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The BIG Book of Writing Lessons

The BIG Book of Writing Lessons

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Published by giselek2012
The BIG Book of Ready-to-Go Writing Lessons

50 ENGAGING ACTIVITIES WITH GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS THAT TEACH KIDS HOW TO TELL A STORY, CONVEY INFORMATION, DESCRIBE, PERSUADE, & MORE!

The BIG Book of Ready-to-Go Writing Lessons

50 ENGAGING ACTIVITIES WITH GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS THAT TEACH KIDS HOW TO TELL A STORY, CONVEY INFORMATION, DESCRIBE, PERSUADE, & MORE!

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Published by: giselek2012 on Nov 03, 2012
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The BIG Book of Ready-to-Go W

riting Lessons © Marci Miller & Martin Lee, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Name: ________________________________________________________________

49

Dastardly Deeds

A mysteryis a story that offers a puzzle to solve. A mystery
needs a problem, a hunt, and a solution—plus clever clues and
shady characters.

Use this planner to develop an idea for a mystery story.

Use the ideas you’ve gathered to write your mystery. Don’t give away too much too soon. But do
give enough clues so that readers can try to “crack the case” as they read.

=

7

And NOW—

SUSPECTS

MYSTERY

OPPORTUNITY

MOTIVE
(WHY?)

(WHEN?)

(

H

O

W

?

)

M

E

A

N

S

CLUES

(WHO?)

The BIG Book of Ready-to-Go W

riting Lessons © Marci Miller & Martin Lee, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Students will develop brief comic strips that
includes their own drawings and dialogue.

Display examples of popular comic strips from local newspapers. Be sure to select
examples that have more than one frame.

Discuss questions like these: What makes comic strips appealing? Which comic strips do
you enjoy? What do you like best about your favorite ones? Which is more important to
you—the art or the words? Do you prefer human characters or non-human ones?

Duplicate and distribute the comic strip information and organizer on page 51. Tell
students that they will use this to develop, draw, and write dialogue for comic strips.

As a variation, provide actual comic strips with the words deleted. Invite students to
make up new words to fit the existing drawings.

As another alternative, suggest that students create “gag panels”—single-frame fun-
nies, such as “Dennis the Menace” or “Ziggy.” They might attach brief character
sketches to give background on the characters in the gag panels.

Point out that students need not possess great art skill to draw comic strips.
Encourage them to draw the simple characters and background details they need, but
remind them that a comic strip tells a story. So, like any story, they need to provide a
setting, characters, and a brief problem or plot.

Suggest that students visualize short episodes or anecdotes that they can turn into
comic strips. Emphasize that there’s no room for lots of details; students should be
concise and clear.

Casual Talk—In a comic strip, it’s okay to use informal language or slang. Make char-
acters speak as real people might. You can use words like
hooray! or hmmm, or sound
effects words such as
Splat! Gasp! Yikes!orPow!

Post students’ comic strips on a bulletin board, or scan them into your classroom com-
puter so they can be posted on the Internet.

Make a collection of favorite comic strips. Invite students to write fan letters or
responses to cartoonists they like, in care of the newspapers that publish their works.

Extend by having students create political or editorial cartoons that give their opinions
on current issues.

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