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Collingwood Active Transportation Plan - January 2013

Collingwood Active Transportation Plan - January 2013

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2013 -2018

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D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

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D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12


Preface
The
 Collingwood
 Ac/ve
 Transporta/on
 Plan
 (ATP)
 shows
 what
 a
 growing
community
with
a
popula/on
of
under
 20,000
can
take
when
 dedicated
 to:
 being
 crea/ve;
 leveraging
 their
 assets;
 facilita/ng
 community
 engagement;
 focusing
 on
 prac/cal
 solu/ons
 and
 improvements;
and,
building
on
their
unique
context.

This
 was
 the
ques/on
 that
 was
asked
to
 help
 guide
 the
development
 and
refinement
 of
the
implementa/on
projects,
or
 “Elements”,
in
 this
 ATP.
 
 These
 were
 specifically
 craLed
 to
 work
 together
 to
 improve
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 by
 crea/ng
 beMer:
 transporta/on
 networks,
 neighbourhoods,
 places,
 and
 community
 engagement
 and
 support.
 The
Plan
was
developed
through
 an
immersion
 in
community
building
 concepts
 of
 a
 fine
 grain:
 of
 neighbourhood
 context;
 walkability;
 bikeabilty;
and,
human‐centered
design.

 The
Elements
in
this
ATP
relate
to
the
planning
for,
and
development
 of,
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 facili/es;
 as
 well
 as,
ways
 of
 engaging
 and
 mobilizing
Collingwood’s
ci/zens
to
help
improve
their
community.



With
 its
 focus
 on
 cumula/ve
 benefits,
 prac/cal
 solu/ons,
 and
 leveraging
 physical
 &
 community
 assets,
 this
 Ac/ve
 Transporta/on
 Plan
also
has
a
subtext
of
resiliency
and
self‐reliance,
a
“Strong
Town”
 vision.
 
 This
 will
 hopefully
facilitate
 the
 beginnings
 of
 conversa/ons
 and
ini/a/ves
that
bring
ci/zens
together
as
a
community;
to
improve
 their
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 systems
 and
 culture
 in
 coopera/on.
 
 Thereby
 projec/ng
 the
 Town
 of
 Collingwood
 into
 a
 more
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
friendly
future.


N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
3

“What
do
we
need
to
do
for
our
community’s
future;
to
be
 successful,
complete,
inspired,
healthy,
and
vibrant?”


Contents
The
Ac/ve
Transporta/on
Plan
(ATP)
is
divided
into
five
sec/ons.

The
 first
 provides
 the
 Introduc/on
 to
 ac/ve
 transporta/on,
 purpose,
 scope,
and
 context
 of
 the
 ATP
 and
 includes
 policy
 items.
 
 The
 four
 remaining
 sec/ons
 are
 focused
 on
 areas
 of
 implementa/on
 (“Elements”).

 Each
implementa/on
sec/on
(listed
in
Roman
numerals
I,
II,
III,
IV)
has
 a
 different
 list
 of
 Elements
 that
 are
 arranged
 around
 successively
 shorter
/meframes
as
follows:
 i) 

Long‐range:
for
projects
that
are
of
a
scale
to
take
 approximately
five
years,
or
more. ii)

Mid‐range:
for
implementa/on
projects
that
require
three
to
 five
years
for
comple/on.
 iii)

Near‐range:
ini/a/ves
that
should
take
up
to
three
years. iv)

100
Day:
for
projects
that
require
approximately
100
days
of
 intensive
and
focused
effort
to
complete.




I


Long‐range
Implementa3on

 
 
 1)

Concurrency
Review



‐
pg
26 2)

Major
Corridor
Gateways
‐
Complete
Streets

‐
pg
28 3)

Trails
for
Active
Transportation

‐
pg
36


 
 
 
 


1)

Sunset
Point
&
St
Lawrence
Street
Corridor

‐
pg
42 2)

Pedestrian
Enhancements
Downtown
‐
pg
44 3)

“Right‐size”
Downtown
Parking
Facilities

‐
pg
46 4)

Bus
Stop
Seating

‐
pg
48 5)

Family
Bike
Boulevards

‐
pg
50

N




II


Mid‐range
Implementa3on

 
 
 


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
4

5
years
or
more

3
to
5
years

6)

Sidewalks
&
Crosswalks
at
Public
Parks

‐
54 7)

Bridge
Link
at
Siding
Trail

‐
pg
56 8)

Link
at
Train
Trail

‐
pg
58 9)
AT
Bridge
at
Mountain
Road

‐
pg
60


Contents
The
 en/re
 ATP
 is
 designed
 to
 be
 implementable
 within
 5
 years
 and
 with
a
modest
budget.

This
is
based
on
an
realis/c
assessment
 of
the
 community’s
 assets
 and
 capacity
 to
 influence
 its
 own
 future
 with
 prac/cal
implementa/on
projects.








III


Near‐range
Implementa3on

 
 
 
 
 1)

“Share
the
Road”
Routes

‐
pg
64 2)

Urban
Acupuncture
&
Traffic
Calming

‐
pg
66 3)

Active
Transportation
Matching
Fund


‐
pg
70 4)

Update
Sidewalk
By‐law
‐
Cycling

‐
pg
72 5)

Update
Sidewalk
By‐law
‐
Skateboarding

‐
pg
74 
 
 
 
 
 


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

 
 
 
 


up
to
3
years

6)

Downtown
Long‐term
Bike
Parking

‐
pg
76 7)

On‐street
Bike
Routes

‐
pg
78 8)

Public
Parking
Lot
Pedestrian
Improvements
‐pg
82 9)
Complete
Streets
Design
Matrix

‐
pg
84 10)

Community‐wide
Walkability/bikeability
 
 Audits

‐
pg

90


 
 
 
 


1)

Bikeable
Collingwood
Wiki
Map

‐
pg
96 2)

Shared
Walkways/Promenade
Strategy

‐
pg
98 3)

Downtown
Parking
Analysis


‐
pg
100 4)

Downtown
“Walking
Time”
 
 
 Wayfinding
Signage

‐
pg
102

N




IV


100
Day
Implementa3on
Projects


100
days

5)

ATP
Citizen
“DO‐TANK”
Task
Force

‐
pg
104 6)

Town
Facility
Bike
Parking
Program

‐
pg
106 7)

Annual
ATP
Meeting
of
the
Public


‐
pg
108 8)

Annual
Public
Information
Program

‐
pg
110 9)

Annual
Community
AT
Audit

‐
pg
112

5


Introduc3on
‐
Ac3ve
Transporta3on
Active
transportation
means
any
form
of
transportation
that
is
human‐ powered.
 
 It
 includes
 walking,
 cycling,
 in‐line
 skating,
 skateboarding,
 cross
country
skiing,
and
canoeing
&
kayaking;
it
also
includes
transport
 for
 persons
 using
 assistive
 mobility
 devices.
 
 In
 fact
 all
 trips
 include
 active
 transportation
 components,
 sometimes
 even
 just
 the
 act
 of
 walking
to
and
from
a
car
or
transit
vehicle.

The
most
popular
modes
of
 active
transportation
 are
 walking
and
 cycling.
 
Walking/wheeling
is
the
 only
form
of
transportation
that
can
be
taken
completely
independently
 of
all
others
for
an
entire
trip
from
beginning
to
destination.
 The
importance
of
 active
transportation
is
increasingly
recognized
 as
 a
 relevant
issue
 in
 light
 of
 environmental;
chronic
 disease;
and
 personal
 mobility
 issues,
 as
 well
 as
 the
 economic
 impacts
 associated
 with
 communities
that
are
not
designed
and
built
to
be
active
transportation
 “friendly”.

This
will
continue
to
increase
in
importance
due
to
an
aging
 population;
challenging
peoples’
quality
of
life
and
enhancing
the
appeal
 of
compact,
walkable
communities.1

 Because
 of
 its
 far
 reaching
 influence,
 active
 transportation
 can
 have
 positive
effects
on
many
aspects
of
communities’
successes
and
overall
 livability.
 
 The
 Walkable
and
 Livable
 Communities
 Institute
 states
 this
 clearly
with
the
following:
 Communities
that
support
walkability
(active
transportation)
 have
 better
 health
 and
 well‐being,
 lower
 rates
 of
 traffic
 injuries
and
deaths,
better
access
for
 people
 of
 all
abilities,
 higher
 property
 values,
 better
 air
 quality
 and
 less
 greenhouse
gas
emissions. 4

1
Ontario
Professional
Planners
Ins/tute,
Planning
and
ImplemenNng
AcNve
TransportaNon
in
Ontario
CommuniNes:
A
Call
To
AcNon,
2012
pg.
2 2
Todd
Litman,
Victoria
Transport
Policy
Ins/tute,
Whose
Roads?
EvaluaNng
Bicyclists’
and
Pedestrians’
Right
to
Use
Public
Roadways,
May
31,
2012,
pg.
6 3
Na/onal
Complete
Streets
Coali/on,
Complete
Streets
Ease
CongesNon,
2011
 4
Walkable
and
Livable
Communi/es
Ins/tute,
Environmental
ProtecNon
Agency
Walkability
PresentaNon,
2012 5
AASHTO,
A
Policy
on
Geometric
Design
of
Highways
and
Streets,
2001,
pg.
96

N

Active
 transportation
 is
 particularly
 important
 recognizing
 that
 it
 is
 necessary
for
 people
that
do
not
have
a
choice
outside
of
these
modes
 for
 getting
 around.
 “People
 who
 are
 physically,
 economically
 and
 socially
 disadvantaged
 often
 rely
 on
 walking
 and
 cycling,
 so
 non‐ motorized
 modes
 can
 help
 achieve
 social
 equity
 and
 economic
 opportunity
 objectives”.2 
 
 “Paying
 attention
 to
 all
 modes
 in
 street
 planning
can
also
create
a
more
efficient
system
that
responds
better
to
 travel
demand”. 3


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
6

Additionally,
 the
 American
 Association
 of
 State
 Highway
 and
 Transportation
Officials
(AASHTO)
report,
A
Policy
on
Geometric
Design
 of
Highways
and
Streets,
2001
specifically
identifies
the
need
to
design
 and
develop
streets
with
regard
to
pedestrian
needs:
 Pedestrians
 are
a
 part
 of
every
 roadway
 environment,
and
 attention
should
be
paid
to
their
presence
in
rural
as
well
as
 urban
 areas...
 provisions
 should
 be
 made,
 because
 pedestrians
are
the
lifeblood
of
our
urban
areas,
especially
in
 the
downtown
 and
other
retail
areas.

In
 general,
the
most
 successful
shopping
sections
are
those
that
provide
the
most
 comfort
and
pleasure
for
pedestrians.5



There
 are
 many
 factors
 which
 impact
 active
 transportation,
 and
 the
 effectiveness
 of
 overall
 community
 transportation
 systems.
 
 By
 only



Purpose
using
 the
outdated
paradigm
 that
 “transportation”
 means
mobility,
or
 physical
travel,
and
evaluation/planning
should
be
based
only
on
these,
 communities
are
not
examining
all
 the
characteristics,
or
influences
on,
 transportation
systems.
 
This
results
in
transportation
systems
that
 do
 not
fully
support
the
needs
of
the
community.
 Mobility
 is
 not
 an
 end
 unto
 itself
 and
 is
 predominantly
 intended
 to
 provide
access
to
needed
and
desired
goods,
services,
and
experiences.
 
 Transportation
planning
must
take
this
into
account
as
a
chief
principle.
 
 Many
 factors
 affect
 transportation
 access;
 including
 the
 options
 available
for
 different
 modes;
quality
of
those
options;
as
 well
as,
land
 use
 and
 design
 factors.
 
 When
 seen
 this
 way,
 the
 role
 of
 active
 transportation
 within
 a
 community
 is
 better
 understood,
 and
 the
 importance
of
proper
design
for
it
is
as
well.6

 The
Transportation
Association
of
Canada
(TAC)
identifies
the
following
 principles
to
guide
practitioners
and
their
 communities
in
responding
to
 the
 challenges
 of
 making
 progress
 toward
 greater
 active
 transportation7,
which
are
all
addressed
in
the
ATP:

 • Principle
1
‐
Leadership • Principle
2
‐
Partnerships • • • • • • • • • Principle
3
‐
Public
involvement Principle
4
‐
Financial
and
human
resources Principle
5
‐
Knowledge
and
skills Principle
6
‐
Policy
and
planning Principle
7
‐
Travel
facilities Principle
8
‐
Road
safety Principle
9
‐
Crime
and
personal
security Principle
10
‐
Affecting
a
culture:
attitudes
and
perceptions Principle
11
‐
Outreach
to
encourage
active
choices

A
good
acNve
transportaNon
system
provides
communiNes
with
safe,
efficient,
well
connected,
and
appealing
access
to
 peoples’
 needs;
 this
includes,
 places
where
 people
 live,
 work,
 learn,
 and
 play.
 
 Without
 this
connecNvity
the
 use
 of
 acNve
transportaNon
networks
tends
to
become
primarily
for
recreaNon.
6
Todd
Litman,
Victoria
Transport
Policy
Ins/tute,
Whose
Roads?
EvaluaNng
Bicyclists’
and
Pedestrians’
Right
to
Use
Public
Roadways,
May
31,
2012,
pg.
6 7

Transporta/on
Associa/on
of
Canada,
AcNve
TransportaNon:
Making
it
Work
in
Canadian
CommuniNes,
March
2012

N
7

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
• • • • • •

The
purpose
of
 this
Plan
is
to
define
policies
&
implementation
 projects,
 called
 “Elements”,
 that
 will
 make
 active
 transportation
 (AT)
 in
 Collingwood
safe,
easy,
desirable,
and,
convenient;
while
ensuring
that
all
 forms
of
transportation
work
well.

The
ATP
is
focused
on
a
short
planning
 horizon
and
the
following
characteristics
to
facilitate
implementation: Building
great
places
in
Collingwood;
 Building
on
Collingwood’s
physical
&
community
assets;
 Building
a
culture
of
active
transportation
within
Collingwood;
 Improving
understanding
of
the
ATP; Facilitating
citizen
participation;
and, Defining
Elements
that
easily
and
strategically
fit
within
the
Town’s
 budget
that
build
community
resilience
and
self‐reliance.


Scope
Area
The
 ATP
 is
 town‐wide
 and
 designed
 to
 provide
 physical
 access
 and
 connec/vity
to
 the
various
places
within
 the
community
that
 people
 travel
 to
 for
 their
 daily
 ac/vi/es;
 the
 places
 people
 live,
work,
 learn
 and
play.




Adaptability
The
ATP
is
 structured
to
 be
very
understandable
and
 manageable
 for
 ci/zens,
elected
officials,
municipal
staff,
and
other
stakeholders
alike.
 
 Addi/onally,
in
terms
of
its
content,
the
ATP
is
unique
in
that
it
is
also
 an
 “open
 plan”.
 
 This
 means
 that
 it
 has
 implementa/on
 projects/ processes
 built
 into
 it
 that
 specifically
 facilitate
 the
 ongoing
 par/cipa/on
of
ci/zens
and
 stakeholders
to
 amend
 the
plan
with
new
 projects.

The
 AcNve
 TransportaNon
 Plan
 extends
 across
 the
 enNre
 town;
 while
 also
 defining
 key
 projects
 that
 link
 Collingwood
 to


N
8

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12


Scope
Perspec3ve
An
 Asset
 Based
 Community
Development
 (ABCD)
 approach
 has
 been
 used
 in
 craLing
 the
 ATP.
 
 This
 is
 an
 approach
 that
 considers
 local
 assets
 and
 people
 as
 the
 principle
 resources
 of
 healthy
 community
 design
and
development.

This
is
a
way
of
crea/ng
greater
success
in
a
 community
 by
 focusing
 inwardly
 to
 the
 community’s
 physical
 and
 social
 assets,
desires,
and
crea/vity;
including
those
that
 are
currently
 untaped
 or
 underu/lized.
 
 The
 Collingwood
 Official
 Plan
 provides
 guidance
in
this
area
in
Sec/on
2.3
‐
Strategic
Planning
Principles8 
that
 is
equally
applicable
to
the
ATP: If
the
 strategy
 to
guide
Collingwood’s
future
growth
 over
 the
 next
 fiZeen
 to
 twenty
 years
 is
 to
 be
 successful,
 it
 must
 recognize
and
foster
the
aspiraNons
of
the
Town’s
residents.
A
 municipality
 is
 not
 merely
 a
 mosaic
 of
 land
 uses;
 it
 is
 a
 community
 of
people.
The
successful
planning
 of
Collingwood,
 therefore,
is
 not
 as
dependent
 upon
 how
 neatly
 its
 land
 uses
 might
 be
 arranged,
 as
 it
 is
 on
 ensuring
 that
 arrangement
 is
 consistent
 with
 the
 wishes
 and
 future
 needs
 of
 the
 community’s
residents.
 • Does
not
necessitate
support
from
other
 government
en//es
for
 the
development
and
funding
of
infrastructure
and/or
programs; • Scaled
to
fit
within
the
regular
budge/ng
process
and
capacity
of
 the
Town; • Focused
on
placemaking;
and, • Focused
on
people‐centred
design. By
 structuring
 the
 ATP
 in
 this
 way,
 its
 Elements
 will
 be
 within
 the
 control
of
 the
community,
greatly
increasing
its
effec/veness
and
 the
 likelihood
of
its
goals
and
implementa/on
projects,

being
achieved.
 From
 a
 financial
 perspec/ve
 the
 Elements
 in
 the
 ATP
 have
 been
 designed
 to
 be
par/cularly
achievable,
fundable,
and
 manageable
 for
 the
Municipality.

RESPONDENTS WHO SUPPORT PRIORITIZING WALKING, BICYCLING & TRANSIT IN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING
DO NOT SUPPORT SUPPORT

The
list
below
outlines
 a
number
of
 the
aspects
 of
this
 perspec/ve
as
 they
relate
to
the
Ac/ve
Transporta/on
Plan
9:

• Support
 and
 build
 on
 the
 value
 of
 land,
 infrastructure,
 developments,
and
businesses; • Facilitate
community
investment
and
support; • Support
and
build
on
the
livability
of
the
community; • Improve
the
health
and
safety
of
Collingwood’s
ci/zens;

N

8
Town
of
Collingwood
Official
Plan,
page
4 9

Adapted
from
the
not‐for‐profit
Strong
Towns;
an
organiza/on
focused
on
prac/cal
and
sustainable
community
and
economic
development.

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
9

There
 is
 an
 overwhelming
 support
 for
 acNve
 transportaNon
 planning
 in
 Collingwood,
 as
illustrated
 in
 the
 results
 from
 the
 Walk
 and
 Bike
 for
 LIfe,
 Trails
 for
 AcNve
TransportaNon,
2009



Scope
Timeline
The
four
 categories
of
Elements
group
projects
together
with
a
similar
 /meline
while
also
fimng
well
within
other
typical
Municipal
processes
 of:
 • • • • Budget
crea/on;
 Staff
and
departmental
work
programs;
 Development
plans
&
reviews;
and, Community
engagement
&
volunteer
efforts.

60% 40%

Preferences for project timeframes defined in the ATP

The
four
Sec/ons
are:

i) 
Long‐range
Implementa/on:
for
projects
that
are
of
a
scale
to
 take
approximately
five
years,
or
more.

ii)

Mid‐range
Implementa/on:
for
implementa/on
projects
that
 require
three
to
five
years
for
comple/on.
 iii)

Near‐range
Implementa/on:
ini/a/ves
that
should
take
up
 to
three
years iv)

100
Day
Implementa/on
Projects:
for
projects
that
require
 approximately
100
days
of
intensive
and
focused
effort
to
 complete.

N
10

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
20%

Near-range Mid-range 100 Day Projects Long-range

In
the
 2012
community
survey
relaNng
to
the
ATP,
people
 were
asked
 what
 their
 preference
 was
 for
 the
 four
 SecNons
 that
 describe
 the
 implementaNon
projects.
 
The
 majority
of
people
were
most
interested
 in
the
shorter‐range
projects
by
a
significant
margin.




Effect
The
 Collingwood
 Ac/ve
 Transporta/on
 Plan
 is
 designed
 to
 be
 implementable
within
 approximately
five
 years,
with
 some
long‐term
 and
 ongoing
processes
that
 will
 be
 used
to
guide
the
“regenera/on”
 the
Plan
for
the
following
five
 year
cycle.
 
It
has
also
 been
wriMen
 to
 address
the
challenges
the
Transporta/on
Associa/on
of
Canada
(TAC)
 has
iden/fied
as
the
“most
 important”
 barriers
that
impede
progress
 toward
 community
 objec/ves
 for
 greater
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 ac/vity,
specifically:
 • • • • • • • • Funding Data Built
form Cycling
culture Individual
percep/ons
of
cycling Winter
weather Geography Other
ins/tu/onal
issues


Empowered
 People:
 Making
it
 easier
 for
 ci/zens
&
 neighbourhood


groups
 to
 get
 involved
 in
 real
 projects
 and
 facilitate
 projects
 in
 partnership
with
the
municipality.

Changed
 Scope:
 Facilita/ng
 real
 measurable
 improvements
 to
 the


various
 aspects
 of
 ac/ve
 transporta/on;
 having
 a
 range
 of
 implementa/on
projects
that
will
“make
things
happen”.

This
way
the
Plan
will
be
an
ac/ve
and
living
tool
for
improving
ac/ve
 transporta/on
 within
 the
 community.
 
 It
 will
 also
 make
 it
 more
 manageable
 and
 scalable
 for
 the
 needs
 and
 available
 assets
 of
 Collingwood.
 
 The
 results
 of
 comple/ng
 the
 ATP’s
 Elements
 are
 expected
to
be:

Changed
 Culture:
 Making
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 easier
 for
 daily
 Changed
Environment:
 A d d r e s s i n g
 a l l
 a s p e c t s
 o f
 a c / v e


transporta/on,
 including:
 people‐oriented
 design;
 beMer
 biking
 facili/es;
 beMer
 signage;
 and,
complete
 streets
approaches;
 that
 will
 all
 make
 the
 towns’
 physical
 form
 more
 suppor/ve
 of
 ac/ve
 transporta/on.

N

ac/vi/es;
and
suppor/ng
the
local
neighbourhoods
and
economy.


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
11

Changed
Expecta3ons:
 Improved
understanding
by
ci/zens,
elected

officials,
 and
 professionals
 of
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 and
 Municipal
 implementa/on
 projects;
 including
 ongoing
 community
 input
 throughout
the
Plan’s
life.

Where
 cars
may
 be
the
 design
vehicle
for
 tradiNonal
 transportaNon
planning,
 for
 contemporary
 acNve
 transportaNon
plans,
 the
 human‐being
 is
viewed
as
 the
 design
 vehicle.
 
 Well
 done
 acNve
 transportaNon
 planning
 and
 design
of
 transportaNon
 faciliNes 
 with
 perspecNves
 such
 as
 “complete
 streets”,
 are
 inherently
people‐centred.
 
 This
puts
the
 end
user
 at
 the
 centre
 of
all
 design
 consideraNons. Collingwood’s
Official
Plan
(Page
 6)
describes
the
results
of
the
 1999
Visioning
 Commicee
 work
 and
 the
 “Core
 Values
 for
 Collingwood”
 with
clear
 direcNon
 toward
a
more
human‐centred
design
perspecNve: “Collingwood
 conNnually
 seeks
 to
 de‐emphasize
 a
 strong
 dependence
 on
 vehicles
and
moves
toward
 being
a
 more
 pedestrian
friendly,
 walkable
 town
 with
a
human
scale”.


Making
the
Plan
Typical
 municipal
 active
 transportation
 plans
 create
 a
 number
 of
 significant
challenges
for
the
town
or
city
for
which
they
were
developed;
 the
following
is
an
outline
of
these.

 
 Scope10 :
 
 Most
 AT
 plans
 are
 overly
 focused
 on
 developing
 transportation
 networks
 and
 infrastructure,
 ignoring
 the
 range
 of
 necessary
 characteristics
 that
 make
 a
community
 active
 transportation
 friendly,
such
as:
 • Placemaking;
 • Complete
community
design;
and, • Community
engagement.



Challenge

developing
 these
 many
 unachieved
 initiatives
 are
 effectually
 misappropriated
because
much
of
that
work
will
likely
be
either
forgotten
 or
 need
 to
 be
 redone
 with
 future
 revisions
 of
 the
 plan.
 
 An
 active
 transportation
 plan
 must
 be
 developed
 as
 a
 strategy
 for
 achieving
 particular
 goals
 if
 it
 is
 to
 be
 successful.
 
 Without
 the
 actionable
 components
 being
reasonably
 “doable”
 the
 plan
 is
 reduced
 to
 being
 a
 vision
 document
 that
 will
 very
 likely
 have
 far
 less
 impact
 on
 the
 community.





The
 result
 is
 that
 they
 are
 overly
 prescriptive
 on
 the
 construction
 of
 physical
infrastructure
while
equally
lacking
in
ways
for
citizens
to
become
 involved,
and
for
 ways
 of
 making
memorable
 and
meaningful
 places
for
 people
to
spend
their
time
and/or
conduct
daily
activities.

This
also
tends
 to
 limit
 their
 adaptability
 because
 they
 cannot
 react
 to
 local
 context
 differences
 in
 neighbourhoods,
 or
 the
 ever‐evolving
 engineering
 and
 planning
solutions
associated
with
active
transportation.



Scale:
 
Most
AT
plans
include
a
series
of
implementation
projects
that


go
well
 beyond
 their
 planning
horizon.
 
 It
 is
 important,
and
 proper,
to
 have
some
long‐term
projects
and
policies
within
an
AT
plan.

However,
if
 it
 is
overburdened
with
these
it
becomes
unmanageable,
confusing,
and
 stale.

If
the
majority
of
the
initiatives
within
a
plan
cannot
reasonably
be
 achieved
within
its
 identified
 timeframe
 it
 does
 not
serve
 a
community
 and
 its
 citizens
 well.
 
 The
 result
 is
 that
 the
 resources
 that
 go
 into


N

10
Walk21,
InternaNonal
Charter
for
Walking,
2010
speaks
to
the
need
to
commit
to
a
clear,
concise
and
comprehensive
ac/on
plan
for
walking
to
set
targets,
secure
stakeholder
support
and
guide
 investment.
 11
Province
of
Ontario,
Provincial
Policy
Statement,
2005,
pg.
13

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
12

Cost:

Most
active
transportation
plans
define
many
projects
which
are
 town‐wide
 initiatives
 that
 tend
 to
 be
 excessively
 difficult
 to
 fund,
 particularly
for
smaller
towns
and
 cities.

 These
projects
are
also
 seldom
 easy
 to
 initiate
 or
 complete
 in
 phases;
 leaving
 them
 half
 done,
 or
 altogether
 passed‐over.
 
 Implementation
 recommendations
 that
 are
 realistically
 not
 fundable,
 because
 of
 their
 size
 and/or
 number,
 are
 inappropriate
 and
 ineffective.
 
 The
 Collingwood
 Active
 Transportation
 Plan
needs
 to
 be
readily
achievable
 through
 the
resources
and
 assets
of
 the
 community.
 
 The
 Town’s
 economic
 wellbeing
 and
 the
 health
 of
 citizens
are
dependent
on
the
practicality
of
an
active
transportation
plan.
The
Province
recognizes
this
in
the
Provincial
Policy
Statement:
 Long‐term
 economic
 prosperity
 should
 be
 supported
 by…
 providing
 for
 an
 efficient,
cost‐effecNve,
 reliable
 mulN‐modal
 transportaNon
system
that
is
integrated
with
adjacent
systems
 and
 those
of
 other
 jurisdicNons,
as
 is
 appropriate
 to
 address
 projected
needs.11

It
 is
 this
 cost
 effec/veness,
 and
 appropriateness,
 that
 is
 oLen
 overlooked
in
ac/ve
transporta/on
plans.


