 1013.
2.

/'

19.

1012. Fr. 34.

I.

1013. Fr. 4 recto

II.

EMPERORS.

Claudius.
5eos

Nero.

Nepiuv

Nepal/

Titus.

DoMITIAN.

: ! ! ! (6 (
3.

1021.

1021. 12.

!
6

1021.

1

8.

5eos TiVor

1028. 33.

1028.

34

37•

1028.

2 8.

Trajan.

Hadrian.

..? .! . .! .
Tpaiavbs
'ASpiavos
6(bs 'ASpiavos

Tpawvos

2c/3. Tepp.
9•

1029.

!

1029.

20, 27.

Imperator Traianus noster 1022. 25.

Tpaiavos 'ASpiavos

2f/3.

1024. 40.

1024.
8.

12.

1023. 1032. 3°-

Antoninus

6(0!

Marcus Aurelius and Verus.
2e3.

'! . : ..
Pius.

!

1035. 1032. 8, 21.

.
2e/3.

1032. 46•

'

.. !

Oirjpos

//.

EMPERORS
(.
1045. 44•

245

Septimius Severus.

Septimius Severus and Caracalla.
AiroKp.
"Zeirripios

Septimius Severus, Caracalla, and Gkta.
AovKiOS

Caracalla.

^ . . . ^ , ^(!' 86 !! .2 !2( : ... ! . (' . ..
..
MeyiOTOS
«cnl

2(!^5

^! ^:

[

2e/3.

Uap-

(.

1020.

3•

teovrjpos

BpfzawtKos

Meyiar.

2(05

Ffrns

BpfravviKo)

Mfyicrr.

1039. 20.

Mf'yiffT.

Bperav, Miyiar.

2e/3.

1030.

17.

Kvptus

AvTOv'iVos

1030. 4•

Elagabalus.

Severus Alexander.

1040.

AURELIAN.

1036. 37•

. .. .
'.
35•
^

2(
II,
1

(.

(8 (
1031. 24.

2(. 1046. 4•

(.

1031. 26

;

'.

. (. .
(, . .

2(.

Gratian, Valentinian
cVot

1041.

Justin

Justin II and Tiberius.

. ,. . (.
\
2.

II.

1038.

(
6.

and Theodosius.

\

\

6

\

(

.\
1042. .

1021. 1021. 3•

7•

246

INDICES
III.

Consuls.
vnareias

'

(
fT-os
eVos-

(568) 1038.

' ^ ' , ! ^ ^ )/ . ,
icai

CONSULS, ERAS, INDICTIONS.
'

(381) 1041.

.

(39^) 1033.
BeioT.

.

'

\

.

(444) 1037.

2.

.

(.

(57*^)

1042.

6.

Eras of Oxyrhynchus.
- (360) 1056.
9•

eros

(362) 1057- 4• (578) 1043.

Indictions.
1st (568) 1038. 6. 2nd (568-9) 1038.

19.

3id (6th cent.) 1060. 10. 5ih (late 6th or early 7th cent.) 1053. 9th (381) 1041. 16. nth (578) 1042. 12 ; 1043. 4. 13th (444) 1037. 9•

i.

IV.

MONTHS AND DAYS,
(rt)

Months.
;

Ne'of

(Choiak) 1030. 21 1045. (Hathur) 1021. 20.

2 7(?).

fi'Sot

1047. introd. 1047. 4. kalendae Martiae 1022. 7, 24. 1047. introd. 1047. introd. 1047- 2. 1047. introd.

' '
(b)

Days.

'2(

.

V.

PERSONAL NAMES
PERSONAL NAMES.
i.

247

V.

",
"Ayo^os
'Actios

f.

of

Theon 1048.
(?).

11.

ASpiavot 1045. 27
decurioii

!! !
1048.
5.

!
lius
f.

AipijXios"A.

gymnasiarch 1025.
4.

decurion 1048.

1065. 25.

\(8,

also called Seren

.

.

.

1045.

19.

also Called

.,

/, ! !
Afio'ts

^ ! ! ^
A/jc[

! !,
f.

ex-chief priest, &c. 1031. i. s. of Copreus 1048.
s.

6.
8.

(!,

of Didymus 1048.

. 1045.

15.

f.

of Petechon, Castor and Helena

1067. 25.

Titos S. of TitUS ManHeraclas 1036. 2. (.?) of Marcus Colaenus 1045. 14.

!

! / •/ !, ! ! ! ! !
2 9.

1034. 22; 1068. 1028.
4.

, 30; 1070.

city-scribe

comogrammateus 1061.
f.

3, 1 1,

27.

lius

of Heliodorus 1024. 14. s. of Heliodorus 1024. 13. f. of L. AureMatreas 1031. 13. s. of Sarapion 1039. i, 1 8. s. of Scopas 1070. 33.

,

1068. 4. 1059. 4.
s.

of

Eudaemon 1048.
2 2.

15.

.

of Ammonius 1027. 8. s. of Ammonius and f. of Theon and Pekusis 1027. 2, 8. s. of Diogenes 1032. 2, 6, 56, 57.

1063.
I,

I,

1

6.
s.

also called Dionysius,
27.

of Ptolemaeus
1 1

1061.

. 1038.

of Aurelius Hiera.x 1037. AvSpea! presbyter 1026. 24.
f.

6.

', 1064. ^! god 1029.

1045. 8. 1045. 7• Antonius, Ant. Valens 1022. 1039. 4•

,
35s.
-ts

! ^' . !
.
8.
f. f.

/

1044. 24. 1044. 22, 23, 1059. 3 (0•

,

27.

1071. 7• f. of Aurelius Johannes 1042. 19, 31, of Dionysius 1063. 10.

2

1

.

! /

alsO Called

. 1046.

7.

17 marg. of Pauseiris 1044.

(?).

7.

of Herodes 1063. 2. f. of Arsinous and Dionysius

1044. 26. 1066. 6

, ! :' ! ! ! !! !! !! !! :! ! ! ! !! !! !! !,
)
s.

'ApaKuy(

1044.

Arrianus, Avidius A. cornicularius 1022. 27. s. of Leon 1063. 1 1.

. 1070.

I,

57.

'((!

s.

of Apollophanes 1044. 26. of Penpauseiris 1044. 27.
g.

1044.

f.

of Tetseiris 1044. 16.

1071. s. of Onnophris

.

102.
I,

3, 14.

1070.

57.
5.
i.

...

s.

of Heraclas 1041.

AipijXtoi "Aya^of

gymnasiarch 1025.

also called Isidorus 1046.

10.

Biaio!

s.

of Biaeus 1031. 7, 28.
4.

night-strategus 1033.

1070.

57• also called Alexander, ex-

I,

chief priest, &c. 1031. I. chief priest 1025. 4, 24.

agoranomus 1031. 2. exegetes 1025. 3,
7•

2 2.

mime 1025.

s.

S. of Sarapas 1036. 5j 42• of Didymus 1040. 4, 41.

night-strategus 1033.
s.

4•

of Anastatianus 1037. 6. S. of Anoup 1042. 1 8, 3O.
5, 25.
f.

cosmetes 1025.
Aip.
13.

/

saep.

!, !
Matreas 1031.

of L. Aur.
Called

Aip.

Marpeai

also

248
Herai'scus,
13•
s. s.

INDICES
of L. Aur. Apollonius 1031.
of Pauseiris
i,

and

f.

of

: >; ! ! !! ,! /!
1040.
2,

Petenouphis 1040.

€(!
39.

38.

s.

of Aurelius Pekusis

S.

of
s.

MarcUS 1040. 50. of Psenamounis 1041.
1025.
8.

3, 22•

reciter

>7;05
3>

1036. 46.
S.

of

Heraclammon 1038.

34, 38.

S. of Doras 1037. 4• Avidius Arrianus cornicularius 1022. 27.

1060. I. 1064. I.
10.

.

also

Called

Isidorus

1046.

BfXXapfiiOS 1050. 10.
f. of PhiloDlCUS 1041. 6. of Aurelius Biaeus 1031. 7, 29. . s. of Biaeus 1031. 7,28.

Bi'aior

f.

Biaios,

1022. 19. Longius Priscus 1022. 13. Minicius Italus praefect 1022. 2. C. Veturius Gemellus 1022. 1 1. Cf. 1035. Celsianus praef. cohortis 1022. 2.
lulius Saturninus

C. C. C. C.

lulius

Maximus 1022.

15.

2.

: : : : :: :, : :
1061.
I,
f.

,! : : : €: : : : : : :
49, 52.
{.

5!

! :

f. of Dius and Diogenes 1061, 6. 1064. I. f. of Alexander 1048. 8. . chief priest 1025. 4, 24,

of Aurelius

Theon 1040.
.

5.

S.

of PlaS 1048. 1 4. 1061. I ; 1064. I s. of Demetrius 1061. 6. f. of Diogenes 1032. 7, 10. s. of Diogenes 1032. 27, 28, 36. s. of Diogenes and f. of Ammonius,

Diogenes and Martheis 1032. 2, 7, 56. s. of Papontos 1030. 3, 21. also called Pausanias, f. of Sarapous also called Tadiogas 1044. 4, 1059. 5 1061. 8 1070. 26. also Called Amoi's, s. of Ptolemaeus
;
;

27.

of Antas 1063. 10. of Apollophanes 1044. 26. assistant of strategus 1032. 25, 31.
s.

ex-gymnasiarch 1028. 1061. 2 2. s. of Demetrius 1061. 6.

3.

1067.
I

1

8.

.

agoranomus 1031.
4.

2.

1057.

(?).

f.

of Aurelius Philoxenus 1037.

1056.

2.

. night-strategus 1033. 4. basilicogrammateus 1028. 3. f. of Gaius Veturius Gemellus 1035. 2. Cf 1022. 11. rnios oieroupios s. of Gaius Veturius Gemellus 1035. i. rt'fifXXof. See ratof. Gemellus, C. Veturius G. 1022. 11. Cf. 1035. 2. 1026. 2, 6, 2 2, 23.
Taios,

rdiof

raios OifToupios

!' '
1044. 1045. 31.
f.

26, note.

,
19.

. also Called
s.
.

Seren

.

.

.

1045.

/! !, ! !,
(!

: ! : : !',
d.

'\(

of Sarap 1045. 47. of Alexander 1067. i.
.
.

of Varus 1020.

5.

: :
22.

1059. 6. 1055. 'J. freedman 1035. 4. imperial freedman 1020. f. of Procunda 1020. 7.

7.

.

exegeteS 1026.

3,

1044. 17, note. 1070. 53. 1070. 55•

. 1070. I, 57. . also Called Alexander,
i.

ex-chief priest, &c. 1031.

:,

:
{.

of

Apphous 1048.

15.
3.

s.

of Sarapas 1048.

, mime 1025.

"J.

.

/ \6$!
[ !,
H.,
s.

, £

V.

PERSONAL NAMES
7.
s.

Saint

1038. 23.

.

d.

of MuSaeUS 1038.
16.

1034. introd.; 1062.
i.

! !
of
s.

249

1054. 3. Thoonis 1028. of Thoonis and

8.
f.

of Taorseus
30.

1028.
/is f.

6, 30.

of

Thompsemis 1028.
1056.
I.

