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BUILDING RETAIL STORE IMAGE

Objectives
To show the importance of communicating with customers and examine the concept of retail image To describe how a retail store image is related to the atmosphere it creates via its exterior, general interior, layout, and displays, and to look at the special case of non-store atmospherics To discuss ways of encouraging customers to spend more time shopping To consider the impact of community relations on a retailers image
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Positioning and Retail Image

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Positioning and Retail Image

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Elements of a Retail Image

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In Seconds
A shopper should be able to determine a stores * Name * Line of trade * Claim to fame * Price position * Personality

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Atmosphere
The psychological feeling a customer gets when visiting a retailer * Store retailer: atmosphere refers to stores physical characteristics that project an image and draw customers * Nonstore retailer: atmosphere refers to the physical characteristics of catalogs, vending machines, Web sites, etc.
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Visual Merchandising
Proactive, integrated atmospherics approach to create a certain look, properly display products, stimulate shopping behavior, and enhance physical behavior

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Shopping at Prada

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Elements of Atmosphere

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Exterior Planning
Storefront Marquee Store entrances Display windows Exterior building height Surrounding stores and area Parking facilities

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Alternatives in Planning a Basic Storefront


Modular structure Prefabricated structure Prototype store Recessed storefront Unique building design

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Store Entrances
How many entrances are needed? What type of entrance is best? How should the walkway be designed?

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How a Store Entrance Can Generate Shopper Interest

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General Interior

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Flooring Colors Lighting Scents Sounds Store fixtures Wall textures Temperature Aisle space Dressing facilities

In-store transportation (elevator, escalator, stairs) Dead areas Personnel Merchandise Price levels Displays Technology Store cleanliness

Eye-Catching Displays from M&M World

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Allocation of Floor Space


Selling space Merchandise space Personnel space Customer space

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How a Supermarket Uses a Straight (Gridiron) Traffic Pattern

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How a Department Store Uses a Curving (Free-Flowing) Traffic Pattern

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Product Grouping Types


Functional product groupings Purchase motivation product groupings Market segment product groupings Storability product groupings

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Straight Traffic Pattern


Advantages
An efficient atmosphere is created More floor space is devoted to product displays People can shop quickly Inventory control and security are simplified Self-service is easy, thereby reducing labor costs
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Disadvantages
Impersonal atmosphere More limited browsing by customers Rushed shopping behavior

Piggly Wigglys Open Traffic Design

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Curving Traffic Pattern


Advantages A friendly atmosphere Shoppers do not feel rushed People are encouraged to walk through in any direction Impulse or unplanned purchases are enhanced
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Disadvantages Possible customer confusion Wasted floor space Difficulties in inventory control Higher labor intensity Potential loitering Displays may cost more

Approaches for Determining Space Needs


Model Stock Approach * Determines floor space necessary to carry and display a proper merchandise assortment Sales-Productivity Ratio * Assigns floor space on the basis of sales or profit per foot

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Interior (Point-of-Purchase) Displays


Assortment display Theme-setting display Ensemble display Rack display Case display Cut case Dump bin

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L.L. Beans Online Storefront

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Online Store Considerations


Advantages
Unlimited space to present assortments, displays, and information Can be customized to the individual customer Can be modified frequently Can promote crossmerchandising and impulse purchasing Enables a consumer to quickly enter and exit an online store

Disadvantages
Can be slow for dialup shoppers Can be too complex Cannot display threedimensional aspects of products well Requires constant updating More likely to be exited without purchase

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Making the Shopping Experience More Pleasant

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The Shopping Carts Role in an Enhanced Shopping Experience

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Community-Oriented Actions
Make stores barrier-free for disabled shoppers Show a concern for the environment by recycling trash and cleaning streets Support charities Participate in anti-drug programs Employ area residents Run sales for senior citizens and other groups Sponsor Little League and other youth activities Cooperate with neighborhood planning groups Donate money/equipment to schools Check IDs for purchases with age minimums
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Retail Store Design


Creating a Powerful Store Image

You never get a second chance to make a first impression


A stores appearance holds the most sway in enticing customers through the doors. People tend to sum up their initial store encounter in visual terms.
Apple Store in NYC has a unique design that draws customers inside.

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10 ways to turn off customers


-First Impressions-

Dirty bathrooms Messy dressing rooms Loud music Handwritten signs Stained floors or ceiling tiles Poor lighting Offensive odors Crowded aisles Disorganized checkout counters Lack of shopping carts/baskets

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The Image-Makers
1. An Identifiable Store Name 2. A Powerful Visual Trademark 3. An Unmistakable Store Front 4. An Inviting Entrance 5. A Consistent and Compelling Store Look and Hook

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1. Identifiable Store Names


Sets the tone of the store Distinguishes a store in the customers mind Store name should be easy to say and remember

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2. Powerful Visual Trademarks


Provides a visual image to accompany a store name Combine words, pictures, colors, shapes, and styles to make it stand out Store should be identifiable even without seeing store name

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3. Unmistakable Storefront Traffic-Stoppers


Provide instant recognition and recall Must project a welcoming, clear, and concise image of whats inside Use thoughtful combo of exterior architecture, signage, and window displays

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4. Store Entrance
Mall retailers easily lure costumers in with wide open entrances from the main mall Visual clutter near store entrance may turn off customers Street retailers need an unobstructed and welcoming doorway to attract nearby motorists

Mall Entrance

Street Entrance
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5. Store Look and Hook


Visual Look
An inviting entrance is crucial for a positive first impression Inside store should be organized and consistent to limit confusion

Visual Hook
Diverts customers attention with a Stop! Theres something here for you! Should combine all visual merchandising components Many store retailers are using sensory appeal for the total package

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