Table of Contents 
Click on any of the titles to take you to the appropriate piece 

Features
The Sweet Spot 12 
By Jill Nussinow, MS, RD 
 

A Romantic Interlude for  Two 24 
By Chef Angela Elliott 

Semi‐sweet chocolate cupcakes    for those without a massive sweet  Prepare your own romantic meals  tooth.  with Angela’s amazing recipes and    advice. 

East Meets West: Pastry, Ice  Cream, Wine, and Tea 14 
By Chef Philip Gelb 
 

 

Columns 
What’s Cooking?  3 
 

Pear and wine tart with oolong tea  Find out what’s up with the Vegan  and vanilla ice cream!  Culinary Experience this month.     

An Ancient Love of  Chocolate  16 
By Chef Mayra 

Candied Citrus 27 
By Liz Lonetti 
 

  Learn about the first cultures to  consume chocolate and use it for  trade.   

Citrus is in season and Liz has some  great pointers to turn your excess  citrus into candied goodies. 

  Vegan Cuisine and the Law:   Chocolate:  Fare of the Gods  Animal Treatment Labels 29  to Fair Trade 19 By Mindy Kursban, Esq. 
By Marty Davey, MS, RD 
   

History, mythology, economics,  and chocolate.  What’s not to  love?   

Ideas for effecting healthy and  compassionate change via labeling.   

Marketplace  7 
 

Dessert without Restrictions  Get connected and find out about  vegan friendly businesses and  22 
By Chef Madelyn Pryor 
 

organizations. 
 

             

A gluten free guide to baked treats  and sweets.           

Recipe Index  48 
 

A listing of all the recipes found in  this issue, compiled with links.    see the following page for  interviews and reviews… 

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Table of Contents 2 
Click on any of the titles to take you to the appropriate piece 

Interviews
 

Reviews 

Interview with Author and  Restaurant Review:  Cooking Show Host Christina  Native Foods  41  By Jason Wyrick  Pirello 32 
   

Christina is the talent behind  Christina Cooks, an Emmy award  winning cooking show, and the  author of five different cookbooks.  
 

Native Foods provides good, solid  vegan fare with an upscale flare  throughout Southern California. 
 

Featured Artist 
 

Product Review:  Bob’s Red  Mill Gluten Free Baking Mix  43 
By Madelyn Pryor 
 

Actress and Singer Persia  White 38 

                                                   

Bob’s Red Mill is well known for  their high quality grains and flours    Not only is Persia a talented artist,  and their gluten free baking mix is  no exception.  she’s also an outstanding and    prolific activist.  Book Review:  Sweet Utopia   

45 
By  Madelyn Pryor 

  Amazing desserts, amazing recipes,  and amazing photography. 
 

Book Review:  My Sweet  Vegan 46 
By  Madelyn Pryor 

  A wide variety of recipes that  always work and are always  delicious.   

Book Review:  Sweet  Freedom 47 
By  Madelyn Pryor 

  A guide to mostly gluten‐free  vegan desserts and baking.   

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The Vegan Culinary Experience
                   Vegan Decadence       February 2010   
                          Publisher    Jason Wyrick                                  Editors     Eleanor Sampson,                                                   Carolyn Mullin,                                                  Madelyn Pryor             Nutrition Analyst     Eleanor Sampson                         Web Design    William Snell & Jason Wyrick                            Graphics     Alex Searcy & Jason Wyrick                                      Reviewer    Madelyn Pryor      Contributing Authors    Jason Wyrick                                                 Madelyn Pryor                                                 Jill Nussinow                                                 Mayra “Dr. Flavor”                                                 Liz Lonetti                                                 Sharon Valencik                                                 Philip Gelb                                                 Eleanor Sampson                                                 Marty Davey   

What’s Cooking?
I have a love/hate relationship with  dessert, fueled by my sweet tooth and  the desire to not stop eating when I  encounter something incredibly tasty!   Thus, desserts are a dangerous mix of  pleasure for me.  Of course, that  doesn’t mean I don’t eat them, but I  do limit how I often indulge.  That  means that when I do have dessert, it better be something  extraordinary.  This issue is dedicated to just those things.  Sweets,  treats, and goodies that make your eyes roll up.      In this issue, you’ll find cakes, cookies, tarts, pies, cobblers, rolls,  brownies, and plenty of other decadent morsels to tempt your  palate.  You’ll also find a range of recipes from incredibly simple to  slightly complex.  Have fun with these and hopefully some of them  will inspire you to make your own sinful creations.    Eat healthy, eat compassionately, and eat well!         

 
                Photography Credits  

                  Cover Page     Milan Valencik    
                Recipe Images     Jason Wyrick                                                 Madelyn Pryor                                                 Milan Valencik of                                                  Milan Photography    Candied Citrus                    Liz Lonetti  Tropical Pudding                Madelyn Pryor  Pear Tart                              Philip Gelb  Pigs and Chickens         Farm Sanctuary    Aztec Statue, Cacao           GNU Free Documentation  Flowers                                 License    Cacao Pods                          Public Domain                      Persian White   Courtesy of Persia White                Christina Pirello   Courtesy of Christina Pirello       Bob’s Red Mill                    Bob’s Red Mill Website  Macy’s Interior                   Macy’s Website                                        
 

         

 

Contributors
  Jason Wyrick ‐ Chef Jason Wyrick is the Executive Chef of Devil Spice, Arizona's vegan catering  company, and the publisher of The Vegan Culinary Experience. Chef Wyrick has been regularly  featured on major television networks and in the press.  He has done demos with several  doctors, including Dr. Neal Barnard of the PCRM, Dr. John McDougall, and Dr. Gabriel  Cousens.  Chef Wyrick was also a guest instructor in the Le Cordon Bleu program.  He has  catered for PETA, Farm Sanctuary, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Google. Visit Chef Jason Wyrick at  www.devilspice.com and www.veganculinaryexperience.com.  

Madelyn Pryor ‐ Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates on her blog,  http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has been making her own tasty desserts for over  16 years, and eating dessert for longer than she cares to admit. When she isn’t in the  kitchen creating new wonders of sugary goodness, she is chasing after her bad kitties, or  reviewing products for various websites and publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.  

Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen ‐ Jill is a Registered Dietitian and has a Masters  Degree in Dietetics and Nutrition from Florida International University. After graduating, she  migrated to California and began a private nutrition practice providing individual consultations  and workshops, specializing in nutrition for pregnancy, new mothers, and children.  You can  find out more about The Veggie Queen at www.theveggiequeen.com.    

Sharon Valencik ‐ Sharon Valencik is the author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Vegan  Desserts. She is raising two vibrant young vegan sons and rescued animals, currently a rabbit  and a dog. She comes from a lineage of artistic chef matriarchs and has been baking since  age five. She is working on her next book, World Utopia: Delicious and Healthy  International Vegan Cuisine. Please visit www.sweetutopia.com for more information, to ask  questions, or to provide feedback.        Eleanor Sampson – Eleanor is the editor for The Vegan Culinary Experience, author, and an  expert vegan baker with a specialty in delicious vegan sweets (particularly cinnamon rolls!)   You can reach Eleanor at Eleanor@veganculinaryexperience.com.            
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Contributors
Mayra “Dr. Flavor” - Chef Mayra has been in the “healthy eating and cooking” industry for  over 11 years and has certifications in sports nutrition, macrobiotic cooking, vegan and  vegetarian, holistic, and feng shui cuisine. She started her career as a cook by learning and  experimenting with French, Caribbean, Southern, Cajun, and West African cuisine.   Chef Mayra is a chef instructor and conducts a variety of classes and demonstrations geared  towards vegan athletes, personal trainers, and anyone who would like to live a healthier life.  “Dr. Flavor” can make healthy cooking easier by becoming your personal chef!    Visit Chef Mayra at www.mychefmayra.com or call her at 702‐372‐4709.      Liz Lonetti ‐ As a professional urban designer, Liz Lonetti is passionate about building  community, both physically and socially.  She graduated from the U of MN with a BA in  Architecture in 1998. She also serves as the Executive Director for the Phoenix Permaculture  Guild, a non‐profit organization whose mission is to inspire sustainable living through  education, community building and creative cooperation (www.phoenixpermaculture.org).   A long time advocate for building greener and more inter‐connected communities, Liz  volunteers her time and talent for other local green causes.  In her spare time, Liz enjoys  cooking with the veggies from her gardens, sharing great food with friends and neighbors,  learning from and teaching others.  To contact Liz, please visit her blog site  www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profile/LizDan.      Chef Philip Gelb ‐ Philip Gelb was born and raised in Brooklyn NY. He ended up in Florida  where he received a BA in cultural anthropology and did graduate studies in  ethnomusicology.  For the last decade he has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area where he  works as a professional musician and music teacher as well as a vegan chef. As a musician he  has performed all over the United States and in Japan, Europe and Canada.  5 years ago he  started In the Mood for Food, a vegetarian personal chef and catering company.  He has  been vegetarian since 17 and after becoming vegan 4 years ago, he changed his business to  strictly vegan cuisine. Although totally self taught as a chef, he is a very popular vegan  cooking teacher, hosting monthly classes.  His other interests include hiking, travelling, and  he is an avid film buff. Of course, he loves cooking, especially for friends as well as professionally. Visit Phil at  www.philipgelb.blogspot.com.        Marty Davey ‐ Marty Davey is a Registered Dietitian and has a Masters degree in Food and  Nutrition from Marywood University. She became a vegetarian in 1980 when she discovered  that the chemicals in American meat made them unsellable to Europeans. She and her  husband have raised their son as a vegan. She teaches nutrition and has a private practice  specializing in assisting clients transitioning to a plant‐based regime step by step. Her  website is www.martydavey.com.  

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About the VCE
The Vegan Culinary Experience is an educational vegan culinary  magazine designed by professional vegan chefs to help make  vegan cuisine more accessible.  Published by Chef Jason Wyrick,  the magazine utilizes the electronic format of the web to go  beyond the traditional content of a print magazine to offer  classes, podcasts, an interactive learning community, and links to  articles, recipes, and sites embedded throughout the magazine to  make retrieving information more convenient for the reader.     The VCE is also designed to bring vegan chefs, instructors,  medical professionals, authors, and businesses together with the  growing number of people interested in vegan cuisine.    Eat healthy, eat compassionately, and eat well. 

Become a Subscriber
Subscribing to the VCE is FREE!  Subscribers have access to our Learning Community, back issues, recipe  database, and extra educational materials.    Visit http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCESubscribe.htm to subscribe.   
*PRIVACY POLICY ‐ Contact information is never, ever given or sold to another individual or company 

 

Not Just a Magazine
Meal Service 
The Vegan Culinary Experience also provides weekly meals that coincide with the recipes from the magazine.   Shipping is available across the United States.  Raw, gluten‐free, and low‐fat diabetic friendly options are  available.  Visit http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCEMealService.htm for more information.   

Culinary Instruction 
Chef Jason Wyrick and many of the contributors to the magazine are available for private culinary instruction,  seminars, interviews, and other educational based activities.  For information and pricing, contact us at  http://veganculinaryexperience.com/VCEContact.htm.  
 

An Educational and Inspirational Journey of Taste, Health, and Compassion 
Vegan Decadence March 2010|6

Marketplace
Welcome to the Marketplace, our new spot for  finding vegetarian friendly companies, chefs, authors,  bloggers, cookbooks, products, and more!  One of the  goals of The Vegan Culinary Experience is to connect  our readers with organizations that provide relevant  products and services for vegans, so we hope you  enjoy this new feature!      Click on the Ads – Each ad is linked to the appropriate  organization’s website.  All you need to do is click on  the ad to take you there.    Become a Marketplace Member – Become connected  by joining the Vegan Culinary Experience  Marketplace.  Membership is available to those who  financially support the magazine, to those who  promote the magazine, and to those who contribute  to the magazine.  Contact Chef Jason Wyrick at  chefjason@veganculinaryexperience.com for details!   

Current Members 
  Rational Animal  (www.rational‐animal.org)   Farm Sanctuary  (www.farmsanctuary.com)   GoDairyFree.org and My Sweet Vegan  (www.godairyfree.org)   Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen  (www.theveggiequeen.com)  Chef Mayra “Dr. Flavor”  (www.mychefmayra.com)   Sweet Utopia  (www.sweetutopia.com)   In The Mood for Food  (www.philipgelb.blogspot.com)   The Phoenix Permactulture Guild  (www.phoneixpermaculture.org)   Milan Photography  (www.milanphotography.com)          

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The Sweet Spot
By Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie Queen™
While I love something sweet at the end of the  meal, it seems that as my eating has evolved to a  more whole foods diet my desire for once‐loved  desserts has, too. My favorite dessert is often  based on any kind of in‐season fresh fruit, right  now it’s citrus, apples, pears and kiwis, alone,  mixed in a fruit salad or baked with a simple grain  topping. (Citrus doesn’t bake well, though.) My  idea of decadence won’t be quite as decadent as  some others.   Earlier in my life, I often made these cupcakes  (which are now extremely popular), for my son’s  class parties and school bake sales. Anything with  chocolate appeals to a chocolate lover’s sensibility.  (I ought to know as I now just eat a square of fair‐ trade organic or raw chocolate instead of baking.  Check out Gnosis Chocolate  http://www.gnosischocolate.com/.)   

Chocolate Cupcakes or Cake
Makes 1 dozen cupcakes or 1 bundt cake    You can make this a bit richer and more moist by adding a tablespoon or two of a neutral oil such as sunflower,  safflower or canola but it tastes great with no added‐oil, too.    1 1/3 cups unbleached white flour        1 teaspoon baking powder  1 teaspoon baking soda          ½ teaspoon salt  3 tablespoons flax seeds          ½ cup water  1 cup sugar or Sucanat          ½ package firm or extra firm silken lite tofu  3 tablespoons coffee or 1‐3 teaspoons coffee substitute such as Inka or Pero and mixed with 3 T. water  1 tablespoon white vinegar          6 tablespoons cocoa powder  1 teaspoon vanilla extract  1/3 cup chocolate chips or your favorite chocolate bar chopped to equal the same    Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.  Lightly oil muffin tins or bundt pan.  In a medium size bowl, combine flour,  baking powder, baking soda and salt. Stir well.  Grind flax seeds in a blender until very fine. Add water and blend  once more. Add the tofu and blend until the tofu is creamy. Add the remaining ingredients except chocolate  chips and blend.  Quickly combine blended mixture with the flour mixture. Stir in the chocolate chips.  Fill muffin tins halfway with batter or pour mixture into bundt or angel food cake pan. This does not work in a  regular cake pan.  Bake for 20 to 25 minutes for cupcakes or 45 minutes for cake, until a toothpick comes out  clean.  Cool on a rack. Serve frosted or not, or dusted with organic powdered sugar with a strawberry garnish.  ©2010 The Veggie Queen™, http://www.theveggiequeen.com 

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These cupcakes are not especially sweet so a light  drizzle of melted chocolate or a dusting of organic  powdered sugar makes them seem sweeter. The  small amount of chocolate chips makes them seem  richer, and no one needs to know about the flax  and tofu. Here’s to your heart health on special  occasions.     With gratitude, Jill, The Veggie Queen™                                                 
Vegan Decadence

The Author 
Jill Nussinow, MS, RD, The Veggie  Queen ‐ Jill is a Registered Dietitian  and has a Masters Degree in Dietetics  and Nutrition from Florida  International University. After  graduating, she migrated to California  and began a private nutrition practice  providing individual consultations and  workshops, specializing in nutrition for pregnancy, new  mothers, and children.  You can find out more about The  Veggie Queen at www.theveggiequeen.com.    

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East Meets West: Pastry, Ice Cream, Wine, and Tea
with Chef Philip Gelb
 

Mmmmmm, desserts!  Who does not enjoy  something sweet to top off a great meal?  Desserts  have always been a challenge for me.  For one,  being a pastry chef is a different world than being a  chef. And second, I came to the conclusion a long  time ago that sugar is totally evil and thus has no  place in my kitchen, whatsoever! Nonetheless,  making desserts without sugar is very easy,  especially if you use very ripe, seasonal fruit.  Here  are a couple of basic ideas I have been playing with  recently that I hope you enjoy.     Pear Pecan Tart  the filling  1 bottle red wine (I have great results using Wild  Hog 2005 dolcetto)  1 whole star anise  6 pears, halved and cored  ¼ cup agave    Place the above in  a sauce pan  and bring to simmer, cover and  let simmer for 30 minutes.  Remove from heat and  refrigerate for at least 6 hours.   After removing the pears, peel  them and slice them.    the crust  3 cups pecans  6 dates  ¼ cup cacao nibs  ½ tsp. salt  Innards of 1 vanilla bean, split and deseeded    Place the above ingredients in a food processor  and grind until coarse. Pat into a tart pan.  Place  pears in concentric circles in the crust and bake at  350 for 12 minutes.    
Vegan Decadence

Vanilla Oolong Ice Cream  1 cup unsweetened soymilk   ½ cup raw cashews  2 tbsp. kuzu  Dash of salt  2 tbsp. high mountain Taiwanese oolong leaves  2 cups of soymilk  1 tbsp. vanilla extract  ½ cup of agave syrup    In a high speed blender, place the 1 cup of soymilk,  cashews, kuzu, and salt and blend on high for 3 ‐ 4  minutes, until the ingredients becomes totally  pureed and the mixture heats up and thickens.    Meanwhile, bring to simmer in a  sauce pan 2 more cups of soymilk.   After it comes to simmer, remove  from heat and add 2 tbsp. high  mountain Taiwanese oolong  leaves. I am using the Dong Ding  variety. Cover and let steep for 4  minutes and then drain the leaves  out of the soymilk.    Place this oolong soymilk in the  blender, adding it to the first mix  that is now thickened. Add 1 tbsp.  vanilla extract and ½  cup agave  syrup. Blend until thoroughly  incorporated.     Place this mixture in an ice cream maker and freeze  it.   
The Author    For the last decade, Phil has lived in the San Francisco  Bay Area where he works as a professional musician and  music teacher as well as a vegan chef. As a musician he 

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has performed all over the United  States and in Japan, Europe and  Canada.  Five years ago he started In  the Mood for Food, a vegetarian  personal chef and catering  company.  He has been vegetarian  since 17 and after becoming vegan 4  years ago, he changed his business  to strictly vegan cuisine. Although  totally self taught as a chef, he is a very popular vegan  cooking teacher, hosting monthly classes.  His other  interests include hiking, travelling, and he is an avid film  buff. Of course, he loves cooking, especially for friends  as well as professionally.  You can reach Chef Philip Gelb  at http://philipgelb.blogspot.com.  

 

Vegan Decadence

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An Ancient Love of Chocolate
by Chef Mayra 
 
Chocolate is made from plant sources with a host  of health benefits. These benefits come from  flavanoids, which act as antioxidants. Antioxidants  protect the body from aging caused by free  radicals, which can cause damage that leads to  heart disease. Dark chocolate contains a large  number of antioxidants (nearly 8 times the number  found in strawberries) with flavanoids that also  help relax blood pressure through the production  of nitric oxide, and balance certain hormones in the  body.  Now that is good news!  Monkeys, Olmecs, and Cacao  Monkeys were the first to find the cacao plant  edible and delectable, not man. In the hottest parts  of ancient Mesoamerica, these brightly colored,  rugby ball‐shaped pods hung off trees, begging to  be picked. Monkeys learned of the sweet,  refreshing pulp concealed within the thick pod.   Ancient man followed their example, picking the  fruit off trees as they walked past.  The sweet pulp of the cacao pod tasted like  apricots or melons. But the beans—or seeds—in  the core of the pulp were bitter and seemingly  inedible. The monkeys would eat the pulp and spit  out the beans. Ancient people followed the  monkeys’ example, and only ate the delicious pulp.  This was probably what Mother Nature had in  mind: the seeds were disseminated throughout  Mesoamerica, making cacao trees plentiful in  South and Central America and guaranteeing  cacao’s evolution.  An ancient tribe called the Olmecs (1200 to 300  B.C.) from the tropical lowlands of South Central  Mexico were the first to domesticate the plant and  use the beans. They had a name for these bitter  seeds that held the secrets to health and power:  kakawa, or cacao. According to recent  archaeologists’ findings, the beans were an integral 
Vegan Decadence

part of this ancient civilization’s diet and culture  from as early as 600 B.C.    The Real Chocolate Lovers    The Mayans are considered the most culturally  advanced among the Mesoamerican civilizations.  During the Mayan Classic Age (300‐900 A.D.), they  had cities with majestic pyramid‐temples and  palaces, a calendar calculated to end in the 21st  century, and a complex written language that filled  thousands of books. They also were the first true  chocolate aficionados, treasuring cacao as a  restorative, mood‐enhancing cure‐all. It became an  integral part of their society, used in ceremonies,  given as gifts and incorporated into their  mythologies.    Burial tombs have been found that contain  offerings, including ancient potteries that bear  witness to cacao’s importance.  The vases are  covered with paintings showing Mayan gods  fighting over beans and kings waiting to be served  cacao creations.    Chocolate played a large part in Mayan religion.  The Mayan’s sacred book, the Popul Vuh, contains  their story of creation, and instead of Dante’s apple  tree, there’s a cacao tree.  In this myth, immortal  ball‐playing twins are beheaded by the gods of  death. One has his head hung on a cacao tree. The  magical head manages to mate with a woman who  becomes the mother of twin gods. These two  defeat the gods of death and then end up in the  sky as the sun and the moon.    These first chocolate lovers did not make chocolate  bars as we know them today. Instead, the beans  were ground into a coarse paste and mixed with  spices, water and chilies to create a variety of hot  and cold frothy, bitter drinks. Or the beans were  mixed with corn and flavorings to make an 

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assortment of porridge‐like meals that varied in  thickness from very thin and watery to thick and  solid.  These dishes were high in nutrients and very  healthy. They also were inedible by our standards  and a far cry from the chocolate we eat today.    An Empire of Chocolate    The Olmecs weren’t the only Mesoamerican  society to value chocolate.  The Aztecs led an  empire of almost 15 million people between the  14th and 16th centuries.  Theirs was an aristocratic  society, and chocolate was reserved for the rich  and the nobles. In fact, the Aztecs prized the cacao  bean so highly that it was their form of currency.   The bean also was used as money in Central  American markets long after the Aztecs were gone,  as late as 1858.    The beans were the natives' "coins." A list of Aztec  trading prices looked something like this:     1 small rabbit = 30 cacao beans   1 turkey egg = 3 cacao beans   1 large tomato = 1 cacao bean    The royal storehouses had “vaults” full of this  currency. One estimate listed the yearly  expenditure of dried beans at 11,680,000. Some of  these beans went to pay the king’s attendants.  Others went into the king’s chocolate drinks—and  he drank a lot of chocolate. Montezuma was  rumored to enjoy 50 cups a day.  The Aztecs consumed chocolate in liquid form, as  did the Mayans. It was served cold and frothy. The  foam was believed to hold chocolate’s  fundamental essence, and the ritual of creating the  foam is seen in Aztec artwork. They’d pour the  chocolate mixture vertically from one vessel to  another, back and forth to make it froth. Today,  many Mexican communities still value the foam so  much they let their cacao beans calcify and turn  white before grinding to ensure a heady mug of  chocolate.    At this point, chocolate was still a bitter‐tasting  brew and contained a mish‐mash of corn,  flavorings and spices, but this would change after  the Spanish arrived in the New World. 
Vegan Decadence

Authentic Central Mexican Black Mole : A Sexy  MIX for the VEGAN lover in you! ( buy organic  and/or local)     2 oz. chihuacle negro chiles (order from  CMC Foods), or mulattos (easier to find, but  you don't get that anise‐like flavor that  distinguishes the black molé from the  others)   5 ½ oz. mullato chiles   2 oz. pasilla chiles   1 pasilla de Oaxaca chile, or chipotle meco  (tan, dried, not canned in adobo)   2 tortillas, torn up   2 slices of toasted bread   ½ small onion, peeled and cut into thick  slices   4 unpeeled garlic cloves   oil    ½ cup sesame seeds   ¼ cup each: sunflower seeds, peanuts,  almonds   3 quarts veggie stock ( fresh would be  better)   8 plum tomatoes, chopped   4 oz. tomatillos, husked, rinsed, and  chopped   2 whole cloves   1 stick canella (true cinnamon)   1 tsp. oregano (preferably Mexican)   ½ tsp. dried thyme   1 ripe banana   3 oz. Mexican chocolate 70% or more cacao   salt    sugar    Directions   1. First, stem the chiles, then tear them open  and separate the seeds and reserve them.  Heat a pan over high heat, and add the  seeds and tortilla (turn on your exhaust fan  and open a window). When they're quite  black, dump them in a strainer and rinse  under running water for a minute, until the  water runs clear. Transfer to your blender  and clean, rinse, and dry the pan. Add the  toasted bread to the blender.  2. Put the pan on high heat, and add the onion  slices and garlic cloves. Roast until soft, and 
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3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

remove to a bowl. Squish the garlic out of  the peels and discard the peels.  Roast the nuts in a 350 degree oven until  fragrant and remove. Heat the pan over  high heat and add a half‐inch of oil or lard.  Be. Very. Careful. Fry the chiles a couple at  a time. They will get fragrant, and when  they begin to lighten, remove them ‐‐ it only  takes a few seconds on each side. Be careful  not to burn the chiles — and you still have  the exhaust fan on and the window open,  right? Remove them as they are done to a  paper towel and drain. Put them in a large  bowl, cover with boiling water, and let them  soak for thirty minutes. Drain.  Reserve about ¼ cup of the toasted sesame  seeds for garnish, and put the remaining  seeds and nuts into the blender. Add about  2 cups of the stock, and puree until smooth.  Remove to a bowl. (There is no need to  rinse the blender until you're completely  done with it.)  Puree the tomatoes, tomatillos, onion,  garlic, and about ½ cup of the stock until  smooth. Remove to a bowl.  Grind the cloves and cinnamon. Add the  spices to the blender with the onion and  garlic, oregano, thyme, banana, and about  ½ cup of the stock. Puree until smooth and  remove to a bowl.  Puree the chiles in two batches, each with 2  c. of the stock, and remove to a bowl. Now,  you can wash the blender.  In a large, heavy, preferably non‐stick pot,  heat 3 tbsp. of oil over high heat until very  hot. Add the tomato‐tomatillo puree, and  cook, stirring constantly, until very dark and  thick. Add the seed/nut mixture, and  repeat, stirring until again, very thick. Add  the banana mixture and repeat, again until  very thick. Add the chile mixture, turn the  heat down to low, and let it cook until very  thick and dark, stirring every few minutes.  Add the stock and chocolate mix well, pour  into a slow cooker and simmer slowly on  the low setting for five to six hours (you can  do this on top of the stove, but be careful  because the nuts fall to the bottom and 

tend to burn, and if that happens, you have  to throw it all out).  9. Add salt and sugar to taste (dried chiles  contain a large amount of tannin, and you  may need to add some sugar to offset the  bitter tannin taste, though most of it should  have cooked away, and you do NOT want  sweet mole). The Mexicans strain  everything at every opportunity. It would be  considered mandatory there to strain the  mole when done. Don't feel obligated.  Really. It's amazingly good whether you  strain it or not.  10. Mole is a sauce. You can tuck a few slices of  tofu ( bakes or fried) or tempeh in some of  the mole (freeze the rest) and simmer them  until done, then sprinkle them with sesame  seeds. You can have some veggies or your  favorite vegan protein, and moisten with  mole as a taco or tamale filling. You can do  anything you like.    Till Next Time  Keep it LEAN, Green and SEXY  with Animal Free Cuisine  Vegan Chef Mayra Your Dr. Flavor  The Author 
Chef Mayra has been in the  “healthy eating and cooking”  industry for over 11 years and has  certifications in sports nutrition,  macrobiotic cooking, vegan and  vegetarian, holistic, and feng shui  cuisine. She started her career as a cook by learning  and experimenting with French, Caribbean,  Southern, Cajun, and West African cuisine.   Chef Mayra is a chef instructor and conducts a  variety of classes and demonstrations geared  towards vegan athletes, personal trainers, and  anyone who would like to live a healthier life. “Dr.  Flavor” can make healthy cooking easier by  becoming your personal chef!  Visit chef Mayra at  www.mychefmayra.com or call her at 702‐372‐4709  and make sure to watch her live‐streaming shows at  www.chefmayra.com/show.html and  www.livestream.com/chefmayra.  
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Vegan Decadence

Chocolate: Fare of the Gods to Fair Trade
By Marty Davey, RD, MS

“Mmmm, chocolate” murmurs one of my favorite  characters, Homer Simpson, sometimes with a little  drool.  Ooh, he is so right.  There are articles galore  on the antioxidant properties of this melt‐in‐your‐ mouth treat. Millions of recipes have been  developed using chocolate from appetizers to  desserts, adding it to everything from chili beans to  avocado puddings.  Who can avoid the chocolate  ads for the latest spin on this ancient food?  I  recently read that the largest producer of cocoa is  the Ivory Coast in Africa.  How did this native  Central American bitter bean change locale and  become one of the top exports of another  continent and the daily indulgence of people  around the globe?  It’s all in the name, theobroma  cacao.    Theobroma cacao is the  scientific name of  chocolate.  In chemistry,  you read names  backwards.  So, “broma”  [or brosi, to be really  picky], refers to food and   “theo” is god or gods.   Theobroma means food of  the god[s].  Very aptly put  since legend has it that a  deity gave humans the  cocoa bean.      The first people believed  to have kakaw [the first  Aztec with cacao pod known moniker of the  cacao plant] were the  Olmecs of the Mexican Gulf Coast around 1000  B.C.i  The Mayans, the next culture to ingest it, had  a legend that the Plumed Serpent bestowed the  plant on mankind after they were formed from 

maize by the  goddess, Xmucane.ii   While Mayans were  sacrificing dogs of  cocoa colors to their  god, Ek Chuah, the  Mexicans made  offerings of lanced  earlobes to their  head honcho,  Quetzacoatl who supposedly discovered,  “cachuatl”, aka bitter water.  During this time  cocoa was mixed with all sorts of other flavors such  as vanilla, chilies, honey and peanuts showing us  that Reese’s is just making something old new  again.  In a total reversal of current trends, only  men could intake the cocoa.  It was considered  toxic to women and children.  Imagine no  afternoon chocolate break, ladies.  I don’t think so.    Around the year 900, cocoa was use as a currency  and was eaten when it was worn out.  That defines  recycle.  1502 brought Christopher Columbus to  Guanaja and the old world discovery of these new  type of “almonds.”  However it was Herman Cortés,  who got “xocalatl” introduced on the continent in  Spainiii by Mayan nobles brought by Dominican  friars looking to impress Prince Philip.    During the next century cocoa bean imports really  took off.  It was seen as a medicinal plant as well as  culinary, and became the beverage of the  European elite.  The traditional Mexican beverage  of Tejate, which is a mixture of maize and cacao,  was made palatable to European palates with the  addition of sugar.  The Spanish kept the secret of  making cocoa for over 100 years which means  Shakespeare comes and goes before common 
cacao flowers

Vegan Decadence

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knowledge of cocoa is disseminated among the  masses.      It is also during this time that the cocoa plant is  introduced to the Philippines and other Asian hot  spots, as well as Africa.  The need for heat to cure  the plants curtails the best growing climate to  anywhere between 10‐20 degrees from the  equator.  To deal with blights, different hybrids are  developed, Criollo from Central America, Forastero  which is centered in the Amazon basin and  Trinitario which originates from Trinidad and is  currently the main tree in Africa.    Cocoa continues to grow its worldwide market in  the 1700’s.  The first chocolate house in London  opens in 1657, by 1720 more intellectual debate is  happening at the chocolate house than at the ale  house. The French begin plantations in Africa and  Central America.  The Swedish biologist, Carolus  Linnaeus coins the scientific name, Theobroma  cacao.  A mill to grind cocoa beans is opened in  Massachusetts.  Conrad van Hooten, a Dutch  scientist discovers how to extract most of the fat or  cocoa butter from the bean.  This extraction  process makes it easier to digest and with use  alkaline salts allows for cheap production of cocoa  powder.  Even today we use Dutch processed  cocoa.iv    Due to this innovative process, everyone can get in  on the act and they do.  In 1847, the first mass‐ produced chocolate bar is created by J.S. Fry and  Sons.  The Cadbury family changes from being a tea  and coffee shop, in 1853, to being the purveyor of  chocolate to Queen Victoria.  Henri Nestlé, a Swiss  chemist works with the chocolate manufacturer,  Daniel Peter, and in 1879 devises a method of  mixing chocolate with milk.  It may seem like a  natural fit, but plain milk is too thin to create a  confectionary.  Nestlé invented condensed milk  and that did the trick.  It is the creation of milk  chocolate.  Rudolphe Lindt, a chocolate  manufacturer designs a method to refine   chocolate into smaller particles called, conching.  It  replaces other grinding methods throughout the  business. 

Chocolate has its ups and downs through the  beginning of the 20th century, but doesn’t have a  real change until 1987 when Food‐Tek, a food  chemistry firm in New Jersey, synthesizes the first  edible heat‐resistant chocolate.  This is looked at as  a great product to open up markets in tropical and  hotter climates.  Sounds like Frankenfood to me.    The latest trend in chocolate is to exalt its  medicinal properties and bring to light labor issues  surrounding the production of cacao beans in  developing countries.  Reports and videos have  come to light showing the inhumane treatment  and slavery conditions of workers on large cocoa  plantations.  This prompted the creation of Fair  Trade cocoa.  Below are some facts about Fair  Trade principals and criteria for inclusion from the  Fair Trade Federation.   

 

cacao pod cut in half

“Fair Trade means an equitable and fair  partnership between global marketers and  producers in Asia, Africa, Latin America and other  parts of the world. A fair trade partnership works  to provide low‐income artisans and farmers with a  living wage for their work.”    Criteria to be considered a Fair Trade product:    1. Paying a fair wage in the local context  2. Offering employees opportunities for  advancement 

Vegan Decadence

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Engaging in environmentally sustainable  practices  4. Being open to public accountability  5. Building long‐term trade relationships  6. Providing healthy and safe working  conditions within the local context  7. Providing financial and technical assistance  to producers whenever possible  8. Ensuring that there is no abuse of child  labor    There are a number of companies selling Fair Trade  chocolates in a multitude of flavors, even with ones  with chili peppers.  So even if you are more  discerning than Homer Simpson, finding one that  fits your conscience and your palate should be easy  and oh, so delicious.        The Author  Marty Davey is a Registered Dietitian and has a Masters degree in Food and Nutrition from Marywood University. She became a vegetarian in 1980 when she discovered that the chemicals in American meat made them unsellable to Europeans. She and her husband have raised their son as a vegan. She teaches nutrition and has a private practice specializing in assisting clients transitioning to a plant-based regime step by step. Her website is www.martydavey.com.
 

