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Writing Lessons

Writing Lessons

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Published by: giselek2012 on Oct 28, 2012
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18

GreatHolidayReading!

The BIG Book of Ready-to-Go W

riting Lessons © Marci Miller & Martin Lee, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Name: ________________________________________________________________

19

Blockbuster Blurbs

A blurbis a shortpiece written to interest
people in a product. A good blurb should
describe, but not give away too much.

Complete this purpose profile to help plan a blurb for a book or movie.

Title (of book/movie) _______________________________________________________

By/Starring_______________________________________________________________

Audience (Who to aim for?) __________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

Purpose (Thumbs UP? Thumbs DOWN? Why?) ____________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

Hook (Interest grabber!) _____________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

And NOW—

Use the purpose profile to help you write a great blurb. Ask a friend to read it. Does your blurb
grab your friend’s interest? Does it “spill the beans?”

=

7

GreatHolidayReading!

The BIG Book of Ready-to-Go W

riting Lessons © Marci Miller & Martin Lee, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Students will describe the ways in which
two items are similar and different.

Clarify the distinction between comparingand contrasting: We compareitems when we
describe how they are alike. We contrastitems when we describe how they differ.

Display pairs of concrete objects (or pictures of them) to spur students to think about
ways to compare and contrast them.

Share All Kinds of Feetby Ron and Nancy Goor, Headsby Ron and Nancy Goor,
and/or Breathtaking Nosesby Hana Machotka. Use these books to stimulate students
to notice and discuss similarities and differences.

Duplicate and distribute the Venn diagram on page 21. Be sure students understand
how this diagram is used to organize details on two subjects. They may be interested to
know that the tool is named for English mathematician John Venn (1834–1923).

Challenge more advanced students to compare and contrast two objects that seem, at
first glance, totally unrelated, such as a brick and a bowling ball. Appeal to their cre-
ativity and cleverness to detect similarities as well as the obvious differences.

You might make a set of cards with words or pictures on them. Students pick any two
cards and use those objects for their description.

Demonstrate how the Venn diagram can be a paragraph organizer. To write a compare
paragraph, students describe the features in the overlapping region. For a contrast
paragraph, they describe details that appear in the two separate regions.

Order—Think about how to organize a compare and contrast piece. There are many
ways to do this. One way is first to identify both objects. Then describe all the ways in
which they are alike, followed by a description of how they differ.

Transitions—Use words that guide the way in comparisons and contrasts. Think about
words and phrases like
on the other hand, however, and although; or similarly, by the
same token, and likewise.

You might direct students to organize their compare and contrast essays according to
different plans, such as a point-by-point presentation.

As an extension, suggest that students compare and contrast three things, such as a
hamster, a gerbil, and a guinea pig, using a 3-circle Venn diagram.

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