MAYORAL SCORECARD – DETAILED

    Public  Transit  (General)   Bike  Lanes   Late  Night  Transit   Rural  Transit   Summer  Transit   Overall  (Transit)       Multi-­‐year  Funding   Increasing  Funding   Overall  (Culture)       Pedestrian  Zoning   Curbing  Sprawl   Greenbelting   Overall  (Space  &  Sprawl)       Housing   Accessibility   Overall  (Affordable   Communities)     ROBBIE   TOM   MIKE  SAVAGE   FRED  CONNORS   AARON  EISSES   McCORMACK   MARTIN  

C+   C+   C+   B   A  

A   C+   B+   C   A  

B   B+   C+   C+   A  

B-­‐   B+   B+   B   A  

B+   B+   A+   A   C+  

B-­‐      
B+   B+  

B+      
B+   B+  

B      
C   C-­‐  

B      
B+   C+  

B+      
C+   B  

B+      
C   B   C-­‐  

B+      
A-­‐   B-­‐   B-­‐  

C      
B   B-­‐   B-­‐  

B-­‐      
C+   B+   B  

B-­‐      
A   B   B+  

C+      
B   B  

B      
B   B  

B-­‐      
B   B-­‐  

B-­‐      
B-­‐   B-­‐  

B+      
A+   C+  

B  
 

B  
 

B-­‐  
 

B-­‐  
 

B  
 

MIKE SAVAGE
Focused on accountability to existing HRM plans and building partnerships. - Proposes investing $50 million in downtown revitalization - Wants to increase role of music industry as an economic driver for HFX; creating a Municipal Arts Council and a Healthy Communities Fund; cites need for stable funding to Nocturne and similar event - Calls for an affordable housing plan working with a variety partners - Many vague answers that do not respond to specific questions. - Only candidate not to clearly support pedestrian zones on Argyle or University Ave; does not clearly support late night transit options

FRED CONNORS
Focused on community consultations; focused on downtown revitalization and community vibrancy - Proposes using some of HRM s $18 million surplus to fund arts programs - Proposes streetscaping and other reforms to make Spring Garden Road area more vibrant ‒ Advocates for a connected set of pedestrian zones - Unclear platform for greenbelting and controlling sprawl

AARON EISES
Offers simple, straight forward answers, but does not provide many details regarding implementation. Highly focused on issues of transit and sprawl; less so on arts and housing

ROBBIE MCCO RMACK
Expresses support for all platform points but lacks details about specific ideas for implementation

TOM MARTIN
Responded 12 hours late - Seeks for HRM to takeover authority for housing - Would commit to 1 year pilot project on Argyle street funded in part by HRM -Would commit to 1 year pilot for late night transit - Only candidate not to commit to summer UPass

 

LISTING  OF  QUESTIONS  
 
Section  1:  Visionary  Transit   • Do  you  support  car-­‐focused  road-­‐widening  projects  such  as  those  for  Bayers  Rd,  Herring  Cove  Rd,  and   Bedford  West?  What  would  you  do  to  halt  projects  that  have  already  been  approved  that  you  disagree   with?     • Do  you  support  the  proposal  for  the  cross  town  connector  bike  lane?  If  not,  what  would  you  do  instead  to   improve  cycling  safety  in  downtown  HRM?     • Late  night  transit  affects  students  studying  late,  working  late,  and  enjoying  recreational  activities.  Students   have  called  for  this  since  at  least  2008.  It  is  an  issue  of  safety  as  well  as  service.  How  will  you  respond  to  the   calls  for  late  night  bus  transit?     • For  students  who  commute  back  and  forth  to  school  and  work,  they  need  access  to  busses  that  go  beyond   the  peninsula.  Where  do  you  see  as  the  key  areas  for  growth  of  the  public  transit  system  beyond  the  urban   core?       • In  past  negotiations,  HRM  has  demanded  that  all  students  pay  the  full  semester  fee  to  extend  the  U-­‐pass   into  the  summer  months.  However,  only  10-­‐15%  of  students  take  summer  courses.  Would  you  commit  to   providing  an  opt-­‐in  summer  u-­‐pass  option  for  students?     Section  2:  Culture   • HRM  currently  only  funds  event-­‐specific  expenses  through  its  grants  program,  leaving  many  important   community  organizations  in  the  midst  of  a  constant  chase  for  funding.  Would  you  support  opening  up  the   criteria  and  under  what  conditions?  How  will  you  ensure  groups  remain  accountable  and  effective  if  given   operational  funding?     • There  has  been  much  discussion  these  elections  about  the  need  to  increase  municipal  arts  funding  to  the   national  average.  Do  you  believe  this  is  a  good  idea  and  if  so  how  do  you  intend  to  fund  this?     Section  3:  Public  Space   • University  Ave  and  Argyle  Street  are  hubs  of  pedestrian  and  cyclists.  Yet,  the  potential  for  these  to  act  as   community  hubs  is  hindered  by  traffic.  Do  you  support  turning  these  areas  into  limited  traffic,  pedestrian-­‐ focused  zones?  Do  you  see  it  as  the  city’s  job  to  pay  for  the  expenses  associated  with  each  of  these   transformations  or  would  you  look  to  other  partners  to  help  fund?  What  else  would  you  do  to  support  the   concept  of  walkable  cities?     • HRM  has  continuously  failed  to  implement  its  own  development  plans  that  aim  to  curb  sprawl.  How  would   you  counteract  this  trend?       • Do  you  support  the  Williams  Lake  development  proposal?  If  not,  what  would  you  do  to  halt  or  adapt  this   development?     Section  4:  Liveable  Communities   • Housing  issues  appear  to  be  an  ongoing  turf  battle  between  the  municipality  and  the  province.  What  do  you   see  as  the  role  of  the  municipality  in  improving  access  to  quality  affordable  housing  and  improving  tenants   rights?     • How  would  you  go  about  ensuring  that  efforts  going  towards  downtown  revitalization  do  not  result  in  the   gentrification  of  historically  marginalized  communities?    

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