3.

iv

Ecom Dutch Cocoa. The history of Cocoa. Retrieved from

http://www.dutchcocoa.com/index.php?id=1 4 on January 13, 2019

Bright, C. 2001. Chocolate Could Bring the Forest Back, Worldwide Magazine. Nov/Dec. Retrieved from http://www.oardc.ohiostate.edu/cocoa/chronology.htm on January 13, 2010
ii

i

Wikipedia, [nd], Theobroma cacao. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobroma_cacao on January 13, 2010 iii Yachana Gourmet. [nd]. A brief history of chocolate. Retrieved from

http://www.yachanagourmet.com/about_chocol ate.htm on January 13, 2010.

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Dessert without Restrictions!
 

by Chef Madelyn Pryor 

It was not until the next morning that my  What is dessert? For most, dessert is the sweet  wonderful now husband gentled me, and said,  ending to a meal that makes your tastebuds dance  “Honey, you’re a pastry  and your eyes squint  chef. All you have to do is  as pleasure courses  Tropical Pudding through your body.  come up with desserts    For some, however,  that don’t use gluten.  ½ cup freshly squeezed orange juice   dessert is an  Bob’s makes a gluten free  ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice   emotional minefield  baking mix. Start with  2 teaspoons of agar powder, or 2 tablespoons of   because, for a variety  that.” (It was a lot more in  agar flakes  depth and inspiring than  of reasons, dessert is  ½ cup agave nectar  that, what I wrote is my  forbidden. Maybe it is  8 oz can of crushed pineapple   simple paraphrase). So, I  because you are on a  8 oz can of diced pineapple   went and bought some  diet. Maybe it is  14 oz can of coconut milk  because you have  GFBM (as I think of gluten    something else going  free baking mix now) and  Squeeze the lemons and oranges, until you have  on. That is what  started experimenting.  the required amount of juice. Heat the juice in a  happened to me, until  Our wedding cupcakes  heavy bottomed skilled until boiling. Add the agar  I overcame it. Nothing  were light and delicious.  and whisk until completely dissolved. Immediately  was going to come  One of our guests was  add the coconut milk, the pineapple, and the  between me and  gluten free, too. She did  agave. Whisk all the ingredients together until  dessert for long.   not know we now were  boiling, then remove from heat immediately.    and, despite our  Lightly grease your desired molds, either 4 10 oz  My then fiancé, now  assurances, she was  ramekins, or 8 5 oz ramekins (PKU survivors I  husband and I were  concerned because she  recommend using the smaller molds, then one  not well. He was  had never tasted a gluten  serving will have 1 gram of protein). Chill several  having muscle pain,  free cupcake that was so  hours or overnight. Unmold and enjoy!   especially in his wrist,  ‘normal’. Now all my    headaches, general  baking is gluten free, even  soreness, and fatigue.  my lemon Bundt cake (the  I was having migraines, fatigue, and dizzy spells.  recipe is on my blog) and my cookies.   Then, one sad day, we realized that we were gluten    intolerant. He took it in stride, but I cried my eyes  This experience inspired me. What about people  out, convinced that life as I knew it was over. How  with other diet restrictions? People who have  could I go on without steaming   cancer have to restrict their intake of refined sugar    and fats because these substances are unhealthy  biscuits slathered with jam? What about my  and help cancer to grow. Diabetics also have to  famous chocolate chip cookies, or peanut butter  askew refined sugar as it spiked blood sugar levels.  cookies? I also couldn’t live without ginger  PKU (Phenylketonuria) is “an inherited disease that  macadamia nut biscotti, Mom’s lemon Bundt cake,  characterized by a deficiency in the hepatic enzyme  and even the coconut lime cupcakes I was going to  phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH)” (Wikipedia,  make for our upcoming wedding! I mourned the  2010). People with this condition must not  death of dessert in my life, crying until I looked like  consume more than 2 grams of protein in any one  I had been battered by Mike Tyson in his brutal  meal. People with excess weight must also restrict  youth.   fat, sugar and calories. It can make your head spin!  
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For all of us out there that have one or more of  these restrictions, I know it all seems helpless and  hopeless, but it is not. I am here to save the day  and give you dessert, too! The following recipe is a  base that is gluten free, and suitable for PKU  survivors, cancer survivors, and diabetics. So grab  your spoons and enjoy life, one sweet bite at a  time!     (Let me say a quick note about a few of my  ingredients. Agar is a powdered seaweed extract  that has been used in Japan as a jelling agent for  centuries, and is now gaining popularity in America.  It is a great alternative to nasty animal gelatin. It  can most often be found in powdered or flake  form. If you have a choice, buy the powdered form  as it is much easier to use, but either form will  work. Coconut milk has fat, however, there is some  research saying that the fat in coconut milk may  actually help dissolve stored human fat. By all  means, do NOT go drinking cans of the stuff, but a  little in moderation is acceptable. Agave is the  syrup made of the agave plant, and in the raw form  it is high in nutrients, and the sweetener has a low  glycemic index, which makes it more acceptable to  diabetics and cancer survivors. Again, do not drink  agave nectar by the bottle, but in moderation it is  ok )               
Vegan Decadence

    The Author     Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates  on her blog, http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/.  She has been making her own  tasty desserts for over 16  years, and eating dessert for  longer than she cares to admit.  When she isn’t in the kitchen  creating new wonders of  sugary goodness, she is  chasing after her bad kitties, or  reviewing products for various  websites and publications. She  can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com  or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.      

March 2010|23

A Romantic Interlude for Two
By Angela Elliott
While everyone is out running around in a mad  frenzy, here are some ways to a night with your  significant other a bit more romantically and  creatively. Every year for Valentine’s Day, I make  my son and husband each a box of chocolate  truffles. I decorated an old cigar box with hearts  and “I love you’s”, and on the inside I put candy  paper wrappers filled with truffles. I enclosed a  handmade card that told each one how much I  loved them, my favorite things about them, and I  included a favorite photo or two of us having a  wonderful time together. I wrapped everything up  in a recycled gift bag, placed tissue paper inside  and then tied it up with ribbon. Here’s the recipe,  so you too, can give your loved one a gift, they are  not likely to forget!    I love romance! Every year, I pick roses from my  garden or ask a neighbor if I can pick theirs. I  spread rose petals all over my living room, then I  light candles and place them all over the living  room and the kitchen. I will usually buy a small  bunch of daffodils or tulips for the kitchen table. I  love Frank Sinatra for every romantic occasion  because let’s face it, no one does romance like  Frank! Don’t forget the importance of a bath for  two. Only if your kids are out of the house of  course. 

Angela’s Top Secret Chocolate Truffles!
1 cup raw walnuts  2 tablespoons agave syrup  1 tablespoon vanilla flavor by Frontier  ½ cup pitted soft dates  ¼ cup coconut water  2 tablespoons of raw carob  2 tablespoons raw cacao nibs    Blend all the above ingredients except for the  raw cacao nibs in a food processor until smooth.  Mix in the raw cacao nibs by hand. Shape the  mixture into truffle shapes, sort of like an egg  shape. Dip each truffle in a mixture of 1/4 cup  powdered raw cacao, 1 tablespoon raw  Rapadura brand sugar, 1 tablespoon raw carob  and 1 tablespoon raw coconut flakes. Grind the  cacao, with the sugar, carob and coconut in a  coffee mill or spice mill until it becomes a fine  powder. Place each truffle into a paper candy  wrapper and let sit in the fridge until ready to  pack in a box. These keep well in the fridge or  freezer, but can be left out initially for a few  hours to give as a gift. 

The Bath for TWO
Bath salts  ½ cup baking soda  ¼  cup Epsom salts  10 drops cinnamon essential oil  10 drops Ylang Ylang essential oil    Put baking soda and Epsom salts in a  food processor and grind into a fine  powder. Transfer powder to a bowl  and add the essential oils and stir well.  Spoon mixture into a glass jar. 

       
March 2010|24

Vegan Decadence

Dinner is usually a three course event starting with  a salad, the main event entree and finally finishing  with dessert.   

Salad  Starter 
Think Green (with a touch of hot pink!)  6 cups of your favorite mixed salad greens  1 avocado, cubed  ½ head of radicchio, chopped  Edible orchids  1 tomato, diced    Arrange the salad greens on each person’s plate,  then place the radicchio and avocado on each  person’s plate. Surround the salad with edible  flowers.    Dressing  2 cups almonds, soaked and drained  1 clove of garlic  1 cup of cilantro  Himalayan salt to taste  Cayenne to taste  ¾ cup water    Blend everything in a blender until smooth and  drizzle over individual salads.  For a thinner  dressing, add more water   

Sauce Ingredients  2 teaspoons mellow un‐pasteurized miso  2 tablespoons of olive oil  ½ cup raw pine nuts  ½ cup cashews soaked at least one hour and  drained  1 clove fresh garlic  1 teaspoon dried oregano  Himalayan salt to taste  Black pepper to taste  ½ cup nut milk  ½ cup zucchini, peeled and chopped fine  Nutritional yeast to taste  Parsley for garnish    Blend everything except the parsley in a blender  and blend until smooth. Place four raviolis on each  plate and top with Alfredo sauce. Garnish all  around the plate with parsley and serve.    

The Finale 
Strawberries and Whipped Cream (from the best‐ selling book, Alive in Five )  1 cup macadamia nuts, soaked and drained  ½ cup water  5 pitted soft dates  1 teaspoon agave syrup  1 teaspoon vanilla flavor by Frontier  1 tablespoon cold pressed Nutiva brand coconut oil    Blend all the above ingredients in a blender and  blend until smooth. Dip strawberries in the  decadent whipped cream and smile at your loved  ones. 
  The Author    Angela Elliott is the author of Alive in  Five, Holiday Fare with Angela, The  Simple Gourmet, and more books on  the way! Angela is the inventor of Five  Minute Gourmet Meals™, Raw Nut‐ Free Cuisine™, Raw Vegan Dog  Cuisine™, and The Celestialwich™,  and the owner and operator of She‐ Zen Cuisine. www.she‐zencuisine.com.   Angela has  contributed to various publications, including Vegnews  Magazine, Vegetarian Baby and Child Magazine, and 

The Main Event 
Ravioli with Alfredo  2 cups almonds, soaked and drained  2 cups zucchini  2 teaspoons Himalayan salt  1 clove fresh garlic  2 teaspoons oregano    Process the above ingredients in a food processor  until creamy. Transfer creamy mixture to a bowl  and add ½ cup minced sweet onion and ½ cup  minced bell pepper by hand to the mixture. Leave  large butter lettuce out long enough to wilt,  remove the heavy center vein. Place 1 tablespoon  of mixture into each lettuce leaf and roll to wrap  up tightly.       
Vegan Decadence

March 2010|25

has taught gourmet classes, holistic classes, lectured,  and on occasion toured with Lou Corona, a nationally  recognized proponent of living food. 

Vegan Decadence

March 2010|26

Candied Citrus
By Liz Lonetti
This time of year there is still a bounty of fresh  citrus available and my backyard orange trees are  covered in hundreds of pounds of the fruit.  I’ve  juiced, cooked and just eaten the fruit sliced and  given bags away and still there is more!  All my  neighbors have citrus trees and at this time of year  an orange is like a zucchini at the end of summer –  you might find bags left anonymously at your  door…    So each year I try to find new ways to use all this  citrus and this year I’ve discovered the joys of  candying the fruit.  I’ve been using oranges, but  you could use any citrus that sounds appealing to  you, limes, lemons, grapefruit or whatever other  varieties you can find!      Sugar is a very old method of preservation, when  used in quantity, it will prevent bacterial growth.   The principle of making jams and jellies is very  similar to candying, but perhaps candying is even  simpler.  Create a water to sugar ratio of 1:1,  meaning equal parts water to sugar.  Slowly cook  down the liquid to syrup and in the process you will  saturate the cell walls of the sliced citrus within the  liquid bath with the sugary syrup.  An otherwise  pithy and bitter rind will develop a rich flavor with  both sweet and sour qualities and makes a  fantastic topping to ice creams, cakes and other  deserts as well as a special treat to be eaten as is.    Candied slices can be stored in jars with the syrup  and should keep for a year or more refrigerated  and months unrefrigerated.  The slices can also be  dried on racks and dipped in sugar to minimize  stickiness and layered between wax paper to store  in a cool dry place.               

Candied Citrus
  6‐12 citrus fruits, preferably seedless with  thinner rind.  I used oranges.  Equal parts water and sugar (I used about 4 cups  Water and 4 cups Sugar)    Combine the water and sugar in large crock pot  or stovetop pan, heat to medium and stir to  dissolve sugar into the water.  Slice oranges ¼  inch in thickness and remove any seeds.    Add slices to pot and simmer over low heat  stirring occasionally.    After 3‐4 hours the citrus should begin to turn  translucent and the water mixture will turn to  caramel colored syrup.    You can remove the citrus after only a few hours  or leave on low overnight in a crock pot with the  lid partially open to achieve a rich caramel  coloring. 

 

   

Vegan Decadence

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  The Author    Liz Lonetti ‐ As a professional  urban designer, Liz Lonetti is  passionate about building  community, both physically and  socially.  She graduated from the  U of MN with a BA in  Architecture in 1998. She also  serves as the Executive Director  for the Phoenix Permaculture  Guild, a non‐profit organization whose mission is to  inspire sustainable living through education,  community building and creative cooperation  (www.phoenixpermaculture.org).  A long time  advocate for building greener and more inter‐ connected communities, Liz volunteers her time and  talent for other local green causes.  In her spare  time, Liz enjoys cooking with the veggies from her  gardens, sharing great food with friends and  neighbors, learning from and teaching others.  To  contact Liz, please visit her blog site  www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profile/LizDan.     Resources  www.urbanfarm.org  www.phoenixpermaculture.org 

                                                                             

Vegan Decadence

March 2010|28

Vegan Cuisine and the Law
Animal Treatment Labels: A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words 
By Mindy Kursban, Esq.

 “If slaughterhouses had glass walls, everyone  would be vegetarian.”‐‐Paul McCartney    Animal protection advocates have demanded  Congress mandate these “glass walls” by requiring  video surveillance in all slaughterhouses. But this  leaves factory farms—where the animals are raised  before they are sent to slaughter and where most  animal cruelty occurs—off the hook.  And while live  video streaming from factory farms and  slaughterhouses would persuade many to eat  lower on the food chain, it still requires that  consumers actively seek out this information.  It’s  time to give truthful information about animal  treatment to consumers at the point of purchase  so they can make informed choices.    When consumers buy chicken breasts neatly  wrapped in plastic or order a milkshake in a  restaurant, they know it comes from an animal, but  they typically do not consider how the animal who  has just become their food lived and died. Keeping  consumers in the dark about the horrors of factory  farming is Animal Agribusiness’s strongest ally.  Once people see what happens, they tend to not  want any part of it. But consumers cannot make  informed choices, because current food labeling  regarding animal treatment is false, misleading, or  nonexistent.    The California Milk Advisory Board’s “Happy Cows”  ad campaign shows cows grazing contentedly with  their herd in bucolic green pastures, ending with  the tag line, “Great Cheese Comes from Happy  Cows. Happy Cows Come from California.”  PETA  filed a false advertising lawsuit because the cows’  actual conditions are in stark contrast to what is  portrayed in the ads. The Superior Court of  California denied PETA’s claim on the grounds that 
Vegan Decadence

the California Milk Advisory Board, a marketing  arm of the California Department of Agriculture, is  exempt from the state’s false‐advertising laws!  Other false claims about farm animal welfare  include KFC’s promise of commitment to animal  welfare, Perdue Chicken’s astounding claims that  their chickens are “all natural” and “raised with the  best of care” in “state‐of‐the‐art housing,” and the  United Egg Producers Animal Care Certified labeling  program, which was discontinued because of false  advertising challenges by the animal advocacy  nonprofit Compassion Over Killing.    Labels claiming “cage‐free,” “natural,” or “free  range” are examples of misleading claims about  animal treatment. For example, the USDA permits  eggs to be labeled “cage free” if the hens are  uncaged inside barns or warehouses. Consumers  believe that the birds who laid those eggs had a  decent life. But the hens never went outside and  were crowded inside an industrial‐scale shed with  thousands of other birds literally walking on top of  one another. To reduce the aggressive pecking that  results from the extreme confinement, these  “cage‐free” hens had the tips of their beaks seared  off with a hot blade without painkiller.      “Free range” labels simply require that the animal  had “access” to the outside. According to Farm  Sanctuary, a national animal advocacy nonprofit  that has thoroughly investigated humane labeling  claims, “free range birds are often crowded by the  thousands into factory‐like warehouses with no  flock size limits, and the outdoor area may be little  more than a barren dirt lot that is difficult for them  to access.”     Labeling meat, dairy, or eggs as “natural” means  they are free of artificial ingredients or added color 
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and only minimally processed. A consumer would  reasonably assume “natural” means something  very different, perhaps that the animal was raised  in a natural environment.    The only honest way to inform consumers is not  with misleading words, but with pictures that show  the actual living conditions of the animals. Animal  Treatment Labels can be modeled after the  mandatory warning images required on cigarette  packages in several nations around the world,  among them Canada, Australia, and the European  Union. The images on cigarette packages are quite  graphic, accurately depicting the results of smoking  tobacco. To see examples of these labels, go to  www.smoke‐free.ca/warnings/laws/australia‐ warnings.pdf.    Similarly, the Animal Treatment Label would show  an accurate ‐ and likely graphic ‐ picture inside the  animal’s living environment along with a simple  description of the image. The label would also  include a website where interested consumers can  read more, see more pictures, and watch real‐time  streaming video of the factory farms, aquaculture  “fish” farms, commercial fisheries operations, and  slaughter of the animals used to create that  company’s products.    Let’s say you’re at Ruby Tuesday’s about to order  the baby back ribs. Beside the menu item would be  something like the following:      

Or you’re at the grocery store buying a carton of  eggs. You might see this:        

Egg‐laying Hens  Hens used to produce these eggs live  their entire lives in cages stacked on top  of each other. There are six hens to a  cage, and each hen is given 67 sq. inches  of floor space, about 3/4 of a sheet of  notebook paper. For more information,  visit  www.Kroger.com/animaltreatment/eggl ayinghens   

         
Vegan Decadence

The most effective way to stop supporting cruelty  to animals is to choose a humane vegan diet.  Though increasing numbers of people are making  this choice, 10 billion land animals and many  billions more marine animals are killed for food  each year in the United States alone. The animals  cannot speak for themselves, but we can be their  voice. Companies that produce or sell animal‐ derived foods must be held to account for how the  animals were treated. Getting Animal Treatment  Labels on animal‐derived products is not going to  happen overnight and  Pigs  would be a protracted  Pigs used for breeding live in gestation  uphill battle, if it is to  crates like these pictured here during  happen at all, but the  their nearly four‐month pregnancies. For  viability and practicalities  more information, visit  of this idea are worth  www.RubyTuesdays.com/animaltreatme exploring. Creating a  nt/pigs   well‐informed public is    the greatest hope for  change.          

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The Author     Mindy Kursban is a  practicing attorney who is  passionate about animals,  food, and health. She  gained her experience and  knowledge about vegan  cuisine and the law while  working for ten years as general counsel and then  executive director of the Physicians Committee for  Responsible Medicine. Since leaving PCRM in 2007,  Mindy has been writing and speaking to help others  make the switch to a plant‐based diet. Contact  Mindy now at mkursban@aol.com.  

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An Interview with Author and Cooking Show Host Christina Pirello!
   

What started you on the path to becoming a  vegan cookbook author and instructor?    Well, that is some story, so I will give you the short  version. I had no intention of doing this with my  life, but when I was diagnosed with cancer at 26  years old, I took a path that opened the whole  world to me. Adopting a vegan macrobiotic diet  healed my health and showed me the path I was  meant to be on…to teach people to have a better,  healthier relationship with food; that eating real  food, unprocessed plant‐based food can have an  immediate and dramatic impact on their day to day  health and wellness.    Television caught me by surprise, to be sure. I was  going along in life, quite contented with teaching  cooking classes (which were packed!) and working  locally, but my husband had other plans. He had  the genius idea that I should have a cooking show  and 3 years after he shared his idea with me, we  were on the air on national public television, with a  cooking show about vegan cooking in 200 markets  in the U.S. Who would have thought?   

With television came the ‘requirement’ of a  cookbook to go with the show, so I wrote my first  one, which was a challenge because I am a very  free and uninhibited cook; no measuring for me. So  to write a book helped me develop that discipline. I  still don’t measure in my day to day cooking, but I  do for my books and it’s a good discipline to have  for developing recipes. Everything has a front and a  back.    Were you always interested in the culinary arts as  a profession or did it catch you by surprise?    I have always loved cooking. Growing up in an  Italian household, I was in the kitchen with my  mother all the time, learning and cooking. I loved it  from an early age, but I also am an artist, so I  imagined my life as a sculptor and painter. I got my  first cooking job when I was 16. (Cooking always  seemed to be the way I supported my art ‘habit.’)  Actually, I was supposed to be working as a  waitress that night (it was a seder being catered by  a friend of the family), but I was so bad at it that  the guests demanded that I be removed from the  floor, so I was sent to the kitchen and my love 

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affair with all things cooking was in full blush. It has  never dimmed for me. Every single meal, every  ingredient, every experience still excites me.      By now, you’re a veteran cooking show star!  How  did your show, Christina Cooks, come about and  what has been the most exciting part of that  journey for you?    As I said earlier, television was never a part of my  big plan in life. I had no intention of ever doing  anything so public, so ‘out there.’ And television  has been challenging for me because of that. It’s  not natural for me to be in front of big crowds, big  audiences, but I have learned to do it and to  channel my nervousness into the energy I need to  do the job.     But this job, this level of doing what I do has  afforded me opportunities that I could not imagine.  Travel, appearances, books to write all have come  as a direct result of the television show. Most  important for me, though, is that television gets my  foot in the door where I might not otherwise have  the chance: because of the show, I get to work with  some of the most amazing people, doing the most  amazing work in the world, making a difference in  lives…especially for our kids. Because I am a TV  chef, I have the chance to work with kids in  schools, parents, teachers, non‐profits all  dedicated to making our children (our whole  society) healthier and more vital. To work with  some of these people and to see systemic change  happen as a result of a cooking class or seminar is  the best part of my job.    What challenges did you face getting the show  going and how did you overcome them?    The biggest challenge we faced was because we  were very clear that we wanted control‐of our  content, our books, our work schedule. And we 

wanted to educate people, not just stand up and  show them how to sauté, but give them  information that would help them make positive  changes for themselves. So we opted for national  public television. With that network, we had total  control. As long as we met the production  standards, kept the information educational and  followed the rules that guide public television to  this day, we had a home on the network.     But that meant that we had to raise all our  production money, every single penny, which  means finding sponsors who shared our philosophy  (a vegan, plant‐based diet) and had the vision to  get involved. When the show was new and not on  the air yet, that was a challenge, but then we met  Michael Potter, the genius behind Eden Foods who  shared my view of food and put his money where  his mouth was and got us off the ground and on  the air. Eden holds a special place in my heart for  so many reasons: their quality, their commitment  to the environment for helping my dream come to  fruition.    You’re also an accomplished cookbook author.   What is the guiding philosophy behind your books  and how did you approach putting them  together?    Well, my life as an author has been dreamy. It was  another thing that was not on my list of things to  do in this life…writing, but well, if you want to  make God laugh, just tell him your plans for the  future.    I signed with Penguin USA back in 1997 and it  would take 1000 crowbars to pry me away from  them! I have worked with John Duff, my publisher  from the beginning and he has always inspired and  guided me in my work. I am committed to helping  people have a better relationship with food and I  have no interest in lecturing, posturing or being 

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holier than thou. My job is to provide good, solid    What are the staple foods you keep stocked in  information and then let people make their  your kitchen?    choices.     Italian extra virgin olive oil, sea salt, whole  As the years and titles  peppercorns,  piled up, Penguin has  traditional balsamic    given me a lot of  vinegar, red wine  freedom to choose my  vinegar, brown rice  topics, but John is  syrup, maple syrup  Extra virgin olive oil always there to guide  granules, whole wheat  3 cloves fresh garlic, smashed me and work with me  pastry flour, semolina  1 red onion, diced to make the material  flour, canned  Sea salt appealing to the  tomatoes (that we can  Cracked black pepper mainstream who may  in the summer), whole  Generous pinch crushed red pepper flakes not be so into eating a  grains (brown rice,  2 stalks celery, diced plant‐based diet. I  millet, quinoa, barley,  1 medium carrot, diced want to make it fun,  amaranth), beans  accessible, easy and  (lentils…all kinds,  1 cup diced tomatoes (fresh in season, otherwise, canned diced sexy for people and  chickpeas, black  tomatoes) with my publisher’s  beans, pinto beans,  1 cup green or brown lentils, rinsed well guidance and support,  split peas, cannellini  Grated zest of 1 fresh lemon (organic, if possible) I think have done okay  beans), dark chocolate  1 bay leaf with that.   (for baking and  4 cups spring or filtered water   snacking), whole  2-3 sprigs fresh basil, leaves removed, left whole What is your absolute  wheat flour for bread,  favorite recipe that  nuts, seeds, onions  Place a small amount of oil in a soup pot with garlic and onion. Turn you’ve done that you  (red and white),  find yourself cooking  shallots, garlic, ginger.  heat to medium and when the onions begin to sizzle, add a pinch of at home?  (Please  The fridge is always  salt, pepper and the chili flakes and sauté for 2 minutes. Stir in share the recipe!)  stocked with greens,  celery, a pinch of salt and sauté for 1 minute. Stir in carrot, a pinch   salad ingredients, root  of salt and sauté for 1 minute. Stir in tomatoes, lentils, lemon zest, Oh, that’s tough. It  veggies (carrots,  bay leaf and water. Bring to a boil, uncovered. Reduce heat to low depends on the day.  turnips, rutabaga),  and cook, covered until the lentils are quite soft, 45 minutes to an cabbage, celery, tofu,  But I will say that  hour. Remove bay leaf and discard. Season to taste with salt and there is one dish I  tempeh,  seitan…whatever is  make once a week, so  pepper and simmer soup 5 minutes more before serving. Garnish fresh and in season at  it’s up there with our  each bowl with fresh basil. Makes 4-6 servings. the market is in my  favorites…a simple,  fridge. And we keep  yummy lentil soup. I  fruit around for snacking, whatever is in season and  have made this recipe my whole life, it seems and  fresh…and local and organic on all the ingredients  it’s always a winner.  possible. Whew!   

My Mother’s Lentil Soup

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What is the most amusing kitchen incident you’ve  had?    Well, it’s a great story. I had a relative who is a  fabulous person, but not so great in the kitchen.  You can’t have everything. So one day, she called  and asked me how to make a lemon meringue pie  for her mother‐in‐law. I tried to talk her out of it,  but she wanted to make that particular pie. I  convinced her to buy the lemon curd and talked  her through the crust, but well, she had to handle  the meringue on her own. A few hours passed and  she called in a panic. I got to her place and tried to  figure out what had  gone awry. Her meringue was  lumpy. Now I have seen meringue too stiff, too  runny, but lumpy??? So I asked her to tell me what  exactly she had done to make it. ‘Well,’ she said,  ‘first I hardboiled the eggs. How else would I  separate the whites from the yolks as you  instructed.’ Somehow I kept a straight face and got  her through the recipe. I have told this story for  years, but only with the promise to never reveal  her name!    What advice can you offer for people new to  eating a healthy vegan diet?  What are your keys  to success?    The key to success in any healthy lifestyle is to  make the commitment and do it. Being healthy is  our birthright, not something reserved for the  wealthy and elite. But we have to want it. We live  in a society that does all it can with marketing to  encourage us to eat more junk food and do less  that is healthy for us. Pharmaceutical companies  have a stranglehold on our culture and only a  change in lifestyle can break that hold.    To begin your journey to health, make small  changes. In the beginning, just add more veggies to  your diet. From there switch up to whole grains  and then add beans. Try something new, like tofu. 

The worst thing that can happen is you won’t like  something and you’ll try something else.     And stop buying processed foods, even vegan ones.  As much as you can, strive to use whole,  unprocessed foods and cook meals for yourself and  your family. Yes, it’s time‐consuming and a bit of  work. But cooking is so sexy, so nourishing, so  wonderful. Give it a go. Dust off the pots and pans  and have at it. You will love it.     Being fit, cooking healthy plant based foods, living  a ‘green’ life need to become non‐negotiable, like  brushing our teeth every day. We live in a world  that steals our health with over‐scheduled lives,  junk food and pollution. It’s up to us to fight back.  We get to vote three times a day, with our forks.  We decide, for the most part, what our health will  be with our lifestyle choices. Choose wellness and  vitality.    What exciting projects do you have coming up?   What’s on the horizon?    Well, I am beginning a new book with Penguin. We  are in the development stages, so this one is about  a year and a half away. I am excited though; I  always am when I begin a new book.    We have also developed and are producing for  public television a kids’ show called ‘I Play with My  Food.’ With a young host from Mississippi, (Chef  David Leathers), the show will strive to help kids  have a better relationship with their food, from an  early age. With segments on fitness, kids’ health,  the planet, how foods grow and of course, cooking,  this show is very exciting and has a great deal of  potential. We hope to launch it in the fall of 2010.    And then there’s the ‘Christina Pirello Health  Education Initiative,’ the non‐profit I founded to  work with schools, teachers and communities to 

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educate people on making healthier diet and  lifestyle choices, especially in the more  underserved in our communities.    And finally, I founded a cooking school this past  year. It’s a 6‐month program designed to take  people from the basics of cooking to home chef.  We meet one weekend a month and guest  teachers and experts come in and share their  expertise about health, wellness and food and we  cook…a lot. From there, people can go on to study  to become instructors for the programs in my non‐ profit…or not.    Thanks Christina! 
 

More About Christina 
 

Christina Pirello is a bright, free spirited, vivacious  redhead who is one of America’s preeminent  authorities on natural and whole foods with a  radiant personality that only serves to make her  message more powerful. She’s made it her purpose  in life to show Americans that they can look their  best and feel great too, by learning to eat natural,  organic food.    Christina’s love affair with food began at a young  age when she spent many happy hours cooking  with her mother, who centered family life in her  Italian kitchen. “My mom was always so happy  while she was cooking. It was the place where the  whole family gathered, and it was a place I knew  great joy came from,” she remembers.    That joy might have been the very thing that  prepared Christina to be open minded about the  healing power of food, because she would need it.  At age 26, she was diagnosed with terminal  leukemia. By the time her illness was identified, the  cancer had already advanced to an acute stage.  Her doctors gave her little reason to have hope for  the effectiveness of conventional medical therapies 
Vegan Decadence

and told her she had only months to live. Initially,  she was discouraged and uncertain. Then a co‐ worker introduced her to Robert Pirello, a whole  foods advocate who helped her adapt her lifestyle  and diet based on whole, unprocessed food.  With  love, dedication and death‐defying discipline,  Christina overcame the odds, and in the process  developed an expertise in cooking with whole  foods. After just two months of eating beans, grains  and vegetables, her doctors noticed a significant  improvement in her condition. In fourteen months,  her cancer was gone.  From that time, she was  utterly convinced of the close relationship between  diet and health.  She knew her life’s calling was to  help others discover the importance of this  relationship in their own lives. To that end, she  studied and became an expert in Traditional  Chinese Medicine, Ayurveda, acupuncture and  earned a Masters Degree in Nutrition. Today,  almost 26 years later, Christina is a glowing  example and inspiration on the power that our food  choices have on our overall health and wellbeing.    Since 1988, Christina has been teaching whole  foods cooking classes, conducting lifestyle seminars  and lecturing all over the United States about the  powerful role food plays in our lives.  She has  shared her deep and clear knowledge in a variety of  settings – from natural food stores to corporate  boardrooms – and not one life is left unchanged  when she leaves the room.  Even if her audience is  skeptical about her message that our food choices  are directly linked to national epidemics such as  obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer, they’ll  never think of food in the same way again…which is  precisely the point.    Christina is the Emmy Award‐winning host of the  television series Christina Cooks!, which airs weekly  on over 150 national public television stations  nationwide and in 50 foreign countries on Discovery  Health. She and her husband Robert publish a bi‐

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monthly newsletter and together they also operate  Christina Trips, a travel company specializing in  healthy vacations to exotic destinations.      Christina has written five cookbooks, the bestselling  Cooking the Whole Foods Way, plus Cook Your  Way to the Life You Want, Glow, A Prescription for  Radiant Health and Beauty and Christina Cooks:  Everything You Always Wanted to Know About  Whole Foods, But Were Afraid to Ask. Her latest  book, This Crazy Vegan Life was published in  January, 2009 and she is currently at work on her  sixth book. In January of 2010, ‘Cooking the Whole  Foods Way’ was named the healthiest cookbook of  the decade by Physicians’ Committee for  Responsible Medicine.    In 2008, Christina founded The Christina Pirello  Health Education Initiative, a non‐profit  organization dedicated to changing America’s  relationship with food, with community outreach,  media programs and several in‐school programs  designed to teach our kids to make healthier  choices before it’s too late. She works closely with  the city of Philadelphia on various school and farm  market programs under the umbrella of The  Initiative.    In January, 2009, Christina, along with other  nutrition experts, offered testimony to the U.S.  Senate subcommittee working to revise the food  pyramid guidelines for healthy eating.    Christina holds a faculty position at Drexel  University, where she lectures as a professor of  culinary arts. She also serves on the board of The  Farm Market Trust, The Green Council of  Philadelphia, The Green City Youth Council of  Philadelphia, The 9th Street Italian Market Business  Association, The Chefs for Humanity Chef’s Council  and is a member of IACP (International Association  of Culinary Professionals) and Women Chefs and 

Restaurateurs.  Christina earned both her Bachelors  and Masters Degrees in Fine Arts from the  University of Miami, and was awarded a Masters  Degree in Nutrition in 2003.    View  Christina’s work at www.christinacooks.com.        

