DCPS Proposed Consolidations and Reorganization: Better Schools for Our Students

District of Columbia Public Schools

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1200 First Street, NE

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Washington, DC

20002

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202.442.5885

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202.442.5026

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dcps.dc.gov

Our Goals and Vision

Our Goals: A Great Future for DCPS
Through our strategic plan, A Capital Commitment, we have set five ambitious goals for the next five years.
We will: 1. Improve achievement for all students; 2. Show dramatic gains in struggling schools; 3. Increase graduation rates; 4. Improve satisfaction; and 5. Increase enrollment.

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Our Goals and Vision

Our Vision
To meet these ambitious goals, we must realize our vision of DCPS as a strong and growing system of traditional, neighborhood, public schools. • Our programs will meet the diverse needs of our students. We will offer a range of programs including, higher quality Career and Technical Education (CTE) opportunities across the city, special education services near the students who need them most, alternative settings for students who need extra help, and challenging offerings for advanced learners. Our schools will be flexible, allowing for population growth and shifts, and always ensuring that students have high-quality schools in their neighborhood, as well as out-of -boundary options. Our district will be financially stable and able to direct funds to our highest priorities.

In order to realize this vision, we have to make significant changes in how we invest.

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Our Challenges

Addressing Our Challenges Together
We cannot achieve our vision or goals unless we work together to address our shared challenge.
Our Challenges: Our current set of 123 schools are not structured to provide our students with the educational opportunities that they deserve. This challenge was identified as early as 2006, in the DC Master Education Plan (MEP). Our Proposal: We propose the consolidation and reorganization of our schools to ensure that our investments in schools will provide the greatest benefit to our students. Our Request To You: To effectively reorganize our school system, we need your creative solutions, workable proposals, and innovative ideas. We want to hear from you about how to build the best programs we can in your neighborhood, now, and in the future.

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Our Challenges

Using Resources Wisely
To prepare our students for success, we must use all of our resources – our facilities, our funds, and our staff – wisely.

There is a significant relationship between the number of schools we have, our staffing and funding.

Facilities

Funds

Staff

By reducing our number of facilities, we can improve the programs we offer and the quality of education we provide to students.

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Our Challenges
Facilities Funds

Facilities
Compared to surrounding jurisdictions and similarly-sized urban districts, DCPS operates many more schools for the number of students we serve. . .
DCPS Building Capacity Rates

Staff

. . . And many DCPS schools have enrollment well below capacity.

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Our Challenges
Facilities Funds

Facilities

Staff

DC population of 5-17 year olds declined by 15,796 from 2000 to 2010, but DCPS’ facilities usage has not matched this decline.

Ward

Children Children 5-17 years 5-17 years olds old, Census Census 2000 2010 9,875 3,083 8,325 15,947 13,017 9,349 12,376 20,735 92,706 6,512 2,322 8,597 14,264 10,788 6,945 10,574 16,907 76,910

10 Year Change

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Total

(3,362) (761) 272 (1,683) (2,229) (2,403) (1,801) (3,828) (15,796)

Data from 21 Century Schools

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Our Challenge
Facilities Funds

Facilities
half of students are enrolled in charter schools.

Staff

In addition to changes in overall student population, charter school enrollment has had a significant impact on DCPS enrollment, and on the number of buildings that we need. For example, in Wards 1, 5, and 7, over

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Our Challenges
Facilities Funds

Facilities

Staff

DCPS’ facilities usage must match the population changes in the city and must be flexible enough to accommodate future growth.

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Our Challenges
Facilities Funds

Facilities DCPS is not maximizing its facilities investments
• • We want as many students as possible to be enrolled at a modernized school. Since 2007 we have modernized 47 of our current 117 buildings. Taking into account buildings that were previously modernized, 57 schools – almost half of our inventory – still await modernization. Even after an enormous, city-wide investment of over $1.3 billion since 2007, almost 20,000 students still attend schools that need modernization. School consolidations will give more students an opportunity to attend modernized schools sooner.
H.D. Woodson HS
District of Columbia Public Schools | November 13, 2012

Staff

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Our Challenges
Facilities Funds

Funds

Staff

Overall, DCPS spends less in large and fully-enrolled schools than it does at small and underenrolled schools. Because DCPS has many under-enrolled schools, we invest in maintaining these schools instead of investing more in programs to help low-performing students, increase opportunities for advanced learners, and develop specialized programs to better engage students.

