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SCtZ-0336-Lo_res

SCtZ-0336-Lo_res

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Published by brentlion
dat upon chitwan tigers, by melvin sunquist, featuring info upon feeding behavior, measurements, ect.
dat upon chitwan tigers, by melvin sunquist, featuring info upon feeding behavior, measurements, ect.

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: brentlion on Jan 23, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/10/2014

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Tigers did not feed on kills at bait sites but
dragged them into dense cover. The mean dis-
tance from kill site to feeding site was 125 m
(range, 30-600 m, N=34). For eight natural kills
there was no evidence of a drag, and in four other
instances kills were taken about 75 m.
For both bait and natural kills (N=39), a single
tiger, without exception, began feeding on the
rump. As more of the carcass is eaten, the abdom-
inal cavity is opened, and the digestive tract is
pulled out. The eviscerated carcass is then
dragged a few meters, and feeding continues until

70

SMITHSONIAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO ZOOLOGY

only pieces of skin and large bones remain. If the
kill is large the tiger will often stay nearby (x =
three days; range = two to seven days, Figure 31)
until it has consumed the kill. In seven instances
remains (skin, bones, little meat) of the kill were
covered with grass. Both males and females
showed this behavior. Occasionally the individual
was relocated in the area of the remains but it
was unlikely that anything remained as wild boar
(Sits scrofa), jackal (Canis aureus), and jungle cat
(Felis chaus) quickly scatter unattended kills.

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