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Featured Artist: Persia White
   
    What prompted you to become vegan and how  did you make the transition?    I was always an animal lover and at age 12, I made  the connection between my family companion  animals, and the animals raised for food. I realized  that people eat dogs and cats in different parts of  the world. The difference between farm animals  and domestic animals is only in the way we VIEW  them. I could never eat my dog, or cat… so how  could I eat any animal? Once I made the  connection between the two, vegetarianism and  eventually being vegan was the path I knew I had  to travel.    You’re both a successful musician and actress.   How does being vegan express itself in your art?    Being vegan has been a huge part of my path as an  artist. In order to connect with art, I need to  connect with truth. Being honest with myself has  brought me closer to nature and the beauty of life.  Most people don’t realize the amount of energy it  takes to be numb. Being vegan opened up my  energy and creativity.    Do you find you are able to influence others in the  entertainment industry to bring up compassion  issues and if so, how do you go about doing that?    
‐ Wanting by Persia White    
 

Visit Persia at  www.persiawhite.com  
  Click on the note to listen to Persia’s song 

I do have the opportunity to influence others and I  do it by offering materials that can inform and  reach people. Books, and films are the most  powerful way to connect with people and open  there eyes to a world they have been shielded  from. I was lucky enough to help produce the film  EARTHLINGS, and it has been my most powerful  way to reach people yet. I can’t count how many  people have turned vegan or vegetarian the day  they watched EARTHLINGS!  (www.earthlings.com)     I was always attracted to the arts. I loved how it  could transform energy…. Make a sad person smile,  or laugh. My mother was a teacher and a writer.  She constantly exposed me to different music, art,  and ways of thinking. Diana Ross, Stevie Wonder,  Hendrix, Pink Floyd, and Billie Holiday were big  influences.    What was your  inspiration for your  album, Mecca?      Mecca, my love, and a  journey. I see sound in 
March 2010|38

Vegan Decadence

color, so I’m very visual when creating music.  Mecca was influenced by feelings I wanted to paint  into sound. I have a series of paintings that go with  the album.     What similarities do you see between acting and  music?     They are both a form of communication between  the viewer and the artist. They both require the  performer to be honest and open in a moment…  with the purpose of giving and allowing another to  receive. I like that you asked what’s similar… I’m  always being asked what’s different     Not only are you involved in the arts, but you are  also a renowned activist.  What projects are you  involved with and what sort of work do you do?      I’m a board member for the Humane Society of The  United States, and a Board member of the Sea  Shepherds Conservation Society. Both groups are  doing so many wonderful things to raise  compassion and awareness it’s astounding! Please  visit www.hsus.org, and www.seashepherd.org for  or more information and ways you can help.    How did you get involved and how has this  changed you on a personal level?    Being an activist was one of the best things I’ve  ever done. I want to help other people become  aware, the same way I became aware. Because  some activist put him or herself on the line and  exposed crimes I wouldn’t believe possible….I  changed. I learned the things that led me to  become the person I am today. The more I learned,  the more I needed too do something to help, and  be part of the “solution,” in a world faced with so  many problems.   

What new, exciting projects do you have coming  up in the near future?     I just released my solo CD MECCA, so I’ll be doing  some live shows to promote my music. I’m also a  painter, so I’m working on my first gallery showing.  I’ll be donating a portion of the profits to animal  welfare charities.  I’m really excited about a new documentary I’m in  and a part of, called “Intelligent Life.”   www.intelligentlifefilm.com  It’s a wonderful and  thought provoking film directed by Brian Malone.     What advice can you give new artists who want to  effectively raise their voices for other creatures?    Follow your HEART! The beauty is truth and we  have that on our side. Never be silenced, art is such  a powerful way to communicate a message.  Remember that we are the voice for the voiceless.    Do you have a favorite dish that you like to make?   (please share the recipe!)    I’ve created an Artichoke Field Roast (wheat free)   Persia’s yumm yumm delight !!!    Lightly glaze a pan with organic oil. On low heat, grill minced onions and several

cloves of crushed garlic. In a separate pan -simmer slices of field roast. (Artisan Mexican Chipotle: www.fieldroast.com)

*field roast is a soy-free vegan grain meat like product
Add grilled artichokes, diced sundried

tomatoes, sliced organic cherry tomatoes. After about 15 min, combine the onion and garlic with the filed roast mix. Add a dash of freshly squeezed lemon juiceabout 1 wedge per serving.

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  This can be served on a bed of brown rice or

wrapped in a lightly toasted spelt tortilla And if you’re in the mood or a hardy meal put rice and mix in the tortilla together to create a Yumm Yumm burrito.
  Thanks Persia!    Contact  You can find Persia at www.persiawhite.com.     More About Persia    Persia is an animal welfare and environmental  activist and is a Board member of The Humane  Society Of The United States, and The Sea  Shepherds Conservation Society. Persia is a trusted  spokesperson on behalf of animal welfare for over  10 years. In 2005 she was honored by PETA as  Humanitarian of the year, as well as Farm  Sanctuary in 2006. Persia also managed to merge  her activism into her character for nine years on her  TV show Girlfriends, by making her character a  vegan and animal activist, leaving millions of fans  globally aware of animal welfare issues. Girlfriends  was the #1 TV show in African American homes for  9 years as well as a leading show for all women  ages 14‐42. Persia produced the award winning  documentary EARTHLINGS narrated by Joaquin  Phoenix. In February 2010 she completed work in  the documentary INTELLIGENT LIFE, and will be  participating in festivals and screenings of  Intelligent Life across the country.  www.intelligentlifefilm.com.     After 9 seasons on the hit TV comedy GIRLFRIENDS  Persia is branching out into the world of film, music  and visual art. In 2008 Persia completed filming  Spoken Word, with Ruben Blades, and Kuno Becker  and in 2009 Persia starred in Stand Off, opposite  Darrin Henson and Regan Gomez. In October 2009  she released her first solo CD MECCA. 

MECCA is a compilation of Persia’s solo music and  collaborative work with recording artist such as  Tricky and Saul Williams. Persia has worked with  great artists such as Gary Wallis of Pink Floyd,  Dominique Miller of Sting, Randy Jackson and Big  Bio of Outcast. Persia has written soundtrack music  for three Independent films, as well as the season 5  and 6 finale song for Girlfriends.   In 2010 Persia  will begin a series of live music art performances  that incorporate her music, paintings and  photography.       

Vegan Decadence

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Restaurant Review: Native Foods
Native Foods  www.nativefoods.com     Locations in Aliso Viejo, Palm Springs,  Tustin, Palm Desert, and Westwood    See website for hours, phone numbers,  and addresses      I finally had the pleasure of dining at Native Foods  on my way through Palm Springs recently and it  was well worth the stop.  Not only was I starving,  but I had been looking forward to my Native Foods  visit for several weeks!  Ok, several months!    Atmosphere    I loved the relaxed atmosphere I found at Native  Foods.  The interior of the restaurant wasn’t that  large, but there was a nice shaded patio just  outside the front doors that made for a quiet,  warm, and comfortable afternoon. In fact,  comfortable is an apt word to describe most of  what I felt at the restaurant.  The feel of the place  was very inviting, the staff friendly, and even the  food felt like a friendly hug.    Service    I visited the restaurant at an odd hour of the day,  so the staff didn’t have much to do besides wait on  my wife and me.  Suffice it to say, we received  impeccable service!         
Vegan Decadence

Reviewer: Jason Wyrick  

    Presentation    The style of food served at Native Foods is similar  to an upscale sandwich/burger restaurant and the  presentation matches that style of food.  It’s  nothing fancy, but if it was, I think it would have  taken away from the aforementioned all around  comfortable feel of the Native Foods experience.  I  thought the presentation worked just fine.    Food    Since I wasn’t sure when I was going to be able to  visit again, my wife and I splurged on the food  while we were there.  It was for a review, so it must  be ok, right?  We tried the chili cheese fries, the  taco salad, a cup of chili, the portobello and  sausage burger, the veggie‐mighty‐vita burger, and  the cheesecake.  Everything was wonderful and  filling, incredibly flavorful, and the meal left me  wondering when I was going to come back and try  out some different menu items.  I particularly liked  the veggie‐mighty‐vita burger, which was a  surprise.  It read like standard veggie burger fare  on the menu, but it was so well done, it ended up  being a favorite.  All the flavors were well balanced  and it was hearty without feeling heavy.  The  portobello and sausage burger were a clear second 
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favorite, though that was a tough decision between  that and the chili cheese fries.      If you can’t tell by the items I listed, Native Foods  serves what is basically vegan comfort food, kicked  up a notch, or two in some cases.    Final Thoughts    This was a great dining experience and all around  enjoyable time.  The food was delicious and filing,  the atmosphere relaxed, and I left feeling satisfied,  but not weighed down. I highly recommend this  restaurant! 
 

The Reviewer 
Chef Jason Wyrick is  an award winning  vegan chef and the  owner of Arizona's  only vegan catering  company, Devil Spice.  Serving the state  since 2004 as both a  caterer and a prolific vegan culinary instructor, Chef  Jason has garnered local and national attention. He was  chosen as vegcooking.com's October, 2005 Chef of the  Month and has been featured in the Arizona Republic  and on ABC's local morning show, Sonoran Living Live.  Formerly a diabetic, Chef Jason approaches vegan  cuisine from both a health and ethical standpoint with  an eye for taste and simplicity.     

                                                             

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Product Review:
Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor 
   

Bob’s Red Mill: Gluten Free Baking Mix

Bob’s Red Mill  http://www.bobsredmill.com/  Milwaukie , OR  Can be purchased at: Sprouts,  Whole Foods, Amazon.com  and Bob’s Red Mill website and  most grocery stores  Price: $3.50 – 5.99 average  depending on the store size of  flour  Special Information: gluten  free   

   

When I found out that I needed to bake gluten  free, I panicked. At first, I tried various gluten free  flours by themselves, and my initial results were  dismal. I had rice flour cookies that were gritty and  corn flour cookies that were crumbly. Finally, I  decided to try Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Baking  Mix (GFBM as I refer to it at home). It has fast  become indispensible in our home for a variety of  reasons. But before you do the gluten free happy  dance, be warned that this culinary wonder does  come with a few warnings, but the bonuses do  make up for the potential risks.     Bob’s GFBM is a combination of flours, including  potato, sorghum (a type of grass seed), tapioca,  garbanzo, and fava bean. This is a radical  combination, and not one I would have thought to  assemble on my own. It provides a flour that is the  same in calories as most flours (100 calories for ¼  cup), and it has a decent amount of both fiber and  protein (3 grams of each for ¼ cups). This makes it  an attractive alternative for some who aren’t even  gluten free, but there is a down side. The first few  times I tried to use this product, I tried to  substitute it cup for cup for wheat flour. That was  semi disastrous. It imparted a large ‘beany’ flavor 

to my baking that I did not enjoy. It also crumbled  easily, which was frustrating. Then I read the back  of the package and saw I needed to add xanthan  gum. They give a chart on the back of the package  as to how much add per cup of GFBM based on  what product you are trying to make. You will want  to start off with this guide, and then experiment a  bit to find the consistency that you enjoy. I have  also found that if I add a bit more sweetener than  is called for normally, it will counteract the ‘beany’  flavor and make a beautiful end product.     All in all, I recommend this product highly to all, not  just those who are gluten free. Baking gluten free  means that over mixing is not a worry, and all your  friends can eat it without warning, which is a good  and happy thing. Grab yourself some good ole  Bob’s Red Mill GFBM and get  baking!     The Author     Madelyn is a lover of dessert,  which she celebrates on her blog, 

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http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/. She has been  making her own tasty desserts for over 16 years,  and eating dessert for longer than she cares to  admit. When she isn’t in the kitchen creating new  wonders of sugary goodness, she is chasing after  her bad kitties, or reviewing products for various  websites and publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.    

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   Book Review:  Sweet Utopia 
Author:    Sharon Valencik 
Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor 
    Sweet Utopia is the wonderful dessert tome  written by one of Vegan Culinary Experience’s own  contributors, Sharon Valencik. With incomparable  style and grace, she delivers a variety of delectable  desserts to you from around the globe, and many  that are quite familiar to Americans. This reflects  Sharon’s own life, an American with strong  international ties ( her husband Milan is  Czechoslovakian  and he  took the wonderful  pictures for the book. Sharon is also the mother of  two, so there is variety in how complicated the  desserts are and how easy they are to make.)     This is one of the rare books that is hard to  describe. It is much easier to see and enjoy. It has a  beautiful layout, and many full color photos that  can best be described as ‘dessert porn’. This is not  a book that you want to look at when you are on a  diet, because it looks like you can reach through  and just pick up and enjoy these desserts. It  inspires you to get in the kitchen and get baking.     And you’ll want to bake the lovely desserts that  Sharon has to offer. There is Vanilla‐agave Custard  for when you want something creamy, Rum Balls  for when you want something a little naughty, and  Peanut Butter Mini‐cheesecakes for when you  want to impress (talk about a great date dessert!  Those will have you new interest coming back for a  second date!) There is actually a whole section on  cheesecake in here that had my eyes bugging out  of my head and my mouth watering. Ditto for the  cake section. I can’t wait to try the ultimate peanut 
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Author:  Sharon Valencik  Publisher:   Book Publishing                        Company  Copyright:  2009  ISBN:   978‐1‐57067‐233‐0  Price:  $19.95    butter cup cake (it’s not a cup cake but a full sized  cake that is peanut butter, chocolate, and bliss).     If you are new to baking, or vegan baking, there is  also  a large section in the beginning that talks  about all the ingredients in the book, about  equipment, and baking in general.     So if you are just starting out, or an accomplished  pastry chef, I know that you will be pleased with  this wonderful tome.     Highest Recommendations!     The Author     Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates  on her blog, http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/.  She has been making her own tasty desserts for  over 16 years, and eating dessert  for longer than she cares to  admit. When she isn’t in the  kitchen creating new wonders of  sugary goodness, she is chasing  after her bad kitties, or reviewing  products for various websites  and publications. She can be  contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.    

March 2010|45

 

   Book Review:  My Sweet Vegan 
Author:   Hannah Kaminsky 
Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor 
    I am a baker and I have been for over 16 years. I  have been a vegan for 5 years, and when I first  converted I was left with a huge amount of  vegetarian dessert books, but none that were  vegan. At first, I just converted my old recipes, but  then I received a copy of My Sweet Vegan. This  book is revelation. Hannah Kaminsky has created a  collection of recipes that are delicious and  beautiful. Too often, with a book, you hear the  phrase “there is something here for everyone”. In  this case, it is completely true. If you have a sweet  tooth, or know anyone who does, you will be  delighted with this book. There are several reasons  why I say this, but I will give you a few.     Hannah gives several categories of sweets. There  are Sweet Starts, or treats that can double as  breakfast, Cookies and Bars, Cakes and Cupcakes,  Pies and Tarts, and Miscellaneous Morsels and  Desserts. Within those categories, her tastes are  diverse. For those who are craving something a  little more traditional, there are Banana Nut  Muffins, Lemon‐Lime Sunshine Bundt Cake, and  Black and White Cookies. If you are looking for  something more adventurous, there are Wasabi  Chocolate Cupcakes, Chai “Cheese” Cakes, and  Green Tea Freezer Pops. If you fall somewhere in  between ordinary and adventurous you will still  find plenty to make and enjoy.     I myself have used this book many times, and I  have gotten great results. The directions are clear  and easy to follow. Most of the recipes can be  Author:  Hannah Kaminsky  Publisher:  Fleming Ink  Copyright:  2007  ISBN:  978‐0‐9791286‐1‐5  Price:  $22.95    made with ingredients that vegans would have in a  well stocked pantry. There are photos of many  recipes, in full color.     This book is a visual treat, and once you do a bit of  baking with it, it makes great treats too. This book  has my highest recommendations, and at $22.95, it  makes a reasonably priced present for anyone who  loves to bake, vegan or not. So grab a copy, jump  into the kitchen, and then get to eating!    The Author     Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates  on her blog, http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/.  She has been making her own tasty desserts for  over 16 years, and eating  dessert for longer than she  cares to admit. When she  isn’t in the kitchen creating  new wonders of sugary  goodness, she is chasing  after her bad kitties, or  reviewing products for  various websites and  publications. She can be  contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.    

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   Book Review:  Sweet Freedom 
Author:    Ricki Heller 
Reviewer: Madelyn Pryor 
    Everyone who is vegan knows that it can be tricky  being vegan and trying to eat out. It is much more  difficult to try and eat out at a place that has vegan  dessert. If you are also allergic to a common baking  element such as wheat, or refined sugar, then  eating out is almost impossible. Luckily, Ricki Heller  makes it simple for you to bake some delicious  desserts and eat in.     Ricki was a baker who was told that for health  reasons she had to avoid wheat, eggs, dairy, and  refined sugar. The good news for us is not only are  her recipes vegan, but the lack of refined sugar  makes the desserts a lot more diabetic friendly  than other vegan dessert book offerings. Despite  the lack of wheat or refined sugar, the desserts are  often light, fluffy, and are always quite delicious. If  you are horrified at trying to bake without wheat,  just remember how you might have felt when you  first became vegan and you thought “How will I  ever bake without milk and eggs?” You’ll find that  wheat is just as replaceable. If you have a food  allergy besides wheat or refined sugar then look  through the book, because she carefully marks  which recipes are free of other allergens.     Another plus is that the index of this book is  amazing! Another reviewer commented on this as  well, but this index is not short review of recipe  titles. You can also look up items by ingredient,  which is wonderful when you have an excess of  raisins or such and you can’t decide what to do  with them.     Author:  Ricki Heller  Publisher:  Trafford                          Publishing  Copyright:  2009  ISBN:  978‐1425176938  Price:  $27.95    I think the only ‘downfall’ of the book is that while  there are some gluten free recipes, many of the  recipes use spelt and barley flour, which do have  gluten. Gluten allergies are one of the most  common food allergies, and if you are buying this  book just for those, then be slightly cautious.     Still, there are a wealth of tasty, lovely desserts in  here, and it will make a great addition to your  vegan cookbook collection.     Highly recommended.     The Author     Madelyn is a lover of dessert, which she celebrates  on her blog, http://badkittybakery.blogspot.com/.  She has been making her own  tasty desserts for over 16 years,  and eating dessert for longer  than she cares to admit. When  she isn’t in the kitchen creating  new wonders of sugary  goodness, she is chasing after  her bad kitties, or reviewing  products for various websites  and publications. She can be contacted at  thebadkittybakery@gmail.com or  madelyn@veganculinaryexperience.com.    

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Recipe Index 

Click on any of the recipes in the index to take you to the relevant recipe.  Some recipes will  have large white sections after the instructional portion of them.  This is so you need only print  out the ingredient and instructional sections for ease of kitchen use. 
 

Recipe 
Cookies  Blue Moon Cookies  Cinnamon Almond Cookies  Gingerbread Cookies  Haystacks  Molasses Spice Cookies  Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip  Cookies  Peppermint Cookies  Rugelach  Swedish Shortbreads  Thai Peanut Lime Cookies  Thumbprint Cookies    Breads  Banana Bread  Dessert Focaccia  Tropical Coffee Cake    Pies & Tarts  Apple Cobbler  Cheesecake with Shaved Chocolate  Coconut Lime Pie  Heirloom Tomato Tart  Icebox Pumpkin Pie  Raw Strawberry Pie  Pear Pecan Tart             

Page
  50  55  60  64  68  72    76  80  85  88  93      97  100  105      110  115  119  123  128  132  14   

   

Recipe 
Cakes, Cupcakes, & Brownies  “Cream Cheese” Brownies  Chocolate Cupcakes  Chocolate Raspberry Cake  Date Pecan Cake  Chocolate Cupcakes/Cake    Puddings & Parfaits  Almond Decadence  Banana Pudding  Chocolate Mousse  Fruit & Granola Parfait  Potato & Apple Pudding  Tropical Pudding    Ice Creams, Sorbets, & Gelato  Basil Lime Chocolate Chip Ice  Cream  Blood Orange Sorbet  Cookies & Cream Ice Cream  Iced Orange  Key Lime Pie Ice Cream  Poblano Gelato  Vanilla Oolong Ice Cream     

Page
  136  140  145  149  12      151  155  159  163  167  22      171    174  177  180  184  187  14         

Continued on next page… 
         

 

       

 

Recipe Index 

Click on any of the recipes in the index to take you to the relevant recipe.  Some recipes will  have large white sections after the instructional portion of them.  This is so you need only print  out the ingredient and instructional sections for ease of kitchen use. 
 

Recipe 
Miscellaneous  Ancho Cannoli  Almond Butter Apple Boats  Baked Apples in Phyllo  Beignets  Chestnut Beignets  Black Cherry Chocolate Bar  Dessert Risotto  Figs in Miso Glaze  Figs Stuffed with Cashew Cream  Fruit Kebabs  Glazed Almonds  Grilled Rum Peaches in Phyllo  Maccha Latte  Peanut Butter Chocolate Balls  Sesame Balls  Strawberry Milkshake  Strawberry Spears  Sweet Bananas with Raspberries  Truffles  Twisted Lemon Bars  Angela’s Top Secret Chocolate  Truffles  Strawberries and Whipped Cream  Candied Citrus               

Page
  191  198  202  206  211  215  219  223  227  231  235  239  243  247  251  256  260  264  268  273  24    25  27         

   

Recipe 
Non‐desserts  Mole  Bath for Two!  Greens with Almond Cilantro  Dressing  Raw Ravioli with Alfredo  Mom’s Lentil Soup  Persia’s Artichoke Field Roast                    

Page
  17  24  25    25  34  39   

 

Blue Moons
Type: Dessert - Cookie Makes: about 2 dozen Time to Prepare: 15 minutes prep, about 30 minutes bake time

Ingredients
For the cookies:

1 ½ cups granulated sugar 2/3 cup shortening 2 tablespoons warm water 1 ½ teaspoons Ener-G egg replacer powder 6 tablespoons Blue Curacao liquor 6 tablespoons Coconut Rum liquor 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 ½ tablespoon lemon zest 1 tsp baking powder 1 tsp baking soda 1/2 tsp salt 2 ½ cup Gluten-Free baking mix (I used Bob’s Red Mill) 2 teaspoons xanthan gum For the frosting: 2 cups powdered sugar 2tablespoons Blue Curacao liquor 2 tablespoons Coconut Rum liquor

Instructions For cookies:

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Cream the shortening and sugar. shortening and sugar. Add the liquors.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Mix the warm water with the egg replacer in a separate container, until creamy, then add to the

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Zest fresh lemons, then use the juice until you have the appropriate amounts. Add the lemon juice and zest to the cookie mix, and mix thoroughly until you have one dough. Add the dry mix to the wet, about ½ cup at a time until they are all one mix. Line the baking sheets with parchment paper. Place two tablespoons of mix per cookie on the sheet, and bake the sheets for 13 minutes. The tops should be slightly golden brown. Cool Completely! Allow the cookies to rest about 5 minutes before removing them from their sheets. Mix the baking soda , baking powder, salt, xananth gum and baking mix until they are blended.

Mix the powdered sugar, and liquors until incorporated. Spoon about 1 teaspoon over completely cooled cookies. Allow to harden.

For Frosting:

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Low-fat Version
This is not a cookie that you eat if you’re counting fat grams.

Kitchen Equipment
A mixer, bowls, cookie sheets, a glass, measuring cups and spoons.

Presentation

These cookies look best against a white plate and need no adornment, but they would go well with a shot of blue curacao served alongside them.

Time Management
You could make the frosting while the cookies are baking. If a crust forms on the top of the frosting from sitting, then just mix.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Since these have a nice alcoholic flavor, they would be great at a cocktail party with finger foods, and retro cocktails .

Where to Shop
These ingredients should be available at any well stocked supermarket.

How It Works
The liquor balances out some of the sweetness of the cookie, and also dissipates as the cookies
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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are baked, which is why the outside, which is exposed most directly to the heat is crisp, and the inside is soft.

Chef’s Notes
This cookie is alcoholic and a few can give a small body a buzz, so they are for adults only, and don’t eat a lot if you plan on driving!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 6109.0 (254.5) Calories from Fat 3469.5 (144.6) Fat 385.5g (16.1g) Total Carbohydrates 519.9g (21.7g) Dietary Fiber 30.0g (1.3g) Sugars 548.9g (22.9g) Protein 30.0g (1.3g) Salt 1163mg (48mg) Vitamin A 0% (0%) Vitamin B6 0% (0%) Calcium 0% (0%) Iron 1% (0.04%) Thiamin 2% (0.1%) Niacin 0% (0%) Folate 0% (0%) Phosphorous 0% (0%) Potassium 0% (0%) Zinc 0% (0%) Magnesium 0% (0%) Copper 0% (0%) Riboflavin 3% (0.1%) Vitamin C 30% (1.3%)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Interesting Facts
Curacao liqueur is named after the island from which it originated.

Curacao is flavored from laraha citrus, a relative of the Valencia orange.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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March 2010|54

Cinnamon Almond Cookies
Type: Dessert Time to Prepare: 1 hour, 30 minutes Serves: 24

2 ¾ cups unbleached white flour 1 tsp baking soda ½ tsp baking powder 1 cup margarine, softened at room temperature 1 ½ cups white sugar 1 ½ tsp Ener-G Egg Replacer 2 tbsp water 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp almond extract 1 tsp cinnamon 3 tbsp sugar 1 tsp cinnamon ¼ cup slivered almonds

Ingredients

Instructions

Sift together flour, baking soda and baking powder into a large bowl and set aside.

Cream the margarine and sugar together with an electric mixer or wooden spoon until light. Whisk the Ener-G Egg Replacer with the water and beat into the margarine mixture. Beat in both the vanilla and the almond extracts. Beat in the first teaspoon of cinnamon. Turn the mixer to medium low and slowly add the flour mixture just until it is uniformly incorporated. Using a large wooden spoon, fold the slivered almonds into the dough, being careful not to over mix. Cover or wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least one hour. Preheat oven to 350. Combine the 3 tablespoon of sugar with the second teaspoon of cinnamon in a small bowl. Divide dough in half, leaving one half in refrigerator. Divide that half of dough into 12 equal portions and roll into approximately 1-inch round balls. Space evenly on a baking sheet, leaving about an inch and a half between each ball.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Using the bottom of a glass, press the balls down until slightly flattened. Sprinkle the individual cookies with cinnamon sugar. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes, or until edges are lightly golden. Allow to cool for a couple minutes on the cookie sheet before moving to a wire rack to cool completely.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Kitchen Equipment
Electric mixer Sieve 2 large mixing bowls 1 small mixing bowl Baking sheets Plastic wrap Flat-bottomed glass Spatula Measuring cups and spoons

Large wooden spoon

Presentation
If you are not plating these up with other cookies, place them on a white plate and then sprinkle a bit of extra cinnamon around the edge of the plate for additional color.

Time Management
This dough can be refrigerated, wrapped in plastic, for up to three days or frozen for a month.

Make up the second pan of cookies while the first is baking to save some time.

Complementary Food and Drinks
These cookies go very well with hot coffee or a tall glass of soymilk.

Where to Shop
Most of the ingredients are available at a regular grocery store. You may have to go to a store like
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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March 2010|57

Whole Foods or Sprouts for vegan margarine and the egg replacer.

How It Works
The egg replacer helps bind the cookie together, while the fat makes it tender. Chilling the dough allows the gluten to rest, which yields a more tender cookie as well. The almond extract gives the entire cookie a subtle nutty taste.

Chef’s Notes
These cookies have a very nice texture with a deep nutty flavor contrasted with the height of the cinnamon. They are also incredibly easy to make, and that’s always a good thing.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 3997.4 (166.6) Calories from Fat 1406.4 (58.6) Fat 156.3g (6.5g) Total Carbohydrates 605.1g (25.2g) Dietary Fiber 12.5g (0.5g) Sugars 337.5g (14.1g) Protein 42.6g (1.8g) Salt 3535mg (147.3mg) Vitamin A 164% (6.8%) Vitamin B6 11% (0.5%) Vitamin C 0% (0%) Iron 96% (4%) Thiamin 136% (5.7%) Niacin 106% (4.4%) Folate 135% (5.6%) Phosphorous 55% (2.3%) Riboflavin 75% (3.1%) Calcium 17% (0.7%)

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Potassium 19% (0.8%) Zinc 23% (1.0%) Magnesium 39% (1.6%) Copper 47% (2.0%)

Interesting Facts
Cinnamon was imported to Egypt from China as early as 2000 BCE.

Almonds are actually a seed, not a nut, and is a close cousin to peaches.

The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

Vegan Decadence

March 2010|59

Gingerbread Cookies
Type: Dessert Serves: 24 Time to Prepare: 2 hours (including 1 ½ hours chill time)

3 cups unbleached white flour ¾ tsp baking soda 1 tsp ground cinnamon ¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg ¼ tsp ground cloves 1 ½ tsp Ener-G Egg Replacer ½ cup sugar 2/3 cup blackstrap molasses 3 tbsp freshly grated ginger ½ cup margarine, softened at room temperature

Ingredients

Instructions

Sift together the flour, baking soda, all the spices (except the ginger), and the egg replacer. Cream margarine and sugar in an electric mixer or with a large wooden spoon until light. Beat in the molasses and the fresh ginger. uniformly smooth. Cover or wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for one hour. Preheat oven to 350. Divide dough in half, leaving one half in the refrigerator. Spray cookie sheet with non-stick spray, then place a piece of parchment paper on sheet. Place dough in the middle of the parchment paper, and flatten a little with your hands. approximately ¼ inch. Cover rolled dough and return to the refrigerator for 30 minutes to allow it to firm up. Cut gingerbread shapes with cookie cutters, and peel away excess dough. Try to get as many shapes out of one pan as possible. If desired, decorate cookies with raisins or candies. when cookies are still soft and the edges are just beginning to brown.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

Turn the mixer to medium low and add the flour mixture slowly, beating just until the dough is

Cover with a second sheet of parchment paper, then roll out with a rolling pin until dough is

Bake for 8-10 minutes (dough will be very dark when raw but lightens as it bakes). They are done

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Low-fat Version
You can replace half the fat in this recipe with a like amount of apple sauce for a lower fat cookie, though it will be denser than a regular gingerbread cookie.

Kitchen Equipment
Electric mixer

Wooden spoon Two 11x17 inch baking sheets Non-stick spray Grater for the ginger and nutmeg Non-stick cooking spray Parchment paper Rolling pin Cookie cutters

Presentation
The gingerbread men pictured here are decorated simply with a few raisins. However, you can go crazy with icing and candies. You can make full shirts of icing, chocolate dips for shoes, takes you! peppermint candy buttons, etc. Go wherever your imagination

Time Management
This dough can be kept three days in the refrigerator and up to a month in the freezer. Make sure it is in a fully sealed plastic bag so it does not pick up any other scents.

Complementary Food and Drinks
I like to have these with a spicy glass of chai tea with just a bit of soy creamer added into the drink.
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Where to Shop
Earth Balance and Willow Run are both great vegan margarines to use for baking, both of which

can usually be found at Sprouts and often Trader Joe’s. When choosing the ginger, do not choose ginger with hard, shriveled ends. Look for a crisp, plump look and a crisp smell.

How It Works
Most gingerbread recipes call for ground ginger, which is spicier and more bitter than fresh ginger. Using fresh ginger in this cookie gives it an almost floral bouquet, and the taste is quite different (and better!) than traditional gingerbread. The blackstrap molasses in this recipe is what gives the gingerbread men their dark appearance and deep flavor. The baking soda and fat is what makes them nice and fluffy! The dough can be soft and sticky, so that's why you use the parchment paper and chill it before cutting.

Chef’s Notes
The flavor of these gingerbread men is softer and more floral than the harder, spicier gingerbread men that are more commonly sold. That made for an incredible cookie experience!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 2905.7 (121.1) Fat 73.3g (3.1g) Total Carbohydrates 521.7g (21.7g) Dietary Fiber 10.5g (0.4g) Sugars 197.8g (8.2g) Protein 39.7g (1.7g) Salt 2213mg (92.2mg) Vitamin A 82% (3.4%) Vitamin B6 86% (3.6%) Vitamin C 3% (0.1%)
The Vegan Culinary Experience – Education, Inspiration, Quality * www.veganculinaryexperience.com
Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

Calories from Fat 659.8 (27.5)

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Calcium 199% (8.3%) Iron 315% (13.1%) Thiamin 151% (6.3%) Riboflavin 101% (4.2%) Niacin 124% (5.2%) Folate 146% (6.1%) Phosphorous 52% (2.2%) Potassium 170% (7.1%) Zinc 33% (1.4%) Magnesium 142% (5.9%) Copper 254% (10.6%)

Interesting Facts
China produces about 25% of the world’s ginger. Ginger “root” is actually a rhizome, which is a stem that grows underground.

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Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Butterscotch Haystacks
Type: Dessert Time to Prepare: 20 minutes Serves: 24

1 cup brown sugar, packed
1

Ingredients

3 tbsp margarine 2 tbsp scotch 1 tsp vanilla

/3 cup soy creamer

2 tbsp dark corn syrup

3 cups chow mien noodles

Optional: flaked coconut (to make snow covered haystacks) Instructions

Melt the margarine in a medium saucepan over medium heat, then add the sugar, corn syrup and

creamer, and stir gently until the sugar melts. Bring to a slow boil. Lower heat and boil gently, stirring often, until sauce thickens and coats the back of a wooden spoon, about 7-10 minutes, or until a candy thermometer reads 270-290 F. Remove from heat and stir in scotch and vanilla. Immediately add the chow mien noodles and stir until coated. Using two spoons, dish out the coated chow mien noodles onto baking sheets, working as quickly as possible (this sets up fairly fast). Try not to make the haystacks bigger than a bite or two, or the cookies will be too unwieldy to eat. Let the haystacks cool to room temperature before moving to an airtight container.

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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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Kitchen Equipment
Saucepan

Large wooden spoon Two regular spoons Baking sheets Candy thermometer

Presentation
I call the version you see in this picture “Snow Covered Haystacks.” Once they cooled, I plated them and then sprinkled them with lots of shredded coconut.

Time Management
This recipe is fairly quick, partly because you have to work quickly once the sauce is ready. Although there is some stovetop cooking, these are no-bake cookies that don’t require the use of an oven. These can be made up to three days in advance, if stored in an airtight container.

Complementary Food and Drinks
These cookies are sweet and fun to eat, and go perfectly with a tall glass of icy cold soymilk.

Where to Shop
All of the ingredients should be available at your local grocery store, though you may have to visit a liquor store to get scotch.

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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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How It Works
The butterscotch sauce absorbs into the noodles and holds everything together. The sauce is

cooked to the soft crack stage, so it hardens nicely as it cools, though the soy creamer keeps it from turning into hard candy.

Chef’s Notes
If you don’t have scotch handy, any type of whiskey will do. Bourbon has a complex flavor that would be delicious in this recipe. Alternatively, you could use dark rum, or omit the alcohol altogether.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 2083.2 (86.8) Calories from Fat 656.2 (27.3) Fat 72.9g (3.0g) Total Carbohydrates 327.7g (13.7g) Dietary Fiber 5.3g (0.2g) Sugars 247.7g (10.3g) Protein 11.6g (0.5g) Salt 1105mg (46.0mg) Vitamin A 33% (1.4%) Vitamin B6 10% (0.4%) Vitamin C 0% (0%) Calcium 24% (1%) Iron 59% (2.5%) Thiamin 40% (1.7%) Niacin 41% (1.7%) Folate 31% (1.3%) Phosphorous 28% (1.2%) Riboflavin 30% (1.3%)

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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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Potassium 28% (1.2%) Zinc 16% (0.7%) Magnesium 35% (1.5%) Copper 45% (1.9%)

Interesting Facts
Though there isn’t actually any scotch in traditional butterscotch, we sure do like it in this recipe! Instead, the “scotch” is likely derived from “scorch”, referring to the way the sugar is cooked. 4,000 year old noodles have been excavated from an archeological site in Qinghai, China.