7, 9,

assistant 1043.
s.

of Apollonius and

f.

of Apol-

lonius 1024. 14. also called Nemesianus 1045. 30. 'Hpats 1070. 51. Marpfas also called AovKtos

of L. Aur. Apollonius 1031. 13. f. of Aurelius Stephanus 1038.

!
. .

,: '
1060.
4.

,
5. 42.

14, 34. 38•
f.

of Auielius

.

1041.

5.

also called Heraclides 1024. 2.
TiVof MiiXios

, /
!,
'!
d. d.

.

f.

of Titus Manlius

Serenus and Titus 1036. 3. 1045. 26.

Manlius

Alexander

!
.
35-

!' , ,' ,
'IcpoviKos

. s. of Anastatianus 1037. basilicogrammateus 1024. 7, 24.
1038. 12. 1056. 4. 1046. 5•

6.

. 1044. 20, note. . also called Apia 1046.
alSO Called
1.

7•

1046.

1030.
f.

7•

€!
genes 1032.

also Called

.,

d.

of Dio-

2, 6,

56.

1069.

7,

"HpaKXtifij;!,

H. 1024. 3. wine-merchant 1055. 2. of Sarapas 1036. s.

35also Called

.

f.

of Petseiris 1044. 19.

'Hpat 1069. 33. s. of Apion 1063. 2, 15. f. of Theon 1065. I.

of Papontos 1030.

7.

of
d.

Chaeremon 1024.
of Petseiris 1044.
2.

15.
9.

1059.
s.

1026.

2 2.
2.

of Parit 1048.

106 .

14;

,7
',

( €

1044. 7, note; 1055. 1067. S. of Agathus 1048. 11. s. of Ammonius 1027. 2, 3. . s. of Didymus 1040. . night-strategus 1033. city-scribe 1028. 5• S. of Hephaestion 1066. 3•
s.
s.

.
4, 41.
4•

of Ischyrion 1061. 28. also called of C
.
.

.

Chaeremon

!! !! ! !! '! !! ,'/ !! , !! ! •
1026. 1038. 37.
2,

of Theon 1061. 28. Italus, C. Minicius I. praefect 1022. lulius, C. I. Maximus 1022. 15. lulius, C. I. Saturninus 1022. 19.
3, 7
;

2.

1038. 36.

loannes
1

.

S.

of

Anoup 1042.
2.

8, 30,

1053.

1043. . s. of Alexander 1067. 23. 1023. I. Kf'Xep, f. of Timotheus 1048. 4. also called Apia 1046. 7. 1045. 1 1 strategus 1028. 2. KIOJM€I/I'posbasilicogrammateusl029.I. riparius 1033. 3. . Ni(cai[ 1045. 25. chief priest 1068. 4» praefect 1023. 6. KdiiTor . S. of Ame[ 1046. 14• S. of Serenus, Inned 1055. introd. Konpfis f. of Alexander 1048. 6. Konpias ., cosmetes 1025. 5, 25. 1044. 20. 1042. 2 . 1051. 23.
assistant

.

1039.

3.

! !

scholasticus 1071.

2.

1050. 5•

250
hfvKo&ioi
f.

INDICES
1048.
15.

/ €

1050.

3.
I.

of Leon 1063. 12. s. of Leonard f. of Harsas 1063. 11. At^epdXiOf, praefect 1032. 20. Longius, C. L. Priscus 1022. 13. Aoi'iKios f. of L. Aui'. Matreas 1031. 13. Marpeas also called Hera'iscus, s. of L. Aur. Apollonius 1031. 13.

'2( .

AoUkios

Lucius Secundus 1022. 17.

'
/!
1048.

'
1043.
I.

Nfpfaiavos 1066.
Nfpeaiavos 'lipa[

1045. 30.
7.

MaiKiavas praefect

1032. 3,5.

[.

?? :
.][ 1045. 21. Maf 1069. I, 36.
MaiKiavoi,

1024. 23.

. praefect 1032.
2.

3,5•

'/, /3

assistant

. StrategUS 1028.
4•
S.

maXtos, Titos

. '^' 5, Tiros ^^.ps
II,

of TitUS ManliuS

Heraclas 1036.

i, 4.

f.of TitUS Manlius Serenas and Titus ManliusAlexanderl036. 3. MaXios, Titos M. Sepijvos S. of TitUS Manlius Heraclas 1036. 2. MapSfis also called Heraclia d. of Diogenes

! ! ^ !
'Ovex
. .

' :
Ni'ypoE
f.

NfpcaiW 1048. 1056. I.
TSIiKm[, TijSeptos

.
f/ saep.

1045.

2

.

1069. 29. 1044. 2 1044. 1038. 15. 1070. 32.
4.

II, 14.

1054.
S.

S.

of Onnophris 1029. 13. of Osmolchis and f. of Asclas
3,

and Osmolchis 1029.
s.

14.

of Pnephersoi's 1044. 22.

of
of

Soi's

and

f.

of Chaeremon of Teos and

1028.

16, 24.
s.

Teos and

f.

Onnophris 1029. 2, 12. f. of Onnophris 1029. 4. s. of Onnophris 1029. 15. OiaXe'pios decurion 1048. 10. Ovcipos s. of Damasaeus 1020. 5.

1032.

1032. 56. 6; called also called Heraclia d. of Diogenes
2,
;

1032. 56

called Map^eis 1032. 2, 6.

Map^oCs 1044. 10.

' , ! ^ ! «
f.

1045. 23. 1062. 1,21.
of Aurelius Petronius 1040. 51. /os s. of Ame[ 1045. 14.
KoiVTOs

, !
OufTovpiot,
rrOKios

OieTovpios,

raios

Veturius Gemellus 1035.
raios

. . ((\
2.
i.

f.

of Gaius

Cf.
S.

1022. 11. of GaiuS
praefect

Veturius Gemellus 1035.
AovKios
Oi.

1032. 3,5.
dioecetes 1032. 44, 51.
2.

MopKos M. Antonius Valens 1022. 21.
MapTtjptos,

.
I,

. ((5
21.

praefect 1023.

6.

1072.

I.

! !

decurion 1048.

1044.
f.

I9.
.
.

Marpeas 1062.
rai'scus, s.

Marpc'as, Aovkios'

.

also Called

He-

Maximus, C.
Mivav&pos,

of L. Aur. Apollonius 1031. 1 3. lulius M. 1022. 15. KXaiSios M. basilicogrammateus

1029.

I.

! !

of

.

emeous 1044.

6.

1071. II. (?) f. of Plutarchus 1048. 1057. I, 4.
s.

5.

/oUTios assistant

of StrategUS 1057. 2. of Spartas and f. of Diogenes

Mf

1045. 9• 1044. 7• 1044. I

/ saep.
2. 9.

Muva-aios

Minicius, C. M. Italus praefect 1022. f. of Flavia Euphemia 1038.

, ',

and Thaesis 1030. 3, 22. 1044. 23. 1044. 2 2, note. f. of Theodorus 1048. 2. (?) s. of Sarapion 1048.

2(7 .
Aioye'i/ijs

10.
3.
f.

riparius

1033.

also called P.,

of Sara4.

pous also called Tadiogas 1044.

V.

PERSONAL NAMES
i,

251
;

'!
€<£(

s.
f.

of Apis 1044. 7. of Auielius Pekusis 1040.
f.

39.

(!
5

f.

s.

of Ptolemaeus 1035. 5 1061. 5. of Ptolemaeus 1035. 4 ; 1061.

of Pauseirion 1044. 6.

e/ saep.

s. s.

of Pauseirion 1044. 6. of Psenamounis 1044. 14.

'! ,
1048.
7.

nroKephos 1056. I. nvppias 1024. 23.

1031. IS.

'/,
;

'P.

MapTiaXis praefect 1023. 6.

1054.

^!

(! / ^ !' , €( ,! !
s.

1055. i. of Ammonius 1027.
I

.

2, 4.
f.

s.

of Pauseiris and

of

Petenouphis 1040. i, 38, 53. 1044. 2 2, note. 1044. 27. lifiOpis s. of Petronius also called Horion 1044. 17. nerfVoC^ir, S. of AureliuS Pekusis 1040. 2, 37. of Alexander 1067. s. s. of Polydeuces 1067. 15. llfToaopanis f. of Petosorapis 1029. 18.

[

1059.
f.

4.

of Eirenion 1045. 47.

1066.
f.

I.

2apawas,

2. reciter

1025.

8.

.

.

, ,
([

of Eudaemon 1048. 3. s. of . and f. of Aurelius
. .

Heracleus 1036.
also called
f.

5.
;

god 1028. 17
.

.

.

1070. 1045.

8.
5.

s.

of Petosorapis and
18.
s.

f.

of Ptole-

maeus 1029.

AvprjXios

. of Marcus 1040. 50. . KfXfp 1023.
I.

UfTpwvtos

also called

Horion

f.

of Penuris

!
1039.
f.
.

of PauluS (?) 1048. 10. f. of Sarapion 1039. i. s. of Sarapion and f. of Apollonius
I.

also called Tadiogas, d. of

Diogenes

also called Pausanias

1044.

4.

1044.

17.

of Heracleus 1044. 19. UfTae'ipLs f. of Horus 1044. 3. ncTffapts f. of Thai'sous 1044. 9. s. of Seirion 1044. 10. U\as f. of Didymus 1048. 14. s. of Psenamounis
IliTo-etptf s.

^,
1054.
3.

104:8. 7, 8; 1068. i, 30. Saturninus, C. lulius S. 1022. 19.

Secundus, Lucius

S.

1022. 17.

of Petseirion 1044. 10. praefect 1032. 20.
g.

1050.

riparius

1033.

3.

.

.,

also called S.

1045.

1 9.

1041.

3, 22.

((! . ((!
9£ '/'

!! ! !
'! '!
1061. 27.
s.

s. of Panion (?) 1048. 5. of Onnophris 1044. 22. 1044. 2. 1034. introd. (f). 1044. II, 20, 25. 1054. I. f. of Petechon 1067. 1 6. Ke'Xfp 1023. I. TiTiavos 1045. 33. Priscus, C. Longius P. 1022. 13. Priscus singularis 1022. 26. d. of Hermaeus 1020. 7. 1059. 7 1070. 53. f. of Dionysius also called Amo'is
;

, , (

1042. 32.

Serenus 1042. 34. amphodogrammateus 1030. 2, 24.
collector

2;,

of Petosorapis

102.

18.

2. 1036. 46. 1043. I. iWii'f 1055. introd. . S. of TitUS Manlius Heraclas 1036. i, 4. 1032. 1068. 21. 1039. 2 1040. 31034. introd. (). . of Apollonius 1070. 34• 1040. 2 ; 1044. ig. f. of Onnophris 1028. 16, 25. . 1045. 23. (. of PapontOS 1030. 4• 1045. 8.
f.

of

Comarus

.
;

252

",

1065.

2(!

2

, ; !
/3</5
TanaTOs,

1038. 13, 34, 38• 1036. 6. 1044. 2, note. 1062. 12. 1044. 2, 5.

!
I
;

INDICES
1070. 35. . son of Heraclammon

1063.

12.

. ! !
', ,
!,
1035.
2.

Valens, M. Antonius V. 1022. 21. Veturius, C. V. Gemellus 1022.

11.

Cf.

also called

.,

d.

of Dio4.

genes also called Pausanias 1044. 1031. 7.