Making
the
Plan
Communica3on:
 
 Most
 AT
 plans
 are
 not
 wriMen
 to
 be
 easily

understandable
 by
 ci/zens,
 elected
 officials,
 and
 professionals
 alike.
 
 This
 results
in
 plans
that
are,
not
only
confusing,
but
 also
 uninspiring
 to
 the
 community;
 effec/vely
 making
 them
 easily
 ignored,
 unimplemented,
and
forgoMen.



Ac3on

Collingwood’s
ATP
has
been
structured
to
address
these
four
significant
 challenges
and
thereby
providing
 a
 more
effective
plan,
and
 improved
 livability
for
the
community
with
its
implementation,
it
includes: • • • • • Placemaking
; Real
action
items; Opportunities

for
citizens
to
get
involved; Low
cost
‐
high
impact
initiatives;

and, An
understandable
format.

Without
 clarity
 in
 direcNon,
 acNonable
 projects,
 and
 facilitated
 community
 parNcipaNon,
 an
 acNve
 transportaNon
 plan
 easily
 becomes
 confusing
 and
 ignored.
 
 This
 ATP
 is
 less
 about
 policy
 and
 vision
 (which
 is
 well
 documented
 elsewhere)
 and
 more
 about
 affecNng
 real
 change
 in
 the
 community
 to
 improve
acNve
transportaNon.

N
12
World
Health
Organiza/on,
World
Health
Day
2010
calls
to
ac/on

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
13

This
 approach
 to
 creating
 the
 ATP
 and
 its
 content
 also
 accurately
 reflects
the
World
Health
Organization’s
recommended
calls
to
action
to
 build
healthy
and
safe
urban
environments
within
our
local
context
by:
 • Promoting
urban
planning
for
healthy
behaviour
and
safety;
 • Creating
designs
to
promote
physical
activity; • Enabling
 participatory
 governance,
 encouraging
 public
 dialogue,
 involving
 citizens
 in
 decision‐making,
 and
 creating
 opportunities
for
participation;
and, • Building
an
inclusive
city
that
 is
accessible
and
age‐friendly
by
 developing
 safe
 AT
 networks
 and
 public
 places
 for
 easy
 access.12

To
do
this
the
ATP
includes
features
that
address
the
range
of
influences
 that
act
on
a
community
and
make
it
more,
or
less,
active
transportation
 friendly.
 
 The
 2012
 ASSHTO,
 Guide
 for
 the
 Development
 of
 Bicycle
 Facilities
speaks
to
these
many
features
in
its
scope
definition:
 Facilities
 are
 only
 one
 of
 several
 elements
 essential
 to
 a
 community’s
 overall
 bicycle
 program.
 
 Bicycle
 safety
 education
 and
 training,
 encouraging
 bicycle
 use,
 and



Context
enforcing
the
rules
of
the
road
as
they
 pertain
to
bicyclists
 and
 motorists
 should
 be
 combined
 with
 engineering
 measures
 to
 form
 a
 comprehensive
 approach
 to
 bicycle
 use. 13 The
Smart
 Growth
Network
identifies
the
scale
of
the
challenges
many
 communities
 such
 as
 Collingwood
 face,
 in
 terms
 of
 active
 transportation:
 Streets
should
be
designed
not
only
to
move
cars
but
also
 to
 be
 safe
 and
 inviting
 for
 pedestrians,
 cyclists,
 and
 transit
 users.
 
 Such
 design
 means
 appropriate
 speeds,
 widths,
 and
 sidewalks,
 as
 well
 as
 buildings,
 trees,
 and
 even
 benches.
 
 Often,
 communities
 already
 have
 the
 basic
 infrastructure
 for
 people
 to
 get
 around
without
 a
 car;
they
just
need
to
make
a
few
improvements
so
that
 it’s
easier
and
more
comfortable”.
14


Physical

N
This
small
“plaza”
&
walkways
successfully
enhance
 the
 walkability
 of
 the
 downtown
 district
 as
 an
 example
of
acNve
transportaNon
supporNve
design.

13
ASSHTO,
Guide
for
the
Development
of
Bicycle
FaciliNes,
2012,
pg.

1‐2 14
Smart
Growth
Network,
This
is
Smart
Growth,
pg.
12

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
14

Overall
 Collingwood’s
physical
form
and
built
 environment
is
very
active
 transportation
 supportive.

Collingwood
has
great
connectivity,
provided
 by
overlapping
networks
of
trails,
roads,
and
sidewalks.

It
has
developed
 at
a
scale
that
is
very
walkable
and
bikeable,
with
an
overall
size,
internal
 block
 patterns,
 and
 land
 use
 mixes,
that
 are
 well
 within
 the
 accepted
 thresholds
 for
 peoples’
desire
to
 use
active
transportation
 modes.
 
 The
 town
 also
 has
 well
 designed
 sites
and
 districts
 that
 are
 interconnected
 with
the
active
transportation
networks
and
transit
system.


 Collingwood
 as
 a
 whole
 generally
 has
 the
 attributes,
 and
 scale,
 of
 a
 complete
 community
 or
 a
 series
 of
 “20‐min
 neighbourhoods”
 as
 described
by
Portland’s
Bureau
of
Planning
and
Sustainability:

CommuniNes
 that
 support
 acNve
 transportaNon
 provide
 easy
 and
 comfortable
opNons
for
people
to
access
their
daily
needs
without
the
need
 for
a
motor
vehicle.
 
To
achieve
this
they
develop
at
a
scale
 that
is
human‐ oriented,
parNcularly
 in
relaNon
 to
the
 length
of
Nme
it
takes
a
person
to
 travel
 from
 one
 desNnaNon
 to
 another
 under
 their
 own
 power.
 
 This
 illustraNon
shows
the
basic
kinds
of
uses
that
need
to
be
 accessible
 within
 20
minutes
walk
or
bike
to
support
acNve
transportaNon.



Context
A
growing
body
of
national
and
international
research
agrees
 on
a
basic
set
 of
 features
and
 elements
that
 make
walkable
 environments
or
20‐minute
neighborhoods.

According
to
the
 research,
 walkable
 environments
 ‐
 or
 20‐minute
 neighborhoods‐
generally
include
the
following: • Building
scales
that
are
comfortable
for
pedestrians; • Mixed‐use
 &
 dense
 development
 near
 neighborhood
 services
and
transit; • Distinct
and
identifiable
centres
and
public
spaces; • A
variety
of
connected
transportation
options; • Lower
speed
streets; • Accessible
design;
and • Street
 grid
or
other
 frequently
connected
 network
of
local
 streets15.


The
challenge
is
to
take
these
characteristics
of
the
community
and
build
 upon
 them
 to
 improve
 livability
 through
 active
transportation
 projects.
 The
 overall
 active
transportation
 network
needs
 to
 be
 considered
 as
 a
 whole,
with
 integrated
streets,
bike
routes,
trails,
sidewalks,
and
 transit
 networks
and
facilities
that
function
together.


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%
WALK FOR RECREATION

COLLINGWOOD AS A GREAT PLACE TO:

GREAT GREATEST

BICYCLE FOR RECREATION WALK FOR BICYCLE FOR TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION

The
 2009
Walk
 and
Bike
 for
 Life
 Collingwood
report
idenNfied
 the
 need
 for
 acNve
transportaNon
oriented
faciliNes
for
both
cycling
and
walking;
 as
the
majority
of
respondents
rated
the
 community’s
faciliNes
as
being
 either
 great
 or
 greatest
 for
 walking
 and
 biking
 faciliNes
 oriented
 to
 recreaNon
(page
 19).
 
 “Over
 50%
 of
 respondents 
rated
 Collingwood
as
 low
 in
 terms
 of
 walking
 and
 bicycling
 for
 transportaNon.
 
 Overall
 Collingwood
 was
 rated
 higher
 for
 recreaNon
rather
 than
transportaNon
 for
walking
as
well
as
bicycling”.

15
City
of
Portland

Bureau
of
Planning
and
Sustainability,
Status
Report:
Twenty‐minute
Neighborhoods,
2009,
pg.
3

N
15


Context
Culture
The
built
environment
 is
the
result
of
many
series
of
design
ideas
and
 construc/on
 projects.
 
 By
 paying
 specific
 aMen/on
 to
 the
 needs
 of
 pedestrians
and
cyclists,
the
 Town
 can
 help
 create
a
community
that
 becomes
more
successful
and
more
livable.

 As
the
 previous
 chart
 shows,
the
 focus
on
 recrea/onal
trails
over
 the
 past
 years
 has
 resulted
 in
 peoples’
 viewpoints
 about
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 in
Collingwood
 to
 be
less
 sa/sfactory
than
 their
 views
 of
recrea/on
opportuni/es.

This
Plan
acknowledges
this
and
works
to
 use
 these
 facili/es
 for
 the
 greatest
 benefit
 while
 diversifying
 the
 Town’s
 approach
 to
 ac/ve
 transporta/on.
 
 However,
 it
 is
 just
 as
 important
 for
 the
 Ac/ve
 Transporta/on
 Plan
 to
 focus
 on
 facilita/ng
 the
culture
of
ac/ve
transporta/on
within
 Collingwood.

This
includes
 the
following Even
 when
 talking
 about
 Provincial
 scale
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 the
 2008
 Ontario
 Bike
 Plan
 by
the
 Cycle
 Ontario
 Alliance
 speaks
 to
 the
 culture
 and
 environment
 of
 cycling
 and
 importance
 of
 ci/zen
 par/cipa/on
when
it
states:
 CreaNng
 a
 supporNve
 environment
 for
 cycling
 in
 Ontario
 can
 only
 be
accomplished
 by
 selng
 prioriNes
and
 through
 partnership
 of
 Provincial
 ministries,
 municipal
 governments,
private
organizaNons
and
individuals.



The
 2012
 Ipsos
 Reid
 poll
 done
 for
 the
 Ontario
 Professional
 Planners
 Ins/tute
 iden/fies
 the
 following
 about
 Ontarians’
 views
 about
 infrastructure
 planning
 for
 ac/ve
 transporta/on:
 60%
 would
 place
 more
emphasis
on
 cyclists
compared
to
6%
that
would
place
less;
52%
 would
 place
 more
 emphasis
 on
 pedestrians
 compared
 to
 4%
 that
 would
 place
less;
and,
while
increased
emphasis
 on
infrastructure
 for
 private
vehicles
was
split
between
24%
for
more,
25%
for
less
and
51%
 for
no
change.

N

• Making
AT
a
reasonable
and
desirable,
and
convenient
choice
 for
ci/zens; • Making
 AT
 prac/cal
 for
 those
 ci/zens
 that
 do
 not
 have
 a
 choice
outside
of
ac/ve
transporta/on
modes; • Making
 community
 engagement
 in
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 projects
desirable
and
easy; • Making
 the
 community
 aware
 of
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 challenges
and
empowered
to
affect
posi/ve
change;
and, • Making
access
to
ac/ve
transporta/on
modes
a
priority.

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
16

Collingwood’s Population: Age & Gender 2011 Census 0 to 14 15 to 64 65 and older

Many
 acNve
 transportaNon
 plans 
focus
 on
 demographic
 informaNon
 to
 describe
needs 
and/or
 users.
 
While
 this
is
informaNve,
it
is
also
important
 to
 understand
 this
 informaNon
 in
 terms
 of
 the
 different
 viewpoints
 and
 assets
 people
 can
 bring
 to
 bare
 on
 the
 implementaNon
 of
 projects 
 to
 address
challenges
at
hand.

This
ATP
describes
ways
community
members
 can
 get
 involved
 with
 parNcular
 acenNon
 to
 encouraging
 diverse
 perspecNves.



Policy
Direc3on
In
 addi/on
 to
 the
 specific
 direc/on
 provided
 through
 the
 adopted
 policies
 for
 the
 Town
 of
 Collingwood;
the
 need
 for
 this
 kind
 plan
 is
 being
 recommended
 and
 accepted
 as
 best
 prac/ce
 across
 many
 professional
 fields
dealing
with
developing
communi/es.

Examples
of
 adopted
policies
and
suggested
guidance
in
these
areas
comes
from:

Provincial
Policy
Statement: The
Provincial
Policy
Statement
says:


Provincial
 plans
 and
 municipal
 official
 plans
 provide
 a
 framework
for
 comprehensive,
integrated
 and
long‐term
 planning
 that
 supports
 and
 integrates
 the
 principles
 of
 strong
 communiNes,
 a
 clean
 and
 healthy
 environment
 and
 economic
 growth,
for
the
long‐term...
the
Provincial
 Policy
 Statement
 supports
 a
 comprehensive,
 integrated
 and
 long‐term
 approach
 to
 planning
 ,
 and
 recognizes
 linkages
among
policy
areas.16

16
Province
of
Ontario,
Provincial
Policy
Statement,
2005,
pg.
1

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
17

• • • • • • • • •

Provincial
Policy
Statement Growth
Plan
for
the
Greater
Golden
Horseshoe Simcoe
County
Official
Plan Accessibility
for
Ontarians
with
Disabili/es
Act Simcoe
Muskoka
District
Health
Unit Ontario
Professional
Planners
Ins/tute Transporta/on
Associa/on
of
Canada
(TAC) Ministry
of
Transporta/on
(MTO) American
 Associa/on
 of
 State
 Highway
 and
 Transporta/on
 Officials
(AASHTO) Na/onal
Associa/on
of
City
Transporta/on
Officials
(NACTO)

The
importance
of
walkability
and
overall
neighbourhood
design
 to
people
who
are
selecNng
where
to
live
is
shown
in
these
three
 tables
 adapted
 from
 the
 2011
 Community
 Preference
 Survey
 conducted
for
the
 NaNonal
 AssociaNon
of
Realtors
in
the
United
 States.
 
 These
 three
 charts 
indicate
 peoples’
 preferences
 when
 asked
how
important
it
would
be
when
deciding
where
to
live:
 1) to
have
specific
uses
within
easy
walking
distance;
 2) the
importance
of
community
characterisNcs;
and,
 3) which
is
more
important,
size
of
home
or
neighbourhood.




Policy
Direc3on
Growth
 Plan
 for
 the
 Greater
 Golden
 Horseshoe
 (and
 Ministry
 of
 Transportation): Growth
Plan
for
the
Greater
Golden
Horseshoe,
Places
to
Grow,
states
in
 the
Policies
for
Infrastructure
to
Support
Growth,
Transportation
section:
 The
transportation
system
within
the
GGH
will
be
planned
and
 managed
 to:
 a)
 provide
 connectivity
 among
 transportation
 modes
 for
 moving
 people
 and
 for
 moving
 goods
 b)
 offer
 a
 balance
of
 transportation
choices
that
 reduces
reliance
upon
 any
single
mode
and
promotes
transit,
cycling
and
walking
c)
 be
 sustainable,
 by
 encouraging
 the
 most
 financially
 and
 environmentally
 appropriate
 mode
 for
 trip‐making
 d)
 offer
 multi‐modal
 access
 to
 jobs,
 housing,
 schools,
 cultural
 and
 recreational
opportunities,
and
goods
and
services
e)
provide
 for
the
safety
of
system
users.17 Simcoe
County
Official
Plan: The
Simcoe
 County
Official
 Plan
recognizes
the
 important
 link
 between
 policy,
regulation,
and
development
of
the
built
environment
to
create
an
 active
transportation
supportive
community.

Policy
4.1.5
states: The
 design
 of
 streetscapes,
building
 orientation,
 and
 traffic
 flow
should
be
planned
to
provide
safe
pedestrian
and
cycling
 access
and
movement
in
downtowns,
main
streets,
and
other
 activity
areas.19


When
describing
the
Growth
Plan
the
Ministry
of
Transportation
states:
 These
 policies
 include
 the
 promotion
 of
 transit,
 bicycling,
 walking,
 and
 transportation
 demand
 management,
 the
 identification
of
 multi‐modal
 corridors
and
the
 facilitation
of
 effective
goods
movement18 .



Additionally,
 the
 Ministry
 “encourage(s)
 municipalities
 to
 review
 best
 practices
in
bicycle
design
in
other
 Canadian
provinces
and
US
States
for
 additional
 guidance”
 as
 the
 Ministry’s
 Bicycle
 Policy
 is
 currently
 under
 review.



17
Province
of
Ontario,
Growth
Plan
for
the
Greater
Golden
Horseshoe,
2006,
pg.
24 18

Ontario
Ministry
of
Transporta/on,
Guidelines
for
Municipal
Official
Plan
PreparaNon
and
Review,
2012

19
County
of
Simcoe,
Official
Plan
of
the
County
of
Simcoe,
DRAFT
June
2012,
pg.
71 20
The
Town
of
Collingwood’s
Urban
Design
Manual
specifically
addresses

characteris/cs
of
the
built
environment
in
terms
of
livability,
human‐centred
design,
and
support
for
ac/ve
transporta/on.

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
18

The
Simcoe
County
Official
Plan
also
provides
minimum
policy
statements
 for
 the
 development
 of
 active
 transportation
 plans
 in
 the
 region.
 
 The
 majority
of
this
direction
 has
been
 addressed
with
a
combination
of
the
 provisions
of
the
Town
of
Collingwood’s
Urban
Design
Manual20 ,
as
well
 as
through
this
ATP.

The
County
defined
minimum
policy
statements
are
 as
follows: • Policies
 requiring
 the
 provision
 of
 sidewalks
 and/or
 multi‐use
 trails
 through
 all
 new
 development
 areas
 and
 standards
 outlining
 a
 minimum
 number
 of
 development
units
for
application
of
the
policy; • Policies
 outlining
 the
 requirements
 and
 conditions
 related
to
the
dedication
of
lands
in
new
development
 areas
 to
 complete
 future
 trail
 and
 sidewalk
 connections
identified
in
the
official
plan; • Policies
 outlining
 cycling
 and
 pedestrian
 safety
 measures
to
 reduce
 injuries
and
 fatalities
associated



Policy
Direc3on
with
 motor
 vehicle
 collisions
 (i.e.
 traffic
 calming,
 narrower
streets,
signage,
cycling
lanes,
etc.); • Policies
 and
 standards
 specifying
 the
 design
 parameters
 that
 should
 be
 used
 for
 new
 trails
 and
 sidewalks
 that
 reflect
 Ontario
 Provincial
 Standards,
 Accessibility
Act
requirements,
and
best
practices; • Policies
requiring
 the
provision
of
secure
bicycle
racks
 and
 shelters,
 showers
 and
 change
 rooms,
 and
 sidewalk
 connections
 between
 buildings
 and
 municipal
 sidewalks
 for
 all
 new
 community
 centres,
 schools
and
 other
 public
 use
buildings,
meeting
halls,
 and
 major
 employment
 land
 uses
 that
 meet
 a
 minimum
 floor
 space
 threshold
 to
 be
 established
 by
 each
municipality21 

 Simcoe
Muskoka
District
Health
Unit
(SMDHU): The
SMDHU
 recognizes
that
the
built
 environment
can
affect
the
overall
 health
 of
 the
 community
both
 negatively
and
 positively.
 
 SMDHU
 has
 developed
the
Healthy
 Community
Design
‐
Policy
Statements
for
Official
 Plans
document,
which
provides
policy
statements
to
assist
municipalities
 in
 creating
 healthy
 and
 complete
 communities
 while
 also
 meeting
 the
 Provincial
Policies.
 The
Document
speaks
to
the
research
which
shows
that
physical
form
and
 development
 patterns
 of
 community
 impacts
 air
 pollution
 and
 greenhouse
 gases,
 water
 quality,
 levels
 of
 physical
 activity,
 access
 to
 nutritious
food,
rates
of
injuries
and
 fatalities
 for
 motorists,
pedestrians
 and
 cyclists
 and
 social
 cohesion.
 
 The
 policy
 statement
 guide
 includes
 statements
related
to
active
transportation
for
example: • Ensure
a
 built
 environment
 that
 supports
and
 encourages
active
 transportation; • Develop
 a
 transportation
 system
 that
 is
 multi‐modal,
 accessible
 and
interconnected; • Provide
infrastructure
that
supports
safe
walking
and
cycling; • Design
roads
that
ensure
the
safety
of
all
users.

Ontario
Professional
Planners
Institute: The
 recently
 released
 Call
 to
 Action
 from
 the
 Ontario
 Professional
 Planners
Institute
states:
 New
 planning
 and
 engineering
 policies
 and
 standards
 are
 being
developed
throughout
North
America
and
globally,
not
 only
 to
allow,
but
 to
require
the
safe,
efficient
 and
 effective
 accommodation
 of
 active
 transportation
 modes
 within
 the
 shared
right‐of‐way.

Planners
in
Ontario
should
be
facilitating
 adoption
and
implementation
of
similar
 requirements,
plans,
 and
projects.
22

N

21
County
of
Simcoe,
Official
Plan
of
the
County
of
Simcoe,
DRAFT
June
2012,
pg.
97 22
Ontario
Professional
Planners
Ins/tute,
Healthy
CommuniNes
and
Planning
for
AcNve
TransportaNon:
A
Call
to
AcNon,
2012,
pg.
4

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
19

Town
of
Collingwood: The
Town
Council
has
also
provided
direction
to
place
increased
emphasis
 on
 alternative
 modes
 of
 transportation.
 
 In
 july
 2009
 the
 Town
 of
 Collingwood
 adopted
 a
Corporate
Strategic
Plan
which
 highlights
one
of
 its
goals
as
“Improving
How
We
Get
Around”.

The
Corporate
objectives
 listed
within
this
goal
include:
 • Increasing
opportunities
for
active
transportation
‐
walking,
cycling;
 and,


Implementa3on
• Increasing
transportation
choices
promoting
multi‐modal
options.

 The
Transportation
section
of
the
Town
of
Collingwood
Official
Plan
states
 the
following: These
 polices
 are
 intended
 to
 enable
 vehicles
 and
 pedestrians
to
move
safely
 and
efficiently
within
a
raNonal
 system
of
roads
and
trails
that,
wherever
possible,
shall
be
 separated.

Funding

It
 goes
 on
 to
 describe
 a
 series
 of
 Goals
 and
 Objectives
 such
 as
 the
 following
(one
goal
and
two
specific
objectives): To
maintain
a
transportaNon
system,
that
permits
the
safe
 and
 efficient
 movement
 of
 people
 and
 goods
 within
 the
 town.
 
 To
 integrate
 where
 appropriate
 traffic
 calming
 measures
into
plans
for
road
improvements
throughout
the
 community.
 
 To
 promote
 suitable
 separaNons
 between
 pedestrian,
cyclist
and
vehicular
traffic.

Also,
 on
 January
 14,
 2008
 a
 presentation
 was
 made
 to
 Council
 which
 identified
 a
 process
 to
 enable
 the
 Town
 of
 Collingwood
 to
 alter
 its
 hierarchy
of
investing
in
transportation
to
the
following
order: 
 
 
 
 1st

 2nd
 3rd
 4th
 Pedestrian Cyclist Public
Transit Vehicle

Council
 adopted
 a
motion
 on
 January
28,
2008
 which
 directed
 staff
 to
 develop
 an
 Active
 Transportation
 Policy
 that
 enables
 the
 Town
 of
 Collingwood
 to
 alter
 the
 current
 hierarchy
 of
 transportation
 to
 the
 recommendation
noted
above.

23
Transporta/on
Associa/on
of
Canada,
Urban
Transporta/on
Council,
A
New
Vision
for
Urban
TransportaNon,
Reprint
November
1998,
pg.
1

N
20

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

Specific
 funding
of
 active
 transportation
 should
 be
 integrated
 into
 the
 Town’s
 budget,
 to
 support
 the
 Elements
 detailed
 in
 the
 ATP.
 
 It
 is
 recommended
 that
 the
 Town
 provide
 dedicated
 funding
 for
 the
 implementation
of
the
ATP
Elements.

The
amount
should
be
in
the
order
 of
$100,000
to
$150,000
annually;
which
is
similar
in
scale
to
the
amount
 dedicated
to
the
 trails
system
for
 the
past
 many
years.
 
 
 Note
that
this
 amount
does
not
 necessarily
address
capital
spending
required
 for
final
 implementation
of
some
of
the
larger
scale
projects
outlined
in
the
ATP. The
Transportation
 Association
of
 Canada,
in
 recognizing
the
 increasing
 costs
 municipalities
 are
 facing
 to
 fund
 transportation
 infrastructure,
 recommends: Realistic
 means
 must
 be
 found
 to
 provide
 adequate
 and
 sustaining
 sources
 of
 funds
for
 new,
expanded
and
 properly
 maintained
 urban
 transportation
 infrastructure
 and
 services23.



They
 go
 on
 to
 identify
 that
 funding
 should
 be:
 stable
 over
 time,
 predictable
in
magnitude,
and
transparent,
open
and
easily
understood
by
 decision
 makers
 and
 the
 public,
 and
 designed
 to
 foster
 an
 urban
 transportation
system
operating
at
the
lowest
possible
cost.
 The
Elements
of
the
ATP
range
in
projected
cost
from
below
$5000
to
just
 over
 $100,000;
 with
 the
 complex
 projects,
 and
 those
 with
 capital
 improvements
 being
 more
 costly
 than
 those
 relating
 to
 community
 engagement
and
amendments
to
existing
infrastructure.

These
estimates
 cover
 a
variety
of
costs
including
the
following
(detailed
 implementation
 costs
 will
 be
 considered
 during
 budget
 reviews):
 engineering/redesign
 review;
 construction
 of
 route
 improvements
 and
 other
 construction;
 public
engagement;
and
technical
resources/tools.


Implementa3on
Ac3ve
Transporta3on
Exper3se
The
AASHTO
Guide
for
the
Development
 of
Bicycle
FaciliNes
speaks
to
 the
 need
 to
 integrate
 the
 needs
 of
 cyclists
 directly
 in
 the
 design
 of
 streets,
this
direc/on
is
also
applicable
to
pedestrian
needs:

 All
roads,
streets
,
and
highways,
except
those
where
bicyclists
 are
 legally
 prohibited,
 should
 be
 designed
 and
 constructed
 under
 the
 assumpNon
 that
 they
 will
 be
 used
 by
 bicyclists.
 
 Therefore,
 bicyclists’
 needs
 should
 be
addressed
 in
 all
 phases
 of
 transportaNon
 planning,
design,
construcNon,
maintenance
 and
 operaNons.
 
 All
 modes
 of
 transportaNon,
 including
 bicycles,
should
be
jointly
integrated
into
plans
and
projects
at
 an
early
stage
so
that
they
funcNon
together
effecNvely. 24


Exis3ng
Programs

24
AASHTO,
Guide
for
the
Development
of
Bicycle
FaciliNes,
2012,
pg.
1‐1 25
Green
Communi/es
Canada
&
Walk21,
Walk21
2007
Walkability
Roadshow
Case
Studies,
2007,
pg.
27

N

To
 achieve
 this,
 the
 Town
 requires
 staff
 resources
 that
 possess
 a
 specific
 set
 of
 professional
 skills
 and
 mindset
 to
 be
effec/ve.
 
 This
is
 recognized
 in
 the
 Walk21
 2007:
 Walkability
 Roadshow
 Case
 Studies
 report
 which
 iden/fied
 as
“one
of
 Collingwood’s
 greatest
 challenges”
 the
need
for
technical
exper/se
on
staff
that
is
strategically
focused
on
 these
 needs
 and
 planning. 25 
 
 As
 such
 the
 Town
 should
 allocate
 responsibility
 for
 implementa/on
 of
 the
 ATP
 Elements
 to
 a
 specific
 Department.