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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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March 2010|67

Molasses Spice Cookies
Type: Dessert - Cookie Makes: about 45 Time to Prepare: 15 minutes prep, about 30 minutes bake time

Ingredients
For the cookies:

½ cup vegan margarine (I used Earth Balance) ¼ cup shortening 1 cup brown sugar, packed 2 tablespoons warm water ¼ cup molasses ¼ teaspoon salt 2 ½ teaspoon xanthan gum 2 teaspoons baking soda 1 teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon allspice ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg ¼ teaspoons ground cloves 2 ¼ cup gluten free baking mix (I used Bob’s Red Mill) For the coating: Granulated sugar 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 ½ teaspoons Ener-G egg replacer powder

Instructions For cookies:

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Cream the shortening , margarine, and brown sugar. shortening/sugar mixture. Add the molasses to the wet mixture and incorporate thoroughly.
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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Mix the water and Ener-G powder in a separate container until creamy, then add to the

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Mix the xanthan gum, ginger, allspice, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, baking soda, baking mix and salt in a separate bowl. This makes the dry mix. The dough should be a cohesive ball. Shape into 1 inch balls and roll in granulated sugar. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper. Place the cookies on the sheet and bake for 10 minutes. Dry on the cookie sheets for 5 minutes before moving. Add the dry mix to the wet mix, one ½ cup at a time until thoroughly combined.

Mix the powdered sugar, and liquors until incorporated. Spoon about 1 teaspoon over completely cooled cookies. Allow to harden.

For Frosting:

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Low-fat Version
This is not a cookie that you eat if you’re counting fat grams.

Kitchen Equipment
A mixer, bowls, cookie sheets, a glass, measuring cups and spoons.

Presentation

Leave these as is or garnish the plate with whole versions of the spices found in the cookies.

Time Management
While the first batch is in the oven, keep making cookie balls! That way, the rest of the dough is ready when you need it.

Complementary Food and Drinks
These warm, homey cookies are perfect with a cup of tea or coffee.

Where to Shop
These ingredients should be available at any well stocked supermarket.

How It Works
The outside coating of sugar on the cookie caramelizes slightly in the oven, making a slight crunch.
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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Chef’s Notes
This cookie is perfect for the fall and the winter. Through a few of these in your next Christmas cookie exchange, or make any time of the year for snacks!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 3110.7 (69.1) Fat 111.7 (2.5g) Calories from Fat 1005.1 (22.3)

Total Carbohydrates 495.4g (11.0g) Dietary Fiber 30.0g (0.7g) Sugars 270.9g (6.0g) Protein 31.0g (0.7g) Salt 1960mg (44mg) Vitamin A 123% (2.7%) Vitamin B6 % (0.09%) Vitamin C 0% (0%) Calcium 40% (0.9%) Iron 45% (1%) Thiamin 4% (0.09%) Riboflavin 4% (0.09%) Niacin 5% (0.1%) Folate 0% (0%) Phosphorous 11% (0.2%) Potassium 57% (1.3%) Zinc 18% (0.4%) Magnesium 24% (0.5%) Copper 0% (0%)

Interesting Facts
Molasses is the byproduct of processing sugar.

Most molasses comes from sugar cane, but some comes from beets.
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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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March 2010|71

Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies
Type: Dessert Serves: 36 Time to Prepare: 30 minutes (includes time to cool)

1 cup of peanut butter 1 cup of vegan margarine, at room temperature 2 cups packed brown sugar EnerG Egg Replacer for 2 eggs 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract 3 cups of unbleached white flour ½ tsp salt 1 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. baking soda 1 cup of vegan chocolate chips

Ingredients

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350. In an electric mixer, whip the peanut butter, margarine, and brown sugar until it is light and well blended. Mix the Egg Replacer solution and vanilla together. Mix thoroughly the Egg Replacer and vanilla into the ingredients in the mixer. Sift the flour, salt, baking powder, and baking soda together in a metal bowl. before adding the next one. Fold in the chocolate chips. Take about 1 tbsp. of dough and form a ball about 2 inches in diameter. Place these on an oiled cookie sheet about 2 inches apart. Press each dough ball down with a fork, making criss-cross lines. Bake these for 16 minutes. Immediately transfer to a rack to cool. Turn the mixer on low and add the dry ingredients in four batches, allowing each batch to combine

margarine, and sugar by whisking them quickly until they get light. You can then whisk in the other ingredients.
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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Optional Method: Instead of using an electric mixer, you can whisk together the peanut butter,

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Kitchen Equipment
Baking Sheet Metal Bowl Electric Mixer or a Second Metal Bowl and Whisk Measuring Cup Measuring Spoons Rack for Cooling Spatula to Remove the Cookies from the Cookie Sheet

Presentation

This looks really nice as part of a dessert. Put the cookie in the bottom of a mug, top it with Soy Delicious vanilla ice cream, top that with chocolate syrup, and top that with some vegan whip cream.

Time Management
Start by putting out the vegan margarine well ahead of time so it can get to room temperature. Since these are best just after they’ve cooled down and they’re a bit soft, it’s nice if you can make these just before you serve them. If you can’t, try making them the morning of the day you serve them, instead.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
A nice glass of vanilla soy milk is perfect with these cookies!

Where to Shop
All of the basic ingredients can be purchased at the local supermarket. The best place to get the chocolate chips, though, is Whole Foods. Their 365 brand works the best with these cookies.
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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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How It Works
The baking powder reacts when it is put in a liquid, becoming a solution that releases carbon

dioxide bubbles which helps the cookies to rise. The Egg Replacer helps bind everything together. The margarine helps keep the cookie moist while it bakes, making it tender.

Chef’s Notes
If you have an oven light, use it so you don’t have to open the door to check on the cookies. Just an extra minute or two longer than necessary is all the difference between a firm cookie and a burnt cookie. Realize that these will be extremely soft when they come out of the oven, so be careful when you transfer them to the cooling rack. Use a big, fat spatula when you do it. If you have trouble doing it, just leave them on the cookie sheet for about ten minutes before working with them.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses)
Calories 6675 (185) Calories from Fat 3011(84) Fat 340g (9.4g) Total Carbohydrates 806g (22.4g) Dietary Fiber 24g (.66g) Sugars 440g (12.2g) Protein 111g (3.1g) Salt 5020mg (139mg) Vitamin A 160% (4.4%) Vitamin B6 n/a Vitamin C n/a Calcium 26% (.72%) Iron 56% (1.56%) Thiamin n/a Riboflavin n/a Niacin n/a

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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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Potassium n/a Folate n/a Zinc n/a Magnesium n/a Copper n/a Phosphorous n/a

Interesting Facts
Cookies are thought to have been invented in the Persian Empire around 700 A.D. During the Renaissance, cookie recipes were found in a plethora of cookbooks. Alexander the Great discovered the sugar we are familiar with today while he was in Asia. After he brought it back with him to Europe, its use quickly spread throughout the Mediterranean. The first chocolate chip cookie was served in 1937 at the Toll House Restaurant.

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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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Type: Dessert

Peppermint Sugar Cookies
Serves: 24

Time to Prepare: 1 hour, 30 minutes

2 ¾ cups unbleached white flour 1 tsp baking soda ½ tsp baking powder 1 ½ cups white sugar 1 ½ tsp Ener-G Egg Replacer 2 tbsp water 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp peppermint extract 24 peppermint candies 1 cup margarine, softened at room temperature

Ingredients

Instructions

Sift together flour, baking soda and baking powder into a large bowl and set aside. Cream the margarine and sugar together with an electric mixer or wooden spoon until light. Whisk the Ener-G Egg Replacer with the water and beat into the margarine mixture. Beat in both the vanilla and the peppermint extracts. Crush the peppermint candies in a zip top baggie with a rolling pin until they are in small pieces. Turn the mixer to medium low and slowly add the flour mixture just until it is uniformly incorporated. Using a large wooden spoon, fold the peppermint pieces into the dough, careful not to over mix. Cover or wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least one hour. Preheat oven to 350. Divide dough in half, leaving one half in the refrigerator. Lightly spray a baking sheet with non-stick spray. Divide unrefrigerated dough into 12 equal portions, and roll each portion into a 1-inch ball. Space dough balls evenly on a baking sheet, leaving an inch and a half of room around each one. Flatten each ball slightly with the bottom of a glass. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes, or until the edges are slightly golden. Cool on the baking sheet for a few minutes before moving to a wire rack to finish cooling. While first sheet of cookies is baking, use refrigerated dough to prepare a second sheet.
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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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Low-fat Version
You can reduce the fat content in ¼ by substituting 1 1/8 cups of applesauce for a like amount of the margarine. The texture will definitely not be the same, but then neither will the calories! If you use this option, make sure to use pastry flour instead of regular unbleached.

Kitchen Equipment
Electric mixer Wooden spoon Two 11x17 inch baking sheets Non-stick spray Baggie in which to crush the peppermint

Presentation
These cookies are perfect for imprinting before they go in the oven. The cookie in this picture has a slight pinwheel pattern, but any pattern can be added. Just lightly imprint the cookies before they go into the oven.

Time Management
The dough can be made up to three days in advance and refrigerated. Alternatively, freeze the dough for up to one month. To save a bit of time, you can sift the flour while the butter and sugar are creaming together. And, since this is a sugar cookie, you can use some of the dough to make other types of cookies by taking off a few pieces before you mix in the peppermints!

Complementary Food and Drinks
A glass of soy milk!

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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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Where to Shop
All of the ingredients can be found at your local grocery store, though you may need to go to a

store like Whole Foods or Sprouts to find vegan margarine. You will find a good range of peppermints at a candy store.

How It Works
The EngerG Egg Replacer binds the ingredients together while the fat makes the cookies tender. Allowing the dough to rest for an hour relaxes the gluten in the cookie, keeping them tender. Peppermint extract is used to give an overall tincture of flavor while the crushed candies give shots of flavor in each bite.

Chef’s Notes
Don’t let these cookies bake too long. They are very easy to overcook, so it is better to pull them a minute too early than a minute too late.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 4127.0 (172.0) Calories from Fat 1283.4 (53.5) Fat 142.6g (5.9g) Total Carbohydrates 674.0g (28.1g) Dietary Fiber 9.3g (0.4g) Sugars 403.7g (16.8g) Protein 36.9g (1.5g) Salt 3575mg (149.0mg) Vitamin A 164% (6.8%) Vitamin B6 9% (0.4%) Vitamin C 0% (0%) Iron 90% (3.8%)
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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

Calcium 10% (0.4%)

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Thiamin 133% (5.5%) Riboflavin 64% (2.7%) Niacin 101% (4.2%) Folate 133% (5.5%) Phosphorous 42% (1.8%) Potassium 13% (0.5%) Zinc 17% (0.7%) Magnesium 20% (0.8%) Copper 31% (1.3%)

Interesting Facts
Archeological evidence shows mint being used as a medicine at least 10,000 years ago. Compounds in peppermint have a wide variety of uses, including as a topical anesthetic, to reduce nausea, as a decongestant, and as a pesticide against tracheal mites infesting honey bees.

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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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March 2010|79

Rugelach
Type: Dessert Time to Prepare: 2 hours Serves: 24

1 cup unbleached flour, sifted ½ cup margarine, softened at room temperature ¼ cup Sour Supreme ½ tsp vanilla extract ¼ cup sugar Soy milk Sugar Filling: 4 ounces Better Than Cream Cheese, softened at room temperature

Ingredients

2 tsp ground cinnamon ½ cup finely chopped walnuts ¼ cup raisins 2 tbsp packed brown sugar ¼ cup raspberry or apricot preserves

Instructions

Cream the margarine, Better Than Cream Cheese, and sugar in a mixer at medium speed, or by hand with a large wooden spoon until light. Beat in the Sour Supreme and vanilla extract. Turn the mixer to low and slowly add the flour, mixing just until uniformly smooth. Cover or wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for an hour. Preheat oven to 350. Combine all the filling ingredients except the fruit preserves in a bowl and mix thoroughly. Spoon the preserves into a second bowl and stir until easily spread. Divide the dough into two, leaving one half in the refrigerator. Dust the counter with flour, and roll the dough into about a 9-inch round. Spread two tablespoons of the fruit preserves onto the dough, going almost to the edge. Then, sprinkle half of the filling over the dough, again going close to the edge.
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Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Cut the dough round in half, then in quarters. Cut each quarter into thirds, so that you have 12 pie wedge shaped pieces. Starting at the wide end, roll up cookies and place them on a baking sheet, seam side down. Return baking sheet to the refrigerator and chill for 30 minutes, until firm. Brush the tops of the cookies with soy milk, and sprinkle lightly with sugar. Bake for 12-15 minutes, or until lightly golden.

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Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Kitchen Equipment
Electric mixer

Large wooden spoon Three mixing bowls Spoon Measuring cups and spoons Plastic wrap Rolling pin Sharp knife or pizza cutter Pastry brush

Presentation
These can be served as part of a cookie spread or on their own. If serving them on their own, sprinkle them with a dash of cinnamon and a few cuts of mint for extra color on the plate.

Time Management
The dough can be stored, covered or wrapped, for up to three days in the refrigerator or for a month in the freezer. The filling ingredients are all nonperishable, and can be put together up to a week in advance. Or, you can make the filling while creaming the sugar, Better That Cream Cheese, and margarine. If possible, make the second pan of cookies when you have returned the first to the refrigerator to chill again; that way, the second pan should be done chilling at about the time the first comes out of the oven.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This is a fairly sturdy cookie that holds up to other strong flavors, and goes wonderfully with a hot cup of coffee.
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Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Where to Shop
Almost all of the ingredients can be found at your local grocery store. A store like Whole Foods

or Sprouts should carry both the Better Than Cream Cheese and Sour Supreme, as well as vegan margarine.

How It Works
The Better Than Cream Cheese, margarine and Sour Supreme make a rich and decadent dough that is not too sweet. The real sweetness comes from the filling. The fruit preserves help the filling stick to the dough, as well as keep the cookie moist. When rolling the dough out, make sure there is plenty of flour on the counter, and rub flour on your rolling pin as well to keep it from sticking.

Chef’s Notes
When cutting the dough into wedges, use either a very sharp knife or (my favorite) a pizza cutter.

Apricot preserves are probably the most traditional, though raspberry preserves are also very nice. Consider substituting different combinations of preserves, dried fruit and nuts, such as

pistachios with dried cranberries and orange marmalade, or almonds with dried cherries and cherry preserves.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 2106.4 (87.8) Calories from Fat 909.1 (37.9) Fat 101.0g (4.2g) Total Carbohydrates 277.7g (11.6g) Dietary Fiber 4.3g (0.2g) Sugars 140.8g (5.9g) Protein 21.6g (0.9g) Salt 2153mg (89.7mg)

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Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Vitamin A 85% (3.5%) Vitamin B6 4% (0.2%) Calcium 9% (0.4%) Iron 34% (1.4%) Thiamin 49% (2.0%) Niacin 37% (1.5%) Folate 55% (2.3%) Phosphorous 18% (0.8%) Potassium 10% (0.4%) Zinc 6% (0.3%) Magnesium 11% (0.5%) Copper 18% (0.8%) Riboflavin 33% (1.4%) Vitamin C 14% (0.6%)

Interesting Facts
Rugelach comes from the Yiddish word for “creeping vine”. Rugelach is of Ashkenazic origin. Famous Ashkenazic Jews include Albert Einstein, Anne Frank, and Groucho Marx.

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Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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March 2010|84

Swedish Shortbreads
Type: Dessert - Cookie Makes: about 2 dozen Time to Prepare: 15 minutes prep, about 45 minutes bake time

For the cookies: ½ cup shortening ½ vegan margarine (I used Earth Balance) 2 cups powdered sugar ½ teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons water 1 ½ teaspoons almond extract 1 teaspoon ground cardamom 1 ¼ cup ground almonds 2 cups gluten free baking mix (I used Bob’s Red Mill) For the coating: About 1 cup powdered sugar

Ingredients

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Cream the shortening, margarine, and powdered sugar. Add the water, and extract, then mix again until incorporated. Mix the almonds, cardamom, salt, and baking mix in a separate bowl. Add the dry mixture to the wet mixture, about ½ cup at a time until thoroughly incorporated. The dough should cling to itself in a solid ball. Line baking sheets with parchment paper. Bake for about 15 minutes. Wait for 5 minutes before removing the cookies from the baking sheets, then roll in powdered sugar. Remove excess powdered sugar. Make balls of dough, about ¾ of an inch in diameter.

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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March 2010|85

Low-fat Version
This is not a cookie that you eat if you’re counting fat grams.

Kitchen Equipment
A mixer, bowls, cookie sheets, a glass, measuring cups and spoons.

Presentation

A dark backdrop shows off the lightness of the cookies. Even a light, but colored dish will do fine. Just avoid a white dish.

Time Management
This cookie goes fast! While the second batch is in the oven you can be rolling the first in powdered sugar.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Make some nice vegan Swedish Meatballs, or add them to a Smörgåsbord.

Where to Shop
These ingredients should be available at any well stocked supermarket.

How It Works
Since there are no leavening agents, like baking powder or baking soda, these cookies do not rise as much as others. They are smaller and more tender than some of their cookie brethren.
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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Chef’s Notes
This is a fun, delicate cookie, so be careful when traveling with it!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 6250.2 (260.4) Calories from Fat 2478.6 (103.3) Fat 275.4g (11.5g) Total Carbohydrates 861.5g (35.9g) Dietary Fiber 54.7g (2.3g) Sugars 609.9g (25.4g) Protein 81.4g (3.4g) Salt 3759mg (157mg) Vitamin A 164% (6.8%) Vitamin B6 1% (0.04%) Vitamin C 5% (0.2%) Calcium 70% (2.9%) Iron 48% (2%) Thiamin 15% (0.6%) Niacin 43% (1.8%) Folate 0% (0%) Phosphorous 114% (4.8%) Potassium 49% (2.0%) Zinc 48% (2%) Magnesium 162% (6.8%) Copper 112% (4.7%) Riboflavin 119% (5%)

Interesting Facts
Shortbreads are basically sweet biscuits. Shortbreads are typically cooked at low temperatures to keep the color and taste even.

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Thai Peanut Lime Bites
Type: Dessert - Cookie Makes: about 2 dozen Time to Prepare: 15 minutes prep, about 20 minutes cook time

Ingredients
½ cup smooth peanut butter ¼ cup shortening ¾ cup brown sugar 1 tablespoon molasses 1 tablespoon Ener-g egg replacer 4 tablespoons warm water ¾ cup gluten free baking mix (I used Bob’s Red Mill) 1 ½ teaspoon xanthan gum ½ teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons mild chili powder ¾ cup chopped roasted peanuts (unsalted) ¼ cup granulated sugar 3 cups powdered sugar The zest from 1 lime ¼ cup fresh lime juice

Instructions For cookies:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Cream the peanut butter, shortening, and brown sugar. Add the molasses, and mix it until incorporated. butter mixture, mixing until incorporated.
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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Beat the water and Ener-g in a separate glass until whites and frothy, then add to the peanut

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Mix in a separate bowl the baking mix, xanthan gum, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and chili powder. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients about ½ cup at a time, until all the wet and dry ingredients have been incorporated. Add the chopped peanuts until they are part of the cookie mix. Roll the dough into balls about ¾ of an inch in diameter. Roll the balls in the granulated sugar until coated. Place on the baking sheet, then flatten with the bottom of a glass. Bake for 8-10 minutes at 350 degrees. Cool completely. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.

Mix the powdered sugar, zest, and lime juice until creamy. Spread over completely cooled cookies. Allow to harden.

For Frosting:

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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March 2010|89

Low-fat Version
This is not a cookie that you eat if you’re counting fat grams.

Kitchen Equipment
A mixer, bowls, cookie sheets, a glass, measuring cups and spoons.

Presentation

Liberally garnish the plate with chopped peanuts, sprinkling them between the cookies.

Time Management
Chop the peanuts while the other ingredients are mixing together.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This would make a great dessert after a meal that showcases peanuts or coconut milk.

Where to Shop
These ingredients should be available at any well stocked supermarket.

How It Works
Magic.

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Chef’s Notes
This cookie is fun because you don’t taste the chili powder at first, but after you have finished the

cookie, the spice lingers in your mouth.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 4766.9 (198.6) Fat 160.9g (6.7g) Total Carbohydrates 751.6g (31.3g) Dietary Fiber 33.0g (1.4g) Sugars 604.9g (25.2g) Protein 78.2g (3.3g) Salt 2200mg (92mg) Vitamin A 42% (1.8%) Vitamin B6 0% (0%) Vitamin C 33% (1.4%) Calcium 15% (0.6%) Iron 23% (1%) Thiamin 13% (0.5%) Riboflavin 23% (1%) Niacin 162% (6.8%) Folate 45% (1.9%) Phosphorous 91% (3.8%) Potassium 49% (2.0%) Zinc 49% (2.0%) Magnesium 98% (4.1%) Copper 60% (2.5%)

Calories from Fat 1447.9 (60.3)

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Interesting Facts
Thai flavors typically combine sweet, sour, bitter, salty, and spicy, only one of which is commonly found in desserts!

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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March 2010|92

Thumbprint Cookies
Type: Dessert Serves: 24 Time to Prepare: 1 hour 30 minutes (includes 1 hour for the dough to rest)

1 ½ cup margarine, softened at room temperature 1 cup sugar 1 tbsp. vanilla extract 1 tbsp. Ener-G Egg Replacer 3 cups unbleached white flour Filling options: ¼ cup chocolate chips, melted with 2 tbsp. soy milk ¼ cup Better than Cream Cheese, mixed with 2 tbsp. sugar ¼ cup of your favorite jam or jelly

Ingredients

Instructions

Sift together the flour and Ener-G Egg Replacer. Cream the margarine and sugar until light in an electric mixer or by hand with a wooden spoon. Beat in the vanilla. Turn mixer to medium low speed, slowly add the flour mixture, and beat just until uniformly smooth. Cover or wrap in plastic wrap and chill at least 1 hour. Preheat oven to 350. Divide dough in half, leaving one half in the refrigerator.

Lightly spray a baking sheet with non-stick spray. Divide unrefrigerated dough into 12 equal portions, and roll each portion into a 1-inch ball. Space dough balls evenly on a baking sheet, leaving an inch and a half of room around each one. with one of the fillings. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the edges are slightly golden. Cool on the baking sheet for a few minutes before moving to a wire rack to finish cooling. While first sheet of cookies is baking, use refrigerated dough to prepare a second sheet. Make an indentation in the center of each cookie with your thumb or fingertips, and fill to the top

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Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Low-fat Version
You can reduce the fat content in ¼ by substituting 1 1/8 cups of applesauce or mashed bananas for a like amount of the margarine. The texture will definitely not be the same, but then neither will the calories! If you use this option, make sure to use pastry flour instead of regular unbleached.

Kitchen Equipment
Electric mixer Wooden spoon Two 11x17 inch baking sheets Non-stick spray

Presentation
You can arrange these with other cookies or make a platter of them by themselves. Try not to stack them when they are too warm, though, or the warm chocolate will smear on the cookies.

Time Management
The dough can be made up to three days in advance and refrigerated. Alternatively, freeze the dough for up to one month.

Complementary Food and Drinks
These cookies are rich, buttery, not too sweet, and go very nicely with hot tea.

Where to Shop
All of the ingredients can be found at your local grocery store, though you may need to go to a store like Whole Foods or Sprouts to find vegan margarine.
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How It Works
The EngerG Egg Replacer binds the ingredients together while the fat makes the cookies

tender. Allowing the dough to rest for an hour relaxes the gluten in the cookie. Agitated gluten molecules make for a tough cookie or bread! The cookies are baked at 350 so they do not heat too fast, which would result in the outside being crisp and the inside being underdone.

Chef’s Notes
Cook times are different because each oven is different, so you will have to pay attention to how rapidly your oven cooks baked goods. I prefer to err on the safe side and take them out earlier rather than later if I am not sure about the oven. A cookie can always be baked longer, but if it bakes too long, it will be hard and that can’t be undone.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 4380.3 (182.5) Fat 250.8g (10.4g) Total Carbohydrates 489.0g (20.4g) Dietary Fiber 10.1g (0.4g) Sugars 199.8g (8.3g) Protein 41.8g (1.7g) Salt 3218mg (134.1mg) Vitamin A 243% (10.1%) Vitamin B6 10% (0.4%) Vitamin C 1% (0.04%) Calcium 16% (0.7%) Iron 99% (4.1%) Thiamin 149% (6.2%) Riboflavin 101% (4.2%) Niacin 111% (4.6%)

Calories from Fat 2257.0 (94.0)

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Folate 145% (6.0%) Phosphorous 49% (2.0%) Potassium 15% (0.6%) Zinc 18% (0.8%) Magnesium 24% (1%) Copper 31% (1.3%)

Interesting Facts
Cookies are thought to have originated in Persia around the 5th century.

The word “cookie” comes from the Dutch word koekje, which means “little cake”.

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Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Banana Bread
Type: Dessert Serves: 8-16 depending on size of slices Time to Prepare: about 10 minutes, plus 55 minutes baking time

Ingredients

3 ripe bananas ¾ cups packed brown sugar ½ cup vegan margarine (I used Earth Balance sticks) 1/3 cup ‘milk’ (I used soy milk) 1 tablespoon vanilla 1 cup chopped walnuts 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder 2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 tablespoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground allspice 2 cups gluten free baking mix (I used Bob’s Red Mill) ½ salt

Instructions

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Add the bananas to a mixer, and beat on high for 1-2 minutes, until pureed. Add the sugar, and softened ‘butter’, and cream together. Add the ‘milk’ and vanilla, mixing until all combined. Combine in a new bowl all the dry ingredients: baking powder, baking soda, xanthan gum, cinnamon, allspice, baking mix and whisk until all ingredients are distributed equally. Chop the walnuts into recognizable but small bits, about 1/8 – ¼ inches. Add to the wet mix, about ½ cup at a time, until thoroughly combined. Place the combined mix into a lightly greased loaf pan (about 8 X 4) and bake for 55 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean. Allow to cool about 10 minutes and remove from pan. Slice and serve.
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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

Add to the dry mixture, and toss them through, so the nuts are coated with the dry mix.

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Low-fat Version
You can reduce the amount of nuts in the recipe by half.

Kitchen Equipment
Bowls, mixing cups and spoon, zester, mixer (optional), loaf pan.

Presentation

Serve 1-2 slices and garnish with a sprinkle of powdered sugar, and sprinkle of chopped nuts.

Time Management
Always wash your dishes while your loaf is baking in the oven. That way, when your dish is done you can enjoy it with everyone else.

Complementary Food and Drinks
I love the decadence of serving a scoop of vanilla ice cream with slices of warm banana bread. It is one of the ultimate desserts.

Where to Shop
You should be able to find these ingredients at any major supermarket. However, since brown bananas are best with this recipe, you have to buy those ahead and let them brown on the counter.

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How It Works
As bananas ripen, the sugars develop and intensify, so when you make your bread with old

bananas, you get a more intense flavor.

Chef’s Notes
Though most people think that banana bread is a simple dish, this dish incorporate spice, a light

sweetness, and an intense nuttiness to elevate it to a gourmet status. Serve it warm for a special treat.

Interesting Facts
Bananas originated in Southeast Asia and were first domesticated in New Guinea. Bananas aren’t just for eating. Banana plants are sometimes grown for the use of their fiber in clothing and other textiles!

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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March 2010|99

Dessert Focaccia
Type: Dessert, Bread Serves: 6 Time to Prepare: 1 hour 30 minutes

1 tsp. of sugar 1 package active dry yeast 2 tbsp. of olive oil 2 to 3 cups of all-purpose flour 1/3 cup of sugar ¼ tsp. of salt 1 tsp. of cinnamon ½ tsp. of allspice ¼ tsp of cloves ½ cup of pistachios ½ cup of golden raisins 1 tsp. of olive oil Additional cinnamon and sugar ½ cup of warm water (110 degrees F)

Ingredients

Instructions

Dissolve 1 tsp. of sugar and yeast in warm water in a small bowl. Let stand until bubbling and frothy, about 10 minutes. In a large bowl, sift together flour, sugar, salt, cinnamon, allspice and cloves. Whisk oil into yeast mixture. Pour yeast mixture into flour mixture and stir well with a wooden spoon. satiny and smooth, about 10 minutes. When the dough has formed a rough ball, turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until

Lightly oil a large bowl and place dough inside. Cover with plastic wrap or a clean tea towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume, about 40 minutes. Punch dough down and turn onto a lightly floured surface. Knead pistachios into dough. Once incorporated, gently knead raisins into dough, working the dough as little as possible.
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Stretch and pat dough into a lightly greased baking sheet. Using knuckles or tips of fingers, press dough down until covered with divots. Brush top with additional oil, then sprinkle lightly with sugar and cinnamon. minutes. Preheat oven to 475 degrees F. Bake focaccia in preheated oven for 15 minutes, until golden and crisp around the edges. Cut into wedges, squares, or slender rectangles and serve. Cover focaccia with plastic wrap or a clean tea towel and let rise in a warm place for about thirty

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Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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Kitchen Equipment Small bowl
Large bowl Wooden spoon Baking sheet

Presentation
Slice this along the width and lay the pieces at an angle against each other. This allows the diner to see what is inside the dessert focaccia, whetting the appetite, and it also makes the slices easy to grab off of the plate.

Time Management
When baking, there tends to be a lot of downtime and this recipe is no exception. That makes it the perfect opportunity to complete some of your other recipes.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This recipe goes nicely with a sparkling apple cider and as the finisher to a spicy dish like the

chipotle aioli potatoes.

Where to Shop
All of these ingredients are readily available at your local supermarket, although, if you do not have some of the ingredients on hand, go to a store like Sprouts that has a bulk spice section so you don’t have to pay for an entire jar of spice just to get ¼ tsp. of it.

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How It Works
The yeast creates bubbles in the dough when it interacts with the water, making the dough fluffy.

Kneading the dough develops the gluten in it which binds together and traps the bubbles the yeast makes inside the focaccia. Pistachios go very well with raisins and add a nice color contrast to the focaccia while the cinnamon provides a nice, dessert touch to the bread.

Chef’s Notes
This focaccia is not as sweet as it first appears, but it is no less delicious. It can be served as a dessert or as an appetizer! If you want to make it more decadent, mix up some vegan margarine, sugar, and cinnamon to pour on top of it.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1908.4 (318.1) Fat 47.5 g (7.9g) Calories from Fat 427.9 (71.3)

Total Carbohydrates 335.7g (55.9g) Dietary Fiber 12.6g (2.1g) Sugars 122.1g (20.4g) Protein 34.5g (5.7g) Salt 598mg (100.0mg) Vitamin A 4% (0.6%)

Vitamin B6 44% (7.3%) Vitamin C 5% (0.8%) Calcium 18% (3%) Iron 87% (14.5%) Thiamin 110% (18.3%) Riboflavin 74% (12.3%) Niacin 80% (13.3%) Folate 101% (16.8%) Phosphorous 50% (8.3%)
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Potassium 38% (6.3%) Zinc 19% (3.2%) Magnesium 35% (5.8%) Copper 62% (10.3%)

Interesting Facts
In Spanish, this recipe is called “bogaza.” Focaccia is also spelled “foccacia.”

The recipe for focaccia is at least 3,000 years old.

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Recipe by Eleanor Sampson

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March 2010|104

Tropical Coffee Cake
Type: Dessert - Cake Makes: about 18 slices Time to Prepare: 20 minutes prep, about 60 minutes total bake time

Ingredients
1 cup sugar

1 ½ cups gluten free baking mix (I used Bob’s Red Mill) 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon nutmeg ½ teaspoons salt 2 oz dried mango 2 oz dried papaya 4 oz dried pineapple 8 oz vanilla flavored coconut yogurt or other non-dairy yogurt ½ cup oil 1 tablespoon Ener-G powder 4 tablespoons water 1teaspoon almond extract 2 teaspoons xananth gum

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Dice the dried fruit, if not already diced. Place to the side. Mix the Ener-G powder with the water in a separate cup until frothy, then set the side. Mix the almond extract, oil, and sugar in a mixing bowl until combined. combined. Mix all the dry ingredients together in a separate bowl, including the baking mix, baking powder, xananth gum, nutmeg and dried fruit. combined. Oil a 13 X 5 loaf pan, or the largest loaf pan you have.
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Add all other wet ingredients, including the combined Ener-G and yogurt until completely

Add the dry ingredients to the wet, about ½ cup at a time, mixing between additions, until

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Pour the batter into the oiled pan and bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until a skewer placed in the middle of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for about 10 to 15 minutes, then unpan the cake. Slice into 1/2” slices and enjoy.

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Low-fat Version
This is not a cookie that you eat if you’re counting fat grams.

Kitchen Equipment
A mixer, bowls, 13 X5 loaf pan, measuring cups and spoons

Presentation

This looks just fine as is, but you can also sprinkle pistachios around the cake, or garnish it with a sprinkle of cinnamon.

Time Management
There are not many time management tricks for this one, but it goes together quickly and is super soft and sweet!

Complementary Food and Drinks
Because this cake is sweet, it would be delicious with some dark coffee or warm tea.

Where to Shop
These ingredients should be available at any well stocked supermarket.

How It Works
The coconut yogurt bakes this a very moist cake. Also, coating the dried fruit in the dry ingredients allows them to be suspended throughout the cake instead of all sinking to the bottom.
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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Chef’s Notes
I just got a new coffee maker that makes me love home coffee more than Starbucks. I said it! Plus,

Starbucks always made me sad when I saw their tasty pastries in the case, and I knew I couldn’t eat any of them. With a treat like this, and my new coffee, I have no urge to buy Starbucks ever again! FREEDOM!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 3312.9 (184.0) Calories from Fat 1086.8 (60.4) Fat 120.8g (6.7g) Total Carbohydrates 524.4g (29.1g) Dietary Fiber 36.4g (2.0g) Sugars 333.1g (18.5g) Protein 32.1g (1.8g) Salt 1232mg (70mg) Vitamin A 58% (3.2%) Vitamin B6 2% (0.1%) Calcium 47% (2.6%) Iron 25% (1.4%) Thiamin 39% (2.2%) Niacin 26% (1.4%) Folate 16% (0.9%) Phosphorous 18% (1%) Potassium 57% (3.2%) Zinc 11% (0.6%) Magnesium 53% (2.9%) Copper 50% (2.8%) Riboflavin 30% (1.7%) Vitamin C 171% (9.5%)

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Interesting Facts
Coffee cakes originally received that moniker because they were slices of cake eaten with coffee. Now, many coffee cakes are actually made with coffee.