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Our Challenge
Facilities Funds

Funds

Staff

Every school requires some basic administration and maintenance. Due to the high number of under-enrolled schools, DCPS spends disproportionately high sums on non-instructional staff and functions, especially in underenrolled schools. This becomes very clear when you compare the spending in two schools of different sizes. • Davis ES has 230 fewer students and spends 34% more per pupil than Langdon EC. • However, to support basic school functions, Davis spends 112% more per pupil on office staff, custodial staff, and other costs. • As a result, Davis ES has less money left over for basic instruction. Davis spends 22% less than Langdon EC on classroom teachers. • And this difference is easy to see in the staff. Davis ES has 6 more students per classroom teacher than Langdon EC
School Year 2012-2013 Students Per Classroom Per Pupil Teacher Budget 23 17 $ 13,225 $ 9,900
12

Enrollment Davis ES Langdon EC 180 410

District of Columbia Public Schools | November 13, 2012

Our Challenges
Facilities Funds

Staff

Staff

The staffing structure at small schools does not allow staff to work collaboratively, does not allow our students to have access to the staffing resources they need, limits flexibility of class sizes and student grouping, and minimizes the impact of our highly effective teachers.

45% of our schools have only one teacher for at
least one grade level, making shared planning time impossible, and forcing teachers to work on lesson plans by themselves.

With only one teacher per grade level, small changes in student populations at a specific grade can force larger class sizes. In addition, schools cannot provide flexible grouping to meet specific student needs (e.g. small groups for struggling learners.)
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Our Challenges
Facilities Staff

Staff

Funds

Because DCPS invests in supporting small schools, individual schools do not have access to all the staff that our students deserve. In FY 2013, this became very clear when DCPS had to limit school allocations for librarians due to budget challenges. With the rising cost of staff, even though DCPS increased school budget allocations by 2%, schools were not able to fund all of their staff members. Funds that went to supporting small schools could have provided additional librarians for our schools. Unfortunately, the loss of librarians is just one example of the pressures that schools will face as the costs of small schools continues to prevent schools from providing robust staffing.

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Our Proposal

Consolidations and Reorganization
We are proposing to consolidate 20 schools across six wards to ensure that we:  Offer a higher quality education to all students;  Use all of our resources more effectively;  Establish a flexible district that can account for future population growth; and  Provide for the district’s long-term financial stability. We considered four factors in selecting schools to recommend for consolidation:

1. Student enrollment and population changes in the community; 2. Building utilization rates; 3. The building condition and its modernization status; and 4. The availability of receiving schools to offer students an improved experience.
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Our Proposal

Proposed Consolidation Plan
WARD 2 2 REASSIGN STUDENTS FROM: Francis-Stevens EC Garrison ES TO WARD 1 RECEIVING SCHOOLS Marie Reed ES (Elementary Grades) Hardy MS (Middle Grades) Seaton ES CONSOLIDATED ENROLLMENT 484 462 439

2013-14

2 2

4
4 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8

MacFarland MS
Sharpe Health School Mamie D Lee School CHOICE at Hamilton Marshall ES Spingarn HS Spingarn STAY Prospect LC Shaw at Garnet-Patterson Davis ES Kenilworth ES Ron Brown MS Smothers ES Winston EC Ferebee-Hope ES Johnson MS Malcolm X ES MC Terrell-McGogney ES

4

Roosevelt HS
River Terrace Cardozo HS Langdon EC Eastern (9-11th), Dunbar, Woodson Ballou STAY and Roosevelt STAY Neighborhood Schools

616
181

2014-15

7 1 5 6, 5, 7 8, 4

477 608, 604, 822 739 and 711 n/a 647 407 356 516 367 and 376 540 379 511 617 and 379 516 479