1069.

21. 35.

.

of

Thompsemis 1028.

6, 40.

!
22.

1029. 3• . riparius 1033. 3• £[.17, (?) 1041. 3. Tepeis 1030. 4. 1029. 4TfTffeipit d. of Harpsemis 1044. 16. Tfif f. of Onnophris 1029. 2. TfSi s. of Onnophris 1029. 2, 12. 1045. 25Ti/ioifof s. of Kichus 1048. 4. . 1045. 33.

,
1039.
Xepiyevqs

dioccetes 1032. 44, 51. subadiuva 1042. 13. ex-gymnasiarch 1028. 4s. of Besammon 1041. 6, 15. 1072. I. s. of Doras 1037. 4. d. of MusaeUS 1038. 7. 1038. II. subadiuva 1042. 13. saint 1060. 9.

.

!
f.

.

. 1045.
also Called

II.
.
.

C

.

,

f.

of

Theon

4.
s.
f.

of Onnophris 1028. 15. of Thais 1024. 16.
6,
1 8.

,
TiVos

[
2.

1044.

^(!

of Aurelius Plutarchus 1041. 3, of Pauseirion 1044. 14.

'\4!

s.

of Titus Manlius

Heraclas 1036.
TiVof

f. of Titus Manlius Serenus and Titus Manlius Alexander 1036. 3. Tiros s. of Titus Manlius Heraclas 1036. I, 4. 1044. 1 7. presbyter 1026. 24. Tpu^as 1062. 21. 1069. I, 36.

'^

:

/
'Qpos
.

f.

,
.
.
. .

1031. 15.

1050.
17.

8.

also Called

.,

f.

of Penuris

1044.
s.

of Petseiris 1044. 3.

'!

.

1044. 1044.

6. 2 3.

VI.

GEOGRAPHICAL.

(( ^
'

(a)

Countries, Nomes, Cities, Toparchies.
1069

1032. 6. 1020. 6, 8; 1068. 6; 1070. 5315; 1045. 3 ^^ ^'^^1042. 15•

(! 1020.
EvfpyeTis

( '8

(;) 1068.
5, 8-

3, 12.

1042. 15. 1025. 6.

'
!
vo/jos

VI.

GEOGRA PHICA L

253
;

1042. 35• Ituraei 1022. 28.

'
4•

1042. 7• 1042. 2 1.

^^'
5
;

1032.

7•

1044.

26,

1024. 1 6 1028. 1030. 5 1032. 2 1035. ; 1039. 2 1040. 4•
;
; ;

7

;

5

;

1029. 1037.

Tlepa-qs rrjs

1041. 4• iniyomp 1035.

1032.

21, 24

;

1045. 46.

^

via

So'mof 1026. II, 18.
(toco's)

}?
38
;

1033.

!
3
;

1024.
3

2;

1032.

7, II,

1041. 1031.

4.
;

1038.

| "!
Mfp
. .

.

. 1038. . 1036. 7
{b)
1 6,

.

38.

k-noUia,

;

1037.

.

^ ,
SeveK(X(C

rhynchus 1033. 5, 7. 13. 7; 1036. 2; 1037. 7 1038. 6, 22; 1039. 5; 1040. 5; 1041. 5, 7; 1044. 26; 1070. 36(?). Eifpye'ris 1025. 6.
;

^
2 8.

6.

.

1042.

2

I

.

=

Oxy-

1070.

. 1031.

6.

'
22.

. 1024.

5•

Villages,
27.

(pxyrJiynchite).

1052. 6, 1063. 2g.

1052. 26.

1052.

,

12.

1031.

8.

2 2
2 {
.

1052.

Sfve^ai 1032.

.

3,

n,

1052. 2, 1053. 191053. 14.

13, 20.

1031. 12.
5, 17. 27•

1061. 28.
1071. 5.
6•

21052.

^! ((
S

1053. 28.
;

1052. 15, 24 1065. intiod. 1052. , 9> 2 7• 1052. 2 1.

1052. 7• MfaKai'ovi'is 1053. . 1052. 4, 23•

/
'Ayopas

4

1064. g. 1053. 30. 1053. 28. ) Ta^iTreVi 1053. 1 5. 1053. 7• 1053. TepOoii 1040. 14. 1068. 17 (? O.xyrhynchite).

1053.
.

6;

[.}

[.}[.

.]

.

1053. 21.

1041.

4•

IlepetraOir

€(/

1024. 4• 1052. 26. 1052. , 20.
(c)

1064.

5•

1024. 21

;

1049.

2.

€ !
1029.

//
31•

/" Oxyrhynchus.

1037.

12.

II.

1029. 17!

cf.

1028.

! :

! (' 1038,
1028.
19.

2 2.

1030. 9

1036.

;

254
(d)

INDICES
Deme

& " '! ' \ ^^
'

!
(e)

[Alexandrian).

1044. 1044.

,

2422, 23, 272 2.

1024. 1044. 7, note. Kopae'mr 1044. 2 . 1024. 23• 1044. 7• 1044. 10 el sacp. 1044. 2 f/ saep.

. ! !

1024.

22.

1044.

II, 14.

(((
);/)'

1044. II, 20, 1024. 23. 1044. 2, note. 1044. 2, 5• Xfpiycvovs 1044. 6, 18.

2
2)£

1031. 15.
25.

'aSeov 1031. 15-

TTepioSos

1030.

'

(/)

Miscellaneous.
I

1028,

^.

SapaTTfhv 1070. 7.

2.

VII.

RELIGION.
(i)

Pagan.
Gods.
1029.
Oeos

(a)

'

' (
UpaTiKci
iVi'-f

(Nero) 1021.

8.

17.

1029. 17 marg. (?). 1060. I. 1021. 3. 17; 1028. 26; 1070. 3•

1025.
1 6.

14.

1029.
1065.
6,

8;

(6
1070.
8.

1028.

"}.

piyas

(6

2.

() Temples.

;«028. 3•
(c)

^:

1070.

7•

Priests, &c.

1046. 4• 1050. 2; 1072.

;^

1031. . 1025. 4> 24 ; 1068.
4(.?).

4•

' ?

1029.

5•

'i-^poyK.

1029.
7j

15-

UpoSovXos 1050. 21.

1028. 1029.
6, 7•

25.

VII.

RELIGION
Christian.

255

!1038.
ayia

(2)

1053. 23.
23.
ciyios

1060.
23.

g.

fKaepavns 1053.
1038.
2 3-

1058.

5-

Kvpws (0! 1058. . (is 5S 1056. I . 1059. . 1038. 1 8 1072. 12. iV-'t 1072. 14 (?)• 1026. 2 4 1072. 3 (?). ) ayios 1060. 9 X/iy 1037. I.
;

<

(

7((9
(3)

' / (
((
avaSoais

Magic.
1060. 41060. 5• 1060. 4• 1060. 3•

1060. 4. 1060. 1060. 1060. 5• 1060. 4•

5•
I.

ayopapopos 1031.

?, (( // (€ (3 ( ^..
2.

VIII.

OFFICIAL

AND MILITARY
an.

TITLES.
15.

1030. 2,24.
eVl

: .

!,
44,

1031.

4•

1023.

2.

!
5•
52.

1033. 1046.

,
2.

.

1032. 48•

. (..

6)

1032.

1063.

5•

1031.
4,

.

apxiepevs

1025. 1033.

24

1068.

4•

9•

1032.

25,

39•

!
(..
(a.D.

1028. 107)1029. .
86)

3•

'1(',5((!
1

///
']
,

. 5! (! ((
!/3 ^.
1025.
See
22.

1042. 5•
2.

1020.

cV. cV.

1032.
(a.D.

0^158105

162)1032. I. 1033.

,

5•

29) 1024.

43•

7,

1031.

•(,

!

3•

,
;

1031.

4•

.
;

See

/305.

yp.

1028. 5 1045. 45• 1063. 3• 1025. 1028. 4• cohors iii Ituraeorum cohors 1022. 5, 31• 1022. 28. cornicularius 1022. 27.

(
161)

/ !
1032.
3-

1032. 36• C. Minicius Italus (a.d. MapTiSKis KoivTOs 103) 1022. 2. (a.D. 117) 1023. 6. (. D. 1 56-7) 1032, 20.

1032.

(

5•

'! ^( .( ! ..

^
(a.D.

1020.

g, 8.

iVn-cus

1055.

inlrod.

256

INDICES
1025.
5•

!
1048.
overpavoi

oypaafvs \.
2,

14!

.

28.

note.
4•

1033.

' !!
1033.
3•

^ ! !
singularis
introd.
:

! [^
3•

1035.

7)€1

1048. 2, 4, 5 1053. 2. 1045- 4^• 1047. . 104:8. 2, note; 1072. 1025. 2.

, ^^ , ! , !! |
1031. 4

eVt ?;?

/5 ,
88(29) 1024. 43•
!

€5

Tiji/

.
1

(a.D.

1032. 26, 39

);!•

MaKfSoViot
(.. D.

(.

D.

86)

1057. 1028.

2. 2.

29)

1024.
2.
2.

.

Cf.

1023.

1048.

2,

note; 1071.

3(f)•

!
tiro

1032. 59• 1022. 4•

'•

1042.

14.

1065.

introd.

.

1032.

26, 31, 41,

5•
1050.
2 2.
1 6.

1022. 26. 1024. 3•

!

^!

1042.

1

4.

! //
'
.
8.

1061.

1053.

12, 20, 25.

IX.

WEIGHTS, MEASURES, COINS.
(a)

Weights and Measures.
1052. 9
el saep.\

1031. 15, i6; 1032. 11; 1044. 2 i/ ??/. ; 1061. 8. dpTa/3,) 1024. 28, 29, 45; 1031. 16; 1034.

1056.

3.

1069.

26.

' !
)

1040.

9
;

d saep.
1056.

;

1044.
8
;

2 ei saep.\

1048.

2

d saep.

4, 5,

1068.

\6
1052.

.
1031.

1024.
2 2.

.

26.

\04iO. ly.
cl saep.

1051. 12.
30.

1070.

1052. 20 e/ saep. 1054. 5, 6 1055. 1070. 30.
;

!
3, 4, 8.

()
''''

1053. 3
3•

^^ saep.

1043. 2, 1053. 3

saep.

1044. 3

e/ saep.

1036. 20 1062. 1039.
15.
7•

;

1037. 14; 1057. 3;

apy.

1047.

! ()
{b)

Coins.

et saep.;

5•

1026.

1037. 14; 1041. 7, 1047. 3, 6 1062. d saep. 6 1057. 3. 1049. II. 1034. introd. 1036. 20
;

12, 13,
;

24;
5,

1056.

;

;

;

1039. 8

;

IX.
1045.
4
I

WEIGHTS, MEASURES, COINS
i

el saep.
;

et saep.

1046. ; 1050. i el

ei saep.
;

snep.

1049. 1055. 5
;

/

1069. 35. 1042. 25, 3,.

Kcpariov

1038.

28, 29, 3S.

/
.
TAXES.
7.

/
{66\

257
6, 8,
1

1046. I 1026.

;

1049.
5•

8,

2i.

(76-/3;/) 1046.

2;

1049. 5

^^ •*'"'/•

(-^/) 1049.
(/3/) 1046.

1045.