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Recipe by Chef Madelyn Pryor

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Apple Ginger Cobbler
Type: Dessert Serves: 8 Time to Prepare: 60 minutes

5 Granny Smith apples, cored and diced 1 tsp. freshly grated ginger 1 cup of flour 1cup of finely ground sugar 1/8 tsp. of salt 6 tbsp. of margarine ¼ tsp. of ground cinnamon ¼ tsp. of freshly ground nutmeg 2 tsp. of EnerG Egg Replacer powder ½ tsp. of vanilla extract 1 tbsp. of water ½ tsp. of lemon juice ½ cup of finely ground sugar

Ingredients

Instructions

Core the apples and dice them into about ½” bits. Toss them with ½ cup of sugar and the grated ginger, place them in the refrigerator, and cover them. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a metal bowl, combine the flour, 1 cup of sugar, and salt. Set aside approximately ¼ cup of this. Add the cinnamon and nutmeg to this reserved mix. With the remaining mixture, cut in the margarine, working it with a fork or by hand until it is crumbly. In a small bowl, combine the Egg Replacer, vanilla, and water. Add this to the main flour and sugar mix and work it by hand until a dry dough is formed. Gently roll the dough out until it is the shape of your baking dish. Add ½ tsp. of lemon juice to the apples. Place them in the baking dish. Top the apples with the rolled out dough.
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Bake this on 400 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes.

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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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Medium Depth Baking Dish Large Metal Bowl Dish Towel Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Apple Corer Knife Nutmeg Grater Medium Metal Bowl

Kitchen Equipment

Presentation

There are two ways to do this. You can roll out the dough and get a uniform presentation or you can form the dough into small discs and overlap the discs as the cover. This picture uses the disc method. Finally, if you want a little something extra, you can place coarsely ground sugar on top of the cobbler during the last five minutes of cooking so the sugar browns and presents a nice contrast against the dough.

Time Management
All the work in this recipe is up front and will take you about 15 minutes. The rest of the time, the cobbler will sit in the oven. This can be made the same morning that you plan on serving it and then warmed up later. I wouldn’t let it sit more than a day, though, as it will get gummy.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This is perfect after a traditional Southern meal. Consider serving it after a set of something spicy, like chili.
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Where to Shop
You will find the best apples at a farmers’ market, but all of the ingredients are common enough, you can get them at your local grocery market. If you want to use the coarsely ground sugar, look either the baking aisle or in a healthy living section. for a package of Sugar in the Raw. It comes in a plain brown package and is most often located in

How It Works
Coating the apples with sugar when you set them aside allows them to slowly release their juices and create a semi-syrup. Coating them with the flour mix helps that syrup gel and stick to the apples when it bakes, which is a trademark of a cobbler. The apples will release more water as they cook, which will finalize that process of turning the flour and sugar into a gel-like syrup. Gently where it is like a pastry. working the margarine into the flour will help keep the crust just a tiny bit flaky, but not to the point

Chef’s Notes
The addition of the ginger to this recipe is my contribution to the traditional Southern cobbler. When working with the flour, do not be alarmed if it seems a bit dry for a dough. The apples will release water as they bake which will mingle with the crust. My favorite way to do this is with the disc method, as I think it adds a whole new texture to the cobbler and adds to the presentation.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 2666 (333) Calories from Fat 666 (83) Fat 74g (9g) Total Carbohydrates 486g (61g) Dietary Fiber 15g (2g) Sugars 370g (42g) Protein 14g (2g) Salt 255mg (32g)

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Vitamin A 5% (1%) Vitamin B6 31% (4%) Calcium 4% (.5%) Iron 25% (3%) Thiamin 40% (5%) Niacin 38% (5%) Folate 18% (2%) Phosphorous 46% (6%) Potassium 50% (6%) Zinc 23% (3%) Magnesium 46% (6%) Copper 27% (3%) Riboflavin 28% (3.5%) Vitamin C 68% (8.5%)

Interesting Facts
Some cobblers are enclosed in a crust while others have a crumbly top.

The apple cobbler is a descendant of apple pies from 15th century England. It is likely that the Romans brought cultivated apples with them when they conquered England and thus brought apples to England.

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Cheesecake with Shaved Chocolate
Type: Dessert Serves: 4 individual servings or 1 small cake Time to Prepare: 35 minutes + time to cool

12 oz. of Better than Cream Cheese 3 tbsp. of lemon juice 4 tbsp. of arrowroot 8 oz. of granulated sugar 4 cinnamon graham cracker rectangles 2 tbsp. of oil or melted margarine 1 oz. of unsweetened chocolate Option: 1 tbsp. of Sour Supreme, 1 tsp. of lemon juice instead of the above amounts if you do not have arrowroot or agar agar 3 tbsp. of Sour Supreme

Ingredients

2 tsp. of agar agar powder

Instructions
The crust… Crumble the graham crackers until they are coarse. Put them in the bottom of the spring form pan or ramekins. Add the oil or margarine and combine that with the cracker crumbs. The filling… Press the mix down until it is firm on the bottom.

Blend together the Better than Cream Cheese, Sour Supreme, lemon juice, agar agar, arrowroot, and sugar until they are well combined. Making the cheese cake… Line the side of the pan with wax paper and lightly oil it (do this before the crust goes in). Pour the filling into the pan or ramekins and shake gently to get rid of lumps, bubbles, and ridges. Bake on 325 degrees for about 20 minutes. Let the cake(s) chill in the refrigerator for at least three hours. Take a knife and gently shave bits of chocolate onto the cake.
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Blender

Kitchen Equipment

Small Spring Form Pan or Ramekins Small Knife Metal Bowl to Hold Graham Cracker Crumbs Measuring Cups Measuring Spoons Oven Wax Paper (if you use the spring form pan)

Presentation
I like serving these in small ramekins because each person gets their own mini cheesecake. Make sure that the cheesecake is thoroughly cooled before you shave the chocolate onto it as the chocolate will melt if it is not. If you have an extremely thin blade, you can make a long curled shave to place right in the middle of the cake. You can also decorate this with fresh strawberries, raspberries, etc.

Time Management
The cheesecake is best if it can sit overnight, so make it the night before if you have the opportunity. Still, three hours of chilling should be sufficient for the cake to completely set. Plan on starting this early afternoon if you are going to serve it for dinner.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This goes very well with a red dessert wine.

Where to Shop
Wild Oats and Whole Foods are safe bets for finding Tofutti’s Better than Cream Cheese and

Sour Supreme. Many markets are also adding health/eco-friendly sections, so there’s a good chance you can find those products there. Agar agar can also most easily be purchased at the
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above stores as well as the arrowroot. They will be difficult to find other places, but fortunately, these stores are common now. The rest of the ingredients can be found at your local supermarket. Just make sure to look at the ingredients on the graham crackers to make sure they don’t contain honey, whey, milk, etc.

How It Works
Mixing the agar agar and the arrowroot helps the cake congeal without turning rubbery, which it

may be prone to do if you only use the agar agar. Adding the lemon juice gives it a slightly tart richness. Baking it helps everything blend together and activates the agar agar/arrowroot. Letting it cool brings the cake to a rest and allows it to firm up. Finally, using unsweetened chocolate adds a nice, contrasting bitterness to the cheesecake.

taste common in a lot of cheesecakes and the Sour Supreme gives it an extra, slightly aromatic

If you do not have the agar agar and arrowroot, you can still make the cheesecake by using the substitution as it reduces the water content and therefore the need for the congealants.

Chef’s Notes
This is just the very basic cheesecake and a whole lot can be added to it. For example, lime juice can be used in place of lemon juice to make a key lime cheesecake. A layer of jam can be placed have fun! between the crust and cheesecake or swirled into the filling once it’s in the pan. Experiment and

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 2737 (684) Calories from Fat 1053 (263) Fat 117g (29g) Total Carbohydrates 400g (100g) Dietary Fiber 4g (1g) Sugars 174g (44g) Protein 21g (5g) Salt 2480mg (820mg)

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Recipe by Chef Jason Wyrick

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Vitamin A 2% (1%) Vitamin B6 3% (1%) Calcium 5% (1%) Iron 16% (4%) Thiamin 30% (8%) Niacin 24% (6%) Folate 27% (7%) Phosphorous 9% (2%) Potassium 3% (1%) Zinc 3% (1%) Magnesium 3% (1%) Copper 6% (2%) Riboflavin 32% (8%) Vitamin C 40% (10%)

Interesting Facts
Cheesecake was a popular dish in ancient Greece. Small cheesecakes were served to the first Olympic athletes in 776 B. C. Cato, a Roman politician, gave cheesecake as his libum (temple offering).

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Coconut Lime Pie
Type: Dessert Serves: Makes a 6” pie or two 4” ramekin pies Time to Prepare: 75 minutes plus 12 hours to set

4 cinnamon graham cracker rectangles 2 tbsp. of oil or melted margarine 12 oz. of extra firm silken tofu ½ cup of sugar ½ cup of lime juice 1 tsp. of lime zest 1 tsp. of vanilla extract 3 tbsp. of arrowroot powder 2 tsp. of agar agar powder 1/3 cup of shredded coconut 8 oz. of Better than Cream Cheese

Ingredients

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Mash the graham crackers. Melt the margarine and add it to the graham crackers. Smash the graham cracker mix into the bottom of the ramekins or the pie tin. Bake the crust for 10 minutes on 300 degrees. vanilla extract, arrowroot, and agar agar. When the crust is done, pour the filling into the ramekins or pie tin and bake the pie for another 60 minutes. While it is baking, toast the coconut in a dry pan. Once the pie is done, top it with the coconut. Let the pie sit in the refrigerator for 12 hours before serving it. While the crust is baking, blend the tofu, lime zest, Better than Cream Cheese, sugar, lime juice,

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Kitchen Equipment
Blender

Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Pie Tin or Ramekins Oven Sauté Pan

Presentation
I like serving these in ramekins because you can set out an individual portion for those people who are dessert share. Also, do not coat the entire pie with the coconut. Leave enough of the filling showing so there is a contrast between the topping and the rest of the pie. fiends or set out one ramekin for a couple that wants to

Time Management
Make sure to preheat the oven when you start so the crust can cook as soon as it’s ready. Once the completed pie goes in the oven, you have some time to move on to another recipe, clean up, etc. You can also make this well in advance and it will keep for four days. If you do that, just cover the pie so it does not dry out.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This pie goes very well with a fresh mango and coconut blended drink. Get a fresh mango, some ice, and some coconut milk, blend those together, and serve that with the dessert.

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Where to Shop
You can either use fresh limes or a bottle of lime juice. If you use the bottle, get an organic variety

as the taste is far, far superior to a non-organic version. If you go for the bottle, you can find that at Whole Foods and similar places. The same is true for the Better than Cream Cheese,

although that is more common and can be found at most stores that have a healthy living section. If you cannot find the agar agar, which can be difficult, add in 1.5 more tbsp. of arrowroot, which can be found at most places that have a healthy living section. The rest of the ingredients should be easy to find.

How It Works
The lime juice is the feature of the pie, with a nice, citric tartness. The Better than Cream Cheese helps smooth that out while the tofu adds structure to the filling without adding any taste. The agar agar and arrowroot help the filling firm up while the pie cooks.

Chef’s Notes
Key lime pies are a popular pie and I’ve wanted to make a vegan version for a while. When I started to make this, I thought the addition of the coconut would be a very nice add-on as the limes and coconut are both tropical flavors. It ended up working out very well! When you make this, make pie will rise, so do not fill the ramekin or pie tin to the brim as it will spill over the sides. sure to use the extra firm silken tofu, not the extra firm water packed tofu. Also, be aware that this

Nutritional Facts (this is for an entire pie)
Calories 1,456 Fat 68g Total Carbohydrates 136g Dietary Fiber 1g Sugars 105g Protein 75g
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Calories from Fat 612

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Salt 1,049mg Vitamin A 1% Vitamin B6 3% Vitamin C 62% Calcium 23% Iron 20% Thiamin 20% Riboflavin 14% Niacin 10% Folate 16% Phosphorous 7% Potassium 2% Zinc 4% Magnesium 6% Copper 8%

Interesting Facts
There is great debate amongst key lime pie aficionados about whether the graham cracker crust or the pastry crust is better! The first key lime pie is attributed to Aunt Sally, the cook of William Curry, Florida’s first millionaire, in the late 1800’s. Limes were brought to the Southeastern U.S. in the 1500’s by the Spanish.

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Sweet Heirloom Tomato Tart
Type: Dessert Serves: 4 small tarts Time to Prepare: 60 minutes

¾ cup of whole wheat pastry flour 1/8 tsp. salt 2 tbsp. turbinado sugar ¼ cup of margarine 1.5 tsp. EnerG Egg Replacer (with 1.5 tbsp. water) Flour for dusting ¼ cup of Better than Cream Cheese ½ tsp. almond extract ½ tsp. lemon juice 1 medium Heirloom tomato 2tbsp. water 4 tbsp. sugar

Ingredients

Option: 1 tbsp. sweet agave nectar instead of the water and sugar
1 tsp. poppy seeds 1 sprig of mint

Instructions
The crust… Combine the salt and flour in a metal bowl. In the small mixer, combine the margarine and sugar. Once those are combined, slowly add in the EnerG Egg Replacer. After that is combined, add in the flour all at once. Mix until they are just combined into a ball, but no more. Flatten the dough into four disks and refrigerate them for about 20 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Lightly flour a flat surface on which to roll out the dough. Take the dough disks and gently roll them out until they are about 1/8 of an inch thick. The end dough disks should be about ¾ of an inch bigger than the tart tin. Gently lay the dough disks in the tart tins.
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Flour a finger and use that to lightly press the dough to the sides of the tins. The tomatoes… Bake the crusts for about 20 minutes.

Slice the Heirloom tomato into 1/6 inch slices. In a small pan, heat the sugar and water on a medium heat until it combines and browns. Reduce the heat to medium low and add the tomato slices. Cook them until the tomatoes just start to soften. Remove them from the heat. Back to the crust… At this point, the crust should be done. The filling… Whip the Better than Cream Cheese, almond extract, and lemon juice together. Assembling the tart… When the tart crust is cool, gently flip it over onto the plate. Spread a thin layer of the cream cheese filling in the middle and slightly up the sides. Add enough tomato slices to fill the tart, lightly pressing on them as needed. Top this with a sprinkle of poppy seeds. This can be served warm or chilled. Pull off a few leaves from the sprig of mint and place that in the middle. Remove it from the oven and let it cool while you make the filling.

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Small mixer Rolling pin

Kitchen Equipment

Tart tin (preferably with a removable bottom) Measuring cup Measuring spoons Knife Fork to combine margarine and flour Metal bowl Small pan Oven

Presentation
Once the tart is done, sprinkle the poppy seeds on top and then place a couple mint leaves in the center. Make sure that the dough does not go over the tart tin so that the top is even. Also, if you want the tart crust to glisten, you can melt a tiny bit of margarine and brush either that or almond oil on the crust.

Time Management
Make sure to preheat the oven when you refrigerate the dough so that you can place the tart in oven as soon as you are done finishing with the dough. While the crust is baking, start on the tomatoes so that the crust and tomatoes are done at about the same time. Finish by assembling the tart.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This would go best as part of a full meal where each part featured Heirloom tomatoes, showcasing
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the versatility of these amazing fruits! For example, try a roasted Heirloom tomato spread on crostini for an appetizer, a salad with an Heirloom vinaigrette, a spicy Heirloom soup, baked Heirloom’s stuffed with risotto, and the Heirloom tart.

Where to Shop
Heirlooms are usually found at gourmet stores and places like Wild Oats and Whole Foods. rest of the ingredients can be purchased on the baking aisle at the local grocery market. EnerG Egg Replacer can be found at the latter two stores and often veg-friendly co-ops. The

How It Works
Barely working the dough enough to get it to stick together and then chilling it keeps the crust almond extract to the filling gives it a deep taste and the lemon juice gives it just a slight hint of sourness to contrast the sweetness of the rest of the dessert. Lightly cooking the tomatoes in the syrup causes the tomatoes to soften enough so that they can be gently pressed into the tart so they don’t stick up too far over the top and also infuses the tomato with sweetness and coats it. Finally, the poppy seeds and mint add two aromatics to the dessert to round it out.

flaky. Too much overworking will activate the gluten and the dough will become heavy. Adding the

Chef’s Notes
Heirloom tomatoes have an incredibly rich flavor without being overpowering, making them perfect for this dessert.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1082 (291) Fat 50g (13g) Total Carbohydrates 143g (36g) Dietary Fiber 13g (3g) Sugars 54g (14g) Protein 15g (4g)
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Calories from Fat 450 (113)

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Salt 506mg (127mg) Vitamin A 20% (5%) Vitamin B6 19% (5%) Vitamin C 20% (5%) Calcium 4% (1%) Iron 21% (5%) Thiamin 29% (7%) Riboflavin 13% (3%) Niacin 30% (8%) Folate 14% (4%) Phosphorous 32% (8%) Potassium 27% (7%) Zinc 18% (5%) Magnesium 33% (8%) Copper 20% (5%)

Interesting Facts
Tomatoes belong to the family Solanacea, which is the same family to which potatoes belong. The most popular thought on the subject is that wild tomatoes originated in Peru and became domesticated eventually in Central America. There is quite a bit of debate over what constitutes an Heirloom tomato, with some saying the cultivar must be at least 100 years old, some say 50 years, and some say before 1945.

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Fluffy Icebox Pumpkin Pie
Type: Desserts Serves: 12 Time to Prepare: 20 minutes + 12 hours to set

1 cup of pureed pumpkin 1 cup of Sour Supreme (sour cream substitute) 2 cups of vanilla icing 1 tsp. of cinnamon ½ tsp. of freshly grated ginger ¼ tsp. of cloves ¼ tsp. of nutmeg Soyatoo whipped topping to top the pie 1 graham cracker crust 16 oz. of extra firm silken tofu (the kind that comes in a box)

Ingredients

Instructions

Grate the ginger and nutmeg. nutmeg until it is thoroughly combined. Pour this into the crust. Allow it to refrigerate for at least 12 hours. Top with the whipped topping just before serving. Whip together the pumpkin, Sour Supreme, vanilla icing, tofu, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, and

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Kitchen Equipment
Food Processor or Blender Spatula Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Grater

Presentation
You can cover the top of the pie with the whipped topping or you can put star shaped dots of the topping across the pie. Make sure to let it sit the full time so that the down on the plate. If you cover it graham crackers, crush them and sprinkle them on top. completely and you have some pie can solidify. If not, it will drupe

Time Management
The longer you let this pie sit, the better it will cut. If you can let it sit for a full day, it will stay together even better!

Complementary Food and Drinks
To keep the pumpkin theme going, try this after a meal of pumpkin ravioli with a sauce tinged with nutmeg.

Where to Shop
Mori Nu makes the most common silken tofu, which should be available in most stores. The Sour Supreme can be purchased at places like Whole Foods, Sprouts, Central Market, and even doesn’t have any cream.
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many supermarkets. When purchasing the icing, make sure to check the ingredients to make sure it

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How It Works
The tofu gives the pie structure without adding any taste to it as the silken tofu is rather bland. while giving it taste that contrasts its sweetness. Allowing it to sit for so long gives everything a chance to stick together, allowing it to retain its shape when cut.

The icing makes the pie fluffy while the Sour Supreme mellows out the intense flavors of the pie

Chef’s Notes
My mom used to make this pie for Thanksgiving when I was young and I’ve always wanted to do a vegan version of it. However, upon finding out just how decadent it is, I cut the serving size down! It is a very powerful, luscious dessert, definitely worth having in small amounts.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 4182.1 (348.5) Fat 188.1g (15.7g) Calories from Fat 1692.5 (141.0)

Total Carbohydrates 576.6g (48.1g) Dietary Fiber 11.2g (0.9g) Sugars 413.0g (34.4g) Protein 45.8g (3.8g) Salt 3197mg (266.4mg) Vitamin A 1188% (99%) Vitamin B6 11% (0.9%) Vitamin C 17% (1.4%) Calcium 20% (1.7%) Iron 67% (5.6%) Thiamin 15% (1.3%) Riboflavin 29% (2.4%) Niacin 30% (2.5%) Folate 29% (2.4%) Phosphorous 43% (3.6%)
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Potassium 25% (2.1%) Zinc 10% (0.8%) Magnesium 26% (2.2%) Copper 30% (2.5%)

Interesting Facts
Sour Supreme is sometimes called Better than Sour Cream.

The vanilla bean is actually part of an orchid indigenous to Central America.

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Fresh Strawberry Pie
Type: Dessert Serves: 8 Time to Prepare: 15 minutes + 2 hours to set

½ cup of soaked almonds ½ cup of soaked Brazil nuts 1 cup of dates 1 tbsp. orange juice 1 ½ cups of strawberries, de-stemmed 1 tbsp. sweet agave nectar ½ tsp. cardamom Option: Banana Cashew Cream ¼ cup of raw cashews soaked for at least six hours. ¼ of a banana 2 tbsp. of water 1 cup of sliced strawberries

Ingredients

Instructions

Pulse the almonds and Brazil nuts a couple times until they are very coarsely broken up. Combine the nuts, dates, and orange juice in a food processor. Finish mashing the crust ingredients together with your hands to fully combine them. Pat the crust mixture down in a glass pie dish. Mix in the sliced strawberries. Spread this in the pie dish and refrigerate for 2 hours. Blend together the 3 tbsp. of sweet agave nectar, 1 ½ cups of berries, and cardamom.

Option: Blend the banana, cashews, and water until creamy.

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Kitchen Equipment
Food Processor Cutting Board Knife Glass Pie Dish

Presentation
Make sure that the pie has completely set. Otherwise, it will fall apart as you slice it. Put a dab of cashew banana cream towards the top of the pie or you can put a few bits of crushed nuts on nectar and put a few fresh green herbs and whole nuts. top. On the side of the plate, you can drizzle some sweet agave

Time Management
The longer this pie sets, the better, so if you can make it the morning of the day you plan on serving it, you should do so.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This goes well with a blended coconut dessert drink and is particularly good during the hot summer months.

Where to Shop
You should be able to purchase the nuts and sweet agave nectar at stores that promote organics, as they often have bulk bins from which to choose the nuts and usually sell sweet agave nectar. The other ingredients can also be purchased at those types of stores. Whole Foods is usually a safe bet. If you can’t find sweet agave nectar, you can purchase it online at www.sweetcactusfarms.com or www.eatraw.com.

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How It Works
The sweet agave nectar is sticky enough that it holds the blended berries together for the pie filling. Cardamom goes with most red berries, so it adds an aromatic compliment. The dates act as a sweet binder for the nuts, which creates a multi-textured crust with a variety of nutty flavors. Soaking the nuts makes them more easily digestible.

Chef’s Notes
It is imperative to let the pie fully set before serving it. While it will be tasty at any stage, it will fall apart if it is not refrigerated long enough. The time it takes to set also varies depending on the water content of the strawberries. If it is still too thin, try mixing it with a few left over dates to give it some extra firmness. Make sure to use raw agave nectar for a truly living foods dessert.

Nutritional Facts (individual portions in parentheses)
Calories 1532 (192) Fat 46g (6g) Calories from Fat 412 (502)

Total Carbohydrates 233g (33g) Dietary Fiber 43g (5g) Sugars 184g (23g) Protein 28g (4g) Salt 2mg (n/a) Vitamin A n/a Vitamin B6 37% (5%)
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Vitamin C 350% (44%) Calcium 38% (5%) Iron 37% (5%) Thiamin 44% (6%) Riboflavin 38% (5%) Niacin 20% (3%) Folate 28% (4%) Phosphorous 106% (13%) Potassium 84% (11%) Zinc 37% (5%) Magnesium 154% (19%) Copper 149% (18%)

Interesting Facts
Brazil nuts grow in tropical South America inside hard, woody coconut-sized shells that weigh about 5 pounds each and contain 15 to 25 nuts. Sweet agave nectar has a low glycemic index, making it a great sweetener for diabetics. Strawberries are thought to have been cultivated in ancient Rome. Strawberry plants are part of the rose family.

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“Cream Cheese” Brownies
Type: Dessert Serves: 8 Time to Prepare: 1 hour 15 minutes (includes bake time and cool down time)

1 cup of unbleached all-purpose flour ¾ cup of sugar ½ cup of unsweetened cocoa powder ½ tsp. of baking powder 1/8 tsp. of salt ½ cup of soymilk ¼ cup of vegetable oil ¼ cup of applesauce 1 tsp. of vanilla extract ½ cup of Better than Cream Cheese 2-3 tbsp. of soymilk

Ingredients

Option: ¼ cup toasted walnuts Option: ¼ cup chocolate chips Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a large bowl, sift together the flour, sugar, cocoa powder, baking powder and salt. In another bowl, whisk together ½ cup soymilk, the oil, the applesauce, and the vanilla extract. Add wet ingredients to dry and mix until well blended. Spread evenly in an 8x8 inch baking pan. Whisk together Better than Cream Cheese with enough soymilk to make a thick, but pourable consistency. Drizzle in a pretty pattern over the top of the brownie batter. Drag a clean knife through the cream cheese and batter to make a marble pattern, making sure not to over mix the two layers. Bake for 20 to 35 minutes in the preheated oven, or until set. Let cool for at least 10 minutes before cutting into 1x1 inch squares.

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Kitchen Equipment
2 Mixing Bowls Whisk Spatula Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Baking Dish

Presentation
Make sure to allow these to thoroughly cool before you cut them. Otherwise, you will end up with gummed up cut lines. I like to put them on a platter and sprinkle them with chocolate nibs!

Time Management
Make sure to preheat the oven before you start anything so that the brownies can go immediately in it. If you want to make these ahead of time, make sure to cover them in plastic wrap. Allow the air and keeps the top moist. plastic wrap to drape down onto the brownies after they cool. This minimizes their exposure to the

Complementary Food and Drinks
Try these as part of a dessert with the brownie, a bit of French vanilla soy ice cream, a dash of chocolate mousse, and a chocolate wafer. Decadence!

Where to Shop
All of these ingredients should be fairly common, though Trader Joe’s will have the best price on

the Better than Cream Cheese. Dagoba makes an excellent vegan cocoa powder, though Hershey’s is also vegan and more commonly available (not as tasty, though.)

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How It Works
The applesauce adds sweetness and also cuts down on the oil. Not only that, it allows the flour to bind with all of the other ingredients. The Better than Cream Cheese is mixed with the soy milk that, generally, when making a batter, wet ingredients are added to dry ingredients to keep the batter from clumping. If the dry is dropped into wet, nodules of dry ingredients become sealed by a wet casing. to thin it just enough to swirl into the batter, but not so much so that it blends with the batter. Note

Chef’s Notes
I don’t like super sweet brownies, but if you would like this a bit sweeter, do one cup of sugar

instead of ¾ cup. I’m not sure what I like better about these; the way they look or the way they taste! Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options) Calories 1937.2 (242.2) Fat 98.8g (12.3g) Total Carbohydrates 239.8g (30.0g) Dietary Fiber 4.9g (0.6g) Sugars 123.6g (15.5g) Protein 22.3g (2.8g) Salt 1016mg (126.9mg) Vitamin A 8% (1%) Vitamin B6 5% (0.6%) Vitamin C 1% (0.1%) Calcium 47% (5.9%) Iron 47% (5.9%) Thiamin 49% (6.1%) Riboflavin 55% (6.9%) Niacin 38% (2.8%)
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Calories from Fat 888.8 (111.1)

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Folate 52% (6.5%) Phosphorous 21% (2.6%) Potassium 21% (2.6%) Zinc 10% (1.3%) Magnesium 21% (2.6%) Copper 25% (3.1%)

Interesting Facts
Stories differ on the details, but most agree that brownies were invented in America in the late 1800s. The original brownie did not use baking powder, making a thick chocolate cake.

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Chocolate Cupcakes
Type: Dessert Serves: 8 Time to Prepare: 35 minutes

1 ¼ cups of flour 1/3 cup of cocoa powder 1 cup of turbinado sugar 1 tsp. baking powder ¼ tsp. salt 1 1/8 cup of water ½ tsp. vanilla extract 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar 3 tbsp. apple sauce 4 oz. of Better than Cream Cheese 1/3 cup of powdered sugar 2 tbsp. toasted walnuts

Ingredients

Options: 2/3 cup of powdered sugar for a sticky batter, 1 cup of powdered sugar for a stiff
the stiffness.

batter, substitute ½ the powdered sugar with corn starch to reduce the amount of sugar but keep

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. In a bowl, combine the flour, cocoa powder, sugar, baking powder, and salt. In a separate bowl, combine the water, vanilla, vinegar, and apple sauce. Pour ½ of the liquid into the bowl with the dry ingredients. Stir together until it is smooth. Repeat this process.

Instructions Making the batter…

Baking the cupcakes…

Line a cupcake tin with cupcake wrappers.

Pour the batter into the wrappers until it is at the top of the tin, but no higher.

Making the icing…

Bake the cupcakes on 375 degrees for 25 minutes.
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In a blender, combine the Better than Cream Cheese and powdered sugar. Dry toast the walnuts in a sauté pan on a medium heat for about three minutes. Stir the walnuts into the Better than Cream Cheese/powdered sugar icing. preferably 20. Remove them from the tin and spread the icing on top with a spoon or small spatula. Once the cupcakes are done, remove them from the oven and let them cool for at least 10 minutes,

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Kitchen Equipment
Cupcake Tin Oven 2 Bowls Whisk or Sifter to Combine the Dry Ingredients Measuring Spoon Measuring Cup Blender Sauté Pan Spoon or Small Spatula to Spread the Icing Whisk to Combine the Wet Ingredients into the Dry Ingredients

Cupcake Wrappers

Presentation

Keep out a walnut or some walnut pieces to sprinkle on top of the icing. If you make a stiff icing, you can also use a small spatula to make the icing rise on one side or in center by spreading it upwards. Toasted coconut also looks good on these cupcakes. Lastly, you can get a little fancier and swirl some food coloring into a stiff icing after you place it on the cupcake by putting some spatula in an upward swirling motion along the outer part of the icing. coloring on the end of a small spatula and running the

Time Management
It only takes a few minutes to mix the batter together, so preheat the oven before you start. That way, you can immediately put the cupcakes in the oven when they tins are filled. Once the cupcakes are in the oven, start making the icing. Whip the icing up and then toast the walnuts. Stir the walnuts in and place the icing in the refrigerator if you want it to be even stiffer. After you’re
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done with that, you can move on to making something else, visiting with friends, reading a book, etc. Just make sure to get the cupcakes out of the oven on time. If you need to quickly cool them, put the finished cupcakes in the refrigerator inside the tin on a dish towel.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
Fresh strawberries go really well with these as they are not too sweet and strawberries and chocolate go well together. Try adding a few strawberry slices around the plate or putting the cupcakes in the middle of a platter of strawberries.

Where to Shop
All of these ingredients are easy to find at the local supermarket except for, perhaps, the Better

than Cream Cheese and the turbinado sugar. If you can’t the Better than Cream Cheese, try

heading over to Whole Foods, Wild Oats, and most co-ops. The same is true of the turbinado sugar, which I prefer to get out of the bulk bins. You can also look at your local market for “Sugar in the Raw,” a brand of turbinado that I have seen cropping up more and more. For those not used to baking, the vanilla extract and cocoa powder is usually found in the spice and/or baking aisle.

How It Works
The applesauce acts as both a binder and a tenderizer in this recipe, obviating the need for eggs

and oil. As a bonus, it can’t be tasted once the batter is baked, so you won’t end up with chocolate apple cupcakes. The baking powder allows the batter to become slightly fluffy and light as it releases gasses into the mix. The vinegar, another ingredient which also loses its taste when baked in the batter, helps keep the cupcake moist. Adding the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, instead of dry to wet, keeps the batter from lumping. Finally, whipping the Better than Cream puts air into the icing, making it a little bit fluffier and stiffer. Cheese with the powdered sugar (a.k.a. confectioners’ sugar) lets the icing fully combine and also

Chef’s Notes
I like how easy this recipe is to make and I really like how easy it is to add variations. For example, you can sprinkle the icing with cinnamon or nutmeg, add mint extract instead of almond extract to the batter, add orange zest to the batter, icing, or both, dress it with a raspberry, omit the walnuts,
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etc. Whatever fits your tastes!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1832 (229) Calories from Fat 252 (32) Fat 28g (4.5g) Total Carbohydrates 365g (43g) Dietary Fiber 31g (4g) Sugars 245g (31g) Protein 30g (4g) Salt 503mg (63mg) Vitamin A 1% (n/a) Vitamin B6 34% (8%) Vitamin C 1% (n/a) Calcium 11% (1%) Iron 57% (7%) Thiamin 51% (6%) Riboflavin 27% (4%) Niacin 51% (6%) Folate 25% (3%) Phosphorous 81% (10%) Potassium 48% (6%) Zinc 47% (6%) Magnesium 98% (12%) Copper 102% (12.5%)

Interesting Facts
Cupcakes are a fairly recent invention developed in North America around the 1790s. Chocolate is derived from the cacao bean from Central America. Chocolate was eaten unsweetened by the Central Americans, often being mixed with chili peppers and used for medicinal purposes.

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Raspberry Chocolate Cake
Type: Dessert Serves: 2 Time to Prepare: 35 minutes + 1 hour to set

½ cup of flour 1/8 tsp. of salt ½ tsp. of baking powder 1/8 tsp. of baking soda 5 tbsp. of sugar ¾ tsp. of apple cider vinegar 1tbsp. of oil ½ tsp. of vanilla extract 5 tbsp. of soy milk 3 tbsp. of gran marnier ¼ cup of raspberries 1 tsp. of shaved almonds for garnish ¼ cup of chocolate sauce

Ingredients

Instructions

Combine the dry ingredients together. In a separate bowl, combine the wet ingredients. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients. over batter). Bake this on 350 degrees for 20 minutes. Once it is done, let it cool and then remove it from the pan. Place it on a plate and cover it with chocolate sauce. Let this sit for about 15 minutes. Top with the raspberries. Place a small amount of shaved almonds on top. Soak it in the 3 tbsp. of gran marnier and let it sit for about 1 hour. Take a 4” mini-cake pan and fill it just below half way with the batter (you will probably have left

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Kitchen Equipment
Measuring Cup Measuring Spoons 4” Mini Cake Pan

Presentation
Make sure this is on a small plate. Otherwise, the cake will rich enough that it will definitely suffice.

look small and while it may not seem like a dessert for two, it is

Time Management
This is something that definitely should be made early as the longer it sits the better. If you can let it sit overnight in the gran marnier, it will taste incredibly good.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This goes very well with a glass of sweet red, sparkling wine or a sparkling Riesling.