1 7

Cardozo HS C.W. Harris ES Houston ES Kelly Miller MS Aiton ES and Plummer ES Stanton ES (Elementary Grades) Kramer MS (Middle Grades) Hendley ES Hart and Kramer MS Turner ES King ES

2013-14

7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8

Our Proposal

Wards 2, 4, and 6 Elementary and Middle Schools
After 2015, population projections indicate that the school-age population may grow in the center of the city. To accommodate this population growth, we must both strengthen our education programming and improve facilities in this area. We have already made a significant commitment by modernizing Cardozo HS and Roosevelt HS; we must now invest in improving middle school options in this community while building strong, attractive elementary school programs. DCPS proposes:
Reassigning Students From Garrison ES (Ward 2) MacFarland MS (Ward 4) Shaw at Garnett-Patterson (Ward 6) Current Enrollment 228 151 131 Building Utilization Rate 64% 25% 27% Receiving School Seaton ES Roosevelt HS Cardozo HS

Programmatic Improvements: Beginning with the 2013-2014 school year, Roosevelt HS will house a robust 6-12 grade model. As renovations are completed, all grades will be incorporated into a newly modernized building. DCPS can rebuild Shaw MS at its former location when there are enough school-age children to support the school, and will retain the Garrison ES campus in our building inventory for potential future use.
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Our Proposal

Ward 5 – Elementary Schools and Middle Schools
DCPS has worked with the Ward 5 community over the past year leading to investments at McKinley Technology HS and Brookland. These efforts will ensure that the local schools in the ward better meet the needs of its students in Ward 5. DCPS has also begun moving forward on implementing the Great Schools Plan. For example:      DCPS and the Ward 5 community agreed to reduce the number of education campuses and instead, provide more traditional middle grades programs to ensure students have a rich middle school experience. Beginning with the 2013-2014 school year, DCPS will open a 6-12 campus at McKinley Tech HS. Langley EC will convert to an elementary school. The 6th-8th graders will attend the new McKinley 6-12 program. DCPS is committed to opening an arts integration and world language middle school at Brookland for the 2014-2015 school year. The Ward 5 Great Schools Plan also calls for consolidating at least one elementary school.

DCPS proposes: Reassigning Students From Marshall ES Current Enrollment 158 Building Utilization Rate 33% Receiving School Langdon ES

Programmatic Improvements: Beginning with the 2013-2014 school year, McKinley Technology HS will house a robust 6-12 grade model similar to that at the Columbia Heights Education Campus. For the 2014-2015 school year, DCPS will open a middle school dedicated to rigorous arts instruction and world languages at Brookland. When demand increases, enough to fill an elementary school on the eastern side of the ward, Marshall ES may reopen; until then, we will provide transportation to Langdon for Marshall students.
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Our Proposal

Ward 7 Elementary and Middle Schools
DCPS has made significant facilities investments in Ward 7 by modernizing H.D. Woodson HS, Sousa MS, and Kelly Miller MS. However, Ward 7 has 14 DCPS elementary schools and one education campus (grades PS-8) with an average enrollment of 276 students and 3 DCPS middle schools with an average enrollment of 288 students. In addition, there are 9 elementary and middle grades public charter schools in Ward 7. With a projected decrease in the school-age population in the ward through 2015, DCPS cannot maintain all of these facilities. DCPS proposes: Reassigning Students From Kenilworth ES Smothers ES Winston EC Davis ES Ron Brown MS Current Enrollment 147 283 308 178 204 Building Utilization Rate 37% 82%* 56% 40% 23% Receiving School Houston ES Aiton ES or Plummer ES Stanton ES Kramer MS C. W. Harris ES Kelly Miller MS

*Although Smothers ES has a high utilization rate, the building is very small, it cannot support a full range of services, and there are nearby, under-enrolled receiving schools.