It
is
most
appropriate
to
have
this
closely
linked
with
the
 Engineering,
Planning,
and
Parks
Recrea/on
and
Culture
Departments
 to
 facilitate
 strong
 interrela/onships
 and
 effec/ve
 work
 program
 development.



D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
21

The
 Town
 has
 an
 excellent
 network
 of
 streets
 with
 sidewalks
 that
 provide
pedestrian
 access
to
 most
of
 the
community’s
built
up
 areas.
 
 However,
there
 are
a
 few
 areas
 that
 are
under‐served
 by
 sidewalks,
 primarily
 some
 older
 developed
 areas
 along
 Beachwood
 Road
 (old
 Highway
26),
in
the
south
east
por/ons
of
Collingwood.

There
are
also
 residen/al,
 commercial,
 and
 educa/onal
 areas
 and
 ins/tu/ons
 that
 are
 not
 accessible
 by
sidewalks
due
to
 gaps
 in
 the
sidewalk
network.
 
 While
 providing
 sidewalks
 for
 this
 last
 group
 of
 areas
 may
 be
 somewhat
 imprac/cal,
 they
 can
 be
 oLen
 accessed
 from
 the
 community’s
 trail
 network.
 
 In
 fact,
 this
 has
 been
 the
 solu/on
 for
 many
residents
that
have
adapted
their
travel
routes
to
accommodate
 the
network.

 Ensuring
 that
 these
 gaps
 are
 eliminated
 and/or
 appropriate
 connec/ons
 to
 trail
 linkages
are
provided
 is
necessary
to
make
 these
 areas
of
 the
 community
accessible
 for
 those
 traveling
 as
pedestrians.
 
 Defining
the
priority
loca/ons,
and
comple/ng
these
sidewalk
gaps;
as
 well
 as,
 defining
 and
 adap/ng
 the
 trail
 corridors
 needed
 for
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
is
a
process
that
 will
 have
to
 be
staged
 and
 completed
 over
 a
 number
 of
 years
 with
 appropriate
 planning,
 design,
 and
 budge/ng.

 The
 Town’s
 Engineering
 Department
 has
 exis/ng
 programs
 for
 maintaining
 bike
 lanes,
 transit
 stops
 and
 for
 sidewalk
 maintenance.
 
 These
 excellent
 work
 programs
 should
 con/nue
 to
 be
 supported
 through
 appropriate
 alloca/ons
 of
 Town
 resources
 because
 of
 their
 important
impact
on
ac/ve
transporta/on.




ATP
‐
Implementa3on
Projects
Through
 the
 Community‐wide
 Walkability/bikeability
 Audits
 Element
 of
the
ATP
 (page
90),
issues
or
 gaps
can
be
 iden/fied,
priori/zed,
and
 then

 addressed
through
 these
exis/ng
programs.

Alterna/vely,
they
 can
be
addressed
through
the
Urban
Acupuncture
Element
on
page
66
 or
added
to
the
100
day
projects
as
a
result
of
the
Annual
ATP
Mee/ng
 of
the
Public
and
Annual
Community
AT
Audit
Elements.


 The
 combina/on
 of
 the
 regula/ons
 in
 the
 Urban
 Design
 Manual,
the
 Engineering
 Department’s
 programs,
along
 with
 the
 implementa/on
 of
 this
ATP,
will
 effec/vely
improve
ac/ve
transporta/on
 for
inclusive
 mobility
described
by
the
Walk21
Interna/onal
Charter
for
Walking:
 Inclusive
Mobility:
Ensure
safe
and
convenient
independent
 mobility
 for
 all
 by
 providing
 access
 on
 foot
 for
 as
 many
 people
 as
 possible
 to
 as
 many
 places
 as
 possible
 parNcularly
to
public
transport
and
public
buildings 26

Implementa3on
“Elements”

The
 following
 pages
 describe
 the
 specific
 implementa/on
 projects,
 “Elements”
that
make
 up
the
majority
of
 the
 ATP.
 
The
Elements
are
 grouped
 by
 general
 /meframe.
 
 However,
these
 are
 not
 necessarily
 related
 to
 a
 priority
 of
 execu/on,
 nor
 a
 /meline
 within
 which
 they
 must
be
completed.

These
/melines
are
related
to:
 • The
 length
 of
 /me
 it
 is
 expected
 to
 take
 to
 complete
 the
 Elements; • The
/meframe
within
 which
the
 Element
 is
most
appropriately
 executed
in
rela/on
to
the
overall
ATP;
and,
 • The
focus
of
the
Element
in
terms
of
its
impact.


26
Walk21,
InternaNonal
Charter
for
Walking,
2010

N
22

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

These
 /meframes
 are
 also
 not
 concrete,
 as
 Elements
 may
 be
 completed
sooner
than
within
the
/meline
they
have
been
arranged
in
 the
ATP.

 Note
 that
 these
 Elements
 oLen
 relate
 to
 strategic
 implementa/on
 methods
and
ac/ons,
some
of
which
directly
result
in
building
physical
 features
 and
 infrastructure
 to
 support
 ac/ve
 transporta/on.
 
 Other
 Elements
 provide
 the
 necessary
 design,
 analysis,
 and
 direc/on
 to
 inform
larger
capital
projects
that
will
be
completed
in
the
future.

This
 combina/on
 of
 projects
 in
 terms
 of
 scope
 and
 implementa/on
 is
 necessary
to
address
the
 various
 characteris/cs
of
 an
 effec/ve
ac/ve
 transporta/on
system.





I


Long‐range
Implementa3on

 
 
 1)

Concurrency
Review



‐
pg
26 2)

Major
Corridor
Gateways
‐
Complete
Streets

‐
pg
28 3)

Trails
for
Active
Transportation

‐
pg
36

5
years
or
more




II


Mid‐range
Implementa3on

 
 
 
 
 1)

Sunset
Point
&
St
Lawrence
Street
Corridor

‐
pg
42 2)

Pedestrian
Enhancements
Downtown
‐
pg
44 3)

“Right‐size”
Downtown
Parking
Facilities

‐
pg
46 4)

Bus
Stop
Seating

‐
pg
48 5)

Family
Bike
Boulevards

‐
pg
50 
 
 
 


3
to
5
years




III


Near‐range
Implementa3on

 
 
 
 
 1)

“Share
the
Road”
Routes

‐
pg
64 2)

Urban
Acupuncture
&
Traffic
Calming

‐
pg
66 3)

Active
Transportation
Matching
Fund


‐
pg
70 4)

Update
Sidewalk
By‐law
‐
Cycling

‐
pg
72 5)

Update
Sidewalk
By‐law
‐
Skateboarding

‐
pg
74 
 
 
 
 
 


N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

 
 
 
 


6)

Sidewalks
&
Crosswalks
at
Public
Parks

‐
54 7)

Bridge
Link
at
Siding
Trail

‐
pg
56 8)

Link
at
Train
Trail

‐
pg
58 9)
AT
Bridge
at
Mountain
Road

‐
pg
60

up
to
3
years

6)

Downtown
Long‐term
Bike
Parking

‐
pg
76 7)

On‐street
Bike
Routes

‐
pg
78 8)

Public
Parking
Lot
Pedestrian
Improvements
‐pg
82 9)
Complete
Streets
Design
Matrix

‐
pg
84 10)

Community‐wide
Walkability/bikeability
 
 Audits

‐
pg
90




IV


100
Day
Implementa3on
Projects

 
 
 
 
 1)

Bikeable
Collingwood
Wiki
Map

‐
pg
96 2)

Shared
Walkways/Promenade
Strategy

‐
pg
98 3)

Downtown
Parking
Analysis


‐
pg
100 4)

Downtown
“Walking
Time”
 
 
 Wayfinding
Signage

‐
pg
102

100
days

5)

ATP
Citizen
“DO‐TANK”
Task
Force

‐
pg
104 6)

Town
Facility
Bike
Parking
Program

‐
pg
106 7)

Annual
ATP
Meeting
of
the
Public


‐
pg
108 8)

Annual
Public
Information
Program

‐
pg
110 9)

Annual
Community
AT
Audit

‐
pg
112

23




I.



Long‐range
Implementa3on

Significant
Projects
5+
years

They
many
require
a
number
of
years
to
complete
or
 set
 the 
 path
 for
 the 
 community
 to
 follow
 in
 its
 ongoing
 efforts 
to
 make 
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 and
 the
accessibility
 it
affords
its 
ci/zens 
more
prac/cal,
 efficient,
desirable,
and
commonplace.

N

As 
work
 programs
and
budgets
are 
generated
 over
 the
coming
years,
the
elements
in
this 
sec/on
of
the
 ATP
 should
be
equally
 considered
as
those
that
 are
 shorter
 in
 term.
 
 This
 is 
 necessary
 because
 the
 preliminary
phases,
and/or
preparatory
work,
for
the
 Elements
 in
 this
 Sec/on
may
 need
 to
 begin
 in
 the
 near‐term
 although
they
 will 
be
 completed
 in
 5
 or
 more
years
from
now.


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
60% 40% 20%
24

The
 Elements 
 that
 fall
 under
 this
 category
 are
 generally
 of
larger
scale 
and/or
 rela/ng
to
long‐term
 policy
 direc/on
 that
 will 
 guide
 the
 evolu/on
 of
 Collingwood
 past
 this
 ini/al 
 Ac/ve
 Transporta/on
 Plan,
and
into
its
future
edi/ons.



80%

Preferred long-range projects

Hume St HWY 26 Hurontario St

The
responses
to
the
2012
community
survey
indicate
that
 the
long‐term
projects
that
are
considered
most
important
 by
members
of
the
community
are
Hume
Street
redesign,
 Hurontario
St
redesign,
Beachwood
Road
(old
Highway
26
to
 Wasaga
Beach)
redesign


 
 


1)

Concurrency
Review

 
 
 
 
 
 2)

Major
Corridor
Gateways
‐
Complete
Streets

 3)

Trails
for
Ac3ve
Transporta3on
 
 
 


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
25

pg
26 pg
28 pg
36

N


1.
Concurrency
Review
Challenge

The
 benefits
 of
 active
 transportation
 are
 significant,
 far
 ranging,
 and
 relate
to
a
variety
of
areas
that
are
addressed
by
Town
plans
and
policies.
 
 Numerous
 intangible
 benefits
 are
associated
 with
 bicycling
 and
 walking.
 
 Providing
more
travel
 options
 can
increase
a
 sense
of
 independence
 in
 seniors,
young
 people,
and
others
 who
 cannot
 or
 choose
 not
 to
 drive.
 
 Increased
 levels
 of
 bicycling
and
walking
can
have
a
great
 impact
 on
an
area’s
 sense
 of
 livability
 by
 creating
 safe
 and
 friendly
 places
 for
 people
to
live
and
work. 27
 The
 SMDHU
 identifies
 that
 physical
 activity,
 sedentary
 lifestyle,
 overweight
 and
 obesity
 are
 associated
 with
 escalating
chronic
 disease
 rates.

 The
majority
of
Canadian
adults
are
inactive,
risking
their
health
 and
quality
of
life.
 
Moderately
intense
physical
activity
such
as
walking
 and
 cycling
 increases
 health
 benefits
 and
 has
 the
 potential
 to
 reduce
 cardiovascular
 disease
 by
 as
 much
 as
 50
 percent29 .
 
 Communities
 designed
 with
an
active
transportation
infrastructure
that
prioritizes
the
 pedestrian
 and
 cyclist
 while
 reducing
automobile
 dependency
supports
 daily
physical
activity.

This
can
also
lead
to
economic
and
environmental
 sustainability.
 
The
Ontario
Professional
 Planners
Institute
identifies
the
 community
benefits
of
active
transportation:30: • • • • • Health; Safety; Environmental; Social/community;
and, Economic.

27

U.S.
Department
of
Transporta/on
Federal
Highway
Administra/on,
NaNonal
Bicycling
and
Walking
Study
15‐Year
Status
Report,
May
2010,
page
2

28
Adapted
from
Walk
and
Bike
for
Life,
Trails
for
AcNve
TransportaNon,
2009,
pg.
21 29

Simcoe
Muskoka
District
Health
Unit,
leMer

September
28,
2012

30
Ontario
Professional
Planners
Ins/tute,
Planning
and
ImplemenNng
AcNve
TransportaNon
in
Ontario
CommuniNes:
A
Call
To
AcNon,
2012
pg.
3

N

The
 recent
 Walk
 and
 Bike
 for
 Life
 survey
 and
 workshop
 asked
 participants
to
identify
their
level
of
support
for
Town
policies
that
would
 ensure:
 “all
 transportation,
 planning
 and
 development
 decisions
 take
 into
account
the
needs
of
all
users
of
public
rights‐of‐way,
in
this
order
of
 priority:
 pedestrians,
 cyclists,
 transit
 users,
 motorists”;
 over
 90%
 of
 respondents
supported
such
a
focus. 28


To
achieve
this
in
a
cohesive
and
 effective
 way
 is
 a
 relatively
 complex
 undertaking.
 
 As
 with
 all
 municipalities,
 the
 Town
 of
 Collingwood
 is
faced
 with
 managing
many
 documents
 defining
 policy
 direction
 as
 well
 as
 their
 resulting
 implementation
 programs
 and
 By‐laws.
 
 As
 the
 community
evolves
 it
 becomes
 necessary
 to
 review
 the
 direction
 given
 by
 newly
 adopted
 policy
documents
against
those
that
have
been
adopted
previously.

This
 is
 also
 needed
 because
 the
 physical
 and
 social
 context
 of
 the
 town
 changes
over
time
as
well.


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
26

As
 a
 result,
 the
 ATP
 affects
 many
 different
 policies,
 regulatory
 and
 implementation
 documents/processes
 for
 the
 Town.
 
 A
 municipality
 cannot
 effectively
 manage
 its
 implementation
 programs,
 nor
 give
 appropriate
direction
to
possible
partners
and
other
stakeholders,
if
their
 policies
 and/or
 regulations
 are
 conflictive.
 
 Establishing
 concurrency
 between
 these
 guiding
 documents
 is
 necessary
 to
 facilitate
 effective
 implementation
 of
 the
 elements
 presented
 herein,
and
 other
 projects
 that
may
result
from
the
evolution
 of
 the
ATP.
Therefore
a
concurrency
 review
 exercise
 is
 necessary
 to
 ensure
 that
 the
 parts
 of
 this
 complex
 system
are
complementary
and
supportive
of
each
other.




Ac3on

There
 are
 number
 of
 documents
 that
 need
 to
 be
 reviewed
 and
 amended
a
part
of
this
exercise
to
ensure
that
they
support
a
walkable
 and
bikeable
community.

This
concept
can
best
be
understood
by
the
 way
it
 is
referred
 to
 by
the
City
of
 Portland’s
Bureau
of
 Planning
and
 Sustainability
as
a
 “twenty‐minute
 neighbourhood”.
 
 This
 term
 is
an
 easy
 way
 for
 people
 to
 understand
 walkability,
 or
 a
 walkable
 environment: A
 20‐minute
 neighbourhood
 is
 a
 place
 with
 convenient,
 safe,
and
 pedestrian‐oriented
 access
 to
 the
 places
 people
 need
to
go
to
and
the
services
people
use
nearly
every
day:
 transit,
 shopping,
 quality
 food,
 school,
 parks,
 and
 social
 acNviNes,
that
is
near
and
adjacent
to
housing. 31

• The
 members
of
 the
 ATP
 task
 force
 “DO
TANK”
 (see
 100
 Day
 Project
Sec/on)
shall
be
included
in
the
process. The
 end
 result
 of
 this
 Element
 will
 be
 updated
 and
 mutually
 suppor/ve
 regula/ons
 and
 work
 programs
 rela/ng
 to
 ac/ve
 transporta/on.



To
 complete
 this
 work
 will
 require
 the
 input
 from
 all
 Town
 departments,
as
 well
 as,
the
ci/zens
 of
Collingwood.
 
 The
regulatory
 requirements
 for
 specific
 procedures
 rela/ng
 to
 ci/zen
 no/fica/on,
 publishing,
and
 public
 mee/ngs
 for
 certain
 kinds
 of
 planning
related
 processes.
 
 However,
 in
 addi/on
 to
 any
 minimum
 requirements
 rela/ng
 to
 community
 informa/on
 and
 engagement,
 the
 following
 shall
 also
 be
 incorporated
 into
 these
 concurrency
 review
 exercises,
 and
the
necessary
updates
and
amendments
resul/ng
from
them: • To
 inform
ci/zens
 and
 stakeholders
 of
 the
upcoming
work
the
 concurrency
review
exercises
 shall
 be
presented
 for
 discussion
 as
 part
 of
 the
 annual
 ATP
 audit
 (described
 later
 in
 the
 ATP)
 preceding
the
strategy
to
make
the
amendment(s); • A
 social
 media
 strategy
 dedicated
 to
 the
 amendment
 project
 shall
be
developed
to
facilitate
communica/on
and
informa/on
 access
for
ci/zens,
staff,
stakeholders,
and
others; • A
public
open
house
 informa/on
 mee/ng
shall
 be
held
rela/ng
 to
 the
 amendments
 to
 present
 informa/on
 and
 gather
 ci/zen
 input; • A
roundtable
 discussion
(or
 similar
open
process)
 shall
be
 held
 with
key
stakeholders
rela/ng
to
the
specific
item;
and,



31
City
of
Portland

Bureau
of
Planning
and
Sustainability,
Status
Report:
Twenty‐minute
Neighborhoods,
2009,
pg.
2

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
27



2.
Major
Corridor
Gateways
‐
Complete
Streets
Challenge

There
are
a
number
 of
street
 corridors
that
are
designated
as
arterials
 entering
Collingwood
that
are
intended
 to
accommodate
large
volumes
 of
 vehicle
traffic.
 
 However,
these
roads
 also
 have
 a
number
 of
other
 important
roles
to
play,
beyond
this
simplistic
definition,
for
example: 1) Gateways
into
the
community; 2) Connectors
 to
 outlaying
 areas
 &
 neighbouring
 communities32;
and, 3) Opportunities
to
enhance
the
value
of
contiguous
lands. without
 a
 negative
 impact
 on
 automobile
 travel”.33 
 
 Through
 this
 exercise
it
is
 important
 to
 note
that
 complete
 streets
design
 principles
 need
 to
be
 context
 specific;
 there
 is
 no
 single
 solution
for
 every
road,
 and
not
every
mode
can
be
optimally
accommodated
on
every
road.



Unfortunately,
with
 standard
designs
and
 development
 treatments
 for
 these
 roads
 they
 will
 not
 be
 able
 to
 effectively
 support
 these
 roles,
 resulting
in: 1) Visually
 un‐attractive
 and
 unappealing
 gateways
 for
 residents
and
visitors
alike; 2) Limited
or
 restricted
access
to
neighbouring
communities
 for
active
transportation
and
transit
modes; 3) Reduced
 potential
 property
 values
 resulting
 from
 traffic
 speeds
 and
 roadway
improvements
 that
 are
 not
 context
 appropriate.


The
challenge
for
 this
Element
 is
to
create
(re)designs
for
these
specific
 corridors
 that
 will
 address
 the
 roles
 these
streets
can
 play
within
 the
 greater
 community‐wide
 context
 beyond
 just
 moving
 motor
 vehicles;
 while
eliminating
the
negative
impacts
of
standard
designs
noted
above.
 The
National
Complete
Streets
Coalition
states:
“Planning
and
designing
 roads
to
make
them
safer
for
all
users
and
more
inviting
to
pedestrians,
 bicyclists,
and
transit
users
 can
 increase
overall
capacity
and
efficiency


N

32
The
Transporta/on
Systems
sec/on
of
the
Provincial
Policy
Statement
it
states:
“1.6.5.3
Connec/vity
within
and
among
transporta/on
systems
and
modes
should
be
maintained
and,
where
possible,
 improved
including
connec/ons
which
cross
jurisdic/onal
boundaries”.
Province
of
Ontario,
Provincial
Policy
Statement,
2005,
pg.
12 33
Na/onal
Complete
Streets
Coali/on,
Complete
Streets
Ease
CongesNon,
2011

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
These
 images
 illustrate
 before
 and
 aZer
 conceptual
 redesign
 of
 Hume
 Street
 using
 complete
 street
 principles.
 
 This
 shows
 how
 all
 modes
 of
 transportaNon
 funcNon
 together
 and
 land
uses
that
are
supported
by
the
street
design.

28

Ac3on

For
 this
 Element
 each
 of
 the
 iden/fied
 street
 corridors
 will
 be
 examined
 and
 (re)designed
 by
 a
 mul/‐disciplinary
 team
 to
 create
 context
 sensi/ve
 designs
that
 will
 be
capable
of
fulfilling
the
 mul/ple
 roles
defined
in
the
challenge.

This
will
also
ensure
that
 the
resul/ng
 designs
 fully
support
 and
facilitate
the
kind
of
 development
 expressly
 envisioned
 by
 the
 community
 for
 these
 important
 corridors
 as
 described
 in
 the
 Official
 Plan.
 
These
 designs
can
 then
 be
used
 when
 the
/me
comes
to
redevelop
these
roads.


 The
five
corridors
iden/fied
in
this
major
element
are: a. b. c. d. e. Hume
Street;
 Hurontario
Street;
 High
Street;
 Mountain
Road;
and,
 Beachwood
Road
(old
Highway
26
to
Wasaga
Beach).

Each
 of
 these
 has
 unique
 characteris/cs;
 however,
they
 share
 things
 that
 make
 it
 appropriate
 to
 group
 them
 together
 in
 this
 element,
 specifically: • The
 gateway
func/on
 they
 play
 in
 the
 community,
 essen/ally
 “semng
 the
 tone”
 for
 those
 entering
 Collingwood,
 helping
 iden/fy
 its
 sense
 of
 place,
 priori/es
 and
 overall
 aMen/on
 to
 ac/ve
transporta/on;
and,
 • Signaling
 the
 shiL
 from
 the
 more
 rural
 surrounding
 areas
into
 the
built‐up
area
and
the
expecta/ons
of
how
transporta/on
is
 managed
in
Collingwood. These
designs
shall
specifically
address:
 • Aesthe/cs;


N
29

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

• Ability
 of
 corridor
 to
 support
 pedestrian‐oriented
 commercial
 ac/vity
(where
designated
by
the
Official
Plan);
 • Ability
to
be
effec/vely
and
efficiently
served
by
mass
transit;
 • Use
 complete
streets
based
design
principles,
with
appropriate
 target
speeds
and
provide
for
all
modes
of
transporta/on; • Integrate
 street
 and
 landscape
 improvements
 that
 create
 a
 visually
 aMrac/ve
 sense
 of
 gateway
 for
 people
 traveling
 along
 these
streets; • Designs
 that
 enhance
the
land
 uses
 along
 the
 corridor
 and
 do
 not
 reduce
 property
 values
 through
 visual
 impacts,
 restricted
 access,
 and/or
 excessive
 (motor
 vehicle
 oriented)
 safety
 features
 resul/ng
 from
 inappropriately
 target
 speeds
 that
 are
 above
the
signed
speed
limits
and
intended
use
of
the
corridor.


Streets
can
be
designed
to
move
cars
efficiently
without
sacrificing
the
 ability
 of
 people
 to
 walk
 or
 bike
 along
 them;
 it
 just
 means
 that
 different
 choices
must
 be
 made
 when
 designing
 and
 building
streets.
 
 Below
 is
 an
 example
of
 two
 different
 street
 sec/ons
 that
 have
 been
 designed
with
different
sets
of
parameters;
the
lower
one
having
been
 created
 with
 parameters
that
 have
more
depth
and
 breath
of
 design


considera/ons,
beyond
just
func/onal
classifica/on
(both
are
collector
 roads)
and
the
movement
of
motor
vehicles. 34 There
 are
 a
 number
 of
 key
 aspects
 connec/ng
 how
 transporta/on
 planning
 and
 land‐use
 planning
 can
 be
 suppor/ve
 of
 each
 other. 35
 These
 need
 to
 be
 considered
 as
 part
 of
 this
 interdisciplinary
 design
 exercise.
 
 In
 determining
 the
 design
 of
 these
 corridors
 a
 number
 of
 considera/ons
will
 have
 to
be
 compared.

 As
part
of
 this
 process
the
 following
 guides
 are
 examples
 of
 useful
 analysis/design
 tools
 that
 should
at
a
minimum
be
used
as
references:
 MTO
Book
18:
Bicycle
Design
Guidelines
(to
be
released
2013) TAC,
Bikeway
Traffic
Control
Guidelines
for
Canada,
2012;
 AASHTO,
Guide
to
the
Development
of
Bicycle
FaciliNes,
2012;
 NACTO,
Urban
Bikeway
Design
Guide,
2011;
 NACTO,
Urban
Street
Design
Guide,
Oct
2012 Los
 Angeles
 County,
 
 Model
 Design
 Manual
 for
 Living
 Streets,
 2011;
 • AASHTO,
 Guide
 for
 the
 Planning,
 Design,
 and
 OperaNon
 of
 Pedestrian
FaciliNes,
2004;
 • Na/onal
 Collabora/ng
Centre
for
 Healthy
Public
 Policy,
Urban
 Traffic
Calming
and
Health:
A
Literature
Review,
2011;
 • Pedestrian
 and
 Bicycle
 Informa/on
 Center,
 Bicycle
 Facility
 SelecNon,
A
Comparison
of
Approaches,
2002. • • • • • •

A.
 Understand
 the
 problem
 and
 the
 context
 before
 B.
U/lize
a
mul/‐disciplinary
team; C.
Develop
a
project‐specific
communica/on
plan; D.
Establish
the
full
spectrum
of
project
needs
and
objec/ves; E.
Focus
on
alterna/ves
that
are
affordable
&
cost‐effec/ve; F.
Define
wide‐ranging
measures
of
success; G.
Consider
a
full
set
of
alterna/ves;
and,
 H.Compare
and
test
alterna/ves.
37
programming
a
solu/on
for
it;

For
 these
 design
 exercises
a
clear
 strategy,
and
 implementa/on
 plan
 
 needs
to
be
developed.

The
“tools
and
 techniques”
recommended
in
 the
Smart
 TransportaNon
Guidebook
are
a
good
 star/ng
point
 for
 this
 strategic
approach36 :

34
Environmental
Protec/on
Agency,
Principles
of
Walkability,
presenta/on,
2012,
pg.
8

35
Walk21,
InternaNonal
Charter
for
Walking,
2010
iden/fies
specific
ac/ons,
for
example:
Put
people
on
foot
at
the
heart
of
urban
planning.
Give
slow
transport
modes
such
as
walking
and
cycling
priority
 over
fast
modes,
and
local
traffic
precedence
over
long‐distance
travel;
Reduce
the
condi/ons
for
car‐dependent
lifestyles,
re‐allocate
road
space
to
pedestrians
and
close
the
missing
links
in
exis/ng
 walking
routes
to
create
priority
networks.
 36
Pennsylvania
and
New
Jersey
Departments
of
Transporta/on,

Smart
TransportaNon
Guidebook,
March
2008
pg..,
20 37
The
recently
completed
TransportaNon
Study
Town
of
Collingwood,
2012,
produced
by
C.C.
Tatham
&
Associates
Ltd.
was
focused
on
specific
areas
of
the
community
and
did
not
assess
transporta/on


issues
throughout
Collingwood,
nor
non‐motor
vehicle
transporta/on.

The
Report
recognizes
the
need
for
more
detailed
analysis
for
ac/ve
transporta/on
modes,
and
states
“While
it
is
acknowledged
 that
several
modes
of
travel
are
available
within
the
Town
(i.e..
Transit,
walk,
cycling,
etc.),
the
primary
focus
is
on
addressing
vehicular
travel
by
road
and
the
infrastructure
necessary
to
accommodate
 such.

