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Markstrat Online Student Handbook English

Markstrat Online Student Handbook English

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Published by Manoj Perumal

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Published by: Manoj Perumal on Nov 10, 2012
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Each period, you are responsible for submitting a production plan for each of
your marketed brands. In the case of a relatively unsuccessful brand you may also
decide to decrease the inventory, by selling all or part of it to a trading company.

The Production department is working for several divisions of your company, and
can thus be viewed as a highly flexible external supplier. As a consequence, you
are not concerned about manufacturing investments, fixed costs or capacity
utilization. From one period to the next, you are completely free to increase or
decrease the production planning of a given product, without any penalty. The
Production department will always manufacture the required quantities in the best
possible conditions.

In a given period, the actual production level for each product is automatically
adjusted in response to actual demand for that product, within plus or minus 20%
of the production plan submitted by Marketing. Figure 10 gives a few examples
for varying situations of inventory, production plan and market demand (all
numbers are in units).

A

B

C

D

Beginning Inventory

8 000

8 000

25 000

0

Production Plan

100 000

120 000

100 000

80 000

Potential Sales

112 000

154 000

95 000

54 000

Actual Production

104 000

144 000

80 000

64 000

Actual Sales

112 000

152 000

95 000

54 000

Lost Sales

0

2 000

0

0

Ending Inventory

0

0

10 000

10 000

Figure 10 – Inventory and production plan versus market demand

The flexibility of the Production department goes beyond automatic adjustment
of production plans. The units produced are charged to the Marketing department
only when they are sold to distributors. The price paid to production is called the
transfer cost; it incorporates all costs associated with this high level of flexibility,

29

including depreciation and fixed costs. Units produced in excess are kept in
inventory, and inventory-holding costs are charged to the Marketing department.
Inventory costs per unit are calculated as a percentage of the transfer cost that
can be found in the Newsletter.

The transfer cost of a given product increases with inflation. On the other hand, it
decreases over time because of experience effects and economies of scale. As a
rule of thumb, you can expect the transfer cost to be reduced by about 15% each
time the cumulative production of a given product is doubled.

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