Where to Shop
Most of the ingredients can be found in the baking aisle. For the chocolate sauce, you can go for

a quick version and get the canned Hershey’s sauce. While it does not have any dairy, it is loaded warm soy creamer and stirring until the chips melt.

up with high fructose corn syrup. I prefer to make my own by combining vegan chocolate chips and

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How It Works
The mixture of the liquid and the baking soda and powder causes the inert portions of those dry

ingredients to become active. They will release gas bubbles which causes the cake to rise as it with chocolate and raspberries gives this a traditional Valentine’s spin.

cooks. Soaking the cake in the gran marnier gets it moist and full of luscious flavor and covering it

Chef’s Notes
Try soaking the cake with different liqueurs or liquids. A thick coffee works very well as does spiced rum. If you want to go even farther, you can soak the raspberries in the alcohol as well.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 717.1 (358.5) Calories from Fat 137.7 (68.8) Fat 15.3g (7.7g) Total Carbohydrates 134.8g (67.4g) Dietary Fiber 5.9g (3.0g) Sugars 79g (39.5g) Protein 10.0g (5.0g) Salt 371mg (185.5mg) Vitamin A 1% (0.5%) Vitamin B6 4% (2%) Calcium 7% (3.5%) Iron 33% (16.5%) Thiamin 30% (15%) Niacin 20% (10%) Folate 57% (28.5%) Phosphorous 21% (10.5%) Riboflavin 20% (10%) Vitamin C 13% (6.5%)

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Potassium 15% (7.5%) Zinc 10% (5%) Magnesium 23% (11.5%) Copper 36% (18%)

Interesting Facts
Although we are used to sweet chocolate, it was originally consumed as a bitter drink. A raspberry is actually an amalgamation of smaller berries. Traditional raspberries are a late summer crop.

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Date Pecan Cake
Type: Cake Serves: 9 Time to Prepare: 60 minutes

1 1/3 cup unbleached, all-purpose flour 1 tbsp. baking powder ½ tsp. baking soda ½ cup vegan butter substitute, at room temperature ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 tbsp. blackstrap molasses 2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1 tsp. vanilla 1 tsp. vinegar ½ tsp. ground nutmeg 1 cup chopped dates 2/3 cup chopped pecans 1 ¼ cup sweetened nondairy milk

Ingredients

Instructions

Heat an oven to 350 degrees F and oil and flour a 9x9 pan. Combine the flour, baking powder and baking soda in a large bowl and set aside. Add the milk, cinnamon, vanilla, vinegar and nutmeg and stir to combine. Stir in the dry ingredients until the batter is fully incorporated. Stir in the dates and pecans. Spoon into the pan and bake for about 45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Serve plain or topped with powdered sugar or vegan cream cheese frosting. Beat the vegan butter, sugar, and molasses with a wooden spoon in a large bowl.

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2 large bowls

Kitchen Equipment

Wooden spoon 9x9 square cake pan

Presentation

The picture speaks for itself. When you cut the cake, make sure your knife is sharp and wet so that the cake does not stick to the blade.

Photograph by Milan Photography

Time Management
If you do the vegan cream cheese frosting, make sure the cake is thoroughly cooled before you frost it!

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a strong coffee.

Where to Shop
All of these ingredients are relatively easy to find.

Chef’s Notes
You’ll love this sweet cake that’s not too spicy and not too sweet. It is especially warming in the winter.

Interesting Facts
Pecan trees are a type of hickory native to northern Mexico and the American Southwest.
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Recipe by Sharon Valencik, author of Sweet Utopia: Simply Stunning Desserts

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Almond Decadence
Type: Dessert Serves: 2 Time to Prepare: 1 hour and 15 minutes to chill + time to soak the nuts

½ cup of almonds, soaked 2 tbsp. of water 2 tbsp. of freshly squeezed orange juice 2 tbsp. of sweet agave nectar 1 banana ½ cup of almonds, pulsed until coarsely chopped 2 tbsp. of sweet agave nectar ¼ tsp. of cinnamon 1/8 tsp. of salt 1/8 tsp. of freshly ground cloves 1 tbsp. of orange zest

Ingredients

Instructions

Soak the almonds overnight. Drain and rinse the almonds. Zest the orange(s). Juice the orange(s). Blend the almonds together with the water, 2 tbsp. of agave nectar, and orange juice until smooth. Add in the banana and continue to blend until smooth again. Pulse the next ½ cup of almonds until finely chopped. Combine these with the cinnamon, salt, cloves, and second set of agave nectar. Place the pulsed almond mix at the bottom of a set of shallow glasses. On top of each, add a generous scoop of the banana blend. Top these with the orange zest. Refrigerate for at least an hour, covered.

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Kitchen Equipment
Small Blender

Bowl to soak the nuts Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Zester Small Mortar and Pestle

Presentation
This looks nice in a shallow, stemmed glass, but if you don’t have on the top really makes the presentation.

one of those, you can serve it in a red wine glass. The orange zest

Time Management
This dessert takes quite awhile to make, but requires little labor. I suggest planning ahead so you

can soak the nuts overnight. Once you make it, it will last about two hours refrigerated before the mousse starts to lose potency.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This is an elegant end to an elegant dinner. Serve this with a portabella that has been marinated overnight with some fresh thyme.

Where to Shop
All of these ingredients save for the agave nectar should be easy to find. For the raw agave, you

may have to find that online or find another raw, syrupy substitute.

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How It Works
Soaking one set of the almonds (for the mousse) allows them to become creamy, which, when blended with the banana, gives a mousse like texture. The orange juice in the mousse keeps the light orange theme going throughout the dessert, which melds with the sweet agave nectar and and create a different sensation as the flavors are more intense and not as melded there. almonds quite well. The bottom layer is there to provide a different texture and look to the dessert

Chef’s Notes
The bottom of this is actually part of the filling for a raw version of baklava. Topped with an orange flavored mousse, you can’t go wrong.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1207.1 (603.6) Calories from Fat 652.4 (326.2) Fat 72.5g (36.2g) Total Carbohydrates 107.1g (53.5g) Dietary Fiber 19.7g (9.8g) Sugars 64.3g (32.1g) Protein 31.6g (15.8g) Salt 2.3mg (1.1mg) Vitamin A 2% (1%) Vitamin B6 45% (22.5%) Vitamin C 38% (19%) Calcium 37% (18.5%) Iron 36% (18%) Thiamin 22% (11%) Riboflavin 64% (32%) Niacin 31% (15.5%) Folate 19% (9.5%) Phosphorous 71% (35.5%)

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Potassium 45% (22.5%) Zinc 33% (16.5%) Magnesium 108% (54%) Copper 85% (42.5%)

Interesting Facts
Almonds were in common use throughout the Middle Ages.

Mousse didn’t really have much popularity in the U.S. until the 60s.

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Banana Pudding
Type: Dessert Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 10 minutes + 1 hour to set

1 tbsp. of agar agar powder ½ cup of water 2 bananas, medium ripeness, peeled 1 tbsp. of EnerG Egg Replacer 3 tbsp. of finely ground sugar 2 tbsp. of sweet agave nectar 10 oz. of firm silken tofu Option: ½ tsp. of ground cinnamon Option: 4 or 5 walnut pieces

Ingredients

Instructions

In a medium sized pot, combine the water and agar agar. Let this sit for a few minutes until the agar agar is mostly dissolved. Once that occurs, cook it on a low heat for 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. When that is smooth, add the tofu and continue to blend it. Add in the agar agar/water solution and blend it for another minute or so. Put this in the serving dish and let it sit for about 1 hour. While it is cooking, blend the bananas, Egg Replacer, sugar, and sweet agave nectar together.

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Measuring Cup Blender

Kitchen Equipment

Measuring Spoon Spatula Serving Dish

Presentation

I like this sprinkled with just a hint of cinnamon on top with a few walnuts in the middle to provide extra texture. This also will evoke the wrong mood for the pudding. Finally, if you want to add a little touch to it, place some banana slice in the with the walnuts. middle first, then sprinkle the cinnamon on, and then top it goes best when served in a lightly colored bowl. A dark bowl

Time Management
You can serve this at room temperature or chilled. If you want to serve it chilled, place it in the refrigerator for at least 45 minutes. You can also make this ahead of time. Keep it covered and it will last for a day.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This goes very well with another dessert, which is a snickerdoodle cookie! This type of cookie has a little give to it, which compliments the texture of the pudding and its light cinnamon flavor provides a balance against the creaminess of the pudding.

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Where to Shop
The EnerG Egg Replacer can be found in most health food sections. The agar agar is a bit

more difficult to find. If you cannot find it, make a solution of ½ cup of water and 3 tbsp. of corn starch. If you cannot find ripe bananas, place two of the bananas in a paper sack and store them in your pantry. They should ripen over the course of a day or two.

How It Works
The tofu is already smooth, which is perfect for the pudding. It’s also tasteless, which is good because that allows it to provide the structure of the pudding without interfering with its flavor. The bananas should be medium ripe so that they are sweet and soft, making them easy to blend sugar (not powdered sugar!) keeps the pudding from becoming grainy. with the tofu, but still white, which preserves the look of the pudding. Using the more finely ground

Chef’s Notes
This pudding is like a lot of other puddings/mousses/creams, etc. that use tofu. The tofu simply provides the bulk to the dessert while whatever the tofu is blended with provides the taste. That makes this a much easier version to make than a dairy one. Note also that bananas are not yellow in side, but white! That means this pudding will be white. If you want the yellow look to your pudding gets its yellow color. pudding, you will have to add yellow food coloring, which is how the more common version of this

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 648 (162) Fat 12g (3g) Total Carbohydrates 112g (28g) Dietary Fiber 6g (1.5g) Sugars 99g (25g) Protein 23g (6g)
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Calories from Fat 108 (27)

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Salt 26mg (6.5mg) Vitamin A 2% (.5%) Vitamin B6 48% (12%) Vitamin C 34% (8.5%) Calcium 33% (8%) Iron 20% (5%) Thiamin 13% (3%) Riboflavin 16% (4%) Niacin 12% (3%) Folate 43% (11%) Phosphorous 31% (8%) Potassium 49% (12%) Zinc 14% (3.5%) Magnesium 32% (8%) Copper 29% (7%)

Interesting Facts
Many older style puddings look more like cakes than what we are used to seeing now. out of fashion!) The puddings we are more used to today are more like custards, which were being prepared by Roman Republic cooks.

Boiled puddings were common on British ships in the 17th and 18th centuries (fortunately, that fell

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Chocolate Mousse
Type: Dessert Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 10 minutes + 1 hour to chill

8 oz. of extra firm silken tofu (* see below) 8 oz. of sweet or semi-sweet chocolate ¼ cup of soy creamer

Ingredients

Option: 1 tsp. of vanilla extract Instructions

Place the chocolate chips in a mixing bowl. Get the tofu ready to add. Simmer the soy creamer. Pour the hot soy creamer on the chocolate chips and immediately stir it until it is smooth. Add the tofu and break it up with a spoon.

Option: Add the vanilla extract.
blender up and down as you go.

Using a hand blender, whip the tofu and chocolate sauce until it is smooth, pumping the hand Transfer this to your serving vessels. Allow this to chill in the refrigerator for at least one hour.

*for the tofu, you will want the version that comes in a box, not the tofu packed in water.

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Kitchen Equipment
Mixing Bowl Small Pan Spoon Hand Blender Measuring Cup

Presentation
This looks nice with a bit of chocolate bar and a few toasted almonds served in a wine or parfait glass.

Time Management
This only take a few minutes to put together, but you must be ready to immediately stir the chocolate as soon as the hot soy creamer is added. If you don’t, the chocolate will cool down (within seconds) to the point where you will not be able to get it smooth. Also, if you don’t want to wait the hour for this to chill, it makes a great pudding!

Complementary Food and Drinks
This is a fairly rich dessert, so don’t serve it set against, say, a salad. Serve it after something hearty like a mushroom seitan steak or do something surprising for dinner and make savory berry pancakes with the mousse following that. You also don’t need to serve one entire serving of this. Instead, you can use it as an accent to another dessert, such as a topping for a light, “cream” filled cake.

Where to Shop
Whole Foods has their 360 brand of sweet chocolate chips, which are vegan. Trader Joe’s also
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carries several vegan chocolates with a range of sweetness and bitterness. For the tofu, do not texture that is more conducive to making a smooth dessert and it also has a more neutral flavor. buy the water packed tofu. Instead, purchase the extra firm tofu that comes in a box. It has a

How It Works
The soy creamer is simmered (not boiled) so that it is hot enough to melt the chocolate and create a thick sauce. That sauce is then whipped with a hand blender to create the fluffy texture of the mousse. The hand blender is used because it tends to pump more air into the mousse than a regular blender would, and that keeps it from being dense. Note that it is important to use the boxed tofu and a strong chocolate, otherwise, you will have mousse that tastes like tofu, which is not tasty at all!

Chef’s Notes
Watch out when pumping the hand blender up and down while blending the sauce. If you bring it up too high, the chocolate will splatter! I suggest putting the bowl in the sink and doing it there.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1438.4 (359.6) Fat 85.4g (21.3g) Calories from Fat 768.5 (192.1)

Total Carbohydrates 143.1g (35.8g) Dietary Fiber 12.7g (3.2g) Sugars 64.4g (16.1g) Protein 24.4g (6.1g) Salt 168.5mg (42.1mg) Vitamin A 1% (0.3%) Vitamin C 0% (0%) Calcium 12% (3%) Iron 49% (12.3%) Thiamin 10% (2.5%)
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Vitamin B6 6% (1.5%)

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Riboflavin 31% (7.8%) Niacin 10% (2.5%) Folate 2% (0.5%) Phosphorous 54% (13.5%) Potassium 28% (7%) Zinc 31% (7.8%) Magnesium 78% (19.5%) Copper 86% (21.5%)

Interesting Facts
Traditional mousse is made with raw eggs (now there’s a safe thing to eat.)

Mousse was a specialty of Spain of Belgium, though is now popular all across the West.

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Soy Yogurt Fruit and Granola Parfait
Type: Breakfast Serves: 1 Time to Prepare: 5 minutes (unless you make your own granola)

½ cup of granola ¾ cup of vanilla soy yogurt ¼ tsp. cardamom ¼ cup of fresh, seasonal berries 2 Brazil nuts, smashed ½ tsp. of sweet agave nectar

Ingredients

Instructions

In the bottom of a parfait glass, place the granola. In a small metal bowl, mix together the soy yogurt, sweet agave nectar, and cardamom. Place this on top of the granola in the parfait glass. Place the fresh berries on top of the soy yogurt. Lay your Brazil nuts on a flat surface and place your knife flat on top of them. Quickly whack the flat of the knife, which will smash the Brazil nuts. Dress the berries with those.

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Kitchen Equipment
Parfait Glass or Other Nice Looking Cup Small Metal Bowl Knife to Smash the Brazil Nuts

Presentation
Make sure the glass is clear in order to show off all the layers of the parfait. You can also put a sprig of fresh mint on top for some extra color.

Time Management
This recipe can be made so quickly, that there are really no time management issues to address.

Just make it is freshly made when you eat it.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This goes well with a glass or freshly squeezed orange juice and a small plate of sliced green apples.

Where to Shop
The fruit is best purchased at a farmers’ market while the granola, sweet agave nectar, and soy yogurt can most easily be found at stores that specialize in organics and/or health food stores.

How It Works
Not only does each layer provide a different taste, it also provides a different texture, enticing the diner to reach their spoon all the way to the bottom to experience the entire parfait. The berries provide a nice freshness so important with breakfast and a hint of sweetness. The sweet agave
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nectar gives a moderate sweetness and helps bring out the flavors of the berries. The cardamom imparts a nice aromatic taste to the parfait and the granola gives some crunch and bulk for the soy yogurt to grab onto.

Chef’s Notes
This is a quick, easy breakfast that looks classy, so it’s particularly good to serve if you are having guests over.

Nutritional Facts
Calories 461 Fat 17g Calories from Fat 153

Total Carbohydrates 63g Dietary Fiber 10g Sugars 30g Protein 14g Salt 26mg Vitamin A 2% Vitamin B6 Vitamin C 6% Calcium 26% Iron 21% Thiamin 4%% Riboflavin 1% Niacin 1% Folate 1% Phosphorous 5% Potassium 3%% Zinc 2% Magnesium 8% Copper 7%

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Interesting Facts
Parfaits are traditionally desserts, but semi-sweet parfaits can also be used for breakfast. Parfait means perfect in French. to a sundae. Parfaits are now enjoyed all over the world, even in places like Japan, where the word parfait refers

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Potato and Apple Pudding
Type: Dessert Serves: 6 Time to Prepare: 3 ¾ hours (45 minutes for the potatoes + 15 minutes to cool down + 15 minutes of labor + 2 ½ hours of cook time)

2 tbsp. of vegan margarine

Ingredients

1 cup of flour + a little extra for flouring a flat surface 6 oz. of potatoes (1 medium potato), boiled ¼ tsp. of salt 4 tbsp. of soy creamer ¼ cup of sugar 2 whole cloves Juice of ½ of a lemon (about 2 tsp.) 3 tbsp. of apple cider or water 5 green apples, peeled, cored, and sliced

Instructions

Boil the potatoes for about 45 minutes.

Let them cool until they are warm, but not hot, and peel them. Mix in the vegan margarine and salt and work the flour in by hand. Add in the soy creamer and continue to work the dough until you have a slack dough (it should still stick together.) Lightly flour a flat surface. Roll out the dough on this surface until it is about ¼” and a deep (preferably metal) baking dish all the way up the sides and about ½” over it (make sure to reserve enough of the rolled out dough to make a lid for the bowl, as well.) Core , peel, and slice the apples. Mix the apples with the sugar, cloves, and lemon juice. Place this mix in the dish. Cut a lid out of the remaining dough. Cover the dish with foil. Steam or boil the dish in a large, shallow pot for 2 ½ hours.
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Moisten the edges of the dough in the bowl and press the lid down onto it gently.

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Kitchen Equipment
Measuring Cup

Measuring Spoon Small Pot to boil the potatoes 2Mixing Bowls (one for mashing the potato, the other for mixing the filling together) Rolling Pin Metal Baking Dish Steamer or Large Pot for boiling the pudding

Presentation
This should be served cut into wedges with a side of custard or whipped soy cream.

Time Management
This recipe takes a very long time to make, so plan accordingly. You can turn it into more of a pie by baking it, but it won’t get a pudding consistency unless it is boiled or steamed. I suggest starting this early in the day and then warming it back up in the oven on 250 degrees about 30 minutes them with the lemon juice so they don’t brown. before you serve it. Also, if you peel and core the apples early, make sure you immediately dress

Complementary Food and Drinks
This is a great finisher to a meal. Consider pairing it with a small cup of Irish coffee. It also goes great with a side of lemon custard.
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Where to Shop
All of the ingredients in this recipe are readily available at your local market, although I suggest getting a high quality cider to get the best taste. For the best cider, look for a local, unpasteurized brand.

How It Works
The potato and flour create a sticky, heavy dough which will cook down onto the apples.

Boiling/steaming it tightens the dough while keeping it moist and that’s necessary for a pudding. The lemon juice accentuates the sweetness of the apples and also keeps them from oxidizing (browning.) The cloves add a deep, aromatic flavor to the pudding.

Chef’s Notes
Despite the long cook time, this recipe has very little labor involved in it and that makes for a stress free dessert. Note that this is a pudding in the traditional since and will be very unlike the puddings served in the United States.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1611.4 (268.6) Calories from Fat 280.9 (46.8) Fat 31.2g (5.2g) Total Carbohydrates 314.8g (52.5g) Dietary Fiber 29.8g (5.0g) Sugars 74.4g (12.4g) Protein 17.8g (3.0g) Salt 28.5mg (4.8mg) Vitamin A 28% (4.7%) Vitamin B6 49% (8.2%) Calcium 12% (2%) Iron 48% (8%)
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Vitamin C 103% (17.2%)

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Thiamin 67% (11.2%) Riboflavin 38% (6.3%) Niacin 52% (8.7%) Folate 55% (9.2%) Phosphorous 26% (4.3%) Potassium 62% (10.3%) Zinc 12% (2%) Magnesium 31% (5.2%) Copper 48% (8%)

Interesting Facts
Pudding is also a name for dessert in many places in the British Commonwealth. Puddings can be cooked by baking, steaming, or boiling them. The wild ancestor of the apple can still be found in Kazakhstan.

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Basil Lime Chocolate Chip Ice Cream
Type: Dessert Makes: about 1 quart Time to Prepare: 25 minutes prep, 25 minutes in an ice cream maker, 4-5 hours in the freezer alone

1 cup of soy milk, divided 2 cups soy creamer ½ cup mint leaves 1 cup baby spinach leaves ½ cup Thai basil ¼ cup basil ½ tablespoon mint extract ½ tablespoon vanilla extract 1 85% dark chocolate bar, vegan, chopped into small pieces 2 tablespoons arrowroot

Ingredients

Instructions

Stir the arrowroot with ¼ cup of the soy milk in a small bowl. Chop the spinach, basils, and mint until diced, then press on them with the flat of your knife to release more flavor. Heat the remaining soy milk, soy creamer, and chopped spinach and herbs. Stir until the mixture reaches a boil. Remove from heat and strain the liquid, removing the solids (if some remain, that is ok, but remove as much as possible). Add the extracts. Cool for about 2-3 hours in the refrigerator. Place in an ice cream maker, according to manufacturer’s directions. Five minutes before it has reached the desired consistency, add the finely chopped chocolate bar. Remove from the ice cream maker, and if you want a firmer consistency, freeze in an airtight container for a few more hours, or overnight. Add the arrowroot mixture to the strained liquid, whisking until incorporated.

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Low-fat Version
The fat in this dish is what gives it mouth appeal, so while you could use low fat soy milk, I would advise against it.

Raw Version
Use raw almond milk, soaking the chopped spinach and herbs overnight. Use cacao nibs instead

of the chocolate. Omit the arrowroot. Omit the extracts. Add 11/2 cups more mint, and scrape one vanilla bean into the mixture. The texture will be different, but it will still be tasty.

Kitchen Equipment
Knife, cutting board, measuring cups and spoons, strainer, whisk, ice cream maker

Presentation
Place a scoop in a dish, and garnish with a sprig of mint and a sprig of basil.

Time Management
Most of the time in this recipe is chilling or freezing, so you can plan to be making dinner in between, or just relaxing.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This would be a great finish to a spicy Thai curry.

Where to Shop
Your local Asian store is the best place to look for the Thai basil. If you cannot find it, regular sweet basil can be substituted. Trader Joes has an excellent assortment of dark chocolate bars but it is more expensive.
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that are vegan, at a great price. Whole Foods has a large amount of decent chocolate bars as well,

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How It Works
The constant stirring break up the ice crystals making it creamy. That is what the ice cream

machine does, and what you have to do if you don’t have one.

Chef’s Notes
I love mint chocolate chip ice cream, and the basil gives it much more depth. This has become my favorite guilty indulgence.

Interesting Facts
The basil has mint and liquorish notes, which is why it works so well with this recipe.

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Blood Orange Sorbet
Type: Dessert Makes: about 1 quart Time to Prepare: 15 minutes prep, 25 minutes in an ice cream maker, 4-5 hours in the freezer alone

1/3 cup agave 1 ½ cups fresh squeezed blood orange juice (about 8-10 small blood oranges) 2 ½ cups fresh squeezed Valencia or navel orange juice (About 4-6 large oranges)

Ingredients

Instructions

Cut the oranges in half. Juice the oranges. Add the agave. Chill for 2-3 hours in the refrigerator, or 1 hour in the freezer. Freeze in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s directions, or if you don’t have an ice cream maker, then place in a large glass dish, so the liquid is only 1-2 inches deep. you desire. Place the completed ice cream in an airtight freezer safe container and store up to 2 months. Scrape and mix the ice cream every 30 minutes if using this method, until you have the consistency

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Raw Version
Use raw agave, and it will be raw.

Kitchen Equipment
knife, measuring cup, and either an ice cream maker or a large glass dish

Presentation
Place a scoop in a dish, and garnish with a thin slice of orange, and a sprig of mint.

Time Management
Most of the time in this recipe is chilling or freezing, so you can plan to be making dinner in between, or just relaxing.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This would be lovely with a spicy southwest dinner.

Where to Shop
Trader Joes has the best price on Blood Oranges, but you might be able to find them at a

farmer’s market for an even better price!

How It Works
The constant stirring break up the ice crystals making it creamy. That is what the ice cream

machine does, and what you have to do if you don’t have one.

Chef’s Notes
This is light and refreshing. It is also quick to make with an ice cream machine. If you don’t have one,
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an electric model is relatively affordable (about $70 dollars) and will make this much easier. Vegan ice cream can be expensive ($5 or more per pint) and you can make your own for $3 to $5 dollars a quart, so if you’re going to make a lot, the electric model will pay for itself quickly.

Interesting Facts
Blood oranges are native to Sicily.

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Cookies ‘N Cream Ice Cream
Type: Dessert Makes: about 1 quart Time to Prepare: 15 minutes prep, 2-3 hours in a refrigerator, 25 minutes in an ice cream maker, 45 hours in the freezer alone

1 cup of soy milk, divided 2 cups soy creamer ¾ cup sugar 2 tablespoons arrowroot 1 tablespoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon almond extract 1/8 teaspoon salt 12 vegan chocolate sandwich cookies (I used Newman’s Os)

Ingredients

Instructions

Stir the arrowroot with ¼ cup of the soy milk in a small bowl. Chop the cookies into small pieces and set to the side. Heat the remaining soy milk, soy creamer, and sugar. Stir until the mixture reaches a boil. Remove from heat. Add the arrowroot mixture to the liquid, whisking until incorporated. Add the extracts. Cool for about 2-3 hours in the refrigerator. Place in an ice cream maker, according to manufacturer’s directions. Five minutes before it has reached the desired consistency, add the chopped cookies. container for a few more hours, or overnight. Remove from the ice cream maker, and if you want a firmer consistency, freeze in an airtight

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Low-fat Version
The fat in this dish is what gives it mouth appeal, so while you could use low fat soy milk, I would advise against it.

Raw Version
You could use raw nut milk and raw cookies. Omit the cooking, and use a vanilla bean instead of

the extract. The taste and texture will be different, but enjoyable.

Kitchen Equipment
Knife, cutting board, measuring cups and spoons,, whisk, ice cream maker

Presentation
Place a scoop in a dish and garnish with half a sandwich cookie.

Time Management
Most of the time in this recipe is chilling or freezing, so you can plan to be making dinner in

between, or just relaxing.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This is perfect for ice cream cones, or to have with a nice barbeque.

Where to Shop
You should be able to get these ingredients at any well stocked supermarket. Look for Newman’s Os by the ‘healthy’ foods.

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How It Works
The constant stirring break up the ice crystals making it creamy. That is what the ice cream

machine does, and what you have to do if you don’t have one.

Chef’s Notes
The secret with the favor of this ice cream is the ½ teaspoon of almond extract. Almond extract

balances out vanilla, much in the same way that the small amount of salt rounds out the sweetness of the ice cream.

Interesting Facts
Cookies and Cream ice cream was invented in the late 70s, with several prominent ice cream manufacturers laying claim to the first production of it.

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Iced Orange
Type: Dessert Serves: 1 Time to Prepare: 10 minutes plus 60 minutes to freeze

1 orange

Ingredients

1 tsp. sweet agave nectar

Instructions

Cut the orange in half. Deseed the orange. Zest one of the halves and save the zest. Freeze the orange for about one hour. Remove the orange from the freezer and let it thaw for about ten minutes. Blend the insides together with the sweet agave nectar and orange zest. Place it back in ½ of the orange. Serve it immediately.

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Kitchen Equipment
Cutting Board Chefs’ Knife Spoon Zester Blender

Presentation
Since this is an individual serving, which is made up of only one orange, it should be served on a small plate so that the dessert is not overwhelmed by empty plate space.

Time Management
Since the orange can be frozen for a long time before, you can get this dessert ready several hours or even a day in advance. Then, once you’re about to serve it, take it out of the freezer, let it thaw, blend it, and it’ll be ready to eat. If you do that, just make sure to save the zest in a small container.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This goes really well served with a meal that features fresh mint.

Where to Shop
Oranges are easy to find. However, you may have to go to Whole Foods, Wild Oats, etc. for the sweet agave nectar. If you can’t find it locally, you can order it online. Just put “sweet agave
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nectar” into Google and find a place to get it!

How It Works
When the orange freezes, the cellular walls break down. Once it thaws a little bit, it is soft enough to blend while still containing the natural orange juice in ice form. This semi-iced orange can then be turned into a thick, almost sherbet like slush with the addition of just a little bit of liquid, which comes from the sweet agave nectar. The zest puts a little kick into the dessert.

Chef’s Notes
These are an excellent dessert, especially after a hot day. You can also blend up berries to go in the orange, too.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories Fat Calories from Fat

Total Carbohydrates 38g Dietary Fiber 4g Sugars 33g Protein 2g Salt Vitamin A 8%

Vitamin B6 5% Vitamin C 163% Calcium 7% Iron 1% Thiamin 10% Riboflavin 4% Niacin 2% Folate 13% Phosphorous 2%
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Potassium 13% Zinc 0% Magnesium 4% Copper 4%

Interesting Facts
The word orange is derived from the Sanskrit word “narang.” It first evolved in Southeast Asia. Oranges account for about 70% of all commercial citrus output.

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Key Lime Pie Ice Cream
Type: Dessert Makes: about 1 quart Time to Prepare: 15 minutes prep, 2-3 hours in a refrigerator, 25 minutes in an ice cream maker, 45 hours in the freezer alone

1 cup of soy milk, divided 2 cups soy creamer 2 tablespoons arrowroot 1 ¼ cups of fresh key lime juice (about 12-14 key limes) 2 tablespoons of key lime zest (about 12-14 key limes) 1/8 teaspoon salt 8-16 graham crackers, vegan, chopped Optional: A few drops of organic green food color

Ingredients

Instructions

Stir the arrowroot with ¼ cup of the soy milk in a small bowl. Zest all the key limes. Juice the zested limes until you have the desired amount of juice. Stir until the mixture reaches a boil. Remove from heat. Add the zest and food color, if being used. Add the arrowroot mixture to the liquid, whisking until incorporated. Add the remaining soy milk, soy creamer, sugar, and key lime juice.

Cool for about 2-3 hours in the refrigerator. Place in an ice cream maker, according to manufacturer’s directions. Five minutes before it has reached the desired consistency, add the chopped graham crackers. Remove from the ice cream maker, and if you want a firmer consistency, freeze in an airtight container for a few more hours, or overnight.

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Low-fat Version
The fat in this dish is what gives it mouth appeal, so while you could use low fat soy milk, I would advise against it.

Kitchen Equipment
knife, cutting board, measuring cups and spoons,, whisk, ice cream maker

Presentation
Place a scoop in a dish and garnish with slice of key lime.

Time Management
Most of the time in this recipe is chilling or freezing, so you can plan to be making dinner in between, or just relaxing.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This ice cream is perfect on a hot summer day, with some Cuban black beans, or other spicy island food.

Where to Shop
You should be able to get the key limes seasonally in most markets. I also have luck finding them at farmer’s markets and Asian stores.

How It Works
The tartness of the key limes reacts with the soy milk making it extra creamy.

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Chef’s Notes
I LOVE this ice cream! The graham crackers simulate the pie crust and the tart sweetness of the

ice cream is divine. This is one you have to try to believe. You can substitute regular limes (you will need less) but the taste will be changed. Key limes are unique to say the least. If yours are yellow, that is fine, key limes are yellow to green and all shades between.

Interesting Facts
The basil has mint and liquorish notes, which is why it works so well with this recipe.

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Poblano Gelato
Type: Raw, Dessert Serves: 6 Time to Prepare: 4 hours to soak the cashews + 1 hour for the gelato to set + 10 minutes of labor

2 cups of soaked cashews ¼ cup of raw agave nectar (if available) ½ tsp. cinnamon powder 1/8 tsp. of salt 6 poblanos 2/3 cup of almonds, coarsely chopped

Ingredients

Option: 2 tbsp. of green pumpkin seeds Instructions

Soak the cashews for at least four hours. Soak the almonds for one hour. other halves for blending. Deseed and remove the membranes from the poblanos. of the poblano halves. Freeze this for at least one hour. Load the gelato into the poblano halves. Blend together the cashew butter, raw agave nectar, cinnamon, almonds, salt, and one half of one Cut the poblanos in half along the length, saving the sides with the stem attached and using the

Option: Garnish with the pumpkin seeds.

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Kitchen Equipment
2 Mixing Bowls to soak the nuts Small Knife Cutting Board Measuring Cup Blender

Presentation
Serve this on a plate with raw cocoa powder sprinkled over it and a few dabs of sweet agave nectar. Alternatively, you can garnish it with pumpkin seeds and/or cinnamon.

Time Management
Make sure to soak the almonds while you are soaking the cashews. If you want to forgo the soaking, you can reduce the amount of prep time significantly. However, you will have slightly made in a large batch and will keep frozen for a couple days before losing flavor. grainy gelato. It will still taste great, but the texture won’t be as nice. This is something that can be

Complementary Food and Drinks
This is definitely a nice, exotic dessert, so serve it with a fancy main meal. Stick with the pepper theme, although go mild, perhaps with a red pepper coconut soup and a jicama croquette topped with your favorite seasonal veggies.

Where to Shop
I shop at Sprouts for these ingredients because the nuts and seeds are available in bulk. If you don’t have one of those stores near you, try Whole Foods since they have the nuts in bulk, as well.
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Raw agave nectar can typically be found at both stores.

How It Works
Soaking the cashews softens them enough that they can be blended into a smooth paste and they also add the creamy fat typically found in desserts, though this is a much better fat than say, dairy fat. The almonds soak for a bit less time so that they add some texture to the gelato instead of getting lost in the creaminess of the cashews. Poblano is used because peppers and sweets go well together and it happens to make a nice boat to hold the gelato. Cinnamon is used to give an aromatic quality to the gelato. A pinch of salt is added to the gelato because salt is the contrasting flavor to sweetness. When a hint of it is added, it forces the sweet flavor to the foreground.

Chef’s Notes
Nut based raw gelatos are certainly decadent, but I find it worthwhile to occasionally indulge in a treat like this.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 2726.4 (454.4) Fat 183.2g (30.5g) Calories from Fat 1648.7 (274.8)

Total Carbohydrates 199.9g (33.3g) Dietary Fiber 26.9g (4.5g) Sugars 70.2g (11.7g) Protein 69.6g (11.6g) Salt 346mg (57.7mg) Vitamin A 50% (8.3%)

Vitamin B6 91% (15.2%) Vitamin C 573% (95.5%) Calcium 39% (6.5%) Iron 137% (22.8%) Thiamin 53% (8.8%)
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Riboflavin 74% (12.3%) Niacin 49% (8.2%) Folate 79% (13.2%) Phosphorous 206% (34.3%) Potassium 68% (11.3%) Zinc 135% (22.5%) Magnesium 276% (46%) Copper 380% (63.3%)

Interesting Facts
Gelato is a dense Italian ice cream. called Poblano Sorbetto.