/

Ji7t;/). ;

1055.
7,

7•

6.

5; 1049.

2, 6•

1039. 7• 1026.
1053. 8
el saep.
;

12;

1042. 24, 25, 35;
iiitrod.

1059.

1048. , 2, 5• 1042. 24, 25, 35•

//
1044. 5 1046.

'' ^'/».

"^ 1044.
3•

o.Von-(e'SoK)

1044.

7 ^^ Jrti^.

1046.

9< II'

Tf\iaa

1031.
;

(

1024. 37
1031.
2

.

2

.

8.

^ !

/3 ^^'
1048.

12, 3('')•

1046.

3•

1032.

12.

1046.

6.

.

1031. 21.

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS.
1042. 33• 1038. 36 1049. 3 ^^ saep. 1020. 6, 8. accipere 1022. 24. 1069. , 37 1070. , 57• 1030. 7 1032. 29, 35! 1056. 13, 15 el saep. 1064. 2 ; 1057. ; 1061. 2 1066. 2 1067. 2, 4, 22 1068. 8; 1070.
;

! /3 !
(
;

a 1022. 4. 1053. 2 3. 1061. 7. 1024. 25; 1040. 15. 1021. 8, 12. ayye'tov 1070. 3°• 1025. 17 1032. 17. Syioc 1038. 3 1060. 9• 1049. 3• 1027. 1 1. 1062. 4 / 1044. g 1069. 28. 27 1031. 2. 1044. 9 note, 27.
;

'5029.
; ;

;

;

;

;

;

;

!

4,

;

/.;

1067.

/

53; 1071. 10. 1024. 25; 1040. 5•
4•

hval 1060.

1027. 4; 1036. 14. 1031. 17. <,)024. 19; 1031. 4; 1039.

;

1040.

28.

; ;

258

INDICES
avev

1031. 8. 1024. 20. aiTtav 1032. 5 1 1033. I 1038. 4 1042. 4. 1044. 17, note. aKoXoidas 1041. 9 1032. 59. 1024. 25 1040. 1 6. 1034. introd. 1041. 19. 1036. 27• 1029. 22; 1032. 331040. 13, 4^. 1040. 27. 1036. 35> 3^. 1026. 1 1 1027. 5 1044. 3 / Ji2i=/. 1048. 13; 1050. 14; 1061. 14, 18; 1070. 1068. 20; 1071. 7• "'

«5

;

;

!
!
52.

;

;

;

1068. 12, g. 1039. 1028. 24 ; 1029. 9• 1067. 3°; 1070. II. annus 1022. 1 2 / saep. 1068. 15. 14; 1069. ^2; 1071. 1032. 43; 1070. 38. 1038. 31. 1044. 9 and note, 13.

.

'^!

:
5
1031.

.

3•

1061. 19.

((!037.
6.
;

1070.

2 1.

6;

1042.28.
;
;

;

;

: ? ! !
'
,
22.
(ivnyfiv

5/(?)

1061.

2.

1067. 7• 1040. 14; 1049. 2. 5,^ 1024. 36 ; 1025. 1 6 1031. 21. 1070. 42, 5°• 1033. . 1058. 51032. II. 1046. 3• 1028. 8, 27; 1030. 9) 1034. 6, II 1036. 12; 1037. 2; 1038.
; ;

((€!

: : :
!,

1030. 12 1032. 37. 54 1033. 14 1038. 36; 1068. 23. 1084. 8. 1060. 6. 1020. 8. 1020. 7 1035. 4• 1024. 4', 1036. 1 8. 1037. 8; 1038. 33; 1041. 2; 1024. 32. 1042.29. 1028. 1 8, 20, 3•
;

102..

7, 13.

1032.

2, 7,

1031. 3 1029. 4 1028. 1 2 1040. 3, 6. 56; 1036. 2
; ;

''

1051.

3,

.
;

;

!

1032. 8. 1063. 4. 1062. ; 1033. 7 1069. 2, 20, 21. 1068. 6. 1042. 23 1032. 36.

3

;

: :
!

1070. 39• 1024. 35 1026. 6, 7 1031. 20 1036. 23, 43; 1037. 15; 1038. 29; 1040. 12, 21, 44; 1041. 25; 1063. 6• 1068. 3; 1070. 57; ;
;

1041.

7,

H•
;

1061.

4.

/

1030. 8, 12. 1032. 5• 1024. 4° ; 1033. 5 1034. 1041. 18; 1061. 9; 1063. 14.
;

introd.

1031.

5•
1 8.

1066.

1041.
;

7.

1072. 20. 1026. 22 1026. 7 1043. 2 1072.
;

;

8.

1032. 50.
arf>'o;(X,)Toi

1033.

16.

: . . : :

1039. 9 1040. 1 3• 1023. 2. 1046. g, 1• 1033. 12. 1066. 3 ^^ saep. 1070. 55• 1032. 5<3• 1024. 38. 1070. 50. 1056. 4, 8, 1032. 44; 1053. 20, 27.

.

See Inde.x

IX

(!•).

apyvpovi 1051. 1 9. Spovpa. See Index

IX (a), See Index IX («).
(magic) 1060.
14.
5.

1038. 1032. 9•

;

XL

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
1063.
5-

(&( .

( ! ^
(
/3dpof

( !,
apxiepivs

1021.

(

1031.

.

!
>
;

1032. 4°.
4•

^
yeou;^eii'

259

yva 1024.

1070. 2 8. 1025. 4•
) ;
;

1025. 4, -4 1033. g.
1061. 24
;

1068.

1067. 20

;

1069. 33

>

1070. 47•
1027. 12

1070. 49• 1041. 10.

1031. 9 1040. 8 g 1038. 9. 1053. 3. yfphiaiva 1069. 9 (•'')• 1031. 1 1. 7£7€/ 1024. 1024. 33, 36 1031. 8, 2. 1061. 7. () 1044.

1071.

2.

/(
y
12.

2
;

;

1033. 13. 1030. 8. 1027. 3. 4 1034. 6 1050. 20. 1025. 1 6. authenticus 1022. 29•
;

;

1086.

4•

,'
a(t>pfv (?)

1031.

6;
;

1044, 25, 28; 1046. 13 1020. 6. 1067. 5.
1051. 17.

1040. 1049.

II,

45;

24.

10^0.

.

, (.
.

&1032.

/36(

1053. 3 ^i ^aep. \02Q. 4; 1051. 2 2. 1069. 26. 1052. . 1062. 14. 1042. . 1037. 9 1038. e/ saep. (-) 1044. See Index VIII. 1041. 5• 1036. 21. 1070. 32• 44', 1065. introd. 1026. 12. 1025. 7• 1058. 3• 1020. 5, 7; 1033. 15• 1021. 1 6. 1037. 1 6 1038. 31 1042. 27. 1031. 3• 1031. 4•
;
;

{) 1044. 7, note. 1027. II, 23 1031. 1 6 1032. 14 1033. 8 1036. 32 1038. 29 1039. 13; 1040. 33; 1041. 14, 18, 19; 1042. 25 1044. 3 ei saep. 1043. 3 1053. I, 8, 11; 1057. 3; 1062. 6, 11; 1064. 3 1066. 16 1068. 23 1069. 3, 1070. 20, 43, 52 ; 1072. 1 1. 5, II, 25 1032. 17. 1031. 21. 1024. 1 8. yoi/fis 1028. 13. 1032. 33; 1036. 47; 10£9. 16; 1040. 31, 52; 1065. 2; 1068. 9, 24; 1070. 49; 1072. 16. 1042. 29, 32, 1041. 15, i8, 20
; ;

&
; ;

/ 7/.

()

1031. II.

1031.

ii saep.

1

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

( .
35•
;
;

;

;

,

See Index VIII. 1071. 8. 1061. ig. 1032. 38; 1036. 46; 1037. i8; 1038. 33, 36; 1039. 17; 1040. 21,31, 1041. 6, 21 1042. 29, 33; 1045. 5t 1061. 3, 21, 22; 1062. 7, 8, 10; 51 1068. 4, 1066. 8 1067. 9 1064. 6 16; 1069. 7, 35; 1070. 12 el saep.; 1071. 6, 7, 8. 1029. 6, 23.
;
;

;

;

;

;

1050. II. 1048. . /3/)' 1069. 22.
iSiJpaa

1028. 4• 1025. I 1063. 3• 1026. 20 ; 1051. 4• 1034. 5; 1044. 6, 22; 1067.
;

7•

1057.

3•

ce(?)1022. . cohors 1022. 5, 28, cornicularius 1022.

31•
27.

yaXi)i<OT>;f

ya/i((«Jr

1042. 7. 1070. 35• 1034. 5•

aaveiov

1021. 9• 1024. 13; 1026. 5

1031.
\

9•

S 2

;

26

INDICES
8.
;

^( 1024.

'
^
.

«032.

51

1036. 3°•
1051.

.
1

13•

6.

ieX/iariitioi/

Sfvoae (magic)

1026. 1051. 1060. 5•

;

! !
.

1046. 2. 1032. 45) 48
1051.
5•
.'

;

1038.

12.

,

2.

«027.

8f|i^£l024. 1 8. Seoirrws 1032. 40.

&(
8(;;

030•
>{?)

1026. I 6. (,icvcll' 1049. 7, 12, 17, 22. 1071 c,. Cf. Indices II, III. 1072. 4. dexter 1022. 23. SiyXoCi/ 1023. 4; 1032. 17, 34; 1040. 47; 1045. 45; 1070. 41, 46. 1033. 6; 1045. I. () 1033. 1024. 37; 1061. 8. . 1040. 17, 32. . 7V 1031. 1 1, Ig.

. !
,

1024:.
7-

27; 1031. 22.

.

1046.

, »(

''

1024. 39 1039. 1040. 31. 9; 1032. 38,54; 1034. introd.; 1068. 15; 1070. 40• 1059. 3• 1058. 37 See Index IX {i). 1044. 7, 8, 12. 1027. 9; 1032. 3^ 1068. 5, 13, 26; 1069. 6, 29• 1049. II. 1028. 14. 22, 27, 3^• 1047. 4•
;
;

?

;

{032.

&((
/35

See Index IX (). 1056. 41032. 53* 3; 1046. 71032. 1 6. 1024. 43• 1061. 3.

1038. 2 1. 1032. 541032. 2 1034. intiod. 1068. 5, 7
.

>

1070. 38, 45•

1031. 12.
;

/3>037.

/
'

&((
1034.

1027. 6 1046. 13. 1061. 1 2. 1040. / <7/. ; 1033. 8. 1041. 9 1042. 28. 1026. 4, 5 1032. 43 ; 1034. introd. 1043. 1053. 13, 2, 27; 1055. 7; 1062. 15 ; 1063. 4, 8; 1066. 1 2 ; 1068. 24; 1069. 35; 1070. 33.54•

;
)

/

;

;

1033. 13. 1032. 8. ego 1022. 4• r^fii• 1024. 34• 1020. 5, 8. 1025. II, 1 8. 61 TIS 1068. 2. «''- 1021. 17; 1036. 47; 1040. 1084. 6 1067. 1045. 1069. tiSos 1026. 9. 15 1032. 17, 24. ciVfli, 1032. 51; 1033. 11; 1063. 4, 7> 9 1067. 10, 5• 1033. 5• fir, (IS 1032. 56 1036. 4• fiT 1033. 1020. 6, 8. fVflras 1063. 7• 1053. 23. 1037. 7 1038. 1 6. wiVeif 1039. 12 1040. 23. 1040. 27. 1043. 2, 3 1070. 29.