The
detailed
assessment
of
needs
as
they
relate
to
pedestrian
and
cyclists
networks,
and
public
transit,
is
not
otherwise
within
the
scope
of
this
study”.

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
30

IllustraNve
 example
 of
 a
 complete
 street
 design
 soluNon
 that
 is
 achievable
 throughout
many
parts
of
Collingwood.
 
All
of
the
design
characterisNcs
make
 the
street
safer
and
more
appealing
for
all
users.

 (Source:
Walkable
and
Livable
CommuniNes
InsNtute)

Mountain Road

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
eS Hum treet
ntari Huro t Stree
High Street

Be

ac

hw

ood

Ro

ad

(“o

ld”

Hi

gh

o

wa

y2

6)

The
 corridors
that
 will
 be
 specifically
 addressed
 through
 this
Element
 are
 shown
in
this 
illustraNon.
 
 Note
 that
 in
 2012
 a
 survey
 was
 conducted
 (with
over
 150
 respondents)
to
gather
community
input
that
related
to
the
components
of
the
draZ
ATP.
 
The
respondents
indicated
that
the
top
three
long‐range
projects
that
they
 were
most
interested
in,
or
felt
were
the
most
important
were
complete
street
(re)designs
for:
 • Hume
Street
Corridor • Hurontario
Street
Corridor • Beachwood
Road
Corridor
(old
Highway
26
to
Wasaga
Beach) With
all
these
Major
Corridor
Gateways
the
 final
design
materials
generated
will
be
developed
by
an
interdisciplinary
team
through
a
public
process.
 
These
will
then
be
 used
to
provide
 the
necessary
design,
 analysis,
and
direction
to
inform
the
 larger
capital
 projects
of
completing
design
drawings
and
(re)developing
these
 roads
in
the
 future.
 
The
characteristics 
and
suggestions
for
 each
as 
outlined
above
 will
act
as
guides
to
these
 design
exercises 
and
do
not
 direct
 final
designs,
 nor
 should
they
 be
 viewed
as
end
results;
as
these
will
be
determined
appropriately
through
the
future
engineering/design
processes.

N

31

Challenge:
Hurontario
Street


Hurontario
 Street
 is
Collingwood’s
 “main
street”
and
 one
of
the
most
 significant
 corridors
 for
 entering
 the
 community
 from
 the
 south.
 
 It
 also
passes
directly
in
front
of
the
public
high
school.
 Hurontario’s
 current
 design
 includes
 significantly
 large
 paved
 shoulders.

These
represent
an
opportunity
to
create
a
more
aMrac/ve
 gateway
into
the
heart
of
the
community
and
an
ac/ve
transporta/on
 corridor
as
well.

 


Challenge:
Hume
Street

The
Hume
Street
corridor
is
envisioned
in
the
Official
Plan
to
be
mixed‐ use,
 and
 should
 evolve
 as
 a
 contemporary
 transi/on
 into
 the
 downtown
business/heritage
district.

 The
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 Technical
 Memorandum
 for
 the
 Town
 of
 Collingwood
 (2011)
 from
 the
 Walkable
 and
 Livable
 Communi/es
 Ins/tute
 iden/fies
the
following
rela/ng
to
 a
complete
streets
design
 approach
for
Hume
Street: These
kinds
of
improvements
will
result
 in
a
more
effecNve
 street
 that
not
 only
moves
cars
more
efficiently
 and
safely,
 but
 also
 does
the
same
for
 non‐vehicular
 transportaNon...
 Note
that
a
value
engineering
assessment
and
amendment


N
32
The
 current
 use
 of
 the
 sidewalk
 for
 cycling,
 and
 the
excessive
paved
shoulder
as
a
layby
for
transit
 vehicles
 indicates
 that
 Hume
 Street
 is
 not
 appropriately
 designed
 to
meet
 the
 needs
of
 the
 community.



Currently
 the
 paved
 shoulder
 along
 Hurontario
 Street
is
oZen
used
by
cyclists,
although
definitely
 not
designed
for
this
use.


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

to
the
current
design
should
be
taken
ASAP
as
it
could
likely
 result
 in
 reduced
 overall
 construcNon
 costs,
even
 with
 an
 improved
 street...
 Any
 increase
 in
 ongoing
 maintenance
 costs
will
 be
fully
 offset
 by
 adding
value
to
adjacent
 reail,
 mixed
 use
and
other
 properNes,
including
 increased
value
 to
many
homes
within
walking
distance.38 This
corridor
has
a
number
of
noteworthy
characteris/cs
that
will
have
 to
be
considered
in
the
design,
such
as: • • • • Access
to
the
hospital; Frontage
and
access
to
Central
Park; Crossing
of
major
trail
corridors;
and, Link
to
Highway
26.


Challenge:
High
Street


The
 southern
 sec/on
 of
 High
 Street
 iden/fied
 for
 this
 Element
 will
 provide
 an
 important
 opportunity
to
 provide
 a
 street
 corridor
 that
 is
 more
connected
 to
 neighbouring
con/guous
development
 while
 also
 suppor/ng
 all
 modes
 of
 transporta/on
 appropriately.
 
 The
 current
 condi/on
makes
this
road
look
and
feel
like
a
“highway”;
more‐so
than
 a
street
within
the
community.

 This
 street
 has
 residen/al
 uses,
 major
 trail
 corridor
 crossings,
major
 crossing
 for
 school
 children,
 and
 linkages
 to
 the
 evolving
 western
 commercial
district
and,
the
new
fire
hall.

Developing
a
design
that
is
 suppor/ve
 of
 these
 diverse
 uses/characteris/cs
 will
 be
 the
 primary
 difficulty
of
this
design
challenge.
 The
“mul/‐use
walkway”
along
por/ons
of
the
High
 Street
corridor
 is
 also
a
significant
considera/on
for
this
design
exercise.


38

Walkable
and
Livable
Communi/es
Ins/tute,
AcNve
TransportaNon
Comes
to
the
Town
of
Collingwood:
Technical
Memorandum,
November
2011,
page
3

N
33

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

Challenge:
Mountain
Road


The
 ability
 of
 this
 road
 to
 support
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 modes
 (and
 future
 transit
 links)
 to
 the
 Town
 of
 the
 Blue
 Mountains
 will
 be
 the
 major
challenge
of
this
corridor
design
exercise.
 This
 road
 also
 includes
 a
major
 trail
 crossing
at
 the
Black
Ash
 Creek
 bridge
that
must
also
be
addressed.



Challenge:
Beachwood
Road
 “Old”
Highway
26
to
Wasaga
Beach


39
Office
of
the
Chief
Coroner
for
Ontario,
Cycling
Death
Review,
June
2012,
pg.
3

N
34

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

The
 evolu/on
 of
 this
 road,
 caused
 by
 the
 development
 of
 the
 new
 Highway
26
sec/on,
allows
for
 significantly
appreciable
changes
to
be
 made
 to
 meet
 the
 goals
 of
 this
 Element
 and
 ATP.
 
 These
 include
 opportuni/es
to
incorporate
the
following
in
the
design: 
 • Bike
lanes; • Pedestrian
walkways
and/or
sidewalks; • Transit
stops; • Turning
pockets;
and, • Trees/landscaping.

The
 right‐of‐way
 in
 this
 area
 could
 be
 par/cularly
 well
 suited
 to
 separated
bicycle
 tracts;
 which
 should
 be
 considered
 throughout
 the
 design
 exercise.
 
 This
 is
 an
 important
 considera/on
 given
 the
 informa/on
 provided
 in
 the
 recently
released
 Cycling
 Death
 Review
 from
 the
 Office
 of
 the
 Chief
 Coroner
 for
 Ontario
 which
 states
 the
 following,
 while
 also
 recommending
 the
 use
 of
 complete
 streets
 design
principles
for
all
roads:
 Studies
in
 Denmark
have
shown
 that
 providing
 segregated
 bicycle
tracks
or
lanes
lanes
alongside
urban
roads
reduced
 deaths
among
cyclists
by
35%.39

NOTE:
As
with
all
these
Major
Corridor
Gateways
the
final
design
 materials
generated
will
be
developed
by
an
interdisciplinary
team
 through
a
public
process.

These
will
then
be
used
to
provide
the
 necessary
design,
analysis,
and
direc/on
to
inform
the
larger
capital
 projects
of
(re)developing
these
roads
in
the
future.

The
 characteris/cs
and
sugges/ons
for
each
as
outlined
above
will
act
as
 guides
to
these
design
exercises
and
do
not
direct
final
designs,
nor
 should
they
be
viewed
as
end
results;
as
these
will
be
determined
 appropriately
through
the
design
processes.


N
35

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12


3.
Trails
for
Ac3ve
Transporta3on
Challenge

Some
 of
 the
 routes
 that
 are
 part
 of
 Collingwood’s
 trail
 network
are
 appropriate
 as
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 links.
 
 This
 is
 because
 they
 provide
 physical
 connec/ons
 to
 specific
 places
 or
 areas
 of
 the
 community
for
people
traveling
under
their
own
power.

However,
the
 development
 and
 management
 of
 the
 trail
 system
 has
been
 focused
 on
 recrea/on
 use
 for
 the
 most
 part,
 as
 opposed
 to
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
parameters.

 When
describing
this
difference,
the
report
created
for
Collingwood
by
 Walk
and
Bike
for
Life
notes:
 It
is
important
to
note
the
different
needs
of
different
users
 of
 trails.

 RecreaNonal
 users
enjoy
 the
very
 curvy,
winding
 paths
of
trails
that
are
oZen
outside
of
the
urbanized
areas
 of
the
city
and
allow
them
to
experience
the
natural
beauty
 and
green
spaces
of
a
city.

In
 terms
of
transportaNon,
the
 most
effecNve
and
well‐used
bike
and
pedestrian
paths
into
 urbanized
 areas
 do
 not
 meander
 around
the
city,
 but
 are
 straight
corridors
between
places
of
origin
and
desNnaNon.

 
 Those
 that
 use
 acNve
 forms
 of
 transport
 want
 to
 get
 to
 their
desNnaNon
 in
the
most
efficient
 manner
possible
and
 need
 corridors
 that
 go
 North‐South,
 East‐West
 in
 a
 grid
 system
for
efficient
transportaNon.
40 A
few
key
routes
have
been
iden/fied
as
having
the
greatest
need
and
 poten/al
 as
shared
purpose
trails.

These
are
illustrated
in
the
map
on
 page
38.

To
 ensure
that
these
key
shared
 purpose
routes
func/on
 as
 part
 of
 the
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 network
 the
 Town
 will
 have
 to
 address
their
design,
construc/on,
and
management
accordingly;
with
 work
programs
executed
to
make
necessary
changes.



The
 chart
 on
 the
 facing
 page
 from
 the
 ASSHTO
 Guide
 for
 the
 Development
of
Bicycle
FaciliNes 41
outlines
some
of
the
differences
in
 characteris/cs
between
recrea/onal
trips
an
u/litarian
trips:

40
Walk
and
Bike
for
Life,
Trail
for
AcNve
TransportaNon,

2009
pg.
10 41
ASSHTO,
Guide
for
the
Development
of
Bicycle
FaciliNes,
2012,
pg.
2‐4

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
36

Users
 of
 trails
 for
 recreaNon
 and
 acNve
 transportaNon
 purposes
 have
 different
 needs;
 and
 trail
 systems
 are
 developed
with
 these
 in
mind.
 
 However,
 some
 porNons
of
 the
trails
network
 may
work
well
 for
both
kinds
of
users
(as
 illustrated
 above).
 
 When
 this
is
 the
 case,
 these
 need
to
 be
 designed,
built,
and
managed
for
this
dual
purpose.



Characteristic Directness

Recreational
Trips Directness
of
route
not
as
 important
as
visual
interest,
 shade,
protection
from
wind.

Utilitarian
Trips Directness
of
route
&
 connected,
 continuous
facilities
 more
important
than
 visual
interest. Trips
generally
travel
 from
residential
to
 schools,
shopping,
or
 work
areas
and
back. Trips
generally
are
 1‐10
miles
in
length.

Ac3on

Connectivity

Loop
trips
may
be
preferred
 to
backtracking;
start
and
end
 points
are
often
the
same. Trips
may
range
from
under
a
 mile
to
over
50
miles. Sort‐term
bicycle
parking
is
 needed
at
recreational
sites,
 parks,
trailheads,
and
other
 recreational
activity
centres. Varied
topography
may
be
 desired.

Parking

Topography Riders Destinations

(individuals)
May
be
riding
in
 a
group. (Individuals)
May
drive
with
 their
bicycles
to
the
starting
 point
of
a
ride.


Time

Typically
occur
on
the
 weekend
or
on
weekdays
 before
morning
commute
 hours
or
after
evening
 commute
hours.

N

42
Victor
Ford
and
Associates
Inc.,
On
&
Off
Road
Cycling/Pedestrian
FaciliNes
&
TransportaNon:
Safety
&
Improvement
RecommendaNons,
December
2009,
Appendix
B

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
Short‐term
&
long
‐ terms
bicycle
parking
 is
needed. Flat
topography
is
 desired.


Distance

To
 ensure
that
 they
can
 func/on
 as
 ac/ve
transporta/on
 routes
 the
 iden/fied
 trails
 (as
 well
 as
 their
 various
 street
 crossings)
 shall
 be
 reviewed
 and
 improved/maintained
 as
 needed
 (including
 design;
 construc/on
 of
 improvements;
seasonal
 maintenance;
 and,
signage).
 
 The
map
on
page
39
illustrates
the
crossings
and
transi/ons
along
the
 off‐street
 trail
 network
 that
 are
 applicable
 to
 this
 Element.
 
 Those
 crossings
 that
 correspond
 with
 the
 trail
 sec/ons
 iden/fied
 for
 this
 Element
 shall
 be
 improved
 with
 facili/es,
 signage,
 and
 markings
 to
 make
them
func/on
beMer
and
improve
pedestrian/cyclist
safety.

This
 applies
to
the
following
numbered
 crossings/transi/ons
 iden/fied
 on
 the
map42:
 • • • • 1
‐
Black
Ash
at
Mountain
Road 11
‐
Black
Ash
@
6th
Street 12
–
Cranberry
Trail;
and,
 4,
5,
6,
7,
and
10
‐
Memory
Lane
and
Train
Trail

(Individuals)
Often
 ride
alone.


Use
bicycle
as
 primary
 transportation
mode;
 may
transfer
to
public
 transportation;
may
 not
have
access
to
a
 car
for
trip.

Bicycle
commute
trips
 may
occur
at
any
 hour
of
the
day.


Black
 Ash
 Creek
Trail
 crossing
 at
 6th
street
 that
 is 
in
 need
of
physical
improvements
to
make
it
more
acNve
 transportaNon
friendly
and
funcNonal.

37

Highw

ay 26

Mountain Road

Si

tre xth S

et

This
map
illustrates
the
six
corridors
(not
necessarily
the
exact
trail
locaNon
depicted)
along
which
the
Collingwood
Trails
Network
routes
should
be
adapted
 to
support
 both
 recreaNonal
 and
acNve
 transportaNon
 uses.
 
 These
 include
 exisNng
 trails,
 as
 well
 as
those
 that
 may
 be
 built
 along
 these
 corridors
as
 addiNons
to
the
 Network
 in
the
 future.
 
The
corridors
are
clock‐wise
 from
upper
leZ:
 Highway
 26
(including
Cranberrry
Inn
Trail);
 Train
Trail;
 Precy
River
 Parkway
and
Beachwood
Raod;
Poplar
Sideroad;
Sixth
Street;
and,
Mountain
Road.



N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
Pr ett yR ive

Po

ide plar S

road

38

Tr

rP

KW

ain

Tr

ail

Developing
 the
 appropriate
 ac/ons
 for
 the
 analysis,
 design,
 implementa/on,
 and
 maintenance
 will
 primarily
 involve
 the
 Trails
 CommiMee,
Parks
Recrea/on
&
Culture
and
Engineering
Departments. The
 end
 result
 will
 be
 that
 physical
 changes
 will
 be
 made
 to
 these
 specific
areas
and
the
funding
for
their
maintenance
will
shiL
from
the
 Trails
CommiMee
budget
 to
 that
 of
Public
 Works
(as
they
will
be
part
 of
the
Town’s
transporta/on
system,
not
 the
recrea/on
system).

The
 Town’s
budget
will
 have
 to
take
into
 account
this
shiL
in
 quality
and
 use
of
these
trails.
The
extent
of
physical
improvements
and
seasonal
 access,
will
 be
 important
 considera/ons
 of
 this
 work;
 as
 well
 as,
the
 phasing
of
improvements.


This
Element
will
have
to
be
closely
managed
with
the
implementa/on
 of
the
Major
Corridor
Gateways
‐
Complete
Streets
Element
described
 earlier,
because
they
have
a
given
amount
of
overlap.



N
39

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

The
 Collingwood
 Trails
 Network
 Management
 Strategy,
 2012,
 developed
by
the
Town
 of
Collingwood
 Parks,
Recrea/on
and
Culture
 Department,
will
be
used
as
a
key
resource
for
informing
analysis
and
 design
 of
 trail
 sec/ons
 and
 crossingsbeing
 adapted
 through
 this
 Element.

PorNon
 of
 map
 from
 “On
 &
 Off
 Road
 Cycling/Pedestrian
 FaciliNes
 &
 TransportaNon:
 Safety
 &
 Improvement
 RecommendaNons”
 report,
 that
 illustrates
 the
 locaNons
of
 the
 trail
 crossings
that
 will
have
 to
 be
 addressed
to
 improve
funcNon
and
safety
during
the
implementaNon
of
this 
Element
as
listed
 on
page
37.




II.
 


Mid‐range
Implementa3on

Large
Scale
Projects
3
to
5
years

N
40

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
40% 20%

The
Elements 
listed
here
are
generally
lesser
in
scale
 and
scope
than
the
previous 
Sec/on;
and
are
able
to
 be
 completed
 within
 3
 to
 5
 years 
of
 adop/ng
 the
 ATP.

60%

Preferences for mid-range projects of the ATP

Sidewalks to parks Train Trail Bike parking Siding Trail Share the road

The
responses
to
the
2012
community
survey
indicated
that
 the
mid‐range
projects
that
are
part
of
the
ATP
that
they
 considered
most
important
were:
Sidewalk
links
to
parks;
 Share
the
road
signage;
Train
Trail
extension;
and,
Siding
Trail
 extension
,
and
bike
parking
strategy.

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
41


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


1)

Sunset
Point
&
St
Lawrence
Street
Corridor
 
 2)

Pedestrian
Enhancements
Downtown
 
 
 
 3)

“Right‐size”
Downtown
Parking
Facili3es
 
 4)

Bus
Stop
Sea3ng
 
 
 
 
 
 
 5)

Family
Bike
Boulevards
 
 
 
 
 
 6)

Sidewalks
&
Crosswalks
at
Public
Parks
 
 
 7)

Bridge
Link
at
Siding
Trail

 
 
 
 
 8)

Link
at
Train
Trail
to
College
 
 
 
 
 9)

Ac3ve
Transporta3on
Bridge
at
Mountain
Road



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


pg
42 pg
44 pg
46 pg
48 pg
50 pg
54 pg
56 pg
58 pg
60


1.
Sunset
Point
&
St
Lawrence
Street
Corridor
Challenge

St.
 Lawrence
 Street
 along
 Collingwood’s
 waterfront
 connects
 the
 community
to
its
major
waterfront
park
and
most
popular
playground,
 along
the
way
weaving
through
 a
residen/al
area.

 Because
of
this,
it
 plays
a
significant
role
in
the
community
in
two
ways:
as
a
high
profile
 connector
 for
 ac/ve
 transporta/on,
and
 as
an
 influence
on
 the
sense
 of
place
of
an
important
loca/on
in
the
community.

 Although
 there
 have
 been
 trial
 projects
 along
 this
 street
 corridor
 aimed
 at
 improving
safety
including
on‐street
 bike
 lanes
and
 reverse
 angle
parking;
unfortunately,
the
 current
 condi/on
 of
the
street
 does
 not
allow
 it
to
 perform
well,
because
it
 is
excessively
wide,
confusing,
 and
out
of
context
from
a
design
perspec/ve.


 The
 ac/vity
node
defined
 by
 the
 area
 around
 Enviro
 Park
 (the
 most
 widely
used
 park
area
 in
 town
 drawing
people
 from
 throughout
 the
 community,
 region,
 and
 from
 afar)
 and
 the
 food
 concessions
 is
 very
 important
 to
the
success
 of
Sunset
 Point
 Park.
 
 However,
it
 is
poorly
 defined,
 has
 imprac/cal
 connec/ons
 and
 rela/onships
 between
 spaces,
 and
 has
 infrastructure
 that
 create
 conflicts
 between
 pedestrians,
 cyclists
 and
 vehicles.
 
 However,
 the
 elements
 and
 characteris/cs
of
 the
 area
 afford
 it
 great
 poten/al
 for
 improvement;
 allowing
it
to
func/on
well
as
a
great
community
place
and
integrated
 well
into
the
Town’s
transporta/on
network(s).

 The
 challenge
 addressed
 with
 this
 Element
 is
 to
 make
 this
 street
 func/on
beMer
 to
 accommodate
the
large
 number
 of
people
 coming
 to
the
park
and
playground
while
achieving
the
following: 1) Crea/ng
 an
 aesthe/cally
 appealing
 &
 context
 sensi/ve
 visual
quality
along
its
length; 2) Being
safe
for
all
modes
of
transporta/on; 3) Func/ons
in
 a
way
that
it
enhances
the
loca/on’s
sense
of
 place
(as
opposed
to
ac/ng
as
a
way
through
a
space); 4) That
the
unique
shared
use
of
the
area
(resul/ng
from
the
 presence
of
many
families
with
children
at
the
Enviro
Park)
 is
recognized
and
addressed
in
its
design
features; 5) Create
 an
 aesthe/cally
 appealing
 entrance
 into
 the
 Park
 from
the
PreMy
River
Parkway; 6) Enhance
 the
 overall
 func/on
 and
 design
 of
 the
 Park
 and
 playground
 (with
 par/cular
 aMen/on
 to
 the
 work
 programs
 focused
 on
 upda/ng
 these
 important
 public
 assets).

ParNcular
 acenNon
 to
 the
 relaNonship
 between
 the
 playground
and
the
 Park
 will
 have
 to
 be
 paid
 during
this
project.
 
 The
 role
the
street
plays
in
its
 current
 locaNon
 will
 have
 to
 be
 seriously
 considered
because
of
the
way
it
divides
elements
 within
 this
 area.
 
 If
 becer
 relaNonships
 between
 these
 areas
 can
 be
 formed
 the
 placemaking
 dividend
 of
 becer
 funcNon
 and
 livability
 will
 be
 realized.

N
42

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

Ac3on


Managing
 the
 conflicts
 between
 users
 (par/cularly
 between
 cyclists
 and
 pedestrians)
 in
 areas
 of
 high
 use,
such
 as
 along
 this
part
 of
 the
 waterfront,
 are
 a
 challenge.
 There
 are
 issues
 of
 expecta/ons,
 familiarity,
travel
speed,
lack
of
signage
and
design. A
design
task
force
should
be
created
to
address
the
challenges
of
this
 Element;
 including
 representa/ves
 from
 Parks
 Recrea/on
 &
 Culture
 and
Engineering
Departments.

Issues
with
urban
design,
street
design,
 park
 design,
 and
 ci/zen/neighbourhood
 engagement,
 as
 described
 here,
 will
 be
 the
 focus
 of
 this
 team’s
 work.
 
 The
 result
 will
 be
 an
 ac/onable
recommended
design
for
Council’s
considera/on.


Examples
of
the
ques/ons
that
will
be
contemplated
are: a) How
do
 we
improve
 the
 safety
of
 this
 “street
 through
 the
 park”
for
pedestrians
and
cyclists”? b) What
 design
 improvements
 could
 we
 make
 to
 have
 this
 street
func/on
more
as
a
parkway? c) Are
there
ways
we
can
reduce
the
impact
the
street
has,
in
 terms
of
the
way
it
divides
the
Enviro
Park
playground
from
 the
waterfront
park? d) Can
 we
 develop
 a
 design
 that
 is
 cost
 effec/ve,
 understanding
 that
 improvements
 to
 stormwater
 structures,
 and
 urban
 cross
 sec/ons
 for
 streets
 are
 very
 costly?

PROBABILITY OF DEATH

1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 0

Pedestrian Fatality Risk Related to Impact Speed of a Car

20

60 40 IMPACT SPEED (km/h)

Because
 of
 the
 large
 number
 of
 people
 acending
 the
 Park,
 playground,
 and
 residenNal
 uses,
 vehicle
 speeds
along
St.
 Lawrence
 street
is
parNcularly
important
and
a
criNcal
aspect
of
the
 design
for
 its
redevelopment.


 The
 World
 Health
 OrganizaNon
 (Road
 Safety‐Speed
 Fact
 Sheet)
 idenNfies
the
 important
 role
 that
 vehicle
 speed
 plays
 in
 pedestrian
 fatality
risk.

“The
higher
the
speed
of
a
vehicle,
the
shorter
the
Nme
a
 driver
has
to
stop
and
avoid
a
crash.
 
 A
car
traveling
at
50
km/h
will
 typically
 require
 13 
metres
in
which
to
stop,
 while
 a
car
 traveling
at
 40
km/h
 will
 stop
in
 less
 than
 8.5
 metres”.
 
 The
 WHO
 goes 
on
 to
 state:
 “an
increase
 in
average
 speed
of
1
km/h
typically
results
in
a
 3%
 higher
 risk
 of
a
crash
involving
injury,
 with
 a
 4‐5%
 increase
 for
 crashes
 that
 result
 in
 fataliNes”.
 
 The
 chart
 above
 illustrates
 the
 Pedestrian
Fatality
Risk
as
a
FuncNon
of
the
Impact
Speed
of
a
car.

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
80 100

Currently
temporary
 crossing
 warning
devices
 and
 traffic
 calming
measures
 are
 in
 place
 in
the
 area
 near
 Enviro
 Park.
 
 More
 appropriate
 and
 permanent
 measures
 will
 have
 to
 be
 part
 of
 the
 design
for
this
Element.
 
An
appropriate
 reducNon
 of
vehicle
speed
will
be
 necessary.
 
When
reducing
 speeds
of
vehicles,
two
things
happen
that
make
it
 safer
 for
 other
street
users.
 
 One
is
that
 the
driver
 has
 an
 increased
 response
 Nme
 to
 deal
 with
 obstacles
 in
 their
 way,
 and
 the
 second
is
that
 the
 distance
 they
 travel
 before
 coming
 to
 a
 stop
 is
 reduced.
 
Both
 of
these
 factors
make
 streets
with
 reduced
speeds
safer.



43


2.
Pedestrian
Enhancements
for
Downtown
Challenge

The
 recent
 downtown
 streetscape
 redevelopment
 made
 changes
 to
 the
 physical
 environment
 that
 improved
 walkability
 and
 bikeability,
 
 that
 included:
 iden/fied
 bike
 routes
 (perimeter
 streets),
 wider
 sidewalks,
 careful
 arrangement
 of
 sidewalk
uses,
 aMen/on
 to
 travel
 routes
 and
 widths,
 curb
 extensions
 at
 corners
 to
 reduce
 walking
 distances,
 countdown
 and
 audio
 crossing
 signals,
 short‐term
 bike
 parking,
and
aesthe/c
improvements.

 Throughout
the
downtown
core
there
are
also
number
of
exis/ng
mid‐ block
 pedestrian
 walkways
 that
 that
 were
 not
 directly
 part
 of
 the
 redevelopment
 project
 and
 act
 as
 shortcuts.
 
