P. 1
Spatial-and-Seasonal-patterns-in-species-composition-and-occurrence-of-fish-larvae-in-the-area-of-the-Canary-Islands-Eastern-Central-Atlantic

Spatial-and-Seasonal-patterns-in-species-composition-and-occurrence-of-fish-larvae-in-the-area-of-the-Canary-Islands-Eastern-Central-Atlantic

|Views: 41|Likes:
Published by Antonio La Barbera
The species composition and occurrence of fish larvae in the area of the Canary Islands was studied regarding the influence
of hydrographic features on spatial and seasonal distribution patterns. A comprehensive annotated larvae taxa list with the
most important taxonomic characters is provided. Mostly late-stage larvae were caught by six pelagic cruises from 1997
to 2002 during different seasons in both the neritic and the oceanic realm off Lanzarote, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, and
Tenerife. A total of 5088 larvae, allocated to 16 orders, 54 families and 70 species, were collected with Engraulidae and
Gobiidae dominating the larval assemblage. Five new records could be documented for the Canarian Archipelago. In the area
of the Canary Islands two main seasonal periods with different hydrographic conditions can be recognized, low intensity of
the upwelling in winter and intense upwelling in spring and summer. The late winter bloom (LWB) and an associated stronger
West African coastal upwelling coincided with an increased diversity and species number of fish larvae. The local diversity and
species richness were highest in an area mostly influenced by the NW African upwelling. Especially in the islands’ wakes and
eddies the larvae accumulated with spatial overlap of oceanic and neritic species. These results corroborate the assumptions
that the Canary Islands are an important migratory area facilitating the colonization by tropical and temperate fish species,
upwelling enhances local productivity, and the islands’ wakes and eddies positively affect fish larvae abundance and diversity
and provide good nursery grounds.
The species composition and occurrence of fish larvae in the area of the Canary Islands was studied regarding the influence
of hydrographic features on spatial and seasonal distribution patterns. A comprehensive annotated larvae taxa list with the
most important taxonomic characters is provided. Mostly late-stage larvae were caught by six pelagic cruises from 1997
to 2002 during different seasons in both the neritic and the oceanic realm off Lanzarote, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, and
Tenerife. A total of 5088 larvae, allocated to 16 orders, 54 families and 70 species, were collected with Engraulidae and
Gobiidae dominating the larval assemblage. Five new records could be documented for the Canarian Archipelago. In the area
of the Canary Islands two main seasonal periods with different hydrographic conditions can be recognized, low intensity of
the upwelling in winter and intense upwelling in spring and summer. The late winter bloom (LWB) and an associated stronger
West African coastal upwelling coincided with an increased diversity and species number of fish larvae. The local diversity and
species richness were highest in an area mostly influenced by the NW African upwelling. Especially in the islands’ wakes and
eddies the larvae accumulated with spatial overlap of oceanic and neritic species. These results corroborate the assumptions
that the Canary Islands are an important migratory area facilitating the colonization by tropical and temperate fish species,
upwelling enhances local productivity, and the islands’ wakes and eddies positively affect fish larvae abundance and diversity
and provide good nursery grounds.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Antonio La Barbera on Nov 21, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/13/2015

pdf

text

original

The anal fn rays are longer than the dorsal fn rays (Figure 49). The second spinous ray of the dorsal fn can be smoothed or

serrated. Light organ can be present or absent, bulbous or tubular. Mouth position is terminal, sub-terminal or inferior. Chin
barbel is present or absent.

-Reference:

FAHAY and MARKLE (1984); MERRET (2006); OLIVAR and FORTUÑO (1991);

-Reference material:

5 specimens; 05/99: S2 (P375467); 01/00: S5 (P375466); 03/02: S16 (P375464-465); S22 (P375463);

-Distribution

The alevins were caught from winter to late spring. one specimen was found at a mesopelagic station at 950 – 1260 m
depth during the day in winter. During very late winter alevins were caught southeast of Fuerteventura in a depth range of
185 – 211 m during the day and 215 – 261 m during the night. In late spring one alevin was caught at a mesopelagic station

east of Fuerteventura at 495 – 561 m depth during the day.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->