5

;

;

2

2

;

.

;

( (' ( (' » (
('('(

;

!

.

;

;

1069. 1024.
;

;

3•
;

introd.

1030. 1031. 1040. 9 1044. 4•

;

;

038. ;

1032. 42, 55• 26; 1044. 27. 1040. 3°• 1032. 2 2. 1021. 14; 1030. II.

( (
'
(\(

;

;

1031. 1 1. 1032. 30• 1071. . 1021. 6. 1059. 1070. 1041. 12, 23. ('! 1038. 32• 1061. 13•

' (

;

.
34•

((1027.
1021.
2

.

emu 1038. 37; 1042.

;

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
1032. i8. 1025. 2. 1038. 7, 8 1043. 1038. 2 . 1033. 8 1071. 2. 1032. 2 31027. 7• 1027. 5•
;

261

(
fv(K(v
eVfldSf

/ (!
(^

2.

;

1038. 28. 1028. 20 1029. 8, 26 1031. 5. 1035. g; 1036. 10; 21 1041. 16. (voUiov 1036. 19, 24, 44; 1037. 14, «6; 1038. 27, 29, 38. cVoiKoXoyor 1038. 13; 1043. I, f'mx\ftt> 1068. II, 25.
;

1070. 41• cWwiar 1037. 14 1024. 1 1

,

;

;

;

6'«/
39, 49.

(
(
1062.

1037. 7; 1038. 1 6. 1070. 4• 1027. 9; 1028. 41; 1029. 22; 1030. II, 22 1031. 29; 1032. 3, 57 1033. 14; 1065. introd.; 1071. 10. 1032. 4°. 1055. 6. iniKp'ivav 1023. 5 1028. 10. 1070. 2 2. 1061. 20. 1070. 45• fVi'liiOf 1029. 25. ininebos 1038. 24. 1032. 24. 1056, 6. 1031. 8; 1045. 48. 1062. 12 1066. <); 1070. 5,

(((

' ( , ( ($
7•

;

;

;

,

;

( ( !
€(5

1029. 27. 1038. 9 1071. 5. 1070. 1 6, 50. eWor 1032. 22. 7;((«020. 2; 1032. 44, 49, 52. 1036. 24; 1038. 30. 1025. 1045. 48; 1065. 3• 1037. 13, 1 7. 2. 1066. 7• 1070. 53• 56• 1032. 52; 1066. 20 (.^). 1027. 6. 1025. 3, 2 2. 1037. 8 1063. 6. ilns 1035. 8 1025. 1 4• 1062. 3. 1024. 33 1031• '8. 1037. 5• 1084. II. 1033. 6. 1070. 20. 1032. 341042. 1 5• 1032. 5• fVei 1032. 16, 48; 1041. 6.

((
'^

;

-.
iiria-ToKibiov

5.5•

\09.

1\.

epistula

! €
( .
fVi

( ^ ^
4

1040.

;

4(
cttoUlov

See Index VIII. 1022. 9, 3°• 1033. 6. 1032. 33 1034. 4 1039.
;

;

8,

2

;

1031. 8

;

1052.

7

;

1065.

4•

;

;

€^( (\(

'
eoTf
?T€pos

1049. 7, 12, 17, 2 2. 1070. 13. epiov 1052. 8. 1060. 7• 1065. 4,' 1067. 3, 17, 8, 1068. 27; 1069. 6; 1070. 54•

( ((
(pyov

20

;

1061. esse 1022. 31-

,

19.

((

'>

1070. 45•
;

73036.
34,

1061.

2.

35> 45
;

48

1037. 1 8 1038. 33 1041. 2 1 1042. 30.
>
;

€\
>

;

(.
(!.
10.
;

1031. 20.
introd.
;

1034.

1041. 13.

'

1068.

(•/ 1036.

6.

(

1024. 31, 39; 1027. 4; 1032. 17; 1034. 10 1070. 56. 1032. 8 1070. 6. cToi, €. 1036. 20, 24 1038. 30• 1042. 13. fifpyfTfir' 1032. 42, 55• fuepyfV/jf 1032. 37 1042. 3• (inopeiv 1068. 3• 1039. 1 1. eipiaKdu 1068. 13; 1069. 4. See Index III. 2 1042. 2. See Index III. 1042,

&}
;

;

;

(. (^

1070. 47.

1

INDICES
1070. 3• 1025. 23, 24, 20 1063. 13 23; 1067. 24; 1068. 28; 1069. 34; 1070. 43• 1033. 15. iXfii/ 1020. 5, 1030. 24; 1033. 9, 1034. 8; 1039. 6; 1040. 7; 1041. II, 23; 1042. 22; 1061. 4; 1068. 15, 20 1070. 25. 1061. 28. ex 1022. 6. fws 1041. 11; 1043. 2; 1061. 7, 12, 16; 1062. 8; 1068. 22.
;

;

.
hie

1050. 4• 1034. 1,7; 1038. 1036. 3 1 1060.
;
.

7•

,

,

6

1022.

9.

,
;

iconismus 1022. 8 e/ saep. i3tosl024. 19; 1032. 9, 15.

;

1042.
note.
I'lW

25, 35.

(y^)

1044.

7,

frater

1022.

.
14.

frons 1022. 22.
ffCyof

1035. 12; 1050. 1033. 17. 1042. 25, 35. fuvd. 1070. 9.

' :
7

(((

!. /3
1020.

1071. 7. 1061. 21. ^«11» 1025. 1014. intiod.

. ^-

1029. 25, 27; 1033. 14, i6; 1040. 28; 1070. 13, 28, 46. 1020. 5, 8; 1070. ;. 1032. 4, 2 . 1042. 1 4. See Index VIII.

.

5, 7•

7/>1025.8;
1056.

1029. 26; 1043.

2;

1068. 14.

3•

1031. 22.

';( 1070.

1040.

,

12.

24, 26, 44•

30.

1067. 29. 1038. 13. 1050. 1 6. 1038. 2 1042. . ic'Xfti'lOei. 21 1069. 9; 1070. 6(os. See Indices VI [. eipEios 1062. 4. 1027. 12. 1025. 1 6.
; ;

!

1070.

15.

& ( :

1066. 5; 1069. 6, 11, 35. UpaTiKos 1046. 4. I'fpfir 1050. 2 1072. 14. 1029. 5, 15. iepoSouXoy 1050. 2 1. 1026. 3. in 1022. 5, 30. ha 1032. 42, 55; 1033. 18; 1061. 26; 1062. 13; 1066. 7, 15; 1068. 5, 19, 24, 26; 1069. 4, 7, 29, 35; 1071. 5, 6. See Index III. 1055. introd. 1050. 5. is 1022. 8. 1035. 14. 1052. 19. 1024. 30; 1031. 20. 103i. S; 1040. 7• TO 1030. 25 1032. 42• (?) 1051. 4• 1034. introd. 1027. 1 inhere 1022. 6.

(\

;

8.

!

"

;

.

1026. 20. 1040. 2 1. 1040. 30.
1024:. 25; 1036.29; 1024:. 38; 1036. 34•

1040.

15.

,

19, 5°) 54-

(037.

1025. 1071. . 1053- 2. 1035. 13. 1060. 7• 1032. ^3. 1047. introd., 2, 4.
II.
7,

;

kalendae 1022.

24•

1062. 4, 6; 1069. 25. 33; 1066. 3; 1067. 3; 1069, 1024. 8.

«? 1040.
2.

-

.

AY.

heveLV \0Q1 6; 1068. 14, 26. 1050. 6. 1069. 3, 24Kivbvviieiv 1033. II. 1024. 19; 1033. 1 8. 1036. 3 1 1067. 8. 1034,. 1 1044. 6, ig; 1045. 47• 1024. 2 4 1031. 15, 1 6. Koims 1034. introd. 1034. 8 1045.
.

^ ( ' ( . ^
37•

( ,
\:

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
17•

263

1069.

lOei. 13.

karissimus 1022. 10.

1062. 1 4, 1040. 32. 1026. 7 1034. I 1061. p. 1071. 2, 8. 1024. lo; 1031. 1024. 32 1081. 17. 1068. 6. 1032. ^6. 1088. 2 2. 1033. 3• 1034. 5; 1069. 3• Ke\eieiv 1024. 28; 1028. 10; 1031. 23; 1032. 32; 1071. 5> 6• 1067. II, 3• 1052. 20 el sacp.
;

I 1068. , 4, 17 ; 1071. , 1068. 2 3• Cf. Inde.x Kvptos ('valid') 1036. 34; 1037. 18; 1038. 33; 1039. 16; 1040. 30; 1041. 20; 1042. 29. 1024. 21 1031. i2; 1040. 14;

.
;

I

1059.

;

/jo?

.

;

.

!
III

1041.

4.

1072.

.
;

(€

;

!

! .
!

37; 1025. ig 1026. 2, 3; 1065. 2; 106S. 11; 1068. 9; 1069. 7;
1071.
7•

102.

See Inde.K IX
introd.
2
1.
;

[a).

1034. 1070.

1045. 49.

'' («

( (
25•
_

1042. 6; 1048. 7, 8. Cf. Index and Index VI s. v. 1042. 2 2. Xf'yfii/ 1066. II 1070. 56. 1067. 1 9• XfTTToVfpos 1066. 5• 1059. inlrod. 1069. 3. 1051. 2 1 1034. introd. 1053. 1 2 1064. g. 1056. 3• 1055. 3• 1033. 4• 1026. 3. 12, 14; 1066.

.

((

;

;

;

;

;

.

1051. 2, 7> 8, 1 See Index IX

6.

(a).

>>6!

;

;

1056. 5• 1038. 38 1041. 9 1043. 2 1045. 1049. 1050. 23(?); 1047. 1053. 13. irpof 1069. 19, 25• 1044. 9, 6, 24, 28; 1054. 5; 1061.
;

;

'

;

;

;

;

;

1048.
1031. I 7• 1051. 4 8, 4• 1062. 8. 1036. 29. 1024. 20; 1040. 1025. 530.
;

KOKKoKoyc'iv

6,

! &!
-'
/li'yas

2,

7•

( '
it/)f'as

1070.

ig• [ 1050. 1029• 25. 5; 1070. 1 8. 1049. 3 ^ ^Cfp1032. 25, 49 1067. manus 1022. 20.
.

5066.

J

6.

1031. 4
5•

1032.

I,

45) 48> 5^•

1056. 2. 1062.

1031. 8; 1048. 9• 1035. 12. 1053. 1072. 13.
;

027. . 102.
;

1051. I 7 (.''), 19 (0• 102Q. 24; 1064. 12; 1068. ig.
3,

7) 8,

ig.
;

1032.
Kvpios
(title)

8. 8.

('guardian') 1028.

6'>056.

1032. 36, 48; 1033. 9; 1047.

1069. 27 1070. 8. 1033. g 1070. 7• 1025. 15 1028. 1 8 1029. 6; 1042. 3• Cf. Index II. 1072. 5• 3; 1067. 7, 1070. 48.

y^o!