 This
 is
 an
 important
 func/on
 for
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 from
 this
 group
 of
 walkways
 because
 they
 create
 a
 finer‐grained
 built
 environment
 that
 is
 more
 convenient
and
 human
scaled.

Moving
throughout
 the
downtown
on
 foot
 is
 benefited
 from
 these
 through‐block
 pedestrian
 connec/ons
 that
 are
 provided.
 
 These
 are
 especially
 useful
 for
 accessing
 neighbouring
streets
 off
of
the
“main
 street”
 of
 Hurontario
Street,
to
 reach
 the
 municipal
 parking
 areas,
 and
 to
 access
 some
 very
 unique
 laneway
businesses.
 
Unfortunately
it
 appears
 that
 many
visitors
are
 not
aware
of
these
helpful
shortcuts
and
access
routes
and
 others
do
 not
use
them
because
of
their
visual
character. leZ
 as
 simply
 uNlitarian,
but
 more
of
it
can
 and
should
 be
used
to
 create
 a
 more
fine‐grained
 variety
 of
 public
 and
semipublic
space. 43 Addi/onally,
 laneways
 in
 the
 downtown
 district
 of
 Collingwood
 are
 being
used
 as
 suppor/ng
infrastructure
 for
 back‐of‐house
 opera/ons
 and
 vehicle
 access.
 
 However,
 these
 downtown
 laneways
 are
 underu/lized
 for
 pedestrian
 and
 cyclist
 access,
 and
 also
 in
 terms
 of
 placemaking
 opportuni/es
that
 could
enhance
business
interests
and
 overall
 livability.

These
lanes
are
not
 being
used
to
their
full
 poten/al
 as
those
found
in
other
communi/es
for
example.
 Overall
 there
 is
 a
 disparity
 between
 the
 use
 and
 poten/al
 of
 these
 areas
 do
 to
 a
 combina/on
 of
 their
 loca/on,
the
 adjacent
 uses,
their
 visual
 quality,
and
 awareness
 about
 them.
 
 Other
 communi/es
 have
 been
 able
 to
 successfully
 design
 and/or
 program
 the
 use
 of
 these
 spaces
as
community
enhancements.

 The
 challenge
 is
to
 develop
 a
 strategy
and
 implementa/on
 program
 that
 will
 physically
 improve
 these
 areas
 so
 that
 they
 add
 to
 the
 downtown
district
in
the
following
ways: 1) Improved
pedestrian
and
bike
environment; 2) Create
 posi/ve
 use
 opportuni/es
 beyond
 parking
 and
 trash
 storage,
 and
 business
 opportuni/es
 where
 appropriate; 3) Create
a
sense
of
 place
and/or
iden/ty
that
complements
 the
downtown
district
and
improves
wayfinding; 4) Makes
 the
 secondary
 entrances
 to
 commercial
 establishments
more
desirable
for
pedestrians;
and, 5) Maintaining/func/oning
 well
 for
 u/litarian
 uses
 where
 needed.

Passageways
that
 cut
through
blocks
and
connect
with
 small
 courtyards
 and
 other
 fragments
 of
 urban
 space
 (the
 “intersNNal
 space”
 between
 the
 primary
 streets
 and
 public
 spaces)
 represent
 opportuniNes
 to
 extend
 the
fabric
of
the
public
realm
and
should
not
 be
treated
 as
 throwaway
 spaces…
 Some
 of
 this
 space
 should
 be


43
Urban
Land
Ins/tute,
Placemaking
Developing
Town
Centers,
Main
Streets,
and
Urban
Villages,
2002,
Pg
289

N

The
importance
of
these
kinds
if
connec/ons
is
described
by
the
Urban
 Land
Ins/tute:


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
44

Ac3on

The
 execution
 of
 this
Element
 must
 proceed
 with
 caution,
 and
 not
 be
 blinded
by
optimism.

The
suggested
range
of
amendments
to
the
quality
 and
 function
 of
 the
 mid‐block
 connections
 and
 alley
 ways
 should
 be
 supportive
 of
 safe
 and
 attractive
 pedestrian
 movement
 and
 activities,
 while
 also
 improving
 the
 functionality
 of
 necessary
 “back‐of‐house”
 activities
as
well.
 
The
Urban
Land
Institute
 describes
the
importance
of
 creating
 this
 balanced
 approach
 to
 developing
 pedestrian‐focused
 “A”
 streets
with
the
more
utilitarian
“B”
streets:

 Too
often,
town
centres
are
envisioned
 as
consisting
entirely
 of
 high‐quality
 main
 streets,
 with
 no
 provision
 for
 the
 utilitarian
 needs
 of
 shops,
 restaurants,
 cinemas,
 and
 residential
 buildings.
 
 In
fact,
the
absence
of
“B”
 streets
can
 wreak
havoc
on
the
pedestrian
quality
of
a
town
centre’s
main
 streets
 by
 pushing
 utilitarian
 activities
 out
 in
 front
 of
 the
 stores.



This
Element
 will
require
a
multi‐disciplinary
approach
 that
 includes
the
 following
participant
skill
sets/interests
represented: • Urban
design; • BIA
&
businesses
(representative
of
the
downtown
district); • Pedestrian
and
bicyclist; • Accessibility/mobility;
and, • Service
needs.

The
 work
 of
 this
 Element
 should
 have
 a
 process
 flow
 similar
 to
 the
 following,
while
working
closely
with
the
BIA
and
land
owners: a) Determination
of
the
physical
parameters; b) Determination
of
existing
formal
and
informal
uses
and
needs; c) Assessment
of
existing
functionality; d) Preliminary
evaluation
of
opportunities
and
options; e) Engagement
of
public; f) Examination
of
opportunities
for
phased
approaches; g) Proofing
of
options
with
public
and
stakeholders; h) Determination
of
prioritized
options;
and, i) Costing
and
implementation
strategy.

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
45

Here
 is
 an
 example
 of
 a
 laneway
 enhanced
 in
 Victoria,
 BriNsh
 Columbia.
 
 This
 laneway
 has
 successfully
changed
its
use
from
a
“B”
street
to
 a
more
 pedestrian/business
supporNve
 “A”
 type
 street.


3.
“Right‐size”
Downtown
Parking
Facili3es
Challenge

One
of
 the
ways
that
 the
community
can
provide
efficient
 use
of
our
 land
 resources
 within
 the
 right‐of‐way
 is
 to
 ensure
 that
 on‐street
 parking
is
properly
designed.

 This
can
 easily
be
combined
with
 road
 diet
and
bike
route
design
 concepts,
the
result
can
be
to
create
more
 func/onal
streets
that
incorporate
more
parking,
while
also
facilita/ng
 improved
transporta/on
along
the
street
for
all
users. 44

 In
 business
 districts
 parking
 demand
 management
 is
 par/cularly
 important.

Providing
too
 liMle
parking
can
 make
areas
inaccessible
to
 a
por/on
of
the
community;
while
providing
too
much
can
damage
the
 overall
 form
 of
 a
 retail
 district,
 making
 it
 unappealing
 and
 poorly
 func/oning
 for
 pedestrians.
 
Both
 of
 these
have
a
nega/ve
effect
 on
 retail
 areas.
 
 Collingwood
 has
 significant
 capital
 and
 cultural
 investments
 in
 its
 downtown
 district.
 
 To
 facilitate
 its
 success
 a
 strategic
 parking
 demand
 management
 strategy
 must
 be
 developed.
 
 Currently
on‐street
 parking
in
 the
 right‐of‐way,
and
 off‐street
 parking
 are
 not
 being
 used
 to
 their
 func/onal
 capacity
 to
 best
 support
 the
 business
district;
long‐term
bike
parking
is
not
provided;
parking
areas
 are
 affec/ng
the
success
 of
 pedestrian
 improvements;
parking
areas
 are
 nega/vely
 impac/ng
 the
 streetscape;
 and,
 infill
 development
 opportuni/es
that
 can
 provide
tax
revenue,
jobs,
and
a
more
dynamic
 downtown
are
being
foregone
for
surface
parking
lots.

 The
challenge
therefore,
is
to
address
these
issues,
to
provide
parking
 facili/es
within
the
downtown
that
maximize
the
use
of
valuable
land/ right‐of‐way
 resources
 for
 parking.
 
 This
 is
 to
 be
 achieved
 through
 appropriate
design
of
parking
facili/es
that: 1) Maximize
 the
 number
 of
 vehicles
 that
 can
 be
 parked
 to
 meet
the
needs
of
the
district
and
community; 2) Balance
 the
 kinds
 of
 parking
facili/es
 provided,
including
 those
for
motor
cycles
and
bicycles;
 3) Are
 safe
and
 convenient
for
 drivers
and
 pedestrians
alike;
 and, 4) Are
dynamically
managed
to
best
support
businesses.




44
Ins/tute
of
Transporta/on
Engineers,

New
Tools
for
Parking
Design
and
Analysis
Web
Briefing,


N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
46

Ac3on

A
process
 will
 have
 to
 be
defined
and
 ini/ated
 for:
analyzing
parking
 func/on
 and
 need;
 business
 and
 community
 engagement;
 and
 assessment
 of
 “highest
 and
 best”
 use
 of
 municipal
 resources
 for
 providing,
managing,
and
maintaining
parking. The
following
provides
an
outline
of
the
basic
elements
that
should,
at
 a
minimum,
be
explored
with
this
ac/on
item: • • • • • • Maximize
use
of
lands
allocated
for
parking; Explora/on
of
parking
“best
prac/ces”; Pedestrian/cyclist/driver
safety; Site
specific
parking
needs; Full
cost
accoun/ng
of
parking
facili/es; Urban
design
and
streetscape
impacts;

• actual
use
of
parking
facili/es; • responses
to
pay
parking
rates; • infill
 development
 opportuni/es
 on
 parking
 lots
 and
 their
 impacts
on
taxes,
businesses,
streetscape).


On‐street
Parallel
 vs.
Angled
Parking
Stalls
 (base
22
foot
parallel
stall) Angle
of
parking
 (degrees) 45 60 75 90

Poten/al
increase
in
 number
of
stalls
% 73

The
 ITE,
 “New
 Tools
 for
 Parking
 Design
 and
 Analysis
Web
Briefing”
describes
one
of
the
 ways
 that
 parking
 use
 can
 be
 opNmized
 to
 more
 efficiently
use
land
is
to
design
for
angled
parking;
 as
 an
 increased
 number
 of
 vehicles
 can
 be
 accommodated
 with
 angled
 versus 
 parallel
 arrangements
as
shown
in
the
 table
 above.
 
This
 kind
of
creaNvity
and
design
analysis
needs 
to
be
 integrated
 into
 the
 implementaNon
 of
 this
 Element.

N
144

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
112 137

Here
 is
 an
 example
 where
 car,
 motorcycle,
 and
 bicycle
 parking
 faciliNes
 are
 well
 integrated
 into
 a
 site.
 
 The
 design
 and
 management
of
parking
faciliNes
is
criNcal
to
their
success. As
 Jeremy
 Nelson
 of
 Nelson\Nygaard
 stated
 in
 the
 2009
 Parking
 Lots
to
Parks
Workshop.
 “Parking
demand
is
always
changing,
 and
 this
is
 why
 it
 is 
criNcal
 to
 both
 esNmate
 demand
 accurately
 and
 manage
parking
supply
dynamically”.
 Source:
Dan
Burden


47


4.
Bus
Stop
Sea3ng
Challenge

To
 be
 effec/ve
 a
public
 transit
 system
 has
 to
 include
 safe,
 efficient,
 and
 func/onal
 transit
 stops
for
 its
 users;
 a
significant
 component
 of
 this
the
 availability
of
sea/ng
at
 bus
stops.

This
 is
a
maMer
 of
health
 and
accessibility
for
the
town’s
ci/zens,
par/cularly
including:

 • Elderly
persons; • People
traveling
with
young
children; • People
 with
 limited
 mobility
 and/or
 stamina
 due
 to
 physical
 health
or
ailments;
and, • Expectant
mothers.

Ac3on

For
 this
 Element
 the
 ac/on
 will
 involve
 developing
 a
 strategy
 and
 /meline
to
install
 sea/ng
at
 bus
stop
 loca/ons
within
the
community.
 
 A
 phased
 program
 for
 implemen/ng
 these
 shall
 be
 developed
 with
 similar
 priority
criteria
to
 that
 currently
used
by
 the
 Engineering
and
 Public
Works
to
provide
bus
shelters.


It
may
be
desirable,
especially
given
our
local
climate
and
community’s
 large
and
growing
number
of
seniors,
to
 have
bus
shelters
at
each
bus
 stop.
 
 However,
 given
 the
 cost
 of
 developing
 and
 maintaining
 bus
 shelters,
it
may
be
imprac/cal
to
meet
this
desire.

As
such
the
Town’s
 Engineering
 and
 Public
 Works
 Departments
 have
 a
 long
 standing
 opera/onal
 policy
 for
 iden/fying
 priority
 stops
 that
 have
 shelters.
 
 Essen/ally
 the
 priori/es
 are
 based
 on:
 loca/on
 type
 (downtown;
 school;
 major
 recrea/on
 facility;
 hospital,
 et
 cetera);
 numbers
 of
 users;
and,

priority
sites
used
by
many
children,
or
seniors.
 The
 investment
 in
 sea/ng
 is
minimal
 compared
 to
providing
shelters
 while
 s/ll
 significantly
improving
 the
 func/on
 of
 the
 bus
 stops.
 
The
 maintenance
 of
 this
 infrastructure
 is
 also
 less
 to
 that
 of
 enclosed
 shelters.

This
 Element
 will
create
 a
 strategy
and
 priority
process
 for
 providing
 sea/ng
at
 all
 bus
stops
to
 help
 maximize
 the
 number
 of
 people
 that
 can
use
the
transit
system.



N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
48

The
majority
of
transit
stops
in
Collingwood
provide
no
seaNng
 for
users.

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
49

If
 seaNng
 is
 not
 provided
 at
 bus
 stops,
 there
 are
 many
 people
 within
 the
 community
 that
 will
 be
 sufficiently
 inconvenienced.
 
For
some
this
will
limit/deter
their
ability
to
 use
transit.
 
In
a
community
with
an
increasing
populaNon
of
 seniors,
this
is
a
significant
concern.


5.
Family
Bike
Boulevards
Challenge
The
 initial
 phase
 of
 the
 development
 of
 the
 bike
 route
 network
 in
 Collingwood
 is
 the
 delineation
 of
 the
 routes
 as
 described
 in
 the
 On‐ Street
Bike
Route
Element
(page
78).

This

Element
is
the
next
phase
of
 making
cycling
enjoyable,
efficient,
and
practical.
 Throughout
 much
 of
 the
 research
 and
 literature
 on
 cycling
and
 active
 transportation,
cyclists
are
often
 identified
by
their
 level
 of
 comfort
 in
 cycling
 in
 traffic
 (see
 also
 page
 37).
 
 This
 helps
 identify
 the
 kinds
 of
 facilities
 needed,
 and
 what
 can
 be
 expected,
 when
 developing
 a
 community
wide
 network
 for
 active
 transportation.
 
The
Ontario
 Bike
 Plan45 
describes
these
categories:
 • The
Strong
and
the
Fearless
‐
 perhaps
1%
 of
the
population
 who
will
ride
regardless
of
the
condition
of
roadways. • The
Enthused
and
the
Confident
‐
5
to
10%
of
the
population
 who
 are
 cycling
 now
 attracted
 by
 improvements
 made
 to
 bikeway
 networks
 in
 their
 communities.
 
 They
 may
 be
 comfortable
sharing
the
road
with
motorists,
but
appreciate
 bike
lanes
and
other
facilities
designed
specifically
for
them.
 
 And
 they
 may
 choose
 to
 cycle
 more
 often
 as
 further
 improvements
are
made. • The
 Interested
 but
 Concerned
 ‐
 perhaps
 60%
 of
 the
 population.
 
 They
 may
 like
 riding
 a
 bicycle
based
on
 good
 experiences
in
their
youth
or
a
ride
they
took
in
the
summer,
 but
are
afraid
 to
ride
a
bicycle
regularly
 but
they
would
ride
 if
 they
 felt
 the
 roadways
 were
 safer
 and
 traffic
 traveled
 slower. • No
 Way
 No
How
 ‐
Some
one
 third
 of
the
population
 is
not
 interested
in
or
capable
of
cycling
at
all.

 The
 greatest
 number
 of
 cyclists
 can
 be
 identified
 as
 “interested
 but
 concerned”
 (62%
of
 bike
riders
 are
not
 comfortable
 in
 traffic.
 
 Prefer
 low‐volume
 low‐speed
 and
 prefer
 physical
 separation
 from
 cars,
 off
 street,
 neighbourhood
 street),
 as
 they
 are
 not
 comfortable
 riding
 in
 traffic
 and
 prefer
 streets
 with
 low‐volumes
 and
 low‐speeds.
 
 For
 this
 reason
the
ATP
includes
a
number
of
 specific
routes
to
 be
improved
 as
 Family
Bike
Boulevards
(see
map
on
page
53).46

 An
 active
 transportation
 network
has
 to
 be
 designed,
developed
 and
 maintained
to
 function
 well
for
the
many
different
kinds
of
people
in
 a
 community.
 
This
 includes
 the
 young,
and
 people
 that
 may
not
 be
 as
 comfortable
or
proficient
at
cycling
for
example.

 To
make
active
transportation
most
practical
for
families,
in
terms
of
the
 bicycle
routes
there
needs
to
be
a
dedicated
set
of
streets
that
achieve
 the
following: 1) Provide
 routes
 whose
 design
 features
 are
 enhanced
 for
 safety
 so
 that
 they
 appeal
 to
 families,
 elderly,
 and
 less
 proficient
 cyclists
 (primarily
 focusing
 on
 residential
 areas
 where
practical); 2) Provide
aesthetic
enhancements
and
street
trees
along
their
 entire
 lengths
 to
 improve
 user
 comfort
 and
 the
 appeal
 of
 the
routes; 3) Connect
with
the
rest
of
the
bike
routes; 4) Prioritize
 the
 movement
 of
 cyclists
 over
 cars
 with
 traffic
 calming
 and
 road
 diet
 features
 that
 create
 a
 lower
 target
 speed
that
is
geared
to
the
requirements
of
cyclists;
and, 5) Has
enhanced
wayfinding
signage.

45
Cycle
Ontario
Alliance,
Ontario
Bike
Plan,
February
2008,
pg.
5 46
Adapted
from:
Walk
and
Bike
for
Life,
Trails
for
AcNve
TransportaNon,
2009,
pg.
38


N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
50

The
Moving
People
subsection
Places
to
Grow,
states:
 Municipalities
 will
 ensure
 that
 pedestrian
 and
 bicycle
 networks
are
integrated
into
transportation
planning
to:
 a)
 provide
safe,
comfortable
travel
 for
 pedestrians
 and
 bicyclists
 within
 existing
 communities
 and
 new
 development
b)
provide
linkages
between
intensification
 areas,
 adjacent
 neighbourhoods,
 and
 transit
 stations,
 including
dedicated
lane
space
for
bicyclists
on
the
major
 street
network
where
feasible.
47
 One
way
to
address
this
is
to
provide
a
bike
boulevard
network.

A
Bike
 boulevard
is
“a
street
segment,
or
series
of
contiguous
street
segments,
 that
 has
 been
 modified
 to
 accommodate
 through
 bicycle
 traffic
 and
 minimize
 through
 motor
 traffic”48 
 
The
 challenge
 with
 this
 Element
 is
 creating
a
bike
boulevard
network
that
is
part
of
the
hierarchy
of
cycling
 oriented
active
transportation
routes.


Note
that
the
implementation
of
 the
 design
 features
 for
 each
 of
 these
Elements
 should
 be
significantly
 influenced
 by
 the
 Ontario
 Traffic
 Manual
 Book
 18:
 Bicycle
 Facilities
 which
will
be
released
in
2013;
described
by
the
Ontario
Traffic
Council: The
 OTM
 Book
 18
 will
 be
 the
 primary
 reference
 document
 used
 by
 engineers,
 planners
 and
 designers
 throughout
Ontario.

It
will
contain
information
on
legal
 requirements,
 standards,
 best
 practices,
 procedures,
 guidelines
 and
 recommendations
 for
 the
 justification,
 planning,
 design,
 timing
 and
 operation
 of
 bicycle
 facilities
and
control
measures.49


Action

There
 are
four
 streets
 within
 Collingwood
 that
 are
 being
identified
 as
 potentially
 being
 part
 of
 this
 enhanced
 family
 bikeway
 network
 (see
 map
on
page
53).

These
connect
to
the
downtown,
a
number
 of
parks,
 trails
and
other
major
routes
within
Collingwood.

 These
bikeways
 are
 envisioned
 as
 streets
 with
 specific
 enhancements
 that
 make
 cycling
 along
 them
 particularly
 safe
 and
 comfortable
 for
 those
people
that
are
less
inclined
to
ride
on
busy
streets
with
vehicular
 traffic;
 such
 as
 young
 children.
 
 They
 will
 be
 created
 through
 the
 introduction
 of
 a
number
 of
 traffic
 calming
features,
landscaping,
and
 public
art,
for
example: • Travel
lanes
will
be
strategically
narrowed
at
(through
the
use
of
 curb
extensions) • Shy
 space
 around
 features
 such
 as
 refuge
 islands
 will
 be
 enhanced
with
wide
drain
gutters
and/or
wide
striping
to
reduce
 vehicular
speeds • Street
 trees
 will
 be
 planted
 to
 provide
 sun
 health
 and
 calm
 vehicular
traffic; • Travel
 for
 bicycle
and
 calmed
 vehicular
 travel
 will
 be
prioritized
 along
the
corridors; • Bikeway
markings
will
be
painted
on
the
street; • Signage
 designating
 the
 bikeway
 will
 be
 positioned
 along
 the
 route; • Key
intersections
 will
 incorporate
 public
 art
 into
 the
signage
 to
 act
 as
 wayfinding
 and
 identification
 markers
 for
 the
 family
 bikeway
50.




47
Province
of
Ontario,
Growth
Plan
for
the
Greater
Golden
Horseshoe,
2006,
pg.
25 48
ASSHTO,
Guide
for
the
Development
of
Bicycle
FaciliNes,

2012,
pg.
1‐2 49

Ontario
Traffic
Council,
OTM
Book
18:
Bicycle
Design
Guidelines,
OMawa
Bike
Summit
2012
presenta/on,
page
4

50
Intersec/on
of
Ontario
Street
and
Ridgeway
bike
routes
in
Vancouver,
Bri/sh
Columbia

N
51

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

Traffic
 calming
 will
 be
 an
 integral
 component
 of
 the
 design
 of
 these
 routes.
 
 The
 principles
 under
 which
 traffic
 calming
 functions,
can
 be
 defined
by
the
following
four
points51: • Vehicle
Speed:
 o Significant
determinant
of
crash
severity o Critical
factor
where
modes
conflict o Appropriate
with
respect
to
context Pedestrian/cyclist
Exposure
to
Risk: o Reduce
time
in
vehicle
travel
lanes o Physical
and
visual
cues
to
increase
legibility
for
users o Human‐centred
design
focus
 Driver
Predictability: o Need
for
vehicle
use
to
be
predictable Effective
24hrs
a
Day: o Self‐evident
function
and
use o Self‐enforcing
through
physical
characteristics

Characteristics Comfort

EXPERIENCES/CONFIDENT
 RIDERS Most
are
comfortable
riding
 with
vehicles
on
streets,
and
 are
able
to
navigate
streets
 like
a
motor
vehicle,
including
 using
the
full
width
of
a
 narrow
travel
lane
when
 appropriate
and
using
left‐ turn
lanes. While
comfortable
on
most
 streets,
some
prefer
on‐ street
bike
lanes,
paved
 shoulders,
or
shared
use
 paths
when
available.

CASUAL/LESS
 CONFIDENT
RIDERS Prefer
shared
use
 paths,
bicycle
 boulevards,
or
 bikelanes
along
low‐ volume,
low‐speed
 streets.

• •

Traffic

This
 Element
 will
 be
 completed
 by
 a
 multi‐disciplinary
 team
 with
 a
 community
engagement
 component,
and
 should
 include
 test
 projects
 with
 low‐cost
 and
 temporary
measures
 to
test
the
design
solutions.

 A
 monitoring
 and
 assessment
 strategy
 will
 have
 to
 be
 developed
 to
 coincide
with
these
test
projects.


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
Directness Sidewalks Speed Distance

May
have
difficulty
 guaging
traffic
and
 may
be
unfamiliar
 with
rules
of
the
road
 as
they
pertain
to
 bicyclists;
may
walk
 bike
across
 intersections. May
use
less
direct
 route
to
avoid
 arterials
with
heavy
 traffic
volumes. If
no
on‐street
facility
 is
available,
may
ride
 on
sidewalks. May
ride
at
speeds
 around
13
km/h
to
20
 km/h. Cycle
shorter
 distances:
1
to
8
km
is
 a
typical
trip
distance.

Prefer
a
more
direct
route.

Avoid
riding
on
sidewalks.
 Ride
with
the
flow
of
traffic
 on
streets. May
ride
at
speeds
up
to
40
 km/h
on
level
grades,
up
to
 72
km/h
on
steep
descents. May
cycle
longer
distances.

These
 images
 show
 examples
 of
 f e a t u r e s
 t h a t
 s h o u l d
 b e
 considered
 for
 the
 Family
 Bike
 Boulevards,
 integrated
 into
 bike
 routes
 in
 Vancouver,
 BriNsh
 Columbia.
 

Pictured
here
are
curb
 extensions,
 mini‐roundabout,
 public
 art,
 road
 markings,
 street
 trees. Source:
Google

N
52

The
 faciliNes
 developed
 in
 the
 community
 need
 to
 address
 the
 specific
needs
of
a
broad
range
 of
people,
 when
it
comes
to
acNve
 transportaNon.
 
 Not
 every
 walker,
 or
 cyclist
 is
 the
 same.
 
 The
 ASSHTO
 
Guide
to
the
Development
of
Bicycle
 FaciliNes
has
a
chart
 that
 explains
 the
 differences
 between
 people’s
 level
 of
 skill
 and
 comfort
 when
 cycling.
 
 There
 are
 similariNes
 in
 the
 ranges
 of
 differences,
and
things
that
 need
to
be
 considered
when
planning,
 designing,
and
building
faciliNes
for
 walkers
as
well,
 as
outlined
in
 the
chart
above.48



51
Michael
King,
Nelson\Nygaard
Associates,
“Designing
Complete
Streets”
presenta/on,
May
29,
2007

Third Str

N
This
map
illustrates
the
four
routes
envisioned
for
 the
Family
Bike
 Boulevards
that
will
be
developed
through
this
Element. The
suitability
of
these
parNcular
roads,
and
the
implementaNon
of
 this
 porNon
 of
 the
 acNve
 transportaNon
 network
 will
 be
 determined
through
the
process
of
compleNng
this
Element.

Ca

ell S mpb

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
eet

O

ar nt

io

re St

et

Pee

lS

treet

tree

Maple S

t

treet

53


6.
Sidewalks
&
Crosswalks
at
Public
Parks
Challenge

The
primary
users
of
Collingwood’s
public
 parks
are
children
and
their
 accompanying
parents
and/or
 minders.
 
Walking
and
 biking
make
 up
 their
principle
forms
of
transporta/on.

Unfortunately,
a
large
number
 of
 Collingwood’s
public
 parks
are
 not
 accessible
 by
sidewalks.
 
Many
 /mes
there
is
no
sidewalk
along
the
park
frontage. The
 challenge
will
 be
 to
 provide
 improved
 access
to
 these
 parks
 for
 pedestrians.