Programmatic Improvements: In August 2014, the former River Terrace ES campus will house special education programs for students from Mamie D. Lee and Sharpe Health, allowing DCPS to continue to improve special education services while providing schooling options closer to students’ homes.
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Our Proposal

Ward 8 Elementary and Middle Schools
DCPS has made significant investments in Ward 8 schools such as Ballou HS, Anacostia HS, and Hart MS. However, Ward 8 has 15 DCPS elementary schools with an average enrollment of 303 students and 3 DCPS middle schools with an average enrollment of 348 students. In addition, there are 12 elementary and middle grades public charter schools in Ward 8. With a projected decrease in the school-age population in Ward 8 through 2015, DCPS cannot maintain all of these facilities. DCPS proposes:

Reassigning Students From Ferebee-Hope ES MC Terrell-McGogney ES Malcolm X ES Johnson MS

Current Enrollment 215 208 221 245

Building Utilization Rate 54% 52% 43% 24%

Receiving School Hendley ES ML King ES Turner ES Kramer MS or Hart MS

Programmatic Improvements: In August 2014, DCPS will reopen the Johnson campus to support an alternative school to provide a second chance to students who have not been successful in traditional middle and high schools.

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Our Proposal

Special Education and Alternative Education
Over the past two years, DCPS has reduced non-public placements by nearly 1,000 students through multiple strategies, including building high-quality special education programs in our neighborhood schools. We will continue to provide additional special education seats through reorganization. In most cases, special education classrooms in consolidated schools will move with other students to the receiving school. In a few cases ,other buildings may be more suited to providing special education opportunities. DCPS remains committed to serving all students, including special education students and students who may be struggling in traditional settings. However, our current configuration of schools does not consistently serve these students well. DCPS will:  Ensure as many special education students as possible are served in their neighborhood school with appropriate supports and services;  When neighborhood schools are not an option for special education students, strive to have a dedicated facility as close to the student’s home as possible; and  Provide students on long-term suspensions with a placement that is easily accessible and provides a richer academic program. DCPS proposes: Reassigning Students From Sharpe Health Mamie D. Lee Prospect LC CHOICE/Hamilton
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Current Enrollment 85 96 83 70

Building Utilization Rate 21% 32% 24% 9%

Receiving School River Terrace Campus River Terrace Campus Neighborhood Schools Moved to Cardozo HS
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Our Proposal

High Schools
DCPS has made a significant investment in high school facilities and programming. However, we still do not offer sufficient opportunities to prepare students for college or high-growth, high-wage careers. In addition, DCPS does not adequately meet the needs of over-age, under-credited students. DCPS proposes:
Reassigning Students From Francis-Stevens EC Current Enrollment 225 Building Utilization Rate Receiving School Re-Use

55% Marie Reed ES or Hardy MS

Campus will be used to expand the number of 9-12 grade seats available at School Without Walls. Campus will be rebuilt into a career and technical education hub, including a transportation specialization program.

Spingarn HS

337

55%

Eastern, Dunbar, or Woodson HS Ballou STAY or Roosevelt STAY

Spingarn STAY

126

55%

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Our Proposal

Wards 1 and 3
DCPS is not proposing to consolidate any schools in Wards 1 or 3. The challenges that Ward 3 and many Ward 1 schools face is over-crowding in their buildings due to growing in-boundary and feeder school demand. Current ward utilization rates :

Ward Ward 1 Ward 3

% Utilization 74% 109%

Proposed Improvements: As part of the ongoing portfolio management process, DCPS has initiated a project aimed at updating boundaries and feeder patterns so we can more evenly distribute students. DCPS has engaged data experts to analyze population and enrollment data. Community engagement will begin this winter and continue through the spring of 2013. New boundaries and feeder patterns will not take effect until the 2014-2015 school year.

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Our Proposal

School Transitions
 Once the decision is made to consolidate a particular school, we will work directly with the impacted school community to ensure a smooth transition to the receiving school.  We will ensure appropriate placements for all special education students. This may mean offering a high-quality placement at different receiving school that is more able to address student needs.  Through this collaboration, we will consider and address important issues including:  Ensuring students have safe routes to walk to and from their receiving school;  Where needed, providing transportation to students;  Working directly with school staff to ensure that they understand their placement options after school consolidation;  Addressing any security or climate issues that may ensue when students from different neighborhoods attend the same school;  Communicating the impact of the closing on school staff, how we will preserve school memorabilia and the names assigned to receiving schools; and  Being good neighbors to those communities through the consolidation and reorganization process.