;

;

2

;

264
ovv

INDICES
1070.
;

12.

w'of

1027. 4

1045. 37<

(\( ((

(
((

1070. 32. 1032. 27, 28, 34• 1032. 33• 1032. 9• 1049. . 1026. 2. 1049. . 1024. 5, 44 1040. ^ 1061. 7. 8• ^eVpijo-it 1024. 27; 1031. 23 1040. 20. 1024. 26; 1031. 22; 1040. 1069. 26. /lexpt 1070. 43• ^i;ifi's• 1024. 30; 1067. 13; 1068. 10, 24; 1070. 25, 45-

^
-

;

;

;

7

;

^; /

/'

1030. 2; 1034. introd. 1035. 8, 15 1037. 8 1038. 18 1040. 1041. 16; 1043. 2; 1053. . 14; 1062. 15 1068. 13 Pap.). 1024. 15; 1029. 3. 4! 1030. 4 1031. 7; 1032.1; 1036. 6; 1038. 15; 1041. 3 1042. 1039. 2, 4 ; 1040. , 3 1044. 6, 19, 27; 1063. 19 1070. 5, 17' 37• 1032. 7 1044. 4• \02S. 3• 1050. 2 5• 1025. 1049. 4> 20 1053. 24; 1069. 91035. 1 1036. , 23, 33. 42 1037. 7; 1038. 171036. 22, 34 1037. 8, 20 1038.
; ; ;

1053. 3 1021.

2

f/ sacp.

1024. 35; 1031.19; 1040. 15; 1042, 1072. 9• 1029. 2 1042. 17; 1061. 5• 1044. 17, 22. (?) veieiv 1038. 20, 24. 1062. 13. 1038. 32. nomen 1022. 7• vofv 1070. . 1039. 8. 1038. 28, 29; 1042. 25. 1039. 3• 1032. 21, 24 1041. 4; 1045. 46. ioVoi 1038. 21, 25. 1033. 4• numeri 1022. 5• 1032. 17, 23; 1070. 7. 6. 1061. 4•

«

9

;

;

(
//

;

»

;

;

{

;

1

.
iSf

|€ 1064.

.

1043. 2, 3• 1053. 3 et saep.; 1066. igiO1050. 7•

;

,
;

;

;

2

;

/35.

'

;
;

.5
; ;

;

See Inde.x IX (/'). 1033. 14• 1068. 25. 1070. 42. 1027. 3. 4; 1034. 6, 8; 1038. 26, 43; 1037.

($
saep.

;
15

103.
20, 26;

14, 19.

1070.
7

29. 49.

5•
9.
;

1032.
;

1036. 19

;

1044.

^

;

33. 35. 38•
f/ ?'/. 1052. 1038. 8; 1042. 6. 1033. 12 1043. 3 1057. 1027. 3• {!) 1026. ig. 1042. 19. 3.5• See Index IX {6). 1026. 21.
;
;

3•

.

1053. 3

^ saep.

(,

1071. 1071. 3•

.

1035. 8

;

1037. 8

;

1038.

17; 1041. 15.

1043. 2 1060. 6. 1021. 5. 1°• 1055. 2. 1054. 6 1055. 8. 1070. 42. oKiywpuv 1065. 6. 1037. 12; 1038. 23. 1026. 5• 1070. 48, 55• 26; 1070. 51. 1025. 8; 1050. 2 6. 1028. 34 1030. 14, 22 1031. 23. 1026. II ; 1030. 13; 1040. 26; 1049. 5 ei saep. o\oye~^v\03. 36, 45 1037. 19 1038. 33 1039. 5; 1040. 6, 34. 49; 1041. 1 1, 21 ; 1042. 21, 26, 30•
;

)5

1038.

;

;

',

;

;

A7.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
naiStKos
;

26=

,

1030. 6. 1047. 6 1053. ir. 1049. 5 el saep. 1031. 12; 1044. 3, 4, 5; 1056. 3; 1063. 3, 5, 105. 7 1070. 46. ofof 1049. 3 el sacp.; 1068. 22 1069. 29.

.

'

!

:\0^&. ,

;

7•
;

(\€
;

! !
!

1051. 8. 1037. 6; 1038. 31 1042. 27. 1039. 9• 1059. 2 cl sacp. 1032. 39.' 1045• 48, 5^ 1061. 6; 1064. 7• opflas 1040. 33• 1032. 23. 1030. 23. 6; 1029. 27 1072. 1 6. OS, f'l 1027. 6. 1031. 6; 1038. 29 ; 1039. 9 1040. 12 1070. 14, 24. 1025. 1 7 101. 7 1062. 6. 1063. 4on 1062. 4, 6, 7.9; 1063. 4 1064. 5 1066. 9, II 1067. 7. 12, 17, 20; 1068. 21 1070. 47, 56 1072. 19. oiSf 1070. 48, 55• oiSels 1063. 7; 1066. 10, 12; 1070. 43• oiSeVoTf 1062. II. 1035. 3• 1024. 17. 1032. 6, 36, 48, 5~ 1033. 1045. 1064. 6; 38; 1061. 17; 1063. 1066. 6; 1067. 7, 9; 1068. 8 </ 1070. 12, 4; 1071. 2, 8. 1026. 9, 15; 1032. 50; 1053. 2, 13; 1065. 7• 1021. , 14; 1032. 2; 1041. 1045. 49 1067. 14 1071. 3, 9• 23 1024. 3• 1024. 17. 1053. . ofupiSlOv 1067. 28. o\j/is 1070. 15, 50.
;

( 5
;

5026.

;

(

1026. 2 1. 1039. 1 8. 1040. 29. 1070. 47• 1032. 28. Trnpuyyf'XXfii/ 1032. 18. 1032. 131032. 3 . 77n/j(i6tSorai 1033. 16; 1036. 28; 1037. 17 1054. 3 1055. 2 1062. 17: 1070. 51. 1039. 71039. 12, 1 6. 1061. 1068. 17; 1070. 8

(
!
;

1066.

,
.

1061. 25.

1069.

1071. 2. 1071. 6.

,

;

;

1071.

.

;

;

;

{),

;

;

;

;

;

;

(8(
;

'-,

;

;

^;
,

1032. 24 1058. . 1036. 1038. 32• 1040. 8. 1043. . 1040. 7, 1 8, 1053. 2. (?) 1026. 12. 1033. 8, 1 7. 1032. 9, 22, 39 1045. 42. 1033. 7, 1 6. 1032. 5, 51, 53; 1037. 9; 1038. 35 1041. 6; 1061. 28; 1070. 45, 5°, 561023. 4• 1042. 20; 1057. 2. pars 1022. 23. 1021. II, 14, 17 1032. 37 1036. 6, 30 1037. 13; 1038. 26; 1039. 15, 19; 1040. 3; 1041. 2; 1045. 52; 1060. 7; 1061. 24; 1065. 3; 1070.
;

3

;

(( !

^

;

'<

5

^
;

;

;

,

3 c/ saep.

;

;

!
1041.
naiSapiov

(

1050.

12, 14.

4•

.

1070.

2.

1028. 17, 2 5• 1067. 25 1027. 8, 22, 29 1032. 1070. 5, 36• 1025. 13. 1032. 45; 1062. 12; 1066. 1067. 21, 29; 1068. 1069. 13, 1070. 26 1071. 5, 6. 10^8. 12, 3• See Inde.x IX {/>). per 1022. 25. wfpi'iSXen-Tos 1038. II.
;
;

;

2

;

2 8

;

;

;

;

266
1020.
I.

INDICES
1033. 12. 1027. 6. 1030. 2.

TTfpi'oSot

77€puraos

1070.
1051.
1
I

l6.
8.

? /
TTtvUKlOV

(1( ,\
;

1026. 4
8.

/ sacp.

1062.

9.

1031.

1070. 23. 1056. . 1070. 1 9. 1034. intiod. 1045. 38. 1070. 46. IV 102S. II, 9• 1027. 7•
1021.
6.

703.

1063. 1053. 3
1

14.

/ sacp.
introd.

6.

1034.

7(048.

, . \((
3. 4, 9•

•?«''/ 1068. 3, 5• 1032. 35; 1040. 20; 1042. 31; 1065. 1045. 39 (?) 1061. 22 1064. 3; 1066. 8; 1069. 2; 1070. 42; 1071.

3

/

;

;

;

;

1062.

3>

7•

See Inde.x

VI
;

{a)-

1048. 2, 4. 5.' 7• 1033. II 1070. 14 ei saep. 1032. 34; 1066. 24; 1067. 1068. 29; 1070. 6, 15. 1066. 2. 1061. 1044. 9, 3•
;

029.

27;
24.

( '

1033. 4• 1070. 55• 1070. 8. 1046. 3. 1027. 7• 1033. 8. 1062. 5• 1032. 12. 1045. , 6, 12 1062. 4• 1028. 14 1032. 13. 1033. 8, 17 1071. . 1032. 9 1044. 2, 7• 1020. 6, 8 1032. 45, 48. 1034. 3•
;
;
;

;

;

po(pflp

1051.

3•

1069. 12. 1053. 2. 1070. 50. 1032. 2, 53> 55; 1060. 8; 1069. 30; 1070. 13, 42• 1045. 46• praeesse 1022. 5. 1047. 1027. 1036. 32; 1039. 14;

^

1031. ig. 1025. 2. 1023. 3• 1050. 5• 1063. 6 1084. 4• 1024. 24, 29, 45> 4^ 1031. 9 introd. 1040. 8 eisaep.; 1044. 3 1069. 17. 1069.
; ; ;

;

1034.

el saep.

.

,
6.

€ ^
(

;
'J ;

qui 1022.

5•

1041. 19.

1063.

(title)

1067. 3• 1026. 24

;

1072.

3-

referre

('older') 1061. 15.
2.
4• 2.

1050. 7• 1022. 6. 1069. 28.
1051. 13.

1070.

piobare 1022. 1021.

1029. 12,14; 1042.31; 1044.
1 5•
;

1033.

1040. 47 1041. 25. 1024. 46; 1029 23; 1036. 1038. 35; 1040. 22, 49; 1041. 44; 25; 1042. 32.

26,

, '
iiiVi)

pn-ifiti/

22,

1051. 3, 5• 1066. 4, 17• 1066. 19, 20. 1033. 3• 1054. 7 1061. 20 1062. 19; 1064.13; 1065.9; 1072.22. c>ev^opai 1025. 23, 24, 25 1063. 13; 1066. 23; 1067. 24; 1068. 28; 1069. 34; 1070. 43•
; ;

( [)

',

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
1060.
4•

. ^
1051.
salus

2.

1022. 3• scribeie 1022. 29. 26; 1062. 13; 1070. 22. 1070• 29. sex 1022. 4• 1032. 27. 1025. 21 1056. 8; 1057. 4• 1063. 4• 1066• 20. 1035. 3• sine 1022. 12, 16, 18.

! ^!
avvfpyov

267

€ !
sinister

;

civSovtov

1051.

1 2.

singularis 1022. 26.

^
13,

1022. 14, 1024• 3•
2, 6.

20.

! .
superciliuni

!.
((1
2.

1089. 8, I 2. 1033. 7. 1053. (?). 1029• 6, 1046. 5; 1034. introd. 1063. II. 1034. 2, 7•

2

7•

6,

, 6, 23;

1070. 40•

1022.

14.