 


Ac3on

The
ac/on
for
this
Element
is
the
development
 and
implementa/on
of
 a
 priori/zed
 process
 to
 install
 pedestrian
 crossings
 and/or
 new
 segments
 of
 sidewalk
 to
 address
 the
 lack
 of
 facili/es
 to
 support
 walking
to
these
important
community
facili/es.

 The
 Town’s
 Parks,
Recrea/on
 &
 Culture
 Department
 will
 assist
 with
 the
 lead
 in
 this
 process
 with
 addi/onal
 assistance
 from
 the
 Engineering
and
Public
Works
Departments.

N
54

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
55

PARK

The
 Ontario
 Ministry
 of
 TransportaNon’s
 Ontario
 Traffic
 Manual
 (Traffic
 Manual,
 Book
 11,
 Pavement,
 Hazard
 and
 DelineaNon
 Markings,
 March
 2000,
 pg.
 97)
 states:
 “in
 urban
 areas,
 crosswalks
 must
 be
 marked
 at
 all
 intersecNon
 where
 there
 is
 substanNal
 conflict
 between
 vehicular
 and
 pedestrian
 movements.
 
 Pedestrian
 crossings
 may
 be
 marked
 at
 non‐intersecNon
 points
 where
 substanNal
 pedestrian
movements
occur
 or
where
 a
safe
 crossing
 point
would
not
otherwise
be
obvious,
parNcularly
to
children”.

 For
this
Element
appropriate
pedestrian
crossings 
will
be
 designed
 and
installed
to
support
safe
 and
comfortable
 access
to
municipal
 parks.


7.
Bridge
Link
at
Siding
Trail
Challenge

Ac/ve
 transporta/on
 systems
 have
 to
 be
 designed,
 developed,
 and
 managed
to
 connect
 people
to
 the
 various
 des/na/ons
 they
need
 to
 reach
 for
 their
 daily
ac/vi/es.

 This
includes
 linkages
to
 places
 where
 people
work.

 This
 Element
 will
 complete
 a
 long
 defined
 connec/on
 to
 the
 employment
lands
in
the
south
east
of
the
community
trail.

With
the
 elimina/on
of
 the
railway
opera/ons
it
 is
now
 possible
to
 design
 and
 create
 a
 trail
 link
 along
 the
 old
 rail
 line,
 poten/ally
 adap/ng
 the
 exis/ng
 bridge
 for
 trail
 use.
 
 This
 will
 improve
 connec/vity
 to
 employment
lands
and
 make
ac/ve
transporta/on
 more
 prac/cal
 for
 ci/zens
of
Collingwood.


Ac3on

The
 Parks,
 Recrea/on
 &
 Culture
 Department
 and
 Trails
 CommiMee,
 will
assist
with
undertaking
a
design
 exercise
to
 develop
a
solu/on
 to
 the
challenge
of
 this
Element.

They
will
then
turn
their
 efforts
to
 the
 management
of
its
implementa/on.



N
56

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

A
 photo
 of
 the
 exisNng
 train
 bridge
 which
 could
 be
 converted
 for
 acNve
transportaNon
use,
now
that
the
rail
service
has
been
closed
in
 Collingwood.



N
57

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

Collingwood
 is
 renowned
 for
 its
 extensive
 trail
 system;
 having
 received
acenNon
throughout
the
Province
and
beyond
for
a
decades
 long
 commitment
 and
 success
 in
 developing
 the
 network.
 
 This
 connecNon
has
been
proposed
for
many
years,
as
it
provides
a
needed
 link
for
acNve
transportaNon.

 The
 locaNon
of
the
 bridge
crossing
is 
highlighted
on
this
scan
of
 the
 Trail
Network
Map,
and
is
indicated
as
a
“future
trail”.



8.
Link
at
Train
Trail
Challenge

The
gap
in
the
trail
system
at
the
south
end
of
the
Train
Trail
creates
a
 separa/on
 between
 the
 rest
 of
 the
 town
 and
 the
 newly
 developed
 Georgian
 College
 campus
 on
 Poplar
 Sideroad.
 
 It
 also
 nega/vely
 impacts
 the
 effec/veness
 of
 the
 connec/on
 to
 Stayner
 along
 this
 route.

 The
 challenge
 with
 this
 Element
 is
 to
 complete
 the
 linking
trails
 and
 bridge
construc/on;
similar
to
the
challenge
for
the
previous
Element.

 This
 will
 improve
 connec/vity
 and
 make
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 more
 prac/cal.

Ac3on


The
Parks,
Recrea/on
&
Culture,
Trails
CommiMee
will
have
to
assist
in
 leading
a
design
exercise
to
develop
a
solu/on
to
the
challenge
of
this
 Element.
 
They
will
 then
 turn
 their
 efforts
 to
 the
 management
 of
 its
 implementa/on.



As
the
college
campus
evolves
over
 /me,
ac/ve
transporta/on
access
 needs
 to
 be
provided
 to
 link
it
with
 the
 rest
 of
the
community.
 
The
 Town
needs
to
provide
improved
ac/ve
transporta/on
connec/ons
to
 this
important
post
secondary
educa/onal
ins/tu/on
as
it
is
one
of
the
 key
des/na/ons
within
the
community.


N
58

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
59

Collingwood
 is
 renowned
 for
 its
 extensive
 trail
 system;
 having
 received
acenNon
throughout
the
Province
and
beyond
for
a
decades
 long
 commitment
 and
 success
 in
 developing
 the
 network.
 
 This
 connecNon
has
been
proposed
for
many
years,
as
it
provides
a
needed
 link
for
acNve
transportaNon.

 The
 locaNon
of
the
missing
link
and
river
crossing
are
highlighted
on
 this
 scan
 of
 the
 Trail
 Network
 Map,
 and
 is
 indicated
 as
 a
 “future
 trail”.



9.
Active
Transportation
Bridge
at
Mountain
Road
Challenge

Ac/ve
 transporta/on
 systems
 have
 to
 be
 designed,
 developed,
 and
 managed
to
 connect
 people
to
 the
 various
 des/na/ons
 they
need
 to
 reach
 for
 their
 daily
ac/vi/es.
 
 This
 includes
 linkages
to
 schools
 and
 neighbouring
communi/es.

 This
 Element
 will
 significantly
 improve
 an
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 connec/on
 to
 the
 Town
 of
 the
 Blue
 Mountains,
 and
 beMer
 link
 por/ons
 of
 Collingwood
 that
 are
 situated
 to
 the
 west
 of
 Black
 Ash
 Creek,
with
those
to
the
east
side
of
this
river
corridor.

Ac3on


The
 Parks,
 Recrea/on
 &
 Culture
 Department
 with
 input
 from
 the
 
 Trails
 CommiMee
 will
 assist
 with
 leading
 the
 exercise
 of
 designing,
 permimng,
and
developing
this
river
crossing.




The
 river
 in
this
 loca/on
is
a
significant
 barrier;
and
 neither
 the
 road
 nor
 the
 trail
 system
 provide
 prac/cal
 and
 comfortable
 op/ons
 for
 ac/ve
transporta/on
at
this
crossing
of
Mountain
Road.

There
 is
 a
 need
 to
 support
 an
 improved
 connec/on
 for
 safety
 and
 efficiency
 with
 the
 Town
 of
 the
 Blue
 Mountains
 and
 the
 residen/al
 areas
and
job
centres
to
the
west
with
the
rest
of
the
built
up
por/ons
 of
the
town
to
the
east.

That
is
the
challenge
that
is
being
addressed
 with
this
Element.

N
60

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

The
 more
 northerly
 and
southerly
crossings 
of
the
 Black
 Ash
Creek
for
 acNve
 transportaNon
 are
 the
 pedestrian
 bridge
 and
Sixth
 street
 bridge
 respecNvely.
 
 Both
are
 not
well
located
for
people
traveling
along
this
direct
corridor
to
the
 Town
of
the
Blue
Mountains.


 The
bridge
crossing
of
Mountain
Road
does
not
facilitate
 comfortable
and
safe
 crossing
for
pedestrians
and
cyclists.


N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
61




III.
 


Near‐range
Implementa3on
Preferences for near-range projects of the ATP

Small
Scale
Projects
0
to
3
years

These 
 items
 are
 designed
 to
 help
 make 
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
more
 prac/cal 
and
 func/onal;
 while
 fulling
 engaging
 the 
 community
 in
 the 
 process
 of
 crea/ng
an
improved
ac/ve
transporta/on
system.

N
62

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
40% 20%

This 
Sec/on
 details 
the
 small 
 projects 
that
 can
 be
 achieved
 within
 3
 years 
 or
 less.
 
 Generally
 these
 items
 are
 system
 or
 network
 oriented;
 however,
 requiring
liMle
capital
expenditures.



Bike routes Skateboarding on Kids riding on sidewalks sidewalks

This
graph
illustrates
the
three
near‐range
projects
idenNfied
 by
respondents
 to
the
 2012
ATP
 survey
as
 being
of
 highest
 priority.


N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
63


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


1)

“Share
the
Road”
Routes
 
 
 
 
 
 2)

Urban
Acupuncture
&
Traffic
Calming
 
 
 
 3)

Active
Transportation
Matching
Fund

 
 
 
 4)

Update
Sidewalk
By‐law
‐
Cycling
 
 
 
 5)

Update
Sidewalk
By‐law
‐
Skateboarding
 
 
 6)

Downtown
Long‐term
Bike
Parking
 
 
 
 7)

On‐street
Bike
Routes

 
 
 
 
 
 8)

Public
Parking
Lot
Pedestrian
Improvements
 
 9)
Complete
Streets
Design
Matrix
 
 
 
 
 10)

Community‐wide
Walkability/bikeability
Audits


pg
64 pg
66 pg
70 pg
72 pg
74 pg
76 pg
78 pg
82 pg
84 pg
90


1.
“Share
the
Road”
Routes
Challenge

Not
 all
 streets
 can
 be
 redeveloped
 or
 retrofiMed
 to
 provide
 cycling
 lanes
 or
 other
 improvements
 for
 ac/ve
 transporta/on.
 
 Some/mes
 this
 is
 the
 result
 of
 the
 characteris/cs
 of
 the
 roads
 in
 ques/on,
 the
 amount
 of
 roadways
 in
 a
 town,
 the
 short
 and
 long‐term
 costs
 of
 improvements,
or
 any
combina/on
 of
these.

However,
one
effec/ve
 way
to
 improve
 the
 safety
and
 appeal
of
 par/cular
 routes
 for
 cycling
 along
some
roads
is
to
install
“share
the
road”
signage.

 The
 Transporta/on
 Associa/on
 of
 Canada
 describes
 when
 the
 share
 the
road
sign
is
used:
 to
 warn
 motorists
 that
 they
 are
 to
 provide
 adequate
 driving
space
for
cyclists
and
other
vehicles
on
the
road.
 
 The
sign
also
advices
motorists
and
cyclists
to
use
extra
 cauNon
on
the
upcoming
secNon
of
road. 52


Ac3on

The
Town’s
Engineering
Department
 will
 assist
 with
 the
review
 of
the
 routes
 designated
 on
 the
 map
 (facing
 page)
 and
 iden/fy
 the
 loca/on(s)
 for
 the
 signage
 to
 be
 installed
 along
 these
 roads,
 or
 appropriate
sec/ons
thereof.

 This
map
was
generated
from
an
amended
map
developed
through
an
 extensive
process
by
the
local
 Share
the
Road
organiza/on
 (which
has
 included
representa/on
from
the
Town).

This
map
shows
those
street
 corridors
 that
 will
 receive
 “share
 the
 road”
 signage
 in
 Collingwood.
 
 These
make
up
main
routes
oLen
used
by
cyclists
that
link
the
built‐up
 areas
 of
 Collingwood,
 with
 the
 surrounding
 more
 rural
 streets,
 developments,
 and
 neighbouring
 communi/es.
 
 These
 routes
 will
 provide
another
link
to
the
neighbouring
communi/es
un/l
such
 /me
 as
other
corridor
redesigns
are
implemented.


This
 Element
is
intended
to
 improve
safety
for
 cyclists
traveling
along
 “outlying”
 roads
 that
 are
 being
 used
 by
 people
 traveling
 to
 neighbouring
areas
or
 communi/es.

This
is
also
intended
to
complete
 the
 Collingwood
 por/ons
 of
 the
 “share
 the
 road”
 network
 being
 created
across
the
region.



 


N

52
Transporta/on
Associa/on
of
Canada,
Bikeway
Traffic
Control
Guidelines
for
Canada,
February
2012,
pg.
39

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
64

Example
 of
 the
 share
 the
 road
 signs
being
used
throughout
 the
 region.

Mountain Road

hS Sixt

treet

N

This
map
shows
the
streets
that
make
up
the
“share
the
road”
network
for
this
Element.

 A
review
 of
the
routes
designated
on
the
 map
will
be
done
 to
idenNfy
the
appropriate
locaNon(s)
for
the
share
 the
road
signage
to
be
installed
along
these
 roads,
or
 secNons
thereof.



D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
Ragl
High St

ve an A

reet

Popl

a

dero r Si

ad

65


2.
Urban
Acupuncture
&
Traffic
Calming
Challenge

Collingwood
 as
 a
 community,
 and
 its
 built
 environment
 is
 constantly
 evolving.

This
means
that
not
all
features
of
what
has
been
constructed
 in
 the
past
 can
 meet
 the
 needs
 of
 the
 community
today,
or
 into
 the
 future.
 
 This
is
 true
 of
 active
 transportation
 networks,
and
 the
places
 people
go
alike.

Placemaking
and
creating
an
interesting
and
functional
 built
environment
is
as
important
to
active
transportation
as
providing
a
 network
along
which
to
travel.

 On
 April
 15,
2011
 the
 Governing
 Council
 of
 UN‐Habitat
 adopted
 the
 first‐ever
 public
 space
 resolution
 which
 urged
 the
 development
 of
 a
 policy
approach
 for
 the
international
 application
 of
 Placemaking.
 
The
 Resolution
 sights
 the
 importance
 of
 Placemaking
 for
 fostering
 social,
 cultural,
economic
 and
environmental
 benefits
 for
 the
overall
livability
 of
 communities.
 
 Placemaking
 is
 the
 human‐centred
 design
 of
 public
 spaces
that
 directly
involves
the
people
that
will
use
the
site.

Over
the
 past
 decade
 the
 specific
value
of
 placemaking
to
 community
livability;
 economic
and
business
resiliency
and
success;
real
estate
development;
 and,
 community
 health
 has
 become
 increasingly
 understood.
 This
 approach
 is
 well
 established
 and
 proven,
 and
 is
 gaining
 popularity
 because
of
 its
practicality
and
far
 reaching
influence
on
 the
success
of
 neighbourhoods
and
communities.
 The
 recent
 Walk
 and
 Bike
 for
 Life
 survey
and
 workshop
 conducted
 in
 Collingwood
 asked
 “how
 would
 you
 rate
 the
 need
 for
 the
 following
 programs
and
facilities
in
Collingwood
to
increase
the
number
of
people
 walking
on
a
regular
 basis?”

The
top
two
that
were
identified
as
either
 great
 or
 greatest
 in
 need
 were
crosswalks
 and
 traffic
 calming.53 
 
The
 graph
on
the
facing
page
is
adapted
from
the
Report
and
illustrates
the
 results.54 
 
 Traffic
 calming
 is
 a
 way
 to
 design
 streets,
 using
 physical
 measures,
to
encourage
people
to
drive
more
slowly.

It
creates
physical
 and
 visual
cues
 that
induce
drivers
to
 travel
 at
 slower
 speeds.
 
Traffic
 calming
 is
 self‐enforcing.
 
 The
 design
 of
 the
 roadway
 results
 in
 the
 desired
effect,
without
relying
on
compliance
with
traffic
control
devices
 such
as
signals,
signs,
and
without
enforcement.

Traffic
calming
is
also
 specifically
 identified
 and
 recommended
 in
 the
 Chief
 Coroner
 of
 Ontario’s
 report
 Pedestrian
 Death
 Review55 
 to
 improve
 road
 safety.
 
 Traffic
calming
has
four
basic
principles
in
terms
of
design:
 1) Vehicles
 speed
 (significant
 determinant
 of
 crash
 severity;
 critical
factor
whens
modes
conflict;
needs
to
be
reduced
to
 context
appropriate
target
speed); 2) Pedestrian/bike
exposure
risk
(reducing
the
amount
 of
time
 that
 pedestrians
 are
 in
 the
 street
 with
 reduced
 crossing
 distances,
and
appropriate
pedestrian
infrastructure); 3) Driver
predictability
(making
vehicle
movements
predictable
 for
others);
and, 4) That
 traffic
 calming
 measures
 are
 active
 24
 hours
 a
 day,
 seven
days
a
week
(do
not
rely
on
enforcement)56

53
Walk
and
Bike
for
Life,
Trails
for
AcNve
TransportaNon,
2009,
pg.
21 54
Adapted
from
Walk
and
Bike
for
Life,
Collingwood
Report,
2010,
pg.
21 55

Office
of
the
Chief
Coroner
for
Ontario,
Pedestrian
Death
Review,
pg.
54,
September
2012

56Michael
King,
Nelson\Nygaard
Associates,
Designing
Complete
Streets
presenta/on,
May
29,
2007


N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
66

The
 challenge
 is
 to
 make
 it
 easier
 for
 the
 community
 (including
 the
 Municipality)
 to
 affect
 change
 and
 test
 ideas
 by
 using
 the
 resources


readily
available.

 In
fact,
small
scale
neighbourhood
 changes
can
have
 significant
impacts.

As
identified
by
the
Centers
for
Disease
Control; Small‐scale
pedestrian
improvements
along
streets
result
 in
 higher
 physical
 activity
 levels
and
 have
high
 levels
of
 public
support.57

 By
creating
a
mechanism
through
this
Element
 for
 citizens
to
work
with
 the
municipality,
the
Town
is
creating
an
integrated
assistance
system
of
 support
that
 is
user‐friendly
and
 effectively
leverages
the
assets
of
the
 community
for
its
improvement.
 This
 Element
 is
 intended
 to
 provide
 a
 way
 for
 creating
 and
 implementing
small‐scale
projects
that: 1) Are
 focused
 on
 improving
the
 built
 environment
 of
 the
 community; 2) Improve
 one
 or
 more
 of
 the
 requirements
 for
 effective
 active
 transportation
 (including
 quality
 public
 places,
 connections
 around
 town,
 connection
 to
 other
 areas
 outside
 of
 town,
 improved
 safety
 for
 active
 transportation
 modes,
 improved
 aesthetics
 and
 visual
 appeal
 of
 areas
 for
 active
 transportation,
 improved
 sun
 health
 and
 visual
 quality
 of
 street
 corridors
 with
 street
 trees,
improved
trail
and
pedestrian
crossings,
et
cetera); 3) Are
permanent,
or
temporary
pilot
projects;
and, 4) Are
 initiated
 by
 community
 members,
 the
 Town,
 or
 stakeholders,
and
facilitated/assisted
by
the
Town.

Short‐term
improvements
allow
residents
and
 visitors
to
 experience
 new
 street
 configurations
 without
 the
 commitment
 of
 major
 funding
 for
 new
 curbs
 and
 other
 capital
 improvements.
 
 This
 method
 has
 many
 advantages:

57
Walk
Boston,
Good
Walking
is
Good
Business,
2011

N

NACTO
 describes
 the
 benefits
 of
 short‐term
 improvements
 in
 Urban
 Street
Design
Guide
(October
2012):

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
67

Neighborhood
 Aesthetics
 ‐
 designs
 for
 temporary
 treatments
 can
 be
 selected
 together
 with
 local
 merchants
 and
 neighbourhood
 organizations,
and
 they
 can
 be
 involved
 in
 planting
 flowers
 and
 other
 ongoing
 activities. Health
 &
 Safety
 ‐
 a
 quick
 turnaround
 project
 can
 immediately
address
unsafe
conditions
on
streets
and
at
 intersections. Low‐cost
 ‐
 materials
 like
 paint,
 blue
 or
 gravel
 are
 inexpensive
compared
to
asphalt
and
cement
curbs. Changeable
 ‐
 if
 a
pilot
 project
 has
negative
impacts
 on
 parking
 or
 traffic
 patterns,
 it
 is
 easy
 to
 restore
 the
 roadway
to
its
original
condition.

The
 opportunities
 that
 are
 sought
 and
 potentially
 afforded
 the
 community
 through
 pilot
 projects
 are
 multiple,
 and
 often
 interconnected,
 including,
 creating
 community
 engagement
 opportunities
 for
 citizens
 of
 Collingwood
 to
 actively
 participate
 in
 improving
their
 neighbourhoods.
 
 Additionally,
regardless
 of
 the
 final
 outcome
of
pilot
 projects,
the
 benefit
to
 the
 Municipality,
and
general
 public
in
working
together
to
execute
the
project
will
be
significant.
Any
 time
 community
 members
 come
 together
 in
 co‐operation
 for
 everyone’s
benefit,
the
act
 itself
is
 a
positive
 outcome.
 
 Pilot
 projects
 also
help
inform
all
future
community
building
improvement
initiatives.

Ac3on

The
 purpose
 of
 this
 Element
 is
 to
 provide
 facilita/on
 for
 small
 scale
 neighbourhood
 improvements.
 
 This
 can
 be
 called
 Asset
 Based
 Community
 Development
 (ABCD),
 Urban
 Acupuncture,
 Tac/cal
 Urbanism
 or
 “Lighter,
 Quicker,
Cheaper”
 (LQC).
 
 It
 
 describes
a
local
 development
 strategy
 that
 has
 produced
 excep/onally
 successful
 public
spaces
and
is
generally
lower
risk
and
lower
cost,
capitalizing
on
 the
crea/ve
energy
of
the
community
to
efficiently
generate
new
uses
 and
revenue
for
places.
 This
 can
take
many
forms,
requiring
varying
 degrees
of
 /me,
money,
 and
 effort,
 and
 the
 spectrum
 of
 interven/ons
 should
 be
 seen
 as
 an
 itera/ve
means
to
build
 las/ng
change.

All
placemaking
and
livability
 improvements
 are
 closely
 related
 to
 walkability
 and
 ac/ve
 transporta/on.
 
 By
 championing
 use,
 over
 design
 aesthe/c,
 and
 capital‐intensive
 construc/on,
 LQC
 interven/ons
 strike
 a
 balance
 between
 providing
 comfortable
 spaces
 for
 people
 to
 enjoy
 while
 genera/ng
and
leveraging
local
assets
necessary
for
further
phases. From
the
BeMer
Block
Org
web
site,
which
is
dedicated
to
“rapid
urban
 revitaliza/on
projects”,
the
purpose
of
these
approaches
is
to
facilitate
 ways
 of
 crea/ng
 demonstra/on
 “tools”
 that
 revise
 an
 area
 to
 show,
 test,
 and
 review
 the
 poten/al
 to
 create
 great
 walkable,
 vibrant
 neighborhood
 streets
 and
 places.
 The
 projects
 will
 act
 as
 a
 living
 model
 so
 that
 ci/zens
can
 ac/vely
 engage
 in
 the
 “complete
 streets”
 and
 placemaking
 buildout
 process,
 and
 develop
 temporary
 pilot
 projects
 to
 show
 and
 assess
 the
 poten/al
 for
 these
 ini/a/ves
 in
 a
 specific
area.

The
intent
 is
to
perform
these
tests
and
 help
the
Town
 and
 community
rapidly
 implement
 infrastructure
 and
 policy
changes
 that
 support
 the
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 plan
 and
 overall
 community
 livability. 58

goals
 of
 the
 project.
 
 These
 projects
 should
 meet
 a
 specific
 set
 of
 criteria
that
will
be
adapted
from
the
11
Principles
of
Placemaking59:
 • • • • • • • • • • • The
Community
is
the
Expert You
are
crea/ng
a
place,
not
a
design You
can’t
do
it
alone They’ll
always
say
“it
can’t
be
done” You
can
see
a
lot
just
by
observing Develop
a
vision Form
supports
func/on Triangulate Start
with
the
petunias Money
is
not
an
issue You
are
never
finished

N

The
 kinds
 of
 projects
 that
 would
 be
 supported
 are
 very
 localized
 improvements
based
on
the
characteris/cs
and
needs
of
the
area,
and


58
Adapted
from
www.beMerblock.org

The
BeMer
Block
is
an
open‐sourced
project
that
is
free
to
re‐use
and
build
upon.
The
site
is
developed
to
provide
help
for
communi/es
who
wish
to
build
their
own


BeMer
Blocks
with
resources
anyone
may
need
to
help
rapidly
revitalize
neighborhoods.
59
Project
for
Public
Spaces,

11
Principles
of
Placemaking,
www.pps.org 60
NACTO,
Urban
Street
Design
Guide,
October
2012,
pg
9

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
68

Part
 of
this
work
will
require
a
shiL
in
perspec/ve,
where
the
street
is
 looked
 at
not
only
as
 thoroughfares
 for
 traffic
 and
their
 performance
 measured
in
terms
of
speed,
delay,
and
conges/on,
but
in
terms
of
the
 mul/ple
real
world
roles
they
play
in
public
life
as
public
spaces.

The
 changing
needs
 of
 our
 streets
need
 to
 be
 considered
 in
 their
 design,
 and
the
design
of
urban
acupuncture
or
traffic
calming
ini/a/ves,
such
 as: • Fundamental
safety
and
opera/onal
strategies • The
spa/al
 quali/es
of
the
street,
from
building
line
to
 building
 line
(exis/ng
and
planned) • The
 rela/onship
 between
 land
 use
 and
 traffic
 (exis/ng
 and
 planned) • Management
strategies
for
parking
and
other
curbside
uses • Flexibility
of
street
use
during
the
course
of
a
day,
week
or
year.

The
 principle
goal
should
 be
designing
streets
where
 people
 walking,
 parking,
shopping,
bicycling,
working
and
driving
can
cross
paths
safely
 as
described
by
NACTO. 60



The
 parameters
 of
 the
 Town’s
 facilita/on
 and
 support
 will
 be
 determined
 by
 the
 Town
 and
 will
 be
 based
 on
 the
 specific
 characteris/cs
 of
 the
 proposal,
 such
 as
 those
 defined
 by
 the
 Street
 Plans
Collabora/ve
manual
Tac/cal
Urbanism: 1) A
deliberate,
phased
approach
to
ins/ga/ng
change; 2) The
offering
of
local
solu/ons
for
local
planning
challenges; 3) Short‐term
commitment
and
realis/c
expecta/ons; 4) Low‐risks,
with
a
possibly
a
high
reward;
and, 5) The
development
of
social
capital
between
ci/zens
and
the
 building
of
 organiza/onal
 capacity
between
 public‐private
 ins/tu/ons,
non‐profits,
and
their
cons/tuents.

NEED FOR FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS TO INCREASE WALKING IN COLLINGWOOD
70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% CROSSWALKS

TRAFFIC CALMING

N

The
 report
 by
 Walk
 and
Bike
 for
 Like
 indicated
that
 people
 felt
 there
was 
a
great
need
for
both
crosswalks 
and
traffic
calming
to
 increase
walking
in
Collingwood.

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
GREAT GREATEST

These
 photographs
 show
 examples
 of
 how
 traffic
 calming
 pilot
 projects
 can
 be
 undertaken
 with
 minimal
 equipment.
 
 Traffic
 movements
 are
 being
 recorded
 by
 the
 gentleman
 in
 the
lower
picture. Source:
Dan
Burden


69


3.
Active
Transportation
Matching
Fund
Challenge

Many
communi/es
are
not
able
to
allocate
large
amounts
of
resources
 for
 ac/ve
transporta/on
ini/a/ves
 because
of
their
 size
and/or
 other
 obliga/ons.
 