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Our Proposal

Our School District: After Consolidation
 We will have an average school enrollment of 432, instead of 376.  Our overall building utilization rate will be 84%, instead of 72%  Only 26 elementary schools will have fewer than 350 students, instead of 41.

 1,700 additional students will have the opportunity to attend school in a modernized building.  We will have 101 buildings, instead of 117 buildings.

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Our Request To You

Building Re-Use
We have begun thinking about the future use of the buildings, but we want to engage the community in this discussion. Together we can generate ideas of how these buildings can still serve the children and families in their neighborhoods.
Possible Future Uses  Going forward, DCPS will monitor population expansion and demand for public school options in individual neighborhoods. When there is critical mass, DCPS will reopen some schools.  Some buildings will be leased to charter schools that can offer quality seats to DC students, and complement DCPS’ portfolio of schools.  We will work with our partners in other agencies to determine if our facilities can help them provide better services in the community.  We are seeking public input as we establish building re-use plans.

Examples • Francis-Stevens will serve as an expansion site for School Without Walls HS. • Malcolm X will allow us to collaborate with a high-performing charter school. • Spingarn will reopen as a Career and Technical Education Center. • A complete building re-use proposal can be found in Appendix E.
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Our Request To You

Public Input
Over the past year, DCPS and the city as a whole have worked to gain community input on an improved configuration of schools. This process included community conversations conducted by the Deputy Mayor for Education, the Ward 5 Great Schools Planning Group, and DCPS’ eight ward-based State of the Schools meetings. Going forward we will meet with a wide variety of stakeholders to get feedback on the proposed consolidations. We have four ward-based meetings scheduled. In addition, we will meet with ANC members, ward-based education councils, and other community groups. The DCPS Office of Family and Public Engagement will host office hours in December to meet with other interested groups to ensure that we can account for public concerns as we finalize our revised school configuration plan.
Meetings Ward 8 Community Dialogue Ward 7 Community Dialogue Wards 5 Community Dialogue Wards 1-4, 6 Community Dialogue Location Savoy ES 2400 Shannon Place, SE Sousa MS 3650 Ely Place, SE Langley EC 101 T Street, NE Brightwood EC 1300 Nicholson Street, NW Date November 27, 2012 November 28, 2012 November 29, 2012 December 5, 2012 Time 6-8 pm 6-8 pm 6-8 pm 6-8 pm

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Our Request To You

Public Input – Council Hearings
The Council of the District of Columbia will also hold two hearings on DCPS consolidations and reorganization.
Meetings City Council Hearing City Council Hearing Location Wilson Building 1350 Pennsylvania Ave, NW Wilson Building 1350 Pennsylvania Ave, NW Date November 15, 2012 November 19, 2012 Time

4-8 pm 2-6 pm

To testify: contact, Erika Wadlington, Office of the Chairman of DC City (202) 724-8124, or via email at EWadlington@dccouncil.us

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Our Request To You

Public Input – Your Ideas
• Share your creative and workable ideas on what we need to modify in the proposal to ensure that we offer all students the schools they deserve. Let us know how we can best manage the transition for families and students so our schools retain our DCPS students. Help us develop proposals for the reuse of our buildings. Tell us what we can do to build public understanding and support for these changes.

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Next Steps

Continuing our DCPS portfolio of schools planning
As noted in our discussion of Wards 1 and 3, once we have established our portfolio of schools, DCPS will work with the community to evaluate feeder patterns and boundaries. Our goals will be to: 1. Examine enrollment policies; 2. Ensure that our boundaries reflect current population trends, neighborhood changes, and public school options in the city; 3. Create feeder patterns that create strong and coherent PS to 12th grade pathways and reflect enrollment conditions; and 4. Continue to maximize the students served in high-quality, modernized buildings.

Date January – May 2013

Event DCPS holds public meetings in affected communities

June 2013
January 2014 August 2014

DCPS announces revised boundaries, feeder patterns, and enrollment policies .
Out-of-boundary process for 2014-2015 school year begins. New boundaries and feeder patterns take effect for the 2014-2015 school year.