SUUS 1022•

axoKaCfW 1070. 56. 1071. 2.

1071•

1068. 7• 1060• 5•
2 4•

€. 6>
>/3'
1061•

1038. 35• 1024. 44• See Index VIII. 1023. 3• subicere 1022. 9. 1034. 6. 1032. II. 1064. 7• 1065. 5• 1063. 2. 1043. . 1025.

, .

((~

1042. 1 4• 1024. 3; 1031. 5. 91066. 6; 23; 1072. 71064. 7• 1068• 8• 1058. 2. 1021. 15. 1047. 2.

6

;

1069.

,

. !
4,
Tc'Xfiof

1044• 2 and note. 1068. 6, 3, 26• 77/3 1032. 37• 1070. 3•

^
8.

1050. 1 3. 1062. 8; 1067. 12. 1070. 3•
II.

tabularium 1022. 30• See Index IX [). 1030. 13 ; 1032. 59 1042. ig.

1051.

7•

1053. 2 Pap.). 1069. 1 6. 1060. 8. 1070. 4• ;(05 1069• 4• re 1021. 11; 1027. 11; 1032. 17; 1033. 16; 1036. 33; 1039. 14; 1041. 19. «^:026. 8; 1059• 2, 6; 1063. 1070.

(.

;

€!

;

(037.

13; 1038. 27; 1061. 2, 17. 1035. 13. TeUiom 1071. 3• etelioth 1042. 34.
1031•
2 2.

(

)\\

(

1061.

.

.

' '

1055. 4• 1032, 14. 1045. 22, 28, ^2, 1025. 12. 1024. 6.

. !
TiXfurai/

((!
1028.
27,

32

;

1030.
2.

;

1032. 29,

35•

1028•

See Index

IX

(b).

1029. 26. 1056. 4• 1070. 51.
1041.
9•

TiKTeiv

1069. 21. 1026. 6, 22 1046. 6; 1056. 2 1057.2. 1025. 20.
;
;

;

1052.

;

1055.

1

268
tiro 1022. 4. Ws 1063. 7; 1071. 3, 9 1072. TOKOf 1046. 2. 1024. 4 1031. 6. -ot 1024. 5; 1032. 14, ig 1038. 24, 32; 1068. II. Tore 1062. 6. 1070. 3 I. 1046. 7•
;
;

INDICES
19.

(( 6 £«053.
1032. 28 1065.

;

6,
;

1040. 52 104. 5. 8 1070. 26. 1062. 14; 1068. 9•
; ;

1070. 4•
1036. i5;
1051.
6, II.

;

Tvyxafdv 1070. 18.

! -!' .
<?;
£iytij5,

1051.

9•

1069. 21, 23• 1062. 6. 1037. 4 (?)• ^opfrpiXfii. 1069. 6(?). 1035. 14.

1062.

.

1066.

13.

104.
IX
;

3, 9.

'4,
;

9•
8.

See Inde.K

().

1030.
vyiaivftv

6;

1031. 25

1032. 38,

54•

1061.
iyioCs

2, 26.

'

1029. 22.

iytHs

1024. 33

>

1031. 18.

1045. 38 1072. (ppoprit 1033. 5 1070. 23. 1054. 3. 1050. 1 6. 1030. 2. 1032. ig. (magic) 1060. 4•
; ; ;

'1028.

15; 1031. 13; 1035. 2; 1038. 4> 34. 38; 1040. 2, 39! 1042. 6, 19. 3, 3; 1063.2; 1065.2; 1067. 6; 1070. 34v'mmjs 1032. 27. 1033. 1 8. 1036. 1038. 19; 1035. 1 1039. 15 1040. 29 1041. 2; 1045. 3 / saep. 1068. 1 7• inareia. See Inde.x III.

-' ^»
vTTfpiT^s

;

;

;

;

;

(!
irrfpT^.

.] (6(
.

(>

1032. 22, 20. 1032.35, 41. 43vnodctKvvvat 1066. 21. 1027. 12. 1024. 3°• 1032. 1 6. 1027. 5. 9 > 1032. 1033. 6, 1027. 2, 8. 1062. 8.

!

1030. 8. 1039. 1040. 25. 1045. 5°• 1065. 3• 1032. 26, 31, 41, 5^

.

>

1057.

2.

1024. 5 1025. 9 1038. 1030. 1054. 1040. 6 1041. 5 1042. 2 1056. 1057. 1061. 2 1055. 1064. 2 1062. 2 1063. 1066. 2 1070. 2. 1067. 2 1068. 2 1069. 1046. 1,25. 1061. 20. 1021. 8; 1071. 3• "*»" 1067. 4; 1068. 6, 21. ;(ci'p, 1039. 6. 1029. 5• 1061. 2 2. 1034. iiitrod. 1040. 53• 1059. introd. 1046. , 4• 1037. . 1044. 3 ( saep.
;

6
;

5
2

;
;

;

;

;

;

;

:
/

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

'&

;

104. .
6, 2.

II.

,

1042. 24 ; 1063. 8; 1068. XPfooTUv 1041. 8; 1057. 2. 10QQ. 14; 1069. 32.

1044. 7>

note.

/

valere 1022. 9•

1061.

1

7.

1026.

4)

12,

3•

>(( .

1029. 25; 1036. 25. 1042. 2 3106. 15; 1037. 13; 1038. 25• 1070. 1036. 9, 27; 1032. 34; 1035. 1040. 25; 1066. 24; 1068. 29. 1042. 24, 25, 35•

.

;

12, 20, 25•

XL

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
1045. 3
1021. 4
et saep.
;

269

Me
6.
<if

1060.

9-

1055.
;

(magic)
1

^

1028. 37

1030.
I

6

;

1031.

1051. 1033. II. \///;. 1071. 5•

5.

^

= 7€

1032. 30

.

3•
;

1040.

1 1

;

1053. 26

;

1056. 6. 1065. 6. 1026. 2, 4•

XII.

INDEX OF PASSAGES DISCUSSED.

270

INDICES
ib)

Papyri, Inscriptions, &c.

Plate

1

No. loio recto

1

iiik
,:— i>w^r-.»'/>..«-<5£>.-'»A*Vti'i'X^;^r?^
/"
>;

- "

,

II

y
ij-'f•»

'K^^

*: * *

T•

!*. -

.'

'.

-..-»r~«t">'"*'"•»*,.

,

^ "^^>

-'^^'«ifli

^v».-

.

[Oil.

Fill.

[

IX-CtO

Plate

III

'"

y.;

^''^^:•''"*»I'•»Vi^l.;

4
..i.^.;>K.1
'»4'

No.

I.

Fol. 2 verso

Plate IV

f j^^/~~>

rr

;v: >l

A
CtJ^

<4

f' f

.;<«-.

^r
-I

n'"" ^-^-^

pt^n^-'^fT'
i-f-JKM• isi^j^
«.J

^''•:+'

No. IOI2.

Frs. 1-3

Plate

V

r >4 1^
I

F'-ti-Y'r*

i*^

'^^^
I

*

C r=4

,!^

r-i

, ^^ h^' " «^

''''

6^

f^ fr^

t>-|

^^ tt^^ ^ *

^* ^\^_

^

is.^ Y'l

-«r

3^ /-t xtc-j^^f. :^^/^

rl-rtr^n-Yrl'-YT^^Y»^^" V^

.-_V-rHHi.*-cA,^\>*Y'-<

y
No. ioi6.
Cols, v-vi

Plate VI

,

-A»y jr

n<»Af/?> 'MfXV

xr

.

Xf

rf y ^^

r "'!

-^

^ V^

A

f t-

'^•//'^

'*^'^

jgHC f •^^,^

,

i)^

%
No. 1017.
Cols, xix-xx

wv^

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND
GRAECO-ROMAN
in

BRANCH.
has conducted Archaeological research

"J^HE EGYPT EXPLOR A TION FUND, which
Egypt
since

1882, in 1897 started a special department, called the Graeco- Roman Branch, for the discovery attd publication of remains of classical antiquity and early
Christianity in Egypt.

The Graeco-Roman Branch

issues

annual volumes, each of about 250 quarto pages, with

facsimile plates of the more important papyri, under the editorship of Prof.

Grenfell and

Dr. Hunt.
volume,

A subscription of One Guinea to the Graeco-Roman Branch entitles subscribers to the annual and also to the annual Archaeological Report. A donation of £2 cottslitutes life
Subscriptions

membership.

may

be sent to the

A. Grueber, British

Museum ; and for America,

for England, Mr. H. Honorary Treasurers— INIr. Robert R. Farquhar, 527 Tremont

Temple, Boston, Mass.

PUBLICATIONS OF THE EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND.

MEMOIRS OF THE FUND.
I.

THE STORE CITY OF
For 1SS3-4.
Edition.')

AND THE ROUTE OF THE EXODUS.
Thirteen Plates and Plans.

By Edouard Naville.
I.

{Fourth and Revised

2^5.

II.

TANIS,

Part

For 1884-5.
(Second Edition.)

By W. M. Flinders
25J.

Pf.trie.

Eighteen Plates

and two Plans.
III.

NAUKRATIS,

Part I. For 1885-6. By W. M. Flinders Petrie. With Chapters by Cecil Smith, Ernest A. Gardner, and Barclay V. Head. Forty-four Plates and Plans. {Second Edition^ 25J.

IV.

GOSHEN AND THE SHRINE OF SAFT-EL-HENNEH.
By Edouard Naville.
Eleven Plates and Plans.
{Second Edition.)
255•.
'

For

1886-7.

V.

TANIS, Part II; including TELL and TELL NEBESHEH. For 18S7-S.
and A.
S.

DEFENNEH
By
\V.
25/.

(The

Biblical

Tahpanhes

')

M. Flinders Petrie,

F. Ll.

Griffith,
F. Ll.

Murray.

Fifty-one Plates and Plans.

VI.
VII.

NAUKRATIS,
Griffith.
Antiquities

Part

.

For 1888-9.

By Ernest A. Gardner and
25^.

Twenty-four Plates and Plans.

THE CITY OF ONIAS AND THE MOUND OF THE
of Tell-el-Yahudiyeh. An Extra F. Ll. Griffith. Twenty-six Plates and Plans.

JEW.
Plates

The
and

Volume.
25J.

]Jy

Edouard Naville and
Fifty-four

VIII.

BUBASTIS.
Plans.,
25J•.

For

1889-90.

By Edouard Naville.

IX.

TWO HIEROGLYPHIC
Containing

GEOGRAPHICAL PAPYRUS
X.
XI.

PAPYRI THE SIGN PAPYRUS (a
(an

FROM

Syllabary).

AlmanacV

By . Ll. Griffith. By W. M. Flinders Petrie.
II

TANIS.

A,i

Extra

Volume.

THE
With
890-1.

Remarks by Heinrich Brugsch.

{Out ofprint.)

THE FESTIVAL HALL OF OSORKON
By Edouard Naville.
Plates.

(BUBASTIS).

For

1

Thirtj'-nine Plates.

25^.

AHNAS EL MEDINEH.
And
Griffith.

For 189 1-2.

By Edouard Naville.
By
J. J.

Eighteen

THE TOMB OF PAHERI AT EL KAB.
Plates.
25i.