 The
 challenge
this
 Element
 is
 addressing
is
 the
 need
 to
 develop
 mechanisms
 that
 help
 leverage
 the
 assets
 within
 the
 community
that
may
be
helpful
in
 improving
the
ac/ve
transporta/on
 infrastructure,
how
it
func/ons,
or
the
culture
of
ac/ve
transporta/on
 in
the
community.


 Similar
 to
 the
 previous
 element,
 this
 one
 is
 intended
 to
 create
 a
 mechanism
by
 which
 the
 Town
 can
 make
prac/cal,
or
 opportunis/c,
 improvements
to
 the
ac/ve
transporta/on
network.

This
can
be
very
 helpful
 for
 the
community,
as
the
 ASSHTO
Guide
to
the
Development
 of
Bicycle
FaciliNes
iden/fies:
 Many
 of
 the
 most
 successful
 bike
 plans
 have
 been
 implemented
 through
 a
 pragmaNc
 approach
 involving
 phasing
 of
 improvements
 and
 opportunisNc
 partnerships
with
other
projects
. 61
 report62 This
is
closely
linked
to
the
previous
Element.

It
is
a
way
of
maximizing
 the
investment
of
 both
 the
community
members
and
 the
Town
 when
 providing
AT
improvements
at
the
neighbourhood
or
street
scale.



D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
40% 20%
70

60% neighbourhood projects

Interest in Town support for

Very interested

Neither Not very

Somewhat

The
 Walk
 and
 Bike
 for
 Life
 
 iden/fies
 the
 kinds
 of
 items
 envisioned
 for
 this
 Element
 as
 recommended
 improvements;
 these
 include
investments
in:
 • • • Public
 spaces
 such
 as
 public
 squares,
 mee/ng
 spaces,
 and
 places
for
outdoor
ac/vi/es; Support
 elements
 for
 non‐vehicle
 transporta/on
 such
 as
 improved
ligh/ng,
signage,
way‐finding;
and, Increased
quality
and
quan/ty
of
bike
parking.

61
AASHTO,
Guide
to
the
Development
of
Bicycle
FaciliNes,

2012
pg.
2‐14 62
Walk
and
Bike
for
Life,
Collingwood
Report,
2009,
pg.
27

N

This
 table
 illustrates
 how
 respondents
 to
 the
 2012
 ATP
 survey
 indicated
how
 interested
 they
 would
 be
 for
 supporNng
 the
 Town’s
 ATP
 to
 “include
 ways
 for
 ciNzens
 and
 neighbourhood
 groups 
 to
 get
 support
 from
 the
 Town
 for
 local
 projects
that
improve
acNve
transportaNon”.



Ac3on

To
 implement
 this
 Element,
the
Town
 Council
 will
 have
to
 allocate
 a
 given
amount
of
funds
to
an
ac/ve
transporta/on
matching
fund.

The
 amount
of
the
matching
fund
should
be
of
sufficient
quan/ty
to
afford
 meaningful
change
 and
 impact.

 An
 amount
 of
$30,000
to
 $50,000
is
 the
 recommended
 minimum.
 The
 alloca/on
 of
 these
 funds
 to
 successful
 community
 proposals
 will
 have
 to
 be
 assessed
 against
 a
 specific
 criteria
 developed
 as
 part
 of
 the
 implementa/on
 of
 this
 Element.
 As
 a
 way
 of
 iden/fying
 project
 proposals
 that
 could
 be
 supported
 through
 this
 Element
 the
 Town
 shall
 develop
 a
 review
 criteria
upon
 which
 decisions
 will
 be
 based.
 
 For
 example,
the
Walkability
Toolkit
 describes
 a
 checklist
 for
 crea/ng
 pedestrian‐friendly
 communi/es63 
 that
 could
 be
adapted
to
develop
the
criteria
for
 ac/ve
transporta/on
 oriented
 projects
 that
 support
 these
 kinds
 of
 features
 within
 Collingwood.

The
checklist
includes:


While
these
are
projects
created
with
community
assets
and
skills
to
a
 great
 degree,
the
 review
 criteria
 for
 community
ini/ated
 proposals/ projects
 should
 also
 include
 an
 understanding,
and
 considera/on,
of
 the
 overall
 aesthe/cs
 and
 urban
 design
 characteris/cs
 of
 the
 final
 project/area
 and
 the
 ability
 to
 support
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 in
 Collingwood.

These
considera/ons
are
important,
because
as
defined
 in
 the
 2009
 report
 by
 Victor
 Ford
 and
 Associates
 which
 reviewed
 Collingwood’s
trail
system:
 Such
 consideraNon
 will
 encourage
use
 by
 highlighNng
 the
 presence
 and
 quality
 of
 the
 faciliNes
 provided,
 and
 will
 support
 the
 impression
 that
 these
 projects
 are
 part
 of
 a
 well‐thought‐out,
integrated,
improvement
iniNaNve. 64


• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Con/nuous
Systems/Connec/vity Shortened
Trips
and
Convenient
Access Linkages
to
a
Variety
of
Land
Uses/Regional
Connec/vity Coordina/on
Between
Jurisdic/ons Con/nuous
Separa/on
from
Traffic Pedestrian‐Suppor/ve
Lane‐Use
paMerns Well‐Func/oning
Facili/es Designated
Space Security
and
Visibility Automobiles
are
Not
the
Only
Considera/on Neighbourhood
Traffic
Calming Accessible
&
Appropriately
Located
Transit Lively
Public
Places Pedestrian
Furnishings Street
Trees
and
Landscaping Proper
Maintenance Safe
Pedestrian
Crossings

63
Walk
On,
Walkability
Toolkit,
2009,
pg.
9 64
Victor
Ford
and
Associates
Inc.,
On
&
Off
Road
Cycling/Pedestrian
FaciliNes
&
TransiNons:
Safety
&
Improvement
RecommendaNons,
December
2009,
pg.
59

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

71


4.
Updated
Sidewalk
By‐law
‐
Cycling
Challenge

Providing
safe
places
 for
 children
 and
 their
 caregivers
 to
 legally
ride
 their
 bikes
 as
they
learn
this
important
 life
 skill
is
being
addressed
 by
 this
Element.

 For
families
with
 children
 learning
to
ride
a
bicycle
the
current
by‐law
 prohibi/ng
cycling
on
the
sidewalk
is
overly
restric/ve
and
imprac/cal.
 
 Yet
 this
 is
 oLen
 the
 safest
 place
 for
 young
riders
 just
 learning,
 and
 their
parents/minders.

Currently
on‐road
cycling
may
not
be
the
most
 safe
alterna/ve
 for
 those
 learning
to
 ride
 a
 bicycle.
 
 The
same
holds
 true
 for
 young
people
 who
 are
 traveling
 independently
to
 and
 from
 school,
parks,
or
 other
 loca/ons
by
bicycle.
 
 These
 residents
 are
not
 permiMed
 to
 use
 the
 sidewalk;
 yet
 their
 abili/es
 and
 comfort
 with
 riding
on
 the
street
makes
this
the
most
appropriate
op/on
 for
them,
 regardless
of
the
prohibi/ve
by‐law.

 To
 recognize
 these
 reali/es
 of
 the
 way
 people
 use
 sidewalks
 and
 improve
 the
 overall
 safety
 for
 these
 individuals
 and
 motorists
 alike,
 this
 Element
 requires
 that
 a
 process
be
 ini/ated
 to
 explore
 how
 the
 sidewalk
use
by‐law
can
be
amended
to
permit
for
these
kinds
of
uses.



Ac3on


Create
a
By‐law
that
 allows
children
 (and
adults
accompanying
them)
 to
 ride
 bicycles
 on
 the
 sidewalk,
 
 The
 specific
 language
 will
 be
 determined
through
a
public
process.


This
process
should
specifically
 include
 representa/on
 from
 young
 ci/zens
 of
 the
 community
 throughout.

 The
 challenge
 of
this
 adapted
 By‐law
 will
 be
to
 make
 these
 ac/vi/es
 both
 legal
 and
 safe
 for
 all
 users
 of
 the
 community’s
 sidewalks,
 including
children,
elderly
persons,
and
persons
with
disabili/es.


 It
is
important
to
note
that
the
prohibi/on
of
cycling
in
the
downtown
 commercial/retail
core
will
be
maintained
due
to
the
space
restric/ons
 and
pedestrian
ac/vity
in
the
area.


 


N
72

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

N
73

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
When
children
are
learning
to
ride
their
bicycles,
 it
 is
 impracNcal
 and
 unsafe
 in
 many
 areas
 for
 them
 to
 ride
 on
 the
 street,
 so
 they
 use
 the
 sidewalks.
 
 Therefore,
 a
 By‐law
 amendment
 needs
to
be
made
that
makes
this
common
use
of
 sidewalks
by
 child
 cyclists
 safe
 and
pracNcal
 for
 all
sidewalk
users.


5.
Updated
Sidewalk
By‐law
‐
Skateboarding
Challenge

Many
young
 people
 in
 par/cular
 choose
 to
 skateboard
 as
 a
 way
 of
 gemng
 from
 one
 place
 to
 another.
 
 Unfortunately
 the
 current
 regulatory
framework
 makes
 it
 illegal
 for
 these
 ci/zens
 to
 do
 so
 on
 both
 streets
 and
 sidewalks,
 and
 skateboarders
 risk
 fines
 and/or
 injuries
 because
 the
 prohibi/ons
 to
 using
 the
 sidewalks.
 
 Skateboarding
is
not
permiMed
 in
 any
public
 area
of
the
town
except
 the
designated
skateboard
park.

 For
families
with
children
learning
to
 ride
a
skateboard,
or
 those
using
 them
as
 a
form
 of
transporta/on
the
current
 by‐law
prohibi/ng
their
 use
is
overly
restric/ve
and
imprac/cal.

Ac3on

Since
 many
 people
 choose
 to
 use
 skateboards
 as
 an
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 mode
 there
is
a
 need
 to
 ensure
 that
 it
 is
 done
 safely
 throughout
 the
community.

This
Element
will
address
the
 safety
and
 legality
 of
 using
 skateboards
 as
 a
 mode
 of
 transporta/on
 within
 Collingwood.




N
74

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

To
 recognize
 these
 reali/es
 of
 the
 way
 people
 use
 skateboards
 and
 sidewalks
 and
 improve
 the
 overall
 safety
 for
 these
 individuals
 and
 motorists
alike,
this
element
 requires
that
 the
sidewalk
use
by‐law
be
 amended
 to
 permit
 skateboard
 use
 with
 key
 provisions
 that
 protect
 pedestrians
sharing
the
sidewalk
(ensuring
that
the
sidewalks
are
safe
 to
 use
 for
 all,
 including
 children,
 elderly
 persons,
 and
 persons
 with
 disabili/es).
 
 For
 example:
 restric/ng
 use
 of
 skateboard
 when
 pedestrians
 are
 present
 (requiring
 that
 skateboarders
 dismount);
 restric/ng
 tricks
 or
 maneuvers
 that
 make
 the
 skateboard
 airborne;
 and,
restric/ng
their
use
in
the
downtown
retail/commercial
district.

 The
specific
language
will
be
determined
through
 a
public
process,
as
 they
address
ques/ons
such
as:
 1) What
 regula/on
 framework
could
 we
develop
 that
 would
 make
it
safe
for
skateboarders
and
other
users
to
travel
on
 our
sidewalks
and
shared
walkways? 2) Recognizing
 that
 the
 “main
 street”
 sidewalk
 corridor
 of
 Hurontario
 Street,
 in
 our
 downtown
 business
 district,
 is
 likely
 to
 always
be
 too
 congested
 for
 this
 kind
 of
 shared
 use;
 what
 informa/on
 signage
 to
 describe
 this
 limita/on
 would
be
most
effec/ve
and
least
visually
obtrusive?

The
 prohibi/on
 of
 skateboarding
in
 the
downtown
 commercial/retail
 core
 should
 be
 maintained
 due
 to
 the
 space
 restric/ons
 and
 pedestrian
ac/vity
in
the
area.

N
75

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
Skateboarders
and
pedestrian
conflicts
can
cause
 serious
personal
 injuries.
 
 Therefore,
any
 By‐law
 consideraNon
 for
 skateboard
 use
 on
 sidewalks
 must
 take
 into
account
 limitaNons
that
 improve
 safety
for
all
sidewalk
users.



6.
Downtown
Long‐term
Bike
Parking
Challenge

The
 recent
 downtown
 revitaliza/on
 project
 provided
 significant
 improvements
to
the
public
realm
that
 support
walkability
in
 terms
of
 aesthe/cs,
and
 safety.

The
downtown
 now
has
wider
 sidewalks,
curb
 extensions,
benches
 and
 other
 street
 furniture,
formalized
 mid‐block
 pedestrian
crossings,
and
street
trees.




 Parking
 is
 one
 of
 the
 necessary
 components
 of
 an
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 system.
 
 The
 municipality
 has
 provided
 significant
 resources
 for
 vehicle
 parking,
while
 propor/onally
 lagging
 behind
 in
 terms
of
 bike
parking.
 
 
 
The
 revitaliza/on
 project
 also
included
bike
 parking
rings
distributed
along
Hurontario
Street.
 By
 using
 these
 areas
 in
 the
downtown
 to
 effec/vely
support
 bicycle
 transporta/on,
 downtown
 Collingwood
 could
 increase
 the
 overall
 number
of
parking
spaces
for
both
ci/zens,
visitors,
and
tourists
alike. This
Element
 will
 result
 in
the
design
and
development
of
appropriate
 long‐term
 bike
 parking
 facili/es
 in
 the
 downtown
 for
 people
 who
 shop,
work,
and
visit
this
area
of
the
community.




High
 quality,
 publicly
 accessible
 long‐term
 bike
 parking
 in
 the
 downtown
 commercial
 district
 does
 not
 currently
 exist.
 
 The
 bicycle
 parking
 op/ons
 do
 not
 provide
 shelter
 from
 the
 elements,
 nor
 are
 they
 supported
 by
 long‐term
 security
 op/ons,
 or
 high
 pedestrian
 traffic
to
provide
oversight.


 There
 are
 many
 loca/ons
 throughout
 downtown
 that
 are
 not
 well
 suited
 and/or
 imprac/cal
 for
 automobile
 parking
 or
 other
 uses,
and
 could
 accommodate
 secure
 bike
 parking
 without
 sacrificing
 the
 facili/es
 and
 ameni/es
 of
 other
 modes
 of
 transporta/on.
 
 
 As
 described
by
the
Victoria
Transport
Policy
Ins/tute,
it
is
also
a
posi/ve
 feature
for
businesses: Bicycle
 parking
 is
 space
 efficient
 and
 so
 generates
 about
 five
 Nmes
 as
 much
 spending
 per
 square
 meter
 as
 car
 parking. 65

65
Todd
Litman,
Victoria
Transport
Policy
Ins/tute,
Whose
Roads?
EvaluaNng
Bicyclists’
and
Pedestrians’
Right
to
Use
Public
Roadways,
May
31,
2012,
pg.
8

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
76

A
 signage
 program
 indicaNng
 where
 long‐term
bike
parking
is
located
in
the
 downtown
 will
 have
 to
 be
 integrated
 into
 the
 implementaNon
 of
 this
 Element.


Ac3on

To
 facilitate
 efficient
 use
 of
 the
 downtown
 by
 those
 that
 travel
 by
 bicycle
 the
 Town
 should
 design
 and
 provide
 appropriate
 long‐term
 bike
parking
facili/es. As
part
 of
 the
 process
 to
 implement
 this
 Element,
 loca/ons
 of
 long‐ term
 bike
 parking
 shall
 be
 reviewed
 and
 selected
 through
 a
 collabora/ve
 process
 with
 the
 Downtown
 BIA
 and
 community
 members.

 Part
 of
the
process
will
be
 the
 recogni/on
 that
 long‐term
 bike
 parking
 has
 specific
 requirements
 in
 terms
 of
 its
 design
 and
 loca/on.

This
kind
of
bike
parking
needs
to
include
the
following: • Weather
protec/on; • Consistent
passive
surveillance
from
users
and
passers‐by;
and, • Central
loca/on.


NEED FOR FACILITIES & PROGRAMS TO INCREASE BICYCLING IN COLLINGWOOD
90% 80% 70%

There
 are
 a
 number
 of
 specific
 ac/on
 items
 for
 this
 Element;
 and,
 while
 it
 is
 an
 independent
 item,
it
 shall
 also
 be
 integrated
 into
 the
 work
 associated
 with
 the
 “right‐sizing”
 downtown
 parking
 work
 program
described
in
 the
ATP.

This
element
shall
 also
 be
executed
in
 such
a
way
to
provide
the
greatest
value
to
users
and
ci/zens.



D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

GREAT GREATEST

BIKE BIKE PARKING LANES BIKE LANES WITH PHYSICAL SEPARTATION

N
77

The
 recent
 Walk
and
Bike
 for
Life
 survey
idenNfied
a
number
of
 needed
 faciliNes
 and
 programs
 to
 increase
 bicycling
 in
 Collingwood.
 
The
top
three
 that
were
sighted
as
either
great
or
 greatest
in
need
were
bike
lanes
with
physical
separaNon
(88%),
 bike
parking
(75%)
and
bike
lanes
(65%).



7.
On‐street
Bike
Routes
Challenge

The
County‘s
Transportation
Master
Plan
states:
 it
 is
 recognized
 that
 over
 time
 the
 County
 should
 be
 encouraging
 a
 greater
 emphasis
on
 walking
and
 cycling
as
 the
 preferred
 mode
of
travel
 for
 short
 trips
(under
 5
km
 in
 length).68
 The
 2008
 Ontario
 Walkability
 Study
 identified
 that
 nearly
 75%
 of
 students
surveyed
would
prefer
to
walk
or
cycle
to
school;
and
although
 3.5%
said
they
currently
ride
their
 bicycle
to
school,
26.8%
would
prefer
 this
mode
of
transportation. 69 While
the
town
of
Collingwood
has
an
excellent
trail
system,
it
is
limited
 in
its
functionality
for
 active
transportation.

 Portions
of
 it
 work
well
to
 provide
the
connectivity
and
efficiency
needed
for
active
transportation,
 but
most
of
it
functions
best
as
a
recreational
system.

 On‐street
 bike
 routes
 can
 provide
 the
 directness
 needed
 for
 active
 transportation,
which
is
difficult
for
recreational
trails
to
provide: It
 is
 important
 to
 note
 the
 different
 needs
 of
 different
 users
of
trails.
 
Recreational
users
enjoy
 the
very
 curvy,
 winding
 path
 of
 trails
 that
 are
 often
 outside
 of
 the
 urbanized
areas
of
the
city
and
allow
them
to
experience
 the
natural
beauty
and
 green
spaces
of
 a
 city.

 In
terms
 of
transportation,
the
most
 effective
and
 well‐used
 bike
 and
 pedestrian
 paths
 into
 urbanized
 areas
 do
 not
 meander
 around
 the
 city,
 but
 are
 straight
 corridors
 between
places
of
origin
and
destination. 66

66
Walk
and
Bike
For
Life,
Trails
for
AcNve
TransportaNon:
Town
of
Collingwood,
2010,
pg.
9 67
ASSHTO,
Guide
for
the
Development
of
Bicycle
FaciliNes,
2012
pg.
1‐3 68
Simcoe
County,
County
of
Simcoe
TransportaNon
Master
Plan,
2008,
pg.
5‐2 69
Catherine
O’Brien,
PhD.
Centre
for
Sustainable
Transporta/on,
Child
and
Youth
Friendly
Planning,
presenta/on,
2008 70
Go
for
Green
The
Ac/ve
Living
&
Environment
Program,

Filng
Places:
How
the
Built
Environment
Affects
AcNve
Living
and
AcNve
TransportaNon,
pg.
18

N

According
 to
 ASSHTO
 a
 bicycle
 network
 is
 a
 designated
 system
 of
 bikeways
that
 may
include
bike
lanes,
bicycle
routes,
shared
use,
paths,
 and
other
identifiable
bicycle
facilities.67

There
is
a
need
for
this
kind
of
 network
 to
 support
 the
 mobility
 of
 our
 residents.
 
 There
 is
 also
 a
 recognized
 desire,
and
 need,
for
 this
kind
of
 infrastructure
 throughout
 the
region,
province,
and
nation.



D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
78

The
 Go
 for
 Green
 The
 Active
 Living
 &
 Environment
 Program
 has
 identified
that:

 70%
 of
 Canadians
 indicated
 they
 would
 be
 willing
 to
 travel
up
 to
 30
 minutes
to
 work
if
 they
 could
 enjoy
 the
 safety
and
convenience
of
a
bike
lane.70

The
on‐street
 bike
 routes
network
will
generally
consist
of
streets
with
 bike
 lanes;
 those
 with
 marked
 shared
 lanes;
 and
 streets
 that
 are
 specifically
designed
as
family
bike
boulevards
as
 defined
 in
a
previous
 Element
of
the
ATP.
 The
 challenge
 for
 this
 Element
 is
 creating
 a
 network
 of
 bike
 routes
 throughout
 the
community
as
has
been
 promoted
 for
 many
years
and
 addresses
the
very
real
needs
for
such
a
system
within
the
community.





Action

An
 effective
 active
 transportation
 system
 must
 provide
 a
 network
 of
 accessible
cycling
routes.

The
most
appropriate
for
Collingwood
at
this
 time
are
on‐street
routes.

This
Element
will
implement
a
network
of
on‐ street
 bike
 routes
 that
 are
 easily
 developed
 and
 maintained
 by
 the
 Town.

These
routes
have
been
strongly
influenced
by
the
on‐road
bike
 routes
 illustrated
 on
 the
 Collingwood
 Trails
 Network
 map
 for
 many
 years.
 One
of
the
principle
features
of
the
on‐street
bike
route
network
is
the
 wayfinding/notification
 marking
 system.
 
 The
 National
 Association
 of
 City
Transportation
Officials
describes
this
as:
 A
 bicycle
 wayfinding
 system
 consists
 of
 comprehensive
 signing
 and/or
 pavement
 markings
to
 guide
bicyclists
to
 their
 destinations
along
 preferred
bicycle
 routes.
 
Signs
 are
 typically
 placed
 at
 decision
 points
 along
 bicycle
 routes
 ‐
 typically
 at
 the
 intersection
 of
 two
 or
 more
 bikeways
and
at
other
key
locations
leading
to
and
along
 bicycle
routes. 71


• Skill
level
of
anticipated
users • Number
of
lanes • Traffic
characteristics • Number
and
frequency
of
potential
conflict
points • Adjacent
land
uses
and
lot
patterns • Frequency
of
transit
stops • Pedestrian
safety • Collision
patterns Step
3
‐
Select
Appropriate
Facility
Type
 • • Based
on
results
from
Steps
1
and
2,
plus
sound
engineering
 judgement A
multi‐disciplinary
team
will
work
to
determine
the
best
routes,
design
 and
 implement
 the
 defined
 on‐street
 bike
 network.
 
 Without
 predetermining
 the
 outcome,
 given
 the
 basic
 characteristics
 of
 the
 roads
in
 question,
it
is
expected
 that
this
will
principally
consist
 of
 bike


Although
 there
 is
 no
 formula
 for
 determining
 appropriate
 facility
 selection,
it
 is
important
 to
note
that
 the
bicycle
facility
type
 selection
 should
 be
 determined
 through
 a
 clearly
 defined
 process
 as
 will
 be
 described
in
the
Ontario
Traffic
Manual:
Book
18
Bicycle
Facilities
(to
be
 released
in
2013).

The
Ontario
Traffic
Council
briefly
describes
the
three
 basic
steps
of
the
process
as
follows72: • Step
1
‐
Preselection
Nomograph
 • Collect
 and
 review
 existing
 and
 future
 volume
 and
 motor
 vehicle
operating
speed
data • Plot
on
Nomograph • Nomograph
 provides
a
general
 guide
 for
facility
types
to
be
 considered • Step
2
‐
Examine
other
factors
71 72

Na/onal
Associa/on
of
City
Transporta/on
Officials
web
site.
 Ontario
Traffic
Council,
OTM
Book
18:
Bicycle
Design
Guidelines,
Ontario
Bike
Summit
2012
presenta/on,
page
9

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
79

The
 TransportaNon
 AssociaNon
 of
 Pictured
 is
 an
 example
 of
 one
 of
 the
 Canada’s 
 Bikeway
 Traffic
 Control
 exisNng
bike
lanes
in
Collingwood.

 Guidelines
 for
 Canada
 states;
 The
 sharrow
(shared
lane
 marking)
“may
 be
 used
 on
 roadways
 with
 lanes
that
 are
 wide
 enough
 for
 side‐by‐side
 bicycle
 and
 vehicle
 operaNon
 but
 not
 wide
 enough
 for
 a
 standard
 bicycle
 lane”.. Source:
Dan
Burden

lane
and
shared
lane
markings
(sharrows),
and
bike
route
signage.

Note
 that
the
positive
influence
sharrow
markings
have
on
cyclists’
use
of
the
 roadway
 is
 significant
 and
 improves
 safety,
 including
 the
 following:
 helps
 cyclists
 position
 themselves
 safely
 in
 lanes;
 alerts
 motorists
 to
 potential
presence
of
bicyclists;
provides
wayfinding
element
along
bike
 routes;
increases
distance
between
parked
 cars
and
 cyclists
(outside
of
 “door
 zone”);
motorists’
behavior
changes
to
 be
more
 safe
 for
 cyclists
 using
the
road;
cyclists
increase
their
use
of
the
roadway
(as
opposed
to
 sidewalks);
 and,
 the
 number
 of
 wrong‐way
 cyclists
 is
 significantly
 reduced. 73



Righ
 is
 an
 example
 of
 a
 pre‐selecNon
 Nomograph
 (a
 diagram
 designed
 to
 allow
 approximate
 graphical
 computaNon)
 presented
 by
 the
 Ontario
Traffic
 Council
 (OTC)
 when
outlining
 the
 soon
to
be
 released
OTM
 Book
 18:
 Bicycle
 Design
 Guidelines.
 
 Below
 is
a
screen
 shot
 showing
 a
 porNon
 of
the
 Bicycle
 Facility
Type
Matrix
presented
by
the
OTC.
 
This
matrix
shows
a
range
of
ways
 for
providing
bike
faciliNes
on
roads.


73
NACTO,
Urban
Bikeway
Design
Guide,
April
2011,
pg.
275

N
80

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

t Maple S

ie St

Third St

Sixth St

N
C C bell amp St

The
 map
shows
the
 proposed
on‐street
 bike
route
 network
 as
based
on
the
 long
standing
suggested
bike
 route
 network
of
the
 Town’s 
trail
maps,
 with
some
 minor
 amendments.
 The
 suitability
 of
 these
 parNcular
 roads,
 and
 the
 implementaNon
 of
this
porNon
 of
 the
 acNve
 transportaNon
 network
 will
 be
 determined
through
 the
 process
of
 compleNng
this
Element.

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
On ta S rio t

Cedar S

t

Pee

St

Ste Mar

t lS

Walnut

on amer

St

lay Find

Dr

81


8.
Public
Parking
Lot
Pedestrian
Improvements
Challenge

By
the
very
nature
of
their
single
use
focused
design,
parking
lots
have
 a
number
of
characteris/cs
that
have
nega/ve
impacts
on
surrounding
 land
 uses;
 pedestrian
 movement
 and
 safety;
 safety
 of
 vehicle
 movements
and,
streetscapes.

 Uncontrolled
 vehicle
 movements
 limited
 only
 by
 painted
 markings
 make
 parking
lots
generally
unsafe
for
 pedestrians
 and
fellow
drivers
 alike.