Gelato that doesn’t use dairy is called sorbetto, so perhaps this recipe should more properly be

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Cannoli with Ancho Cream Cheese
Type: Dessert Serves: 8 Time to Prepare: 60 minutes

Ingredients The shells…

¼ cup soy creamer

1 ½ tsp. maple syrup ¼ cup + 1 tbsp. raw sugar crystals 2 tbsp. canola oil 1/8 tsp. salt ½ tsp. vanilla extract 1/8 tsp. EnerG Egg Replacer 1 ½ cups of flour + more as needed Canola oil for frying

The filling…

2 anchos, rehydrated and minced 12 oz. of Better than Cream Cheese 3 tbsp. sweet agave nectar

The prickly pear cactus… Finishing ingredients…
Sweet agave nectar

4 prickly pear cactus fruits, sliced

3 tbsp. toasted pine nuts 1 tbsp. powdered sugar

Instructions Start by making the dough for the shells…

In a metal bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. In a blender, combine the rest of the ingredients. Blend them for about 1 minute until they are well emulsified. Add the liquid to the dry ingredients and mix well. tighter (it should feel like a soft bread dough.) Once the wet and dry ingredients form a dough, you can add more flour to make the dough

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Don’t over knead the dough. Let the dough sit for about 15 minutes. Cut out 4 inch circles. Wrap the circles around the cannoli forms. wrap. Wet your finger and run it along the seam of the wrap and press down gently to seal the On a floured surface, roll out the dough until it is about 1/16 of an inch.

Set up a deep fryer or wok and fill it with oil until it will cover the shells. Turn it up to medium high. With a set of tongs, drop the wrapped cannoli form into the oil. Fry it until it is a light golden color and immediately remove it. Set it on a paper towel to drain the oil. Repeat with the other wrapped cannoli forms.

Making the filling…

Fill up a small pot with water. Turn it to medium low. While it is heating, deseed the anchos by removing the top stem and shaking out the seeds

through the hole that is created.

Place the anchos in the water and rehydrate them. They should turn a lighter color and the skin should smooth out. While they are rehydrating, place the Better than Cream Cheese and sweet agave nectar

in a blender.

Blend them on high for at least one minute.

Alternatively, you can place the Better than Cream Cheese and sweet agave nectar in a narrow, tall, metal bowl and use an immersion blender on it. Once the anchos have rehydrated, mince them very small. Stir the mince into the filling. Alternatively, you can blend it in. Slice the cactus fruit so that you have slices about 1/8 of an inch. Lightly oil a sauté pan. Heat the pan up to a medium heat. Sauté the prickly pear fruit for about two minutes or until you see the colors smooth out. Place them on the plate, two or three per plate. Pump the immersion blender up and down to fluff up the filling.

Preparing the cactus fruit…

Toasting the pine nuts…

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In a sauté pan, toast the pine nuts on a medium heat until they start to develop light brown spots on them. This should only take 2 or 3 minutes. Set them aside.

Filling the cannoli…

Attach a wide star-shaped tip.

Place the filling in a piping bag (see Chef’s Notes for a cheat).

The setup…

Pipe the filling into the cannoli shell until it is filled. Arrange the prickly pear fruit on the plate. Lay the stuffed cannoli against the fruit. Drizzle sweet agave nectar across the plate, the cannoli, and the fruit. Sift a little bit of powdered sugar across the plate. Sprinkle some of the pine nuts around the plate.

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Kitchen Equipment
2 or 3 Metal Bowls Rolling Pin Blender Piping Bag with Star Shaped Tip 2 Sauté Pans Chefs’ Knife Measuring Cups Whisk Wok or Deep Fryer Sifter Measuring Spoons Spatula for the Prickly Pear Fruit A Knife or Large Ramekin to Cut the Dough

Presentation
When arranging the prickly pear fruit slices, spread them on top of each other instead of just placing them side by side or stacked right on top of each other. Lay the cannoli against the fruit. Take the bottle of sweet agave nectar and quickly move it from side to side to make the lines. This works if it has the squeeze tip. If it doesn’t, put the sweet agave nectar on a spoon and do nuts so they pine nuts give a nice contrast against the whiteness of the sugar. it that way. Put the powdered sugar on before the pine

Time Management
These take awhile to make and are fairly labor intensive. However, the shells and filling can be made ahead of time. If you make the shells ahead of time, serve this as a chilled dessert. The pine nuts and the prickly pear fruit definitely need to be served fresh. Start with the dough. Get the
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anchos rehydrated while the dough is resting. Get the filling ready after that. Once you are done with that, roll out the dough and make the shells. While they cool, you can toast the pine nuts and get the fruit sautéed. After that, they are quick to put together.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This goes very well with a nice Riesling or even a lightly flavored cider like a pear cider.

Where to Shop
Anchos can sometimes be found prepackaged in gourmet food stores. However, the best place to shop is one that has a preponderance of Mexican foods. Anchos can often be found there in bulk bins. Note that they are often mislabeled as pasilla peppers. The pepper should be very, Replacer, and sweet agave nectar are most easily found at places like Whole Foods and Wild Oats. Pine nuts can be found at most places, including Costco. The rest of the ingredients can easily be found at the local supermarket. very dark, dry, and the skin should be shriveled. The Better than Cream Cheese, EnerG Egg

How It Works
The dough is tight enough so that it does not fall apart when it is deep fried, but soft enough so lighter. There are several different types and levels of sweetness in the dessert. The filling is that it creates a lightly crisped shell. Using the immersion blender on the filling fluffs it up, making it

slightly sweet and the anchos have their own sweetness to them. The shells are fairly sweet, but not cloyingly sweet. The cactus fruit has a little bit of sweetness, but is more astringent. Putting some of the sweet agave nectar on top of the fruit helps that. Lastly, the powdered sugar adds sprinkles of intense sweetness to the dish. The prickly pear fruit is there to give the dessert a beautiful color contrast and a contrast in taste with its astringency. It also gives people something to talk about as most people have not tried it before. The anchos are there to add another flavor most people don’t associate with dessert, which is a chili flavor, making the dish even better because of its uniqueness.

Chef’s Notes
This recipe requires a lot of setup, but once everything is prepped, it goes very quickly. That’s
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why this dessert is best when made for 6 to 10 people instead of 2 or 3. This is also a particularly fun dish to make with friends as each person can be in the kitchen with their own job (one person can do the filling, one person prep the dough, etc.).

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses)
Calories 2268 (283) Fat 96g (12g) Calories from Fat 864 (108)

Total Carbohydrates 351g (44g) Dietary Fiber 21g (2.5g) Sugars 172g (21.5g) Protein 29g (3.5g) Salt 285mg (36mg) Vitamin A 138% (17%) Vitamin C 70% (8.5%) Calcium 19% (2%) Iron 21% (2.5%) Thiamin 106% (13%) Riboflavin 98% (12%) Niacin 64% (8%) Folate 84% (10.5%) Phosphorous 26% (3%) Potassium 42% (5%) Zinc 10% (1%) Magnesium 81% (10%) Copper 22% (2.5%) * This recipe is by no means healthy, but it is healthier than a regular dairy-based cannoli. I also think it’s important to treat ourselves to some decadence occasionally.

Vitamin B6 60% (7.5%)

Interesting Facts

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Anchos are the dried form of the poblano pepper, which is the pepper used in chili rellenos. In Spanish, ancho means “wide”. The cannoli originated in Sicily.

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Almond Butter Apple Boats
Type: Quick Meal - Dessert Time to Prepare: 5 minutes Serves: 2

1 green apple 2 tbsp. of almond butter 2 tsp. toasted coconut 2 tsp. black raisins

Ingredients

Instructions

Cut the apple in half lengthways. Cut a small wedge into the bottom of the apple, removing the rough part. Core the apple. Place 1 tsp. of raisins at the bottom of each half. Fill each half with 1 tbsp. of almond butter. Sprinkle 1 tsp. of toasted coconut on top of each apple boat.

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Cutting Board Knife Spoon

Kitchen Equipment

Measuring Spoons Apple Corer (optionally use the spoon)

Presentation
These look nice set on a platter with some raisins and coconut sprinkled on the platter. You can also sprinkle the platter with chopped mint. Make sure you place them on a light colored platter to accentuate the springy feel of the dish.

Time Management
Make these just before serving. Otherwise, they will brown. If you have to make them earlier, dip the apple in a half-and-half water/lemon juice solution before putting the raisins and almond butter in the boat. Then store it in the refrigerator.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
These go really with some sparkling cider and are a great summer treat.

Where to Shop
Try finding the apples at a farmers’ market. If you can’t, you should be able to find them at a generic supermarket, along with the raisins and coconut (which will probably be found in the baking aisle.) The best place to get almond butter is at a store that supports organic produce and you can get fresh almond butter in the bulk section at most Whole Foods.

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How It Works
The slight tartness of the apples makes a nice contrast with the sweetness of the raisins. Almond

butter is also just a bit sweet and the creamy texture plays off of the crisp apple. The raisins are also a nice sweet treasure to be found when the apple is bit into. Finally, the coconut puts one more flavor in the dish, rounding it out with another type of sweetness.

Chef’s Notes
Make sure that the apples are as fresh as possible as the light springiness of them is one of the highlights of this recipe. If you want a sweeter version of this, you can mix the almond butter with 1 tsp. of sweet agave nectar.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses)
Calories 315 (157) Fat 19g (9.5g) Calories from Fat 171(85)

Total Carbohydrates 32g (16g) Dietary Fiber 6g (3g) Sugars 21g (10.5g) Protein 4g (2g) Salt 20mg (1g) Vitamin A 1% (.5%)

Vitamin B6 2% (1%) Vitamin C 10% (5%) Calcium 2% (1%) Iron 4% (2%) Thiamin 2% (1%) Riboflavin 7% (3.5%) Niacin 2% (1%) Folate 3% (1.5%) Phosphorous 9% (4.5%)
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Potassium 11% (5.5%) Zinc 3% (1.5%) Magnesium 13% (6.5%) Copper 8% (4%)

Interesting Facts
Almond butter and almond milk were used in many Elizabethan era desserts. California is now the largest producer of almonds in the world. resulting in what we have today. Wild apples use to be bitter, but the Romans discovered they could cultivate a sweet apple,

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Baked Apples in Phyllo Dough
Type: Dessert Serves: 6 Time to Prepare: 45 minutes

2 apples

Ingredients

18-20 sheets of phyllo dough 1 tsp. of cinnamon ¼ tsp. of allspice 1 tsp. of cardamom 2 tbsp. of flame red raisins 2 tbsp. of sweet agave nectar

Instructions

Mix together the dried spices. Core the apples. Slice them thinly. Toss them in the spice mix and then the agave nectar. Mix in the raisins. Place three phyllo sheets atop each other. Place 1/6 of the apple mix in the middle of the phyllo sheet. Fold the sides over the apples, starting with one side, then folding over the opposite end, then folding the other two sides (it should make a rectangle.) Place these in a glass baking dish. Bake this on 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

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Kitchen Equipment
Glass Baking Dish Knife Apple Corer Measuring Spoon Small Mixing Bowl Small Spoon

Presentation
When you serve these, sprinkle them with a bit of cinnamon so they’ve got some color. You can also get fancy and add some curled apple slices or some rose petals to the plate. The plate should be small if there is not garnish, but can be larger with garnish as long as the garnish is also used to decorate the plate.

Time Management
If you are making a lot of these, place the apple slices in chilled water with a bit of lemon juice. The cold and the acid will keep the apples crisp and fresh.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This makes a nice end to a large meal as the dessert is flavorful without being overly sweet and the phyllo dough is flaky, making this a semi-light dessert.

Where to Shop
All of these ingredients should be available at your local market, though you can get organic phyllo at Sprouts for a good price. For the phyllo, look in the frozen section. It may also be spelled filo or fyllo.

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How It Works
The raisins give a contrasting texture to the apples and also provide a dark sweetness to the

dessert while the sweet agave nectar provides a honey like taste to it. The agave is also used to keep the apples moist as it will coat the apples and keep in some of the steam released during baking. The spices are there to provide a full bodies aromatic quality to the dessert and cardamom, cinnamon, and allspice always go well with sweetness.

Chef’s Notes
I’ve been playing around with phyllo dough recently and this is the first dessert I’ve created with it.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1068.1 (178.0) Calories from Fat 66.1 (11.0) Fat 7.3g (1.2g) Total Carbohydrates 233.0g (38.8g) Dietary Fiber 13.0g (2.2g) Sugars 62.8g (10.5g) Protein 17.5g (2.9g) Salt 949.6mg (158.3mg) Vitamin A 3% (0.5%) Vitamin B6 10% (1.7%) Vitamin C 2% (0.3%) Calcium 3% (0.5%) Iron 46% (7.7%) Thiamin 4% (0.7%) Niacin 3% (0.5%) Folate 1% (0.2%) Phosphorous 5% (0.8%) Riboflavin 3% (0.5%)

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Potassium 13% (2.2%) Zinc 1% (0.2%) Magnesium 4% (0.7%) Copper 9% (1.5%)

Interesting Facts
Phyllo dough used to be made by hand by delicately rolling out small balls of dough into paper thin sheets that would often stretch across a kitchen table. Apples originated in Kazakhstan.

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Beignets
Type: Side Serves: 12 Time to Prepare: 20 minutes to prepare + 2 hours for the dough + 20 minutes at the end for frying

¼ envelope active dry yeast (1 package equals 2 ¼ tsp.) 3/8 cup warm water (approx. 105°) 2 tbsp. granulated sugar ¼ tsp. of salt ½ EnerG Egg Replacer ½ cup of soy creamer, reduced to ¼ cup 1.75 cups all-purpose flour Oil for deep frying Powdered sugar 1 tbsp. shortening, softened

Ingredients

Instructions

Reduce the soy creamer on a medium heat from ½ cup to ¼ cup. While the soy creamer is reducing, mix the sugar and warm water together. Allow the soy creamer to cool until it is warm to room temperature. Mix the soy creamer into the water and add in the salt. Mix together 1 portion of the EnerG Egg Replacer mix into the water. Stir in approximately 2/3 of the flour, stirring until it is smooth. Slowly fold in the rest of the flour. Knead the dough until it no longer sticks to your fingers. If necessary, add in a tiny amount of flour. Form the dough into a ball. Lightly oil a bowl and place the dough in it. Cover it with a towel and store it in a warm place. The dough should double in size over the next two hours. Once it has risen, punch it down and knead it a few more times. Lightly flour a flat surface and roll the dough out until it is about ¼” thick. Cut the dough into 2 ½” squares.
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Add the yeast and proof it for about five minutes (check to see if it bubbles).

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Deep fry the squares in vegetable oil at 360 degrees for three to five minutes, turning the beignets golden brown. Place them on a paper towel to drain away the excess oil. Plate them up and sprinkle them with powdered sugar.

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Kitchen Equipment
Measuring Cup Rolling Pin Sifter Deep Fryer, Dutch Oven, or Wok Temperature Gauge Dish Towel Bowl for letting the dough rise

Measuring Spoon

Presentation
I think these look nicest when stacked on a plate from which everyone can take their beignets instead of put on small, individual plates.

Time Management
Start off by reducing the soy creamer as that will take about ten to fifteen minutes. You can do

some of the other work on these while it reduces, such as proofing the yeast. Also, heat up the oil before you start rolling the dough. By the time you are done rolling and cutting it, the oil should be sufficiently hot.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This is traditionally served at Café du Monde with chicory café’ au lait, so get a coffee with a nice French Roast, a little bit of sweetener, and some soy creamer.
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Where to Shop
All of these ingredients can be found at your local market.

How It Works
Placing the yeast in warm water with sugar tests by allowing the yeast to feed off of the sugar. If it is active, it will release gas bubbles as it processes the sugar. If nothing happens, you know the yeast is inactive. Those gas bubbles will do two things. One, it will help the dough rise, which will make it fluffier. Two, it will help the dough puff up as it cooks, making for a nice, fluffy beignet. Kneading the dough helps the glutinous molecules bind together, which will keep the dough intact as it cooks and also create a barrier to trap the gas bubbles released by the yeast, which is how it puffs up.

Chef’s Notes
Beignets are not as sweet as I expected when I first had them. Being in New Orleans, I expected bold flavors in everything I ate. However, these had a nice subtlety to them.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1107.5 (92.3) Calories from Fat 223.9 (18.7) Fat 24.9g (2.1g) Total Carbohydrates 197.7g (16.4g) Dietary Fiber 5.9g (0.5g) Sugars 46g (3.8g) Protein 23.2g (1.9g) Salt 628.9mg

Vitamin A 1% (0.1%) Vitamin B6 5% (0.4%) Vitamin C 1% (0.1%) Calcium 5% (0.4%) Iron 59% (4.9%)
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Thiamin 86% (7.2%) Riboflavin 54% (4.5%) Niacin 65% (5.4%) Folate 84% (7%) Phosphorous 29% (2.4%) Potassium 12% (1%) Zinc 10% (0.8%) Magnesium 14% (1.2%) Copper 20% (1.7%)

Interesting Facts
Beignet is pronounced ben-yay. Some beignets are also stuffed with various ingredients. In France, beignet refers to any deep fried dough that is stuffed with veggies.

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Chestnut Beignets with Eau de Vie
Type: Dessert Time to Prepare: 1 hour Serves: 12

1 tsp. of yeast 5/8 cup of warm soy creamer ¼ cup of turbinado sugar 1 serving of EnerG Egg Replacer (with water called for on package) 1 ¼ cups of whole wheat pastry flour 1 cup of chestnut flour 1/8 tsp. of salt Oil for frying ¼ cup of sweet agave nectar 2 tbsp. of Eau de Vie 1 tbsp. of vegetable shortening

Ingredients

Instructions

Warm the soy creamer until it is just warm to the touch. Remove it from the heat. Mix in the yeast, vegetable shortening, and turbinado sugar. Perpare the EnerG Egg Replacer. Combine the whole wheat pastry flour, chestnut flour, and salt. Gently stir the wet ingredient mix into the dry ingredient mix. Work this into a light dough. Roll the dough out into a ¼” sheet. Cut the dough into 3” squares. Allow the squares to rise for about 20 -30 minutes. Fill a deep pot with enough oil to cover several of the sheets of dough by 3”. Bring the oil to 360 degrees. Drop in 2-3 squares of dough and fry them until they puff up and turn golden. Mix together the sweet agave nectar and Eau de Vie. Dress the beignet with the Eau de Vie syrup.
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Remove them and set them on a rack or paper towel, repeating this with the rest of the squares.

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Low-fat Version
Bake the beignets after they have risen on 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes instead of frying them.

Kitchen Equipment
2 Mixing Bowls 1 Small Bowl to mix the egg replacer Whisk Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Dutch Oven, Wok, or Fryer Fry Basket

Presentation
If you have some fruit that matches the fruit in the eau de vie, plate that alongside the platter of beignets. It makes for an elegant presentation.

Time Management
The larger the fryer you have, the more beignets you can cook at one time.

Complementary Food and Drinks
These go very well after a savory meal that is not too filling as the chestnut flour in the beignets will be filling on its own. Go for a soup with a light broth or a roasted veggie dish.

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Where to Shop
Chestnut flour is not the easiest flour to find, so you will probably have to order it online. Agave nectar is available at Sprouts, Whole Foods, and Trader Joe’s. Eau de vie will be available at often pear. The rest of the ingredients should be readily available. Price per serving is approximately $1.50. higher end shops that specialize in alcohol. Eau de vie is a brandy that has been flavored with fruit,

How It Works
The chestnut flour has a natural sweetness to it, but it will not bind together and keep under the heat very well. That’s why the wheat flour is added to the chestnut flour. The yeast will create bubbles in the dough squares, which helps make the beignets puffy. Make sure that the oil is hot before the beignets enter it or else they will absorb too much oil and become greasy. The eau de vie is mixed with the sweet agave nectar to create a fruit flavored brandy syrup used to top the beignets.

Chef’s Notes
I’ve had beignets before, but the chestnut flour in this Corsican recipe was incredible and the eau de vie just made these even more special.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1604.4 (133.8) Calories from Fat 263.5 (22.0) Fat 29.3g (2.4g) Total Carbohydrates 292.3g (24.4g) Dietary Fiber 27.5g (2.3g) Sugars 122.5g (10.2g) Protein 27.1g) Salt 372mg (31mg)

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Vitamin A 0% (0%) Vitamin B6 27% (2.3%) Vitamin C 0% (0%) Calcium 9% (0.8%) Iron 37% (3.1%) Thiamin 34% (2.8%) Niacin 48% (4%) Folate 17% (1.4%) Phosphorous 53% (4.4%) Potassium 22% (1.8%) Zinc 30% (2.5%) Magnesium 56% (4.7%) Copper 36% (3%) Riboflavin 16% (1.3%)

Interesting Facts
Beignet means bump. Eau de vie has an alcohol content above 40%, so is typically served in 1 oz. servings.

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Black Cherry Chocolate Bar
Type: Dessert Serves: 1 Time to Prepare: 4 hours to set + 15 minutes of labor

8 candied black cherries 1 tbsp. of black cherry syrup 8 oz. of dark chocolate ¼ tsp. of cardamom

Ingredients

Instructions

Dice the candied black cherries. Lightly oil a chocolate bar form and place it on a sheet of wax paper. Melt the chocolate in the top pan of a double boiler, stirring it continuously. Immediately add in the cardamom and black cherry syrup. Pour the chocolate into the form until it rises just over the top of the form. Quickly scrape along the top of the form to even out the chocolate. Allow it to chill for at least four hours.

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Kitchen Equipment
Chocolate Bar Form Wax Paper Double Boiler Knife to scrape the top of the form Cutting Board Knife to dice the cherries Measuring Spoon

Presentation
Serve this as part of another dessert and drizzle a bit of extra bar.

cherry syrup or cherry liqueur and syrup mix atop the chocolate

Time Management
This recipe requires very little work. However, you will have to move quickly because the

chocolate will immediately start to cool as it is poured out of the double boiler. That means you will have to have the form oiled and on the wax paper and a knife ready to scrape the top of the form at hand.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Break off a piece of this bar and serve it with another dessert, like a chocolate mousse or as part of a parfait.

Where to Shop
The forms can be difficult to find. However, if you have a fancy kitchen store near you, you may be able to find them there, or you can try a chocolatier. Barring that, you can cheat and use a
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shallow ice cube tray and make bite sized chocolate bars! I like to get my vegan chocolates at Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s, with Trader Joe’s having a more affordable and sometimes you can get the candied dark cherries, it’s ok to omit them or substitute maraschino cherries. better selection without compromising on the quality. If you don’t have a gourmet store at which

How It Works
Melting the chocolate in the double boiler allows it to melt gently, keeping its smoothness. Adding

in the cherry syrup increases the bar’s flavor and also makes the chocolate more liquid, allowing it to pour into the form. Oiling the form will let the bar slip out easily and filling it just above the rim allows the knife to slip along the top and make an even scrape, flattening out the bar.

Chef’s Notes
This one was tough to get right and a lot of it was the viscosity of the chocolate and the quickness with which I got the chocolate into the form. However, once those were worked out, the bar turned out to be both delicious and easy to make.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1408.6 Fat 77.5g Calories from Fat 697.2

Total Carbohydrates 168.9g Dietary Fiber 12.8g Sugars 147.6g Protein 8.9g Salt 62.3mg Vitamin A 1%

Vitamin B6 5% Vitamin C 2% Calcium 9% Iron 36% Thiamin 2%
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Riboflavin 27% Niacin 8% Folate 2% Phosphorous 34% Potassium 21% Zinc 23% Magnesium 66% Copper 72%

Interesting Facts
Chocolate was eaten in its bitter form for over 2,000 years before the Europeans added sugar to it. Chocolate is said to increase serotonin levels.

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Dessert Risotto
Type: Dessert Serves: 2 Time to Prepare: 45 minutes

1 cup of Arborio rice ½ tsp. of olive oil 3 cups of water 2 cinnamon sticks 1 tbsp. of sugar 1/8 tsp. of salt

Ingredients

Option: ½ cup of white wine in place of ½ cup of veggie stock
2 tbsp. of currants or raisins ¼ cup of pistachios 1 tbsp. of sweet agave nectar 2 tsp. of chopped mint leaves 1/8 tsp. of freshly ground nutmeg

Instructions

Simmer the water with the cinnamon sticks and sugar for 10 minutes. While it is simmering, toast the rice in the risotto pan on a medium heat in the oil. Once the water is done simmering, add ½ cup to the rice. Stir this continuously until the cinnamon water is absorbed and repeat the process until all the cinnamon water is gone. Stir in the currants and pistachios. Add the sweet agave nectar next. Garnish with the nutmeg and mint leaves.

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Kitchen Equipment
Medium sized Pot for the risotto Medium sized Pot for the cinnamon water Ladle Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Scissors or Knife for the mint leaves Wooden Spoon to stir the rice

Presentation
I like to place a few extra currants and pistachios just off center stick, you can also place that on the dish.

and then lay a cut of mint atop that. If you have another cinnamon

Time Management
The cinnamon water gets better the longer you allow it to sit with the cinnamon sticks, so if you can start the water earlier, do so.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This is a nice ending to a semi-spicy meal. If you serve a drink with it, don’t serve anything too sweet. Otherwise it will make the risotto seem bland. Try something like a peach cider.

Where to Shop
My favorite store to purchase these ingredients is Sprouts as they have almost all of them in bulk. them packaged at your local market, though you may have trouble finding the sweet agave nectar there.
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You can also get them at Wild Oats and most of them at Whole Foods. Barring that, you can get

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How It Works
Creating the stock with the cinnamon sticks will allow the rice to soak up all that yummy cinnamon a darker tasting sweetness. The sweet agave nectar acts as a light syrup and the mint brightens the risotto.

flavor. The pistachios are there for color and for a rich, nutty taste while the currants are there for

Chef’s Notes
I had a bit of trepidation when I first made this because I wasn’t sure how a dessert risotto would turn out, but it ended up turning out to be one of my favorites. I taught it in a class the following day and it was a hit there, as well. It was funny to see the students go through the same experience I did, from trepidation to surprise, to pleasure.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1061.6 (530.8) Fat 15.8g (7.9g) Total Carbohydrates 209.6g (104.8g) Dietary Fiber 10.6g (5.3g) Sugars 42.2g (21.1g) Protein 20.4g (10.2g) Salt 298.1mg (149.0mg) Vitamin A 3% (1.5%) Vitamin B6 46% (23%) Vitamin C 2% (1%) Calcium 6% (3%) Iron 57% (28.5%) Thiamin 71% (35.5%) Riboflavin 9% (4.5%) Niacin 44% (22%)

Calories from Fat 141.8 (70.9)

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Folate 120% (60%) Phosphorous 37% (18.5%) Potassium 18% (9%) Zinc 20% (10%) Magnesium 24% (12%) Copper 47% (23.5%)

Interesting Facts
Cinnamon’s unique flavor comes from an oil that makes up about 1% of the bark. Cinnamon is a word derived from the Malaysian “kayu manis,” which means sweet bark.

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Figs with Sweet Miso Glaze
Type: Dessert, Raw Time to Prepare: 5 minutes Serves: 4

8 fresh figs or 12 lightly dehydrated figs 1 tbsp. of red miso 1 tbsp. of diced red bell pepper 3 tbsp. of raw sweet agave nectar 2 flares of a star anise seed

Ingredients

Instructions

Crush the star anise flares in a mortar and pestle until they are finely ground. Dice the red bell pepper. Blend together the miso, bell pepper, agave nectar, and crushed star anise. Drizzle the glaze onto the figs or toss the figs in the glaze.

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Kitchen Equipment
Small Knife Cutting Board Blender Measuring Spoon Mortar and Pestle

Presentation
Serve these on a white plate with several pieces of star anise spread around the plate, some drops of the glaze, or both. This picture features some figs I dehydrated.

Time Management
While the glaze can be made well ahead of time and stored, the figs should not be covered in it unless you want to marinade the figs in it.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This would be a nice dessert preceded by a cauliflower rice accented with freshly minced lemongrass.

Where to Shop
Fresh figs aren’t always in season, but Sprouts generally carries some that are lightly dehydrated. Whole Foods also carries them, occasionally, saving you the work of dehydrating them yourself. Fresh figs, however, are far superior and you can be assured that they are raw. When choosing those, make sure that they have a firm outer skin. For the miso, look for an unpasteurized miso paste. Again, Whole Foods is a good place for this.

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How It Works
Miso gives a tangy, salty quality to the glaze which is a nice contrast the burst of fragrant freshness from the figs. The red pepper in the glaze adds a touch of color and one more layer of sweetness to the dish.

Chef’s Notes
Fresh figs are a wonder and the first time I worked with them, I served them with cashew butter and mint. However, I wanted to come up with a low fat fresh fig dish and thus was born the miso glaze.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 513.3 (128.3) Fat 2.3g (0.6g) Total Carbohydrates 118.1g (29.5g) Dietary Fiber 14.3g (3.6g) Sugars 101.4g (25.4g) Protein 5.1g (1.3g) Salt 631mg (157.8mg) Vitamin A 22% (5.5%) Vitamin B6 26% (6.5%) Vitamin C 42% (10.5%) Calcium 15% (3.8%) Iron 11% (2.8%) Thiamin 13% (3.3%) Riboflavin 12% (3%) Niacin 9% (2.3%) Folate 8% (2%) Phosphorous 9% (2.3%) Potassium 28% (7%) Zinc 8% (2%) Magnesium 19% (4.8%)
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Calories from Fat 20.3 (5.1)

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Copper 18% (4.5%)

Interesting Facts
Although miso is a cooked food, it is considered part of the raw repertoire because of its live enzymes. Miso is made from fermented soybeans and there are dozens of different types of miso.

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Cashew Cream Stuffed Figs
Type: Side, Dessert Serves: 8 Time to Prepare: 15 minutes + 6 hours to soak the cashews

8 fresh figs

Ingredients

1/3 cup of cashews, soaked 3 tbsp. of water ¼ tsp. of salt 1 fresh nutmeg

Instructions

Blend the cashews, salt, and water together. Score the fig on top cross ways about ½” down or along the side of the fig. inside of the fig such that it creates a small depression in the fig. Fill this with the cashew cream. Grate a small bit of fresh nutmeg atop the cashew cream stuffed figs. Gently pull apart the four flaps of the fig created by the scoring and gently press to the side the

If you made the side cut instead, gently squeeze the fig to open up a depression.

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Kitchen Equipment
Small Knife Spoon Cutting Board Blender

Presentation
These look nicest when put on a lightly colored plate or arranged on a white plate that is sprinkled with fresh nutmeg. Place all the figs on one plate from which your guests can grab their figs. This makes the dessert plate look full instead of having a lone fig on a small plate. If you decide to plate the figs up individually, you should serve another dessert or fruit side with it to round out the plate. As a presentation option, you can drizzle the cashew cream over the fig since the figs with the sides sliced open can sometimes look funny.

Time Management
Since the cashews require soaking, plan ahead and either soak these the morning of the day you make the dish or the night before. It’s ok if the nuts soak longer than six hours.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This goes well if it is set with a couple other small desserts with lighter flavors. Try it with an orange coffee cake and a sweetened min tea.

Where to Shop
Fresh figs can be hard to find and are often only available from late July to early November, when they are in season. When they are in season, they are most easily found at gourmet stores.

How It Works
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The cashew cream adds a semi-sweet fat to the fresh fig while the salt contrasts the sweetness of the fig and the cream. The nutmeg really brings the fig to life with a completely different flavor.

Chef’s Notes
This is an easy to make, healthy dessert or refreshing summer starter dish. Feel free to experiment adding different spices to the cashew cream. Note also that the cashew cream will taste boring plain, but will really come to life when added to the fig.

Nutritional Facts (individual portions in parentheses)
Calories 644 (81) Calories from Fat 212 (27) Fat 24g (3g) Total Carbohydrates 98g (12g) Dietary Fiber 10g (1g) Sugars 68g (9g) Protein 10g (1g) Salt 492mg (62mg) Vitamin A 8% (1%) Vitamin B6 26% (3%) Vitamin C 8% (1%) Calcium 8% (1%) Iron 28% (3.5%) Thiamin 16% (2%) Niacin 8% (1%) Folate n/a Phosphorous 32% (4%) Potassium 32% (4%) Zinc 20% (2.5%) Magnesium 56% (7%) Copper 68% (8.5%) Riboflavin 8% (1%)

Interesting Facts
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Fresh figs were a treasure to the Greeks and Romans. Fig trees produce the best fruit in dry, warm climates. The Latin word for fig is fica. Fig trees usually produce a first, inferior crop, in the spring and then a second, main crop in the fall.

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Summer Fruit Kebabs
Type: Main Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 10 minutes

1 cup of chopped watermelon 4 strawberries 4 figs 4 dates ½ of a ripe poblano, chopped large ½ cup of fresh pomegranate juice 2 tbsp. of sweet agave nectar 1 tsp. of freshly grated ginger ½ tsp. of unpasteurized apple cider vinegar 1 white or yellow peach, quartered

Ingredients

Instructions

Juice the pomegranates until you have ½ cup of juice. Grate the ginger. Mix the agave nectar, pomegranate juice, ginger, and apple cider vinegar together. Chop the watermelon and poblano. Cut the peach in half, remove the stone, and cut each half in half. On each skewer, place at least one piece of each fruit. Roll each skewer of fruit lightly in the sauce.

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Kitchen Equipment
Cutting Board Large Knife Small Mixing Bowl Stirring Spoon Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Bamboo Skewers

Presentation

I like to take a little extra sauce and spread it around the plate. It’s easiest to do if you have a squeeze bottle. Also, a sprinkle of almonds does a nice job of adding more contrast to the dish.

Time Management
Fresh fruit is best and that means this should be served immediately as the fruit will start to lose its potency once they are cut open.

Complementary Food and Drinks
Serve this with a side of pomegranate seeds and you’ll have a wonderful fruit spread at hand.

Where to Shop
Farmers’ markets generally have the best fruit. Just make sure the fruit was picked within a day or the fruit at a conventional market. For the raw sweet agave nectar, I suggest a Google search as companies are often adding raw agave nectar to their repertoire.
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two of showing up at the market for the freshest flavor. Of course, you should be able to get all of

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How It Works
This is a spread of cooling fruit, perfect for summer. This flavor of the spread is deepened by the

richness of the dates and the sweetness of the fruit goes incredibly well with the fresh snap and heat of the poblano.