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Appendices
A. B. C. D. E. Projected Population Map (2010-2015) Projected Population Map (2015-2020) Charter School Enrollment (2011-2012) Criteria Used for Selecting Schools Building Re-Use Preliminary Thoughts

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Appendix A

Appendix A: Decreases in child population impacts public schools
In the near term, DC’s child population (ages 4-17) is estimated to decrease by 8.5 percent between 2010 and 2015. These losses are concentrated in Wards 4, 5, 7 and 8.

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Appendix B

Appendix B: Child population projected to grow by 2020
By 2020, the District of Columbia’s child population (4-17 year olds) is estimated to increase substantially across most of the city

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Appendix C

Appendix C: Public Charter School Enrollment Impact
 There is no limit on the number of charter operators that can be authorized.  57 charter operators, with 102 schools among them, enrolled about 31,000 charter students in the 2011-12 school year.

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Appendix D

Appendix D: Criteria used for selecting schools
Schools Proposed for Consolidation or Reorganization Schools Targeted for Enrollment Growth (Receiving Schools)
• Excess building capacity that will support an increase in enrollment
• Adequate building site and size that is conducive to expansion or consolidation • Proximity to schools and communities affected by closure

• Under-enrolled schools where enrollment falls below recommended program and budget recommended thresholds • 350 students for elementary schools • 500 students for education campuses • 450 students for middle schools • 600 students for high schools • Under-utilized school buildings • Facility not modernized • Located in proximity to receiving schools

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Appendix E

Appendix E: Building Reuse Preliminary Thoughts
WARD 2 2 4 4 SCHOOL Francis-Stevens EC Garrison ES MacFarland MS Sharpe Health School PRELIMINARY REUSE PROPOSAL(S) Retain in DCPS inventory for the expansion of School Without Walls HS (2013-2014). Retain in DCPS inventory and reopen should population/demand increase. Coordinate possible reopening with modernization. •Interim use proposal: Temporary lease for community arts center. Retain in DCPS inventory for modernization swing space. Strategic Partnership. Explore the opportunity to partner with a local high-performing charter school to help reduce non-public placements. To Be Determined. Work with the community to identify uses for the building that will benefit the children and families of that neighborhood. Strategic Partnership. Explore the opportunity to partner with a complementary high-performing charter school to increase quality seats. Retain in DCPS inventory and reopen should population/demand increase. Coordinate possible reopening with modernization. Retain in DCPS inventory for proposed start-of-the-art Career and Technical Education Center.

5
5 5 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8

Mamie D Lee School
Hamilton Campus Marshall ES Spingarn HS Prospect LC Shaw MS at GarnetPatterson Davis ES Kenilworth ES Ron Brown MS Smothers ES Winston EC Ferebee-Hope ES Johnson MS Malcolm X ES MC Terrell-McGogney ES

Retain in DCPS inventory to accommodate new programming or expansion of programs.
Retain in DCPS inventory for possible DCPS Alternative Education Campus (serving secondary students) or To Be Determined. Work with the community to identify uses for the building that will benefit the children and families of that neighborhood. Retain in DCPS inventory and reopen should population/demand increase.

Retain in DCPS inventory to support Promise Neighborhood Initiative or to account for population increase. •Interim use proposal: Collaborate with another district agency for short or long-term community use.
To Be Determined. Work with the community to identify uses for the building that will benefit the children and families of that neighborhood. To Be Determined. Work with the community to identify uses for the building that will benefit the children and families of that neighborhood. To Be Determined. Work with the community to identify uses for the building that will benefit the children and families of that neighborhood. Retain in DCPS inventory and reopen should population/demand increase. •Interim use proposal: Collaborate with another district agency for short or long-term community use. Retain in DCPS inventory for a DCPS Alternative Education Campus for secondary students (2014-2015). Strategic Partnership. Explore the opportunity to partner with a complementary high-performing charter school to increase quality seats. To Be Determined. Work with the community to identify uses for the building that will benefit the children and families of that neighborhood.

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