Tylor andV. Ll.
Naville.
Plates
Plates

Ten

XII.
XIII.

DEIR EL BAHARI,
Fifteen Plates and Plans.

Introductory.
25i.

For
1893-4.
Royal

1892-3.

By Edouard

DEIR EL BAHARI,
I-XXIV

Part
Part

I.

For

By
folio.

Edou..\rd
30i.

Naville.

(three coloured) vith Description.
II.

XIV.

DEIR EL BAHARI,
XXV-LV
other Plates.
25J.

For 1894-5.
Royal

By Edouard Naville.
30i.

(two coloured) with Description.

folio.

XV. DESHASHEH.
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.

For 1895-6.
Part

By W. M. Flinders
For 1896-7.
Royal
loi.)

Petrie.

Photogravure and
Plates

DEIR EL BAHARL
LVI-LXXXVI

.
IV.

By Edouard Naville.
folio.

(two coloured) with Description.

30i.

DENDEREH.
25i.

For 1897-8.

By W. M. Flinders
Forty Plates,

Petrie.

Thirty-eight Plates.

(Extra Plates of Inscriptions.

ROYAL TOMBS OF THE FIRST DYNASTY.
Flinders Petrie.
Sixty-eight Plates.
25;.
'

For 1898-9.

By W. M.

XIX.

DEIR EL BAHARI,
Plates

Part

For 1899-1900.
Volume.

By Edouard Naville.
Royal
folio.

LXXXVII-CXVIII

(two coloured) with Description.

30J.

XX. DIOSPOLIS PARVA.
Forty-nine Plates.

An Extra

By W. M. Flinders Petrie.

{Out ofprint ^

XXI.
XXII.
XXIII.

THE ROYAL TOMBS OF THE EARLIEST DYNASTIES,
1900-1.

Part

II.

For
25^.

By W. M. Flinders Petrie.
Part
I.

Sixty-three
]\I.

I'l.itcs.

2c,s.

(Thirty-five extra Plates, lOi.)

ABYDOS,

For 1901-2.

By W.

F. Petrie.

Eighty-one Plates.

EL AMRAH AND ABYDOS.
A. C. Mace, and F. Ll. Griffith.

An Exlra

Volume.
25i.

By D. Randall-IVIacIver,

Sixty Plates.

XXIV. ABYDOS,

Part
P.

II.

For 1902-3.
i&e.

XXV. ABYDOS,
and A. E.

Part III.

By W. M. F. Petrie. Sixty-four Plates. 25^. An Extra Volume. By C. T. Currelly, E. R. Ayrton,
Sixty-one Plates,
zsi.

Weigall,

XXVI. EHNASYA. Fori903-4. By W. M. Flinders

Petrie.

Forty-three Plates,

zc^s.

(ROMAN EHN.ASYA. XXVII. DEIR el BAHARI,
CXIX-CL
XXVIII.
For 1905-6.

Thirty-two extra Plates.

los.)

Part V. For 1904-5. with Description. Royal folio. 30J.

By Edouard Naville.

Plates

THE ELEVENTH DYNASTY TEMPLE AT DEIR EL BAHARI.
By Edouard Naville and H. R. Hall.
Thirty-one Plates,
i^s.

Part

\.

XXIX. DEIR EL BAHARI, Part VI. For 1906-7. CLI to CLXXIV (one coloured) with Description.

By Edouard Naville.
Royal
folio.
300'.

Plates

XXX.

THE ELEVENTH DYNASTY TEMPLE AT DEIR EL BAHARI.
For
1

Part

.

907-S.

{In preparaiion.)

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY,
Edited by F. Ll. Griffith.
I.

BENI HASAN,
BENI HASAN,

Part I. For 1890-1. By Percy E. Newberry. by G. W. Eraser. Forty-nine Plates (four coloured). 25J.
Part
II.

With Plans

II.

Fori89i-2. By Percy
Eraser.

. Newberry.
E.

With Appendix,
25J.

Plans, and Measurements by G. \V.

Thirty-seven Plates (two coloured).

in.
IV.

EL BERSHEH,

Part Plates (two coloured'.

I.

For 1892-3.

By Percy

Newberry.

Thirty-four

25^.

Part II. For 1893-4. By F. Ll. Grifeith and Percy E. Newberry. With Appendix by G. W. Eraser. Twenty-three Plates (two coloured). 251. (Hieroglyphs, V. BENI HASAN, Part III. For 1894-5. By F. Ll. Grifitth.

EL BERSHEH,

and manufacture, &c., of Flint Knives.)

Ten coloured

Plates.

25J,

VI.
VII.

HIEROGLYPHS FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF THE EGYPT
EXPLORATION FUND. For 1S95-6. By F.Ll. Griffith. Nine coloured I'lates. 25^-. BENI HASAN, Part IV. For 1S96-7. By F. Ll. Griffith. (Illustrating
beasts and birds, arts, crafts, &c.)

Twenty-seven Plates (twenty-one coloured).

25J.

VIII.

THE THE

MASTABA
Part

OF OF

PTAHHETEP
25^.

AND AKHETHETEP
F. Ll.

AT
Thirty-

SAQQAREH,
IX.

L

For 1S97-S.

By N. DE G. Davies and

Griffith.

one Plates (three coloured).

MASTABA
Part
II.

PTAHHETEP
SAID.

AND AKHETHETEP AT
Thirty-

SAQQAREH,
five Plates.

For 1898-9.

By N. DE G. Davies and F.Ll. Griffith.

2^s.

X.

THE ROCK 'tombs OF SHEIKH
Davies.
Thirty-five Plates.
25^.

For

1 899-1 900.

By N. de G. By

XL THE ROCK TOIMBS OF DEIR EL GEBRAWI,
N. DE G. Davies. XII.
Twenty-seven Plates (two coloured).

Part
25^.

I.

For 1900-1.

DEIR EL GEBRAWI,
Plates (two coloured).

Part IL

For 1901-2.
Part

By N. de G. Davies.

Thirty

25J.

Xm. THE ROCK TOMBS OF EL AMARNA,
Davies.
Forty-one Plates.
25^.

L

For 1902-3.

ByN. deG.
25i.
25i.
25^.

EL AMARNA, Part II. For 1903-4. By N.deG.D.^vies. Forty-seven Plates. XV. EL AMARNA, Part III. For 1904-5. By N. deG. Davies. FortyPlates. XVI. EL AMARNA, Part IV. FOr 1905-6. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-five Plates. XVII. ELAMARNA.PartV. For 1906-7. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-four Plates. XVIII. EL AMARNA, Part. VI. For 1907-8. By N. de G. Davies. Forty-four Plates.
XIV.

25^.

25*.

GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH.
I.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
and A.
S.

PAPYRI,
PAPYRI,

Part
25^.

I.

For 1897-8. For 1898-9.

By
By

B. P.
B. P.

Grenfell
Grenfell

Hunt.

Eight Collotype Plates. Eight Collotype Plates.

II.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
and A.
S.

Part
25^.

II.

Hunt.

III.

FAYUM TOWNS AND THEIR
A.
S.

PAPYRI.

For 1899-1900. By B. P. Grenfell,
25^.

Hunt, and D. G. Hogarth.

Eighteen Plates.

IV.

THE TEBTUNIS
Grenfell, A.
S.

PAPYRI.
J.

Double Volume
G. Smyly.

for

1900-1 and 1901-2.
{Notfor
sale.)

By

B. P.

Hunt, and

Nine Collotype Plates.

V.
VI.
VII.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
and A. and A.
B. P.
S.

PAPYRI,
PAPYRI,
Part
I.

Part III.
25i.

For 1902-3. For 1903-4.
for
45i.

By By

B. P.

Grenfell Grenfell

Hunt.

Six Collotype Plates.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
S.

Part IV.
2c,s.

B. P.

Hunt.

Eight Collotype Plates.
A.

THE HIBEH
and A.
S.

PAPYRI,
S.

Double Volume
Plates.

1904-5 and 1905-6.

By

Grenfell and
Hunt.
Hunt.

Hunt.

Ten Collotype
Part V.
25J.

VIII.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
THE OXYRHYNCHUS
and A.
S.

PAPYRI,
PAPYRI,

For 1906-7.
For 1907-8.
For 1908-9.

By
By

B. P.

Grenfell

Seven Collotype Plates.
Six Collotype Plates.

IX.

Part VI.
25J.

B. P.

Grenfell
S.

X.
XI.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS
Six Collotype Plates.
25J.

PAPYRI,
PAPYRI,
E.

Part VII. Part VIII.

By A.

Hunt.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS

For 1909-10.

{In preparation.)

ANNUAL ARCHEAOLOGICAL REPORTS.
(Yearly Summaries by F. G.

Kenvon, W.

Crum, and

the Officers of the Society, with

Maps.)

Edited by F. Ll. Griffith.

THE

SEASON'S WORK.
G. W. Eraser. 92-3 and 1893-4.
1894-5. 1895-6.
6-7.
7-8.
3J. 6d. 2s. 6d.
2-^•

For

1

890-1.

By Edguard Naville, Percy E. Newberry, and

^^• each.

y.
2i. 6i/.

2i. 6rf.

8-g.

2i. 6rf.
2s.

9-1900.

Containing Report of D. G. Hogarth's Excavations in Alexandria. With Illustrated Article on the Transport of Obelisks by Edouard Naville. With Articles on Oxyrhynchus and its Papyri by B. P. Grenfell, and a Thucydides Papyrus from Oxyrhynchus by A. S. Hunt. With Illustrated Article on Excavations at Hierakonpolis by W. M. F. Petrie. With Article on the Position of Lake Moeris by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. With Article on Knossos in its Egyptian Relations by A. J. Evans. dd.
2s.

And

nine successive years,

6d. each.

SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS.
and A.

IH20Y Sayings of Our Lord,' from an Early Greek Papyrus. 2s. (with Collotypes) and 6d. net. S. HUNT.
'
:

By

B. P.

Grenfell

NEW

SAYINGS OF JESUS AND FRAGMENT OF A LOST GOSPEL.
Grenfell and
is. net.

By
S.

B. P.

A.

S.

Hunt.

li. net.

FRAGMENT OF AN UNCANONICAL GOSPEL,
Hunt.

By

B. P.

Grenfell and A.

ATLAS OF ANCIENT EGYPT. With Letterpress and GUIDE TO THE TEMPLE OF DEIR EL BAHARL
COPTIC OSTRACA.
Slides

Index.

{Out of print:) With Plan. {Out of print.)

By W.

E. Crum.
be

ioj. td. net.

from Fund Photographs may

and Prints from Mr.

obtained through Messrs. Newton (s^ Co., 3 Fleet Street, E.G.; R. C. Mtirray, 37 Dartmouth Park Hill, N.W.

Offices of the
37

Egypt Exploration Fund:

GREAT RUSSELL STREET, LONDON, W.C, and 527 TREMONT TEMPLE, BOSTON, MASS., U.S.A.
Agents :

BERNARD QUARITCH, 11 GRAFTON STREET, NEW BOND STREET, W. KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & Co., DRYDEN HOUSE, GERRARD STREET, W. ASHER & Co., 14 BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN, W.C, and 56 UNTER DEN LINDEN, BERLIN. HENRY FROWDE, AMEN CORNER, E.C., and 29-35 WEST 32ND STREET, NEW YORK.

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY

3 1197 22884 0127

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->