Chef’s Notes
I enjoyed the poblano and date combination immensely and ended up eating several poblano slices and dates together!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 511.2 (127.8) Calories from Fat 19.2 (4.8) Fat 2.1g (0.5g) Total Carbohydrates 117.7g (29.4g) Dietary Fiber 12.5g (3.1g) Sugars 102.9g (25.7g) Protein 5.3g (1.3g) Salt 11.0mg (2.8mg) Vitamin A 31% (7.8%) Vitamin B6 37% (9.3%) Vitamin C 174% (43.5%) Calcium 9% (2.3%) Iron 12% (3%) Thiamin 17% (4.3%) Riboflavin 13% (3.3%) Niacin 15% (3.8%) Folate 12% (3%) Phosphorous 8% (2%) Potassium 40% (10%) Zinc 6% (1.5%)

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Magnesium 19% (4.8%) Copper 20% (5%)

Interesting Facts
Dates have been cultivated in the Middle East since 6000 B.C. (ripe, soft), and tamr (ripe, sun-dried).

Dates are known by their four stages of ripeness: kimri (unripe), khalal (full-size, crunchy), rutab

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Glazed Almonds
Type: Dessert Serves: Varies by Use Time to Prepare: 10 minutes

½ cup of almonds 1 tbsp. of vegan margarine 2 tbsp. of sugar ½ tsp. of cardamom 1 tsp. of cinnamon ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper 1 tbsp. of sugar

Ingredients

Instructions

Mix the sugar, cardamom, cinnamon, and cayenne pepper together. Melt the margarine on a medium heat. Add the almonds to the pan. Add the spice mix to the pan and mix until the almonds are coated. Cook the almonds for about five minutes or until the sugars start to caramelize. Remove from the heat. Sprinkle on one more tbsp. of sugar. Break up the glazed almonds into small clumps and let the almonds sit until they cool.

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Sauté Pan

Kitchen Equipment

Measuring Spoon Metal Bowl in which to Mix the Spices Small Spoon to Mix the Spices

Presentation
Take a few of these and put them on top of salads, on top of soy ice cream, cakes, etc. You can also put these in a tiny dish with a small metal spoon and let people come by and sample them.

Time Management
These only take a few minutes to make, but will last several days and still maintain their flavor. Just make sure to store them in a dry place. If you put them in the refrigerator to keep them longer, make sure they are in a container so they do not absorb any residual scent in your refrigerator as sugar is very absorbent.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
A whitish soy ice cream goes very well with this. Try French vanilla to showcase the flavor of the almonds.

Where to Shop
I prefer getting the ingredients for this in stores that have bulk bins, such as Sprouts, Central
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Market, and Wild Oats. You can get just the amount of ingredients that you need without having to buy a huge supply of each of the spices.

How It Works
The margarine adds flavor as well as creates a binding agent to which the spices and sugar can stick. The cardamom makes the almonds light and aromatic instead of just sweet while the cayenne pepper makes them jump out a little bit to grab your attention. Breaking the almonds into clumps allows the sticky sugar mix to cool around the almonds and bind them.

Chef’s Notes
These are very tasty and best used as an accent to different desserts. Eat them in moderation,

though, because they have a high sugar and fat content.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 552 Fat 36g Total Carbohydrates 41g Dietary Fiber 8g Sugars 28g Protein 16g Salt 20mg Vitamin A 3% Vitamin B6 8% Vitamin C 1% Calcium 17% Iron 19% Thiamin 15% Riboflavin 10% Niacin 24%

Calories from Fat 324

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Folate 13% Phosphorous 35% Potassium 20% Zinc 15% Magnesium 50% Copper 42%

Technically, almonds are considered a stonefruit. California is the largest producer of almonds in the world. Almond trees were imported to Southern Europe by Iraqi traders, who missed the foods of their homeland.

Interesting Facts

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Grilled Rum Peaches in Phyllo
Type: Dessert Serves: 4 Time to Prepare: 40 minutes + 1 hour to soak the peaches

4 peaches, cut in half with stone removed 3 tbsp. of spiced rum 1 tbsp. of almond oil (olive oil can be substituted) 8 sheets of phyllo dough ¼ cup of slivered almonds

Ingredients

Instructions

Draw your knife into a peach until you hit the stone. Run your knife through the peach and around the stone to cut the peach in half. Remove the stone (freestone peaches work best for this.) Place the peach halves in a mixing bowl. Toss them in the rum. Allow them to rest for 15 minutes. Add the almond oil and toss the peaches again, allowing this to rest for 45 minutes. While the peaches are resting in the oil and rum, light your grill and allow the flames to die down. Grill the peaches on both sides until they develop small browned parts (this takes about 3-5 minutes per side.) Lay 4 sets of phyllo dough out, each set 2 sheets thick. Lay 2 peach halves at one end of each phyllo set. Sprinkle slivered almonds over the peaches. Fold the phyllo over the peaches and then fold the sides over to create a phyllo pouch. Place these on a baking sheet with the folded edges down. Brush the top with the left over almond oil and rum mix. Bake these on 350 degrees for 20 minutes.

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Low-fat Version
Omit the oil from the peaches and grill them that way. Instead of brushing the phyllo with the oil and rum mix, spritz it with water.

Raw Version
Omit the rum, but add 1/8 tsp. of cinnamon and cloves to the almond oil. Allow the peaches to soak in the almond oil for a couple hours. You will also want to slice the peaches into wedges instead of halves. Take a tart dish and press a thin date and almond crust into it. Add the peach wedges and then cover with one more date and almond crust. Date and almond crust can be made by mixing a cup of fine almond meal with four or five smashed dates and a pinch of salt.

Kitchen Equipment
Mixing Bowl Knife Cutting Board Grill Tongs Baking Sheet Brush Measuring Spoon

Presentation
I add a few sprinkles of slivered almonds and a touch of cinnamon to the plate for color, but like to leave this dessert mostly ungarnished so it can speak for itself.

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Time Management
This is something that should be served immediately. If you must prepare it ahead of time, plan on baking it again for about ten minutes to re-crisp the phyllo dough.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This dessert gets into the gourmet realm, so plan on serving it after a fancy, grilled dinner; perhaps a risotto with grilled oyster mushrooms and saffron or ravioli stuffed with smoked squash.

Where to Shop
I generally use Captain Morgan’s spiced rum in this recipe. All of the ingredients should be readily available except for the almond oil, which you may need to head to a gourmet store or Whole Foods to purchase. Approximate price per serving is $2.50.

How It Works
Fifteen minutes is about enough time to allow most of the rum to soak into the peaches while the rest of the time is used to infuse them with the flavor of the almond oil. There is another reason this amount of time is used. It allows some of the juice from the peaches to mix with the almond oil and rum that invariably collects at the bottom of the mixing bowl. This creates a fragrant oil which is used to brush the phyllo. Grilling the peaches softens them and also gives them a hint of smokiness, creating a subtle balance of flavors in this dessert.

Chef’s Notes
I still have some almond oil infused with the peach juice and rum left-over and ready to use for something else. The amount of flavor the oil acquired was an incredibly nice surprise.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 909.5 (227.4) Fat 35.8g (8.9g) Calories from Fat 322.0 (80.5)
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Total Carbohydrates 128.1g (32.0g) Dietary Fiber 13.5g (3.4g) Sugars 34.4g (8.6g) Protein 18.8g (4.7g) Salt 734mg (184mg) Vitamin A 42% (10.5%) Vitamin B6 7% (1.8%) Vitamin C 43% (10.8%) Calcium 9% (2.3%) Iron 33% (8.3%) Thiamin 45% (11.3%) Riboflavin 41% (10.3%) Niacin 53% (13.3%) Folate 32% (8%) Phosphorous 25% (6.3%) Potassium 29% (7.3%) Zinc 13% (3.3%) Magnesium 26% (6.5%) Copper 30% (7.5%)

Interesting Facts
Rum is part of a long line of sugarcane based alcoholic drinks that have been fermented for several thousand years.

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Maccha (Green Tea) Latte’
Type: Drink Serves: 1 Time to Prepare: 10 minutes

1 cup of plain soy milk 2 tbsp. of maccha koicha (high quality green tea powder)

Ingredients

Option: 6 tbsp. of green tea leaves Option: 1 tsp. of sugar Instructions

Place the maccha koicha in the bottom of the cup. the maccha.

Option: Grind up the 6 tbsp. of green tea leaves in a mortar and pestle and use that instead of

Heat the soy milk on medium heat until it starts to simmer. sweetness that maccha leaves have naturally. Let the latte’ sit for just a couple minutes.

Option: If you grind regular tea leaves, add 1 tsp. of sugar to the soy milk to make up for the
Put the hot soy milk in the cup and vigorously stir until the maccha koicha is dissolved.

green tea powder faster and more evenly.

Option: A bamboo stir works very well with this as the individual bamboo strands help dissolve the

Insert a hand held foamer into the liquid and turn it on for about 30 seconds to create the foam.

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Cup

Kitchen Equipment

Small Pot Stir

Measuring Spoon Foam Maker

Presentation
This should have a light green color with a thin layer of foam over the top. I like serving this in a coffee mug as it is just the right size for 1 cup of liquid. If you want to make it look very nice, place the mug on a small, square, wooden platter and place a bamboo stir next to the mug.

Time Management
This drink takes very little time to make, so plan on spending about ten minutes making it before lose some of its flavor after about half a day.

you drink it. You can also make a larger batch ahead of time to store in your refrigerator, but it will

Complimentary Food and Drinks
This goes very nicely after a nice, gentle stir fry of Chinese straw mushrooms and other delicate

vegetables in a light garlic sauce. For the health benefits of it, consider drinking it by itself or adding a slice of ginger to it.

Where to Shop
Maccha leaves can be hard to come by, but you should have some luck finding them at a decent sized Asian market, where they will also be less expensive. If you do not have access to an Asian
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market, you can look online at http://www.itoen.com/index.cfm.

How It Works
Maccha is a high quality tea that is then powdered to be used to create a semi-thick tea for the Japanese tea ceremony. Powdering the tea not only allows it to dissolve faster, it also allows it to thicken the liquid. Using the soy milk adds an extra flavor of richness to it and also softens the taste a bit. By pouring the hot soy milk onto the ground tea instead of pouring the ground tea into the soy milk, you can avoid creating green tea lumps, which both look and taste bad!

Chef’s Notes
The leaves from which maccha is made are nutrient dense. In fact, they are the most dense out of all the green tea leaves, carrying with them more nutritional value than spinach. They are also incredibly high in anti-oxidants, making this tea a very valuable healing and prevention drink. Although it has some caffeine in it, it is thought that the theanine, a chemical also found in the green tea, counteracts the negative effects of caffeine. The addition of the soy milk adds an easily digestible calcium and also provides heart benefits.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 131 Fat 3g Total Carbohydrates 15g Dietary Fiber 3g Sugars 1g Protein 11g Salt 135mg Vitamin A 40%% Vitamin B6 11% Vitamin B12 49% Vitamin C 10% Calcium 15%

Calories from Fat 27

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Iron 20% Thiamin 14% Niacin 13% Folate 19% Phosphorous 18% Potassium 15% Zinc 17% Magnesium 15% Copper 17% Riboflavin 27%

Interesting Facts
In the 16th century, Sen no Rikyu declared that maccha was the official tea for the Japanese tea ceremony. Powdered tea was created by the Chinese, but fell out of use while it became ever more popular in Japan. For a host of interesting information on maccha, check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maccha.

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Chocolate Dipped Peanut Butter Balls
Type: Dessert Serves: 8 (makes 15 to 20) Time to Prepare: 10 minutes plus 15 minutes to chill

½ cup of peanut butter ½ cup of powdered sugar 2 tbsp. of soy creamer 4 tbsp. of vegan chocolate chips

Ingredients

Instructions

Thoroughly combine the peanut butter and powdered sugar. Form the mix into 1” diameter balls. Heat up the soy milk. Add the chocolate chips. Immediately stir in the chocolate chips. Quickly dip ½ of each peanut butter ball into the chocolate. Place on a plate. Let these chill in the refrigerator for 15 minutes.

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Kitchen Equipment
Metal Bowl or Small Blender to Combine the Sugar and Peanut Butter Measuring Spoon Small Pot for the Chocolate Sauce

Presentation

Dipping the peanut butter balls only halfway in the chocolate allows the peanut butter to shine through, which looks both brown contrast. appetizing and nice as it provides a nice light brown, very dark

Time Management
Make the peanut butter balls first as those can sit for awhile. However, the chocolate will cool down quickly which is why you should dip the finished peanut butter balls in it immediately. Otherwise, you’ll have to reheat the chocolate.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
If you want to serve these with something else, try serving them as a garnish to a scoop of soy French vanilla ice cream.

Where to Shop
Whole Foods 365 brand is the best vegan chocolate chip readily available. You can also try some vegan chocolate sauces. The peanut butter and powdered sugar can be found anywhere.
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How It Works
The powdered sugar gives the dessert its sweetness and also helps hold the peanut butter together in a ball form. The chocolate adds some moisture back in and, of course, compliments the peanut butter.

Chef’s Notes
Most people love peanut butter and most people love chocolate, so this is a good one to serve

when you are entertaining people.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1189 (149) Fat 65g (8g) Total Carbohydrates 119g (15g) Dietary Fiber 11g (1g) Sugars 90g (11g) Protein 32g (4g) Salt 39mg (5g) Vitamin A 3% (n/a) Vitamin B6 28% (4%) Vitamin C n/a (n/a) Calcium 7% (1%) Iron 15% (2%) Thiamin 10% (1%) Riboflavin 8% (1%) Niacin 88% (11%) Folate 31% (4%) Phosphorous 42% (5%) Potassium 41% (5%) Zinc 24% (3%) Magnesium 53% (7%)
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Calories from Fat 585 (73)

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Copper 39% (5%)

Interesting Facts
Peanut butter was created in 1890 by Doctor John Kellog as a health food. Skippy brand peanut butter is the first commercially successful peanut butter. Federal law mandates that peanut butter must contain 90% peanuts and the other 10% can be comprised of salt, sweeteners, and stabilizers.

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Jien Duy “Sweet Bean Sesame Dumplings”
Type: Dessert, Chinese Time to Prepare: 40 minutes Serves: 6

1 cup of red beans, rinsed ½ cup of sugar 2 tbsp. of oil ½ cup of sesame seeds ¾ cup of brown sugar 3 cups of sticky rice flour 1 cup of boiling water Oil for frying

Ingredients

Instructions

The Dough… Bring the water to a boil. Dissolve the ¾ cup of brown sugar in the water. The Red Bean Paste… Mash the beans. Combine them with the sugar. Assembling the Sesame Balls… Saute the bean paste in the sesame oil on a medium high heat until the bean paste is dry. Take enough dough to form a 1 ½” ball. Press in on it with your thumb to form it into a cup. Fold the dough over and seal it into a ball. Repeat this until you are out of dough. Quickly dip a ball in cold water and roll it in sesame seeds, repeating this with all the sesame balls. Fill a wok with enough oil to cover the sesame balls well. Heat the oil to 350 degrees.
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Add this to the rice flour and combine everything thoroughly.

Fill this with about 1 tsp. of the red bean paste.

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Fry the sesame balls two or three at a time until the seeds turn golden (this takes about two minutes.) Constantly rotate the balls in the oil to ensure an even color. With a wire basket, gently press the balls against the side of the wok until they expand to about three times their size (if they do not expand and start to turn dark, remove them immediately.) Place them on a rack and allow them to drain.

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Kitchen Equipment
Mixing Bowl Wok Wire Frying Basket Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Small Pan Spoon to mash the beans Pot for boiling the water Plate for the sesame seeds

Presentation
If you want to get fancy, you can form these into a stack with balls propped up on bamboo skewers, laid against each other in odd arrangements. Usually, though, I just place mine out on a platter with tongs and let everyone come by and get their own.

Time Management
These will keep quite well in the refrigerator and since they can be labor intensive, it makes sense to make a big batch of them and then keep them chilled and covered with plastic wrap. If you want to save a few minutes of time, heat the oil while you are forming the sesame balls.

Complementary Food and Drinks
These are generally served during festivals, so pick other party food like BBQ on a skewer, sticky buns, and rice flour cakes.

Where to Shop
The sticky rice flour can be purchased at Asian markets while the other ingredients are fairly common.
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How It Works
The sticky rice flour is what holds everything together and gives the ball its spongy quality.

Boiling water is used to quickly activate the flour by exciting all of the glutinous molecules, allowing them to stick together. The dissolved sugar also helps bind the dough as well as make it sweet. The red bean paste is fried to infuse it with toasted sesame flavor and to dry it out so it does not make the inside of the dough ball too moist. The ball is pressed against the wok in the middle of the frying process so it is exposed to the direct heat of the pan, which helps the sticky rice flour expand. This also keeps them submerged in the oil, keeping the cooking of the ball even.

Chef’s Notes
I first had these at a restaurant in San Antonio called The Bean Sprout. Needless to say, they were quite addictive.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 3642.8 (607.1) Fat 70.8g (11.8g)

Calories from Fat 637.3 (106.2) * does not include the calories from frying

Total Carbohydrates 695.1g (115.8g) Dietary Fiber 37.2g (6.2g) Sugars 259.4g (43.2g) Protein 56.3g (9.4g) Salt 135mg (22.5mg) Vitamin A 1% (0.2%) Vitamin B6 122% (20.3%) Vitamin C 4% (0.7%) Calcium 42% (7%) Iron 98% (16.3%) Thiamin 93% (15.5%) Riboflavin 28% (4.7%) Niacin 87% (14.5%)

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Folate 80% (13.3%) Phosphorous 135% (22.5%) Potassium 65% (10.8%) Zinc 92% (15.3%) Magnesium 145% (24.2%) Copper 147% (24.5%)

Interesting Facts
Jien duy are served during festivals, particularly Chinese New Year. All parts of the sesame plant are used in Chinese cuisine, including sesame leaves.

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Strawberry Milkshake
Type: Dessert Serves: 2 or 1 if you really want milkshake Time to Prepare: about 10 minutes if you need to prepare the strawberries.

Ingredients
1 pint non-dairy ice cream (I use So Delicious) 16 oz of fresh strawberries, hulled 3 tablespoons agave nectar 1 cup non-dairy milk

Instructions
If not already done, take your pint of strawberries and hull them. Add the hulled strawberries, ice cream, milk, and agave to a blender, and whip it at high speed until creamy.

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Low-fat Version
Substitute low fat ‘milk’ and ice cream.

Raw Version
Substitute raw vanilla ice cream, raw milk, and raw agave.

Kitchen Equipment
The only equipment needed is a knife for the strawberry tops and a blender for the drink. A stand blender would work better than an immersion blender, but you could make do with one in a pinch.

Presentation
Top with a mint leaf or two, or some soy whip cream.

Time Management
This is very time friendly. There are no short cuts because it doesn’t take time.

Complementary Food and Drinks
If you serve this with a nice grilled veggie burger and sweet potato French fies, your friends will love you forever. Seriously.

Where to Shop
Fresh and Easy has cheap So Delicious ice cream. But really you be able to get the ingredients at most places.

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How It Works
The blender whips in air, which helps make this creamy. That is why a high speed blender stand

blender works best with this.

Chef’s Notes
As my husband would say, this is extra ‘ghetto’ meaning he’s food slumming but can’t get enough. I

have had friends hold out empty cups with intense longing in their eyes. It’s so simple you might think it won’t be good, but it is delicious!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1215.9 (608.0) Calories from Fat 337.5 (168.8) Fat 37.5g (18.8g) Total Carbohydrates 210.1g (105.1g) Dietary Fiber 35.7g (17.9g) Sugars 141.2g (70.6g) Protein 9.5g (4.8g) Salt 181mg (91mg) Vitamin A 24% (12%) Vitamin B6 11% (5.5%) Vitamin C 445% (222.5%) Calcium 40% (20%) Iron 36% (18%) Thiamin 14% (7%) Riboflavin 33% (16.5%) Niacin 14% (7%) Folate 28% (14%) Phosphorous 32% (16%) Potassium 27% (13.5%) Zinc 8% (4%)

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Magnesium 26% (13%) Copper 22% (11%)

Interesting Facts
Milkshakes, named in the late 1800s, were originally made with milk, eggs, and whiskey.

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Strawberry Rosemary Spears
Type: Dessert Serves: 6 Time to Prepare: 10 minutes + 1 hour to set

15 to 20 strawberries 6 fresh rosemary spears

Ingredients

Instructions

Destem the strawberries. Pierce the strawberries with the thick end of the rosemary spears, threading the spear through successive strawberries. Let it sit in the refrigerator for an hour.

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Small Knife

Kitchen Equipment

Presentation
These look very nice either arranged on a long wooden platter or against a white, rectangular plate. Make sure that each person has their own strawberry and rosemary spear.

Time Management
Make these at least an hour ahead of time so that strawberries have a chance to properly absorb

some of the fresh rosemary flavor. However, don’t let them sit for more than two hours as they will start to lose their fresh flavor.

Complementary Food and Drinks
This goes nicely with a sparkling apple cider that is not too sweet. One of my favorite brands is

Woodchuck.

Where to Shop
Fresh strawberries and fresh rosemary can be found just about anywhere, but you will generally

get the best quality at a farmers’ market. Look for thick rosemary stems as they will hold the strawberries together the best.

How It Works
A good set of strawberries are both juicy and sweet, perfect for a dessert. Piercing them with the
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rosemary allows the strawberries to pick up a hint of that very aromatic herb and also creates an interesting presentation.

Chef’s Notes
This is a simple, classy dessert that really brings to life the flavor of the strawberries and there are very few people that don’t like fresh strawberries!

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 109.7 (18.3) Calories from Fat 10.8 (1.8) Fat 1.2g (0.2g) Total Carbohydrates 22.7g (3.8g) Dietary Fiber 7.5g (1.2g) Sugars 0g (0g) Protein 2.0g (0.5g) Salt 3.24mg (0.54mg) Vitamin A 2% (0.3%) Vitamin B6 10% (1.7%) Vitamin C 306% (51%) Calcium 5% (0.8%) Iron 7% (1.2%) Thiamin 3% (0.5%) Niacin 4% (0.7%) Folate 14% (2.3%) Phosphorous 6% (1%) Zinc 3% (0.5%) Magnesium 8% (1.3%) Copper 8% (1.3%) Potassium 15% (2.5%) Riboflavin 11% (1.8%)

Interesting Facts
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There are more than 20 different varieties of strawberries throughout the world. Strawberries have been thought to be an anti-aging food. Rosemary was sometimes used to treat headaches.

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Sweet Bananas with Raspberries
Type: Dessert Serves: 1 Time to Prepare: 10 minutes

1 banana

Ingredients

5 or 6 Brazil nuts

5 or 6 raspberries 1 pinch of saffron 1/8 tsp. salt 1 tsp. sweet agave nectar 2 tsp. water

Instructions

Peel the banana.

Slice it in half along the width. Slice each half once more along the length. Add the salt and banana to the pan. Add in the sweet agave nectar and sauté for another minute. Place the banana slices on the plate. In the same pan in which the bananas were cooked, add the Brazil nuts and stir them, coating them with the remaining agave syrup. Cook these for one minute. Sprinkle the saffron on the bananas. Add the Brazil nuts to the plate. Add the raspberries to the plate. Sauté the banana in the water on a medium low heat for about five minutes.

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Kitchen Equipment
Sauté Pan Spatula Knife Cutting Board Measuring Spoon

Presentation
Make sure that you put this on a smaller plate so the bananas do not look overwhelmed by empty space. It’s on top of the bananas so that they look like part of the dessert and not just something sprinkled around the plate. also good to ensure that at least one of the raspberries is

Time Management
These do not take long to make, so plan on making them just before they are served. Keep in mind that they will not keep, so you can’t make them ahead of time.

Complimentary Food and Drinks
The dessert can be a bit filling after a meal, so serve it with something light like a small portabella sandwich. It also goes very well with just about any tropical style meal.

Where to Shop
Brazil nuts are most easily found at stores with bulk bins, like Whole Foods. Sweet agave nectar can be found at most stores that have a health and/or eco-friendly oriented section. Stores that
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specialize in organics are a good bet. The rest can be found at your local market.

How It Works
Softening the bananas gives them a nice, melt-in-your-mouth texture while sautéing them briefly in the agave nectar coats them with a tasty syrup. The saffron is there for color and the raspberries give a contrasting tartness. The tiny bit of salt helps showcase the sweetness of the dessert. Finally, the Brazil nuts give a mild nutty flavor while giving the diner something to bite into.

Chef’s Notes
I like this dessert because it uses only a few ingredients and still creates a nice look and a great taste.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 250 Fat 10g Calories from Fat 90

Total Carbohydrates 36g Dietary Fiber 4g Sugars 21g Protein 4g Salt 246mg Vitamin A 1%

Vitamin B6 21% Vitamin C 21% Calcium 2% Iron 3% Thiamin 8% Riboflavin 5% Niacin 3% Folate 5% Phosphorous 12%
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Potassium 21% Zinc 5% Magnesium 20% Copper 16%

Interesting Facts
George Washington cultivated raspberries in his Mt. Vernon gardens.

Raspberries are ready to harvest in July and August and slightly later in warmer climates. To find out a host of information about Brazil nuts, go here: http://www.nybg.org/bsci/braznut/

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Truffles
Type: Dessert Serves: 12 Time to Prepare: At least 1 hour with 15 minutes of labor

Method 1

Ingredients

6 oz. of dark chocolate

1 tbsp. of coconut oil or softened margarine (Earth Balance is good) ½ cup of soy creamer that has been reduced to ¼ cup 2 tbsp. of cocoa powder 2 tbsp. of confectioner’s sugar Method 2 5 oz. of bittersweet chocolate, chopped 1 ½ tbsp. of softened margarine (Earth Balance is good) 1cup of soy creamer reduced to ¼ cup 1 ½ tsp. of corn syrup 2 tbsp. of brandy 2 tbsp. of cocoa powder 1 tbsp. of confectioner’s sugar Method 3 8 oz. of semisweet chocolate 1 tbsp. + 1 tsp. of softened margarine 2 tbsp. of liqueur (coffee liqueur is good) ¼ up of pulsed almonds

Instructions
Method 1 Simmer the soy creamer until it is reduced to ¼ cup, skimming off the top film. Break up the chocolate into small bits. Bring water to a simmer in a double boiler, with the chocolate bits in the top pan. * Stir the chocolate continuously until it is thoroughly melted. Remove the top pan from the heat and immediately stir in the coconut oil and reduced soy creamer.
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This makes a sauce called a ganache. Cover this and allow it to come down to room temperature. Refrigerate this for at least 1 hour (until it is firm.) While it is in the refrigerator, chill a plate and remove it just before you form the truffles. Mix together the cocoa powder and the confectioner’s sugar. Chill your hands by placing them in cold water and then wipe them off. Immediately take portion of the chocolate and form it into a 1” ball. Repeat until you have used all of the chocolate. Method 2 Simmer the soy creamer until it is reduced to ¼ cup. Melt the chocolate as in Method 1. Immediately fold in the soy creamer, brandy, corn syrup, and margarine. Chill the chocolate and form them as in Method 1. Method 3 Melt the chocolate as in Method 1. Immediately fold in the softened margarine and coffee liqueur (or liqueur of your choice.) Chill the chocolate and form them as in Method 1. Pulse the almonds. Roll the truffles in the pulsed almonds. Roll this ball in the cocoa and sugar mix and set it on a chilled plate.

Note that you can cut these truffles in half for a mini-bite sized goodie.

simmering water.

* Instead of using a double boiler, you can fill a deep pot with water and float a mixing bowl on the

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Kitchen Equipment
Double Boiler Spatula Towel or Plastic Wrap Plate to hold the finished truffles Small Shallow Mixing Bowl for the cocoa mix Small Whisk for the cocoa mix Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Small Pot to reduce the soy creamer

Presentation
In this picture, I did a simple presentation. First, I scattered almonds around the plate. Then, I place the truffles on it and with cardamom, one part with chili powder, and one part with drizzled it with sweet agave nectar. Finally, I sprinkled one part cinnamon. You can also make a nice thick syrup to drizzle on the plate and if you want to get real fancy, you can make several different sauces to adorn each truffle.

Time Management
For such a luscious dessert, these truffles take a very short amount of time to make. What you don’t want to do, though, is leave the ganache (the chocolate sauce that you make after combining with. everything) in the refrigerator for more than two hours or else it will get too hard to effectively work

Complementary Food and Drinks
Truffles can take an large variety of flavors. Here are some ideas: orange liqueur, Kahlua, lime

zest, almonds, Macadamian nuts, chili powder, allspice, dark cherry bits, raspberry syrup, and more! You can mix these directly into the ganache (if you use a syrup, make sure to remove a like amount of liquid from somewhere else in the recipe,) or you can roll the truffles in them.
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Where to Shop
Vivani is a good brand of vegan dark chocolate with Dagoba coming in second, though definitely

serviceable. Whole Foods also has their 360 brand of chocolate chips (though these are

particularly sweet) and if you’re desperate, you can get a bar of Hershey’s dark, which happens to be vegan. Callebaut is one of the best brands you can use if you can find it. If you can’t get it at your local Whole Foods, try a Google search as most of these companies sell their products online.

How It Works
Using the double boiler gently softens the chocolate, which is necessary for it to maintain a lush

integrity. Folding in the other ingredients makes a sauce called a ganache, which is a semi-thick soy creamer is reduced so that it attains the consistency of heavy cream. If it is too thin, the

sauce that is used to form chocolate shapes by chilling it. It is often used to coat cakes, too! The ganache will be too thin and will not form into nice shapes. Chilling it allows the ganache to firm up enough to be pliable, which is necessary for forming it into balls. Chilling your hands is important plate, keeping the plate from melting the truffles with its ambient heat. so that you don’t melt the chocolate with your body heat. The same principle applies to the chilled

Chef’s Notes
I was very surprised at how easy these were to make, especially since they were so tasty. If I’m serving them for a party, I like to get at least ten different sauces, spice mixes, and nuts ready so that the truffles can amaze not only with their flavor, but their variety.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 1240.2 (103.3) Calories from Fat 685.5 (57.1) Fat 76.2g (6.3g) Total Carbohydrates 130.0g (10.8g) Dietary Fiber 12.6g (1.0g) Sugars 67.7g (5.6g)
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Protein 8.7g (0.7g) Salt 252mg (21.0mg) Vitamin A 11% (0.9%) Vitamin B6 5% (0.4%) Vitamin C 0% (0%) Calcium 5% (0.4%) Iron 35% (2.9%) Thiamin 3% (0.3%) Riboflavin 22% (1.8%) Niacin 7% (0.6%) Folate 2% (0.2%) Phosphorous 33% (2.8%) Potassium 22% (1.8%) Zinc 22% (1.8%) Magnesium 61% (5.1%) Copper 68% (5.7%)

Interesting Facts
Truffles are named after the mushroom, another delicious delicacy. The first method in this recipe is closest to a Swiss truffle, while the second is similar to the standard European truffle (with the Swiss being an exception.)

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Twisted Lemon Bars
Type: Dessert - Bar Makes: about 2 dozen Time to Prepare: 30 minutes prep, about 60 minutes total bake time

Ingredients
For the crust:

2 cups gluten free baking mix (I use Bob’s Red Mill) ½ cup powdered sugar 1 cup dairy-free margarine 1 teaspoon nutmeg ½ teaspoon almond extract 2 teaspoons xanthan gum For the filling:

¼ cup lemon juice 1 tablespoon lemon zest 8 oz soft silken tofu 2 cups granulated sugar ¼ cup gluten free baking mix (I use Bob’s Red Mill) ½ teaspoon xanthan gum 1 teaspoon baking powder For the frosting: 3 cups powdered sugar About ¼ cup lemon juice Lemon zest for garnish

Instructions
For the crust:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and mix until a cohesive lump of dough. Press the dough into a 13X9 baking sheet, making sure the dough is in an even layer.
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Place in the oven and bake for 20 minutes.

While the crust is baking, take the lemon juice and tofu, and pulse in a blender or food processor until it is completely smooth. Quickly add the rest of the ingredients EXCEPT the baking powder, and pulse again until combined. Only 1 or 2 minutes before your crust is ready to come out of the oven, add the baking powder and blend one more time until you have a thick liquid. Pull the crust from the oven and pour the mixture over the crust. Immediately place back in the oven, and bake for 30-40 minutes until the top is lightly golden brown. Remove from the oven and let rest for a few hours or overnight until cool.

For the Filling:

Wait until the bars are completely cool, then mix the lemon juice and powdered sugar. You want a constancy that spreads easily, but isn’t too runny. It should run off your spoon, but also coat your spoon. Spread the frosting evenly over the bars, and decorate with fresh lemon zest. Allow the frosting to harden. Cut into 1 ½ inch square bars and enjoy!

For the Frosting:

.

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Low-fat Version
This is not a cookie that you eat if you’re counting fat grams.

Kitchen Equipment
A mixer, bowls, 13 x 9 casserole dish, a glass, measuring cups and spoons

Presentation
Garnish the finished bar with a few pinches of lemon zest or lemon strips.

Time Management
While the crust is baking, make the filling. It saves time. Also, all the ingredients but the baking add the baking powder at the last minute or it will lose much of its fluffing powder.

powder can be tossed in the blender and blended together for the filling at once. Make sure you

Complementary Food and Drinks
These would go great with some vegan barbeque, like a hamburger and tofu hotdog and some nice iced tea. This would make a refreshing but sweet dessert.

Where to Shop
These ingredients should be available at any well stocked supermarket.

How It Works
The tofu acts like a binder for the filling, as eggs do in the traditional recipe.
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Chef’s Notes
I love these bars! The nutmeg in the crust is the ‘twist’ in the title, because it is not added to other lemon bar recipes. If you are a traditionalist, then omit the nutmeg, but if you are feeling a little adventurous, you will be amazed at how much flavor a little spice can impart. For extra kick, grate your own nutmeg! It’s easy with a Microplane and will give you the most flavor bang for your buck.

Nutritional Facts (individual servings in parentheses, does not include any options)
Calories 5778.3 (240.8) Calories from Fat 449.8 (18.7) Fat 50.0g (2.1g) Total Carbohydrates 1285.7g (53.6g) Dietary Fiber 30.7g (1.3g) Sugars 1063.8g (44.3g) Protein 46.4g (1.9g) Salt 1695mg (71mg) Vitamin A 41% (1.7%) Vitamin B6 0% (0%) Vitamin C 95% (4%) Calcium 9% (0.4%) Iron 13% (0.5%) Thiamin 17% (0.7%) Riboflavin 14% (0.6%) Niacin 4% (0.2%) Folate 47% (2.0%) Phosphorous 22% (0.9%) Potassium 17% (0.7%) Zinc 9% (0.4%) Magnesium 17% (0.7%) Copper 25% (1%)

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Interesting Facts
Lemons were not only cultivated for their culinary properties, but also as antiseptics.

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