The
American
Associa/on
of
State
Highway
and
Transporta/on
 Officials
 (AASHTO)
report,
A
Policy
 on
 Geometric
Design
 of
 Highways
 and
 Streets,
2001
 specifically
iden/fies
 the
 need
 to
 design
 regard
 to
 pedestrian
needs:
 In
general,
the
most
successful
shopping
secNons
are
those
 that
 provide
 the
 most
 comfort
 and
 pleasure
 for
 pedestrians. 74



Ac3on

The
 open
 gaps
 in
 the
 streetscape
 created
 by
 a
 lack
 of
 streetwall
 elements,
and
general
 unsightliness
of
 parking
lots
 nega/vely
impact
 neighbouring
 uses
 compared
 to
 well
 designed
 infill
 development
 or
 civic
spaces.

 This
Element
will
implement
changes
to
the
exis/ng
public
parking
lots
 to
make
them
safer
and
more
aesthe/cally
appealing
through
low
cost
 measures
 such
 as
 repain/ng
 and
 introduc/on
 of
 planters,
 trees,
 signage,
and
low
level
ligh/ng.


N

74
AASHTO,
A
Policy
on
Geometric
Design
of
Highways
and
Streets,
2001,
pg.
96 75
Todd
Litman,
Victoria
Transport
Policy
Ins/tute,
Whose
Roads?
EvaluaNng
Bicyclists’
and
Pedestrians’
Right
to
Use
Public
Roadways,
May
31,
2012,
pg.
6

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
82

“Park
 once”
 strategies
 intend
 to
 make
 vehicle
 parking
 safe
 and
 convenient,
 while
 pairing
 it
 with
 a
 highly
walkable
environment
 that
 makes
 it
 comfortable,
 convenient
 and
 enjoyable
 for
 users
 to
 be
 pedestrians
 for
 longer
 periods
 of
 /me;
 as
 opposed
 to
 repeatedly
 moving
 and
 re‐parking
 their
 vehicles
 within
 the
 same
 district.
 
 To
 achieve
 this,
 and
 also
 address
 the
 challenges
 listed
 above,
 this
 Element
 requires
 the
 following
 improvements
 to
 be
 made
 to
 the
 public
parking
lots
in
the
downtown: • Pavement
 marking
 to
 define
 pedestrian
 ways
 that
 are
 safe,
 convenient,
 and
 link
to
 the
 fine‐grained
 network
of
 sidewalks
 and
mid‐block
pedestrian
routes; • Wayfinding
signage
to
indicate
pedestrian
routes
; • Trees
 and/or
 landscaped
 islands
 in
 areas
 that
 create
 a
 safer
 (through
 shy
 space),
 more
 comfortable
 walking
 environment
 while
 not
 impac/ng
 the
 effec/veness
 of
 the
 parking
 lot
 for
 vehicle
parking,
within
the
overall
“park‐once”
strategy.


All
 trips
 involve
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 links
 and
 “improving
 non‐ motorized
(transporta/on)
can
improve
motor
vehicle
access.

Parking
 lots,
 transport
 terminals,
 airports,
 and
 commercial
 centers
 are
 all
 pedestrian
 environments”. 75 
 
 The
 amendments
 and
 design
 of
 the
 parking
lots
should
follow
the
general
 design
hierarchy
considera/ons
 rela/ng
to
the
following:
 1) First
considera/on
is
for
pedestrians;
 2) Access
point(s); 3) Sight
distances;
and
 4) Vehicles


Urban
 design
 and
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 considera/ons,
 along
 with
 parking
needs
and
safe
vehicle
movement
will
be
priori/zed
during
the
 development
of
the
designs
for
this
Element.


The
 improvements
that
 will
 be
developed
through
this
 Element
 will
 improve
 accessibility,
 while
 also
 being
 good
for
business. The
 1970
Collingwood
Urban
Traffic
Study
 states
“The
 (parking)
 lots
 should
 be
 acracNvely
 landscaped
 by
 providing
 some
 green
 areas.
 
 Small
 parkece
 arrangements
with
benches
can
be
integrated
with
the
 parking
 plan
to
provide
 waiNng
 areas
 for
 Downtown
 shoppers.
 
All
of
these
 ameniNes
will
help
promote
 the
 use
 of
 these
 off‐street
 parking
 faciliNes
 and
 also
 acract
the
shoppers
to
the
Downtown”.



N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
83

Pictured
 is
 an
 example
 of
 a
 pedestrian
 route
 idenNfied
 through
 a
 parking
 area
 which
 uses
 the
 shy
 distance
 around
 a
 planter
 to
 improve
 pedestrian
safety.


9.
Complete
Streets
Design
Matrix
Challenge

In
 recent
 decades
 the
 design
 parameters
 of
 the
 roads
 constructed
 throughout
 North
 America
 have
 relied
 too
 heavily
 on
 level‐of‐service
 (LOS)
 and
 increasing
 vehicle
 traffic
 speeds,
 thereby
 skewing
 their
 use
 more
 and
 more
toward
 a
single
mode
of
 transportation.

 This
has
also
 negatively
impacted
adjacent
land‐use
and
values,
and
the
overall
safety
 for
 active
 transportation
 users.
 
 In
 fact,
 “People
 who
 choose
 active
 transport
modes
face
an
increased
risk
of
injury
from
collisions,
relative
 to
motor
vehicle
users”. 76 By
not
 focusing
on
 safety
 for
 pedestrians
and
 cyclists
in
 the
 design
 of
 transportation
 systems
 over
 the
 past
 few
 decades,
 has
 resulted
 in
 dangerous
 road
 networks
 throughout
 communities
 for
 active
 transportation
 users.
 
 This
 didn’t
 just
 happen;
 streets
 have
 been
 designed,
built,
and
maintained
in
ways
that
favour
vehicle
movements
 over
the
needs
of
pedestrians
and
cyclists.
 However,
there
 is
encouraging
 evidence
that
 injury
 and
 fatality
 rates
 decrease
 as
 active
 transportation
 mode
 shares
increase,
and
effect
that
has
been
dubbed
“safety
 in
numbers”.
The
Safety
in
numbers
effect
is
complicated
 by
 the
 fact
 that
 in
 areas
 higher
 active
 transportation
 mode
 share,
 transportation
 infrastructure
 is
 often
 designed
 with
 the
 safety
 of
 pedestrians
 and
 cyclists
 in
 mind. 77 the
risk
of
injury,
it
is
important
that
urban
transportation
infrastructure
 be
carefully
designed
for
active
modes”. 78

 Just
as
with
designing
for
moving
vehicles,
designing
for
people
requires
 close
 attention
 to
 how
 people
 move
 and
 use
 spaces
 and
 the
 specific
 dimensions
of
 people
using
these
facilities:
for
 example
people
walking
 side‐by‐side,
 or
 parents
 pushing
 a
 stroller,
 or
 persons
 traveling
 in
 wheelchairs.

 Streets
can
 be
designed
to
 move
cars
 efficiently
without
 sacrificing
the
ability
of
people
to
walk
or
bike
along
them;
it
just
means


One
of
the
effects
of
not
 designing
“complete
streets”
is
increased
risk
 to
 people
 that
 use
 non‐motorized
 transportation,
 the
 National
 Collaborating
 Center
 for
 Environmental
 Health
 cautions:
 “to
 minimize


76
Na/onal
Collabora/ng
Centre
for
Environmental
Health,
AcNve
TransportaNon
in
Urban
Areas:
Exploring
Health
Benefits
and
Risks,

2010 77
Na/onal
Collabora/ng
Centre
for
Environmental
Health,
AcNve
TransportaNon
in
Urban
Areas:
Exploring
Health
Benefits
and
Risks,

2010,
pg.
3 78
Na/onal
Collabora/ng
Centre
for
Environmental
Health,
AcNve
TransportaNon
in
Urban
Areas:
Exploring
Health
Benefits
and
Risks,

2010,
pg.
5

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
84

Our
 built
 environment
 is
 the
 result
 of
 many
 series
 of
 design
 ideas
 and
 construcNon
 projects.
 
 By
 paying
 specific
 acenNon
 to
 the
 needs
 of
 pedestrians,
 and
 cyclists,
 we
 can
 create
 towns
and
 ciNes
 that
 are
 more
 livable. It
 is
 important
 to
 note
 that
 the
 capacity
 of
 streets
 to
 move
 vehicles
 is
 not
 exclusively
 dependent
 on
 the
 number
 of
 lanes
as
 one
 may
expect.
 
 In
fact,
 having
 a
 greater
number
of
lanes
on
a
street
 can
oZen
reduce
its
 capacity
and
funcNon

different
choices
be
made
when
designing
and
building
streets.

Also
the
 specific
characteristics
of
streets
are
different
and
should
be
included
in
 their
 designs,
for
 example:
 intended
 use,
setting,
traffic
 volumes,
and
 intended
speeds.

In
the
Congress
for
New
Urbanism’s
2012,
Sustainable
 Street
 Network
 Principles,
they
 define
 the
 following
 as
 a
principle
 for
 road
design:
 All
 people
 should
 be
 able
 to
 travel
 within
 their
 community
 in
 a
 safe,
dignified
 and
 efficient
manner.
 
A
 sustainable
 street
 network
 makes
 that
 possible
 and
 ensures
 a
 choice
 of
 transportation
 modes
 and
 routes.
 
 People
 can
 walk,
bicycle,
take
transit,
or
 use
 a
 vehicle.
 
 Each
 mode
 is
 integrated,
 as
 appropriate,
 within
 each
 street79.


The
 first
 recommendations
 defined
 in
 both
 the
 Pedestrian
 Death
 Review81
and
Cycling
Death
Review
from
the
Office
of
the
Chief
Coroner
 of
Ontario
is
focused
on
developing
complete
streets:
 A
 ‘complete
 streets’
 approach
 should
 be
 adopted
 to
 guide
 the
 redevelopment
 of
 existing
 communities
 and
 the
 creation
 of
 new
 communities
 throughout
 Ontario.
 
 S u c h
 a n
 a p p r o a c h
 w o u l d
 r e q u i r e
 t h a t
 a n d
 (re‐)development
 give
consideration
 to
enhancing
safety
 for
 all
 road
 users,
 and
 should
 include:
 ‐
 Creation
 of
 cycling
 networks
 (incorporating
 strategies
 such
 as
 connected
cycling
lanes,
separated
bike
lanes,
bike
paths
 and
 other
 models
 appropriate
 to
 the
 community.)
 –
 Designation
 of
 community
 safety
 zones
 in
 residential
 areas,
 with
 reduced
 posted
 maximum
 speeds
 and
 increased
fines
for
speeding.
82

In
 its
introduction
 the
 Institute
 of
 Transportation
 Engineers’
Designing
 Walkable
 Urban
 Thoroughfares:
 A
 Context
 Sensitive
 Approach
 (2010)
 states
that
it:
 provides
 guidance
 for
 the
 design
 of
 walkable
 urban
 thoroughfares
in
places
that
currently
support
 the
mode
 of
walking
and
in
places
where
the
community
desires
to
 provide
a
more
walkable
thoroughfare,
and
the
context
 to
support
them
in
the
future. 80



This
should
be
referenced
 as
a
significant
source
of
design
guidance
for
 the
 local
 streets
that
 are
 more
centrally
located
 with
 greater
 diversity
 and
urban
mix
of
uses,
such
as
the
primary
retail/commercial
corridors.



79 80 81

Congress
for
New
Urbanism,

Sustainable
Street
Network
Principles,

2012,
page
14 Ins/tute
of
Transporta/on
Engineers,
Designing
Walkable
Urban
Thoroughfares:
A
Context
SensiNve
Approach,
2010,
pg.
3 Office
of
the
Chief
Coroner
for
Ontario,
Pedestrian
Death
Review,
September
2012

82
Office
of
the
Chief
Coroner
for
Ontario,
Cycling
Death
Review,
June
2012,
pg.
20

N
85

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

The
American
Association
of
State
Highway
and
Transportation
Officials
 
 describes
this
in
Policy
On
Geometric
Design
of
Highways
and
Streets: Emphasis
has
been
placed
on
the
joint
 use
of
transportation
 corridors
by
pedestrians,
cyclists,
and
 public
transit
 vehicles.
 
 Designers
should
recognize
the
implications
of
this
sharing
of
 transportation
corridors
and
are
encouraged
to
consider
not
 only
 vehicular
 movement,
 but
 also
 movement
 of
 people,
 distribution
 of
 goods,
and
provision
of
essential
services.

A
 more
 comprehensive
 transportation
 program
 is
 thereby
 emphasized.

 Cost‐effective
design
is
also
emphasized.

 The
 traditional
 procedure
 of
 comparing
 highway‐user
 benefits


with
 costs
 has
been
 expanded
 to
reflect
 the
 needs
of
 non‐ users
and
the
environment. 83.
 AASHTO
also
clearly
defines
the
need
to
address
pedestrian
needs
in
all
 street
designs:
 Pedestrians
 are
a
 part
 of
every
 roadway
 environment,
and
 attention
should
be
paid
to
their
presence
in
rural
as
well
as
 urban
areas...
Because
of
the
demands
of
vehicular
 traffic
in
 congested
 urban
 areas,
 it
 is
 often
 very
 difficult
 to
 make
 adequate
provisions
 for
 pedestrians.
 
 Yet
 provisions
should
 be
made,
because
pedestrians
are
the
lifeblood
of
our
urban
 areas,
especially
in
the
downtown
and
other
retail
areas.

In
 general
the
most
successful
shopping
sections
are
those
that
 provide
the
most
comfort
and
pleasure
for
pedestrians.84

The
 Simcoe
 Muskoka
 District
 Health
 Unit’s
 2009
 Road
 Safety
 Report
 describes
 the
 health
 benefits
 of
 how
 we
 design
 for
 active
 transportation:
 The
way
 our
communities
are
designed
 is
a
contributing
 factor
 to
 injuries
 and
 deaths
 from
 motor
 vehicle‐ pedestrian
 collisions
 and
motor
 vehicle‐cyclist
 collisions.
 
 Road
 design
 (sidewalks,
roads,
bike
paths,
etc.)
 and
 the
 types
 of
 features
 it
 contains
(speed
 bumps,
crosswalks,
 streetscape,
etc.)
 affects
 how
 often,
 how
 far
 and
 how
 fast
 we
 drive,
 traffic
 volume,
 and
 our
 choice
 of
 transportation
mode.

Decreasing
the
amount
of
time
we
 spend
in
a
 car
 can
lessen
 our
risk
of
being
involved
 in
 a


The
Toronto
Centre
for
Active
Transportation’s
describes
the
benefits
of
 complete
street
design
strategies:

 The
implementation
of
Complete
Streets
results
not
only
 in
 improved
 conditions
for
 cyclists,
pedestrians,
 seniors,
 and
 children
 but
 also
 supports
 vibrant,
 healthy
 communities.

Evidence
shows
that
Complete
Streets:
 Provide
better
and
more
transportation
options Improve
safety
for
cyclists
and
pedestrians Reduce
traffic
congestion Reduce
greenhouse
gas
emissions Create
 more
 walkable,
 therefore,
 livable
 communities • Stimulate
 economic
 growth
 with
 increased
 shopping
activity,
sales,
and
property
values.85
 • • • • •

83
American
Associa/on
of
State
Highway
and
Transporta/on
Officials,
Policy
On
Geometric
Design
of
Highways
and
Streets,
2001,
pg.
xlii
 84
American
Associa/on
of
State
Highway
and
Transporta/on
Officials,
Policy
On
Geometric
Design
of
Highways
and
Streets,
2001,
pg.
96 85

Toronto
Centre
for
Ac/ve
Transporta/on,
Complete
Streets
by
Design,
2012,
pg.
5

N
86

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

The
 World
 Health
 OrganizaNon,
 World
Report
 on
 Road
 Traffic
Injury
PrevenNon
(2004,
pg.
78)
states 
“Speed
has
 been
idenNfied
as
a
key
risk
factor
in
road
traffic
injuries,
 influencing
 both
 the
 risk
 of
a
road
crash
as
well
as
 the
 severity
of
the
injuries
that
result
from
crashes”.
 
This
is
 why
 it
 is
parNcularly
 important
 to
 focus
on
appropriate
 target
speeds
in
road
designs.
The
image
above
shows
a
 complete
 street
 within
 an
 urban
 context.
 
 The
 appropriate
 design
 speeds
 and
 infrastructure
 for
 different
 modes
of
 transportaNon
 make
 this
designated
 State
 Truck
 Route
 funcNon
 well
 for
 all
 modes
 of
 transportaNon.
(Photo
by
Dan
Burden,
WALC
InsNtute)

MVC.
 
 Designing
 communities
 that
 are
 less
 sprawled
 (leading
 to
 fewer
 vehicle
 trips)
 and
 providing
 for
 safer
 street
environments
that
protect
pedestrians
and
cyclists,
 can
reduce
or
prevent
road‐related
injuries
and
fatalities.

 As
 part
 of
 developing
complete
 streets
 it
 is
 important
 to
 identify
the
 appropriate
 target
 speed
 for
 the
 design
 because
it
 makes
them
 safer.
 
 Designing
using
target
speed
means
that
the
 street
is
designed
for
 the
 speed
 one
intends
for
 drivers
to
 go,
rather
 than
 operating
 speed
 (the
 speed
at
which
drivers
are
going):
Target
Speed
=
Design
Speed
=
Posted
 Speed. 86 
 
 Appropriately
 designed
 streets
 do
 not
 have
 to
 rely
 on
 enforcement
 to
 address
 issues
 of
 speeding
 motor
 vehicles,
 as
 their
 characteristics
 inherently
encourage
appropriate
 speeds.
 
 It
 is
obvious
 that
 collision
 severity
 is
 reduced
 with
 speed
 reductions.
 
 However,
 street
 safety
is
 more
 importantly
improved
 by
reduced
 motor
 vehicle
 speeds,
which
allow
for
increased
response
times
and
reduced
stopping
 distances,
which
 in
 turn
 improve
collision
 avoidance
all
 together.
 
The
 table
below
highlights
the
relationship
between
speed
and
collisions87:




Ac3on

The
 development
 of
 the
 matrix
 will
 be
 a
 mul/‐disciplinary
 process
 with
 representa/ves
 from,
Engineering,
 Parks,
 Recrea/on
 &
 Culture,
 Planning,
 Public
 Works,
 Fire,
 and
 Police
 Departments;
 as
 well
 as,
 ci/zen
representa/ves. The
 matrix
 shall
 include
 specific
 sec/ons
 for
 each
 type
 of
 transporta/on
 mode,
 as
 well
 as
 public
 par/cipa/on
 and
 stakeholder
 involvement.
 
 The
 development
 of
 the
 matrix
 and
 use
 of
 it
 in
 the
 future
 shall
 be
 an
 interdisciplinary
 team
 approach
 that
 includes
 Engineers,
 Planners,
 Landscape
 Architects,
 Ac/ve
 Transporta/on
 experts,
 and
 others
 determined
 to
 be
 poten/ally
 insigh{ul
 and
 helpful.
 Of
par/cular
 note
is
that
the
matrix
shall
 integrate
the
use
of
 “target
 speeds”
as
a
primary
parameter
of
street
designs.

Target
speed
is
the
 speed
at
which
vehicles
should
operate
on
a
thoroughfare
in
a
specific
 context,
consistent
with
the
level
 of
mul/modal
 ac/vity
generated
 by
 adjacent
 land
 uses,
 and
 to
 provide
 both
 mobility
for
 motor
 vehicles
 and
 a
 safe
 environment
 for
 pedestrians
 and
 bicyclists.
 
 The
 design
 speed
(no
more
than
5
mph
over
the
target
speed)
should
be
designed
 to
 those
 geometric
 design
 elements
 where
 speed
 is
 cri/cal
 for
 safe
 vehicle
opera/on.
 
The
 target
 speed
is
 based
on
the
street
 type
and
 context
including
neighbouring
land
uses.
88


Speed
vs.
Collisions Speed
Drop 1
mph 3
mph 6
mph

As
such,
the
challenge
for
this
Element
 requires
the
Town
 to
develop
 a
 decision
 making
 matrix,
 and
 associated
 process,
 for
 (re)developing
 roads
 within
 Collingwood
 that
 is
 complete
 streets
 focused.
 
 This
 approach
 will
ensure
that
all
modes
of
transportation
are
addressed
in
 the
design/development
process.






86
NACTO,
Urban
Street
Design
Guide,
October
2012,
pg
27 87
Michael
King,
Nelson\Nygaard
Associates,
“Designing
Complete
Streets”
presenta/on,
May
29,
2007 88

Knoxville
Regional
Transporta/on
Planning
Organiza/on,
Complete
Streets
Design
Guidelines,
2009,
pg.
10

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
Collision
Drop 5% 15% 42%

Contextual
measurements/assessments
criteria
will
 also
be
important
 in
 this
 work
(which
should
also
 take
into
account
 the
intended
future
 of
the
area
as
described
in
the
Official
Plan),
because:
 Understanding
 the
land
 use
 context
 provides
guidance
 on
 who
 will
 need
 to
 use
 the
 road
 and
 how.
 
 This
 understanding
 influences
 the
 geometric
 design
 of
 the
 roadway
 and
 the
 types
 of
 ameniNes
 required
 in
 the
 right‐of‐way...
 
 
 Land
 use
 context
 and
 roadway
 type


87

comprise
the
organizing
framework
for
 the
selecNon
of
 appropriate
roadway
 design
values.
A
context
 area
is
a
 land
area
comprising
a
unique
combinaNon
of
different
 land
 uses,
 architectural
 types,
 urban
 form,
 building
 density,
 roadways,
 and
 topography
 and
 other
 natural
 features”. 89


 The
basic
complete
streets
design
approach
from
which
the
matrix
will
 be
 developed
 is
 outlined
 in
 the
 following
 categories
 that
 will
 all
 be
 addressed
: • Safe: • for
people
first • real
and
perceived • Reliable: • well
designed • appropriate
infrastructure
for
all
transporta/on
modes • integrated
modes
of
transporta/on • Effec/ve: • for
all
transporta/on
modes • for
needs
of
ci/zens
and
businesses • interconnected • efficient • Human‐centred: • addresses
peoples’
needs • age
appropriate
transporta/on
op/ons • easily
understood • aesthe/cally
designed • Context
Sensi/ve: • land
use
suppor/ve • land
value
enhancing • target
speed
appropriate • Accessible: • diversity
of
transporta/on
modes
facilitated • affordable • “8/80”
accessibility

89
Pennsylvania
and
New
Jersey
Departments
of
Transporta/on,

Smart
TransportaNon
Guidebook,
March
2008,
pg
23

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
88

N
89

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12


10.
Community‐wide
Walkability/bikeability
Audits
Challenge

The
 need
 to
 effecNvely
 review
 walking
 condiNons
 to
 encourage
 travel
 on
 foot
 intrinsically
 requires
 a
 systemaNc
 method
 for
 assessing
 pedestrian
 environments.
 
 Alongside
 this
 recogniNon,
 the
 importance
 of
 parNcular
 aspects
 of
 the
 public
 realm
 such
 as
 public
 spaces
 and
 interchange
 spaces
 are
 considered
to
 be
of
key
 importance
in
 the
opNmizaNon
 of
walking
environments90.

 the
 environment.
 
 Therefore,
 this
 Element
 outlines
 how
 the
 Town,
 with
 local
 stakeholders,
will
 conduct
 walking
and
 biking
audits
of
 the
 en/re
town
within
three
years.

These
will
be
conducted
to:
 1) Develop
 and
 understanding
 of
 the
 current
 (baseline)
 condi/on
 of
 the
 community
 in
 terms
 of
 ac/ve
 transporta/on; 2) Iden/fy
issues
 that
 need
 to
 addressed
 to
 improve
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
within
the
community;
and, 3) Build
 local
 capacity
 by
 informing
 and
 educa/ng
 local
 ci/zens
about
ac/ve
transporta/on
and
road
design.

The
 above
 was
 said
 in
 terms
 of
 the
 PERS
 (Pedestrian
 Environment
 Review
 System)
 which
 looks
 at
 a
 variety
 of
 parameters,
 including:
 moving
 in
 the
space;
 interpre/ng
the
space;
 personal
 safety;
 feeling
 comfortable;
 sense
 of
 place;
 opportunity
 for
 ac/vity;
 quality
 of
 the
 environment;
and
 maintenance.

The
County’s
Transporta/on
Master
 Plan
states: Walking
 and
 cycling
 infrastructure
 should
 be
 designed
 in
 such
 a
 way
 as
 to
 connect
 to
 the
 exisNng
 trails
 network,
 provide
 access
 to
 local
 commercial
 areas,
 encourage
increased
walking
and
cycling
for
local
short
 trips,
 and
 provide
 safe
 walking
 and
 cycling
 routes
 to
 neighbourhood
schools
and
community
centres. 91


The
 most
 effec/ve
 method
 of
 analyzing
the
 built
 environment
 when
 designing
for
 new
developments
 is
through
 first‐hand,
on‐the‐ground
 experience.

This
provides
insights
into
 the
physical
 features
and
uses
 of
 the
area
 that
are
 not
 able
to
 be
assessed
 otherwise.
 
Addi/onally,
 the
 people
 most
 familiar
 with
 an
 area,
the
 local
 ci/zens,
 are
 oLen
 more
acutely
aware
of
 design
 issues
because
 of
their
 familiarity
with


90
David
Allen,
Transport
researcher,
TRL
Ltd,
AudiNng
Public
Spaces
and
Interchange
Spaces,
presented
at
Walk21
the
6th
Interna/onal
Conference
on
Walking
in
the
21st
Century,
September
2005 91
Simcoe
County,
County
of
Simcoe
Transporta/on
Master
Plan,
2008,
pg.
5‐2

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
90

Walkability
 (and
 bikeability)
 is
 determined
 by
 looking
at
the
features
and
characterisNcs
of
the
 environment
 and
how
 people
 use
 it.
 
There
 are
 four
 basic
categories
that
 this
informaNon
 falls
 into
as
illustrated
above.
 
Assessments
of
these
 categories
and
features
are
 part
of
walkability/ bikeability
audits.

Ac3on

The
walkability
audits
shall
consider
 the
full
range
of
factors
that
affect
 walkability
in
a
community
or
 neighbourhood,
specifically:
directness;
 con/nuity;
 street
 crossings;
 visual
 interest
 and
 ameni/es;
 and,
 security.

A
single
methodology
shall
be
used
 throughout
 the
audi/ng
 process.
 
 However,
 amendments
 can
 be
 made
 if
 determined
 to
 be
 appropriately
 addressing
 a
 shor{all
 or
 concern
 resul/ng
 from
 experience
 with
 previous
 audits.
 
 This
 will
 help
 increase
 awareness
 and
 help
 develop
 the
 priori/es
 of
 the
 community
 in
 terms
 of
 future
 ac/ve
transporta/on
ini/a/ves.


 The
 Ins/tute
of
 Transporta/on
 Engineers’
Designing
Walkable
Urban
 Thoroughfares:
 A
 Context
 SensiNve
 Approach
 (2010)
 describes
 the
 “Con/nuum
 of
 Walkability”
 as
 falling
 into
 a
 range
 which
 includes:
 Pedestrian
 Places;
 Pedestrian
 Suppor/ve;
 Pedestrian
 Tolerant;
 and
 Pedestrian
 Intolerant. 92
 
 
The
 walkability
audit
 process
 will
 help
 the
 community
 iden/fy
 and
 categorize
 its
 corridors,
 neighbourhoods,
 places,
 and
 districts
 within
 this
 con/nuum
 with
 specifically
 iden/fied
 characteris/cs.
 
 This
 informa/on
 will
 be
 used
 to
 directly
 inform
 implementa/on
ac/ons. This
 will
 be
 conducted
 with
 the
 ci/zens
 and
 business
 owners
 of
 the
 area
 with
 facilita/on
 by
 Town
 staff
 and
 external
 consultants
 as
 necessary.
 
 The
 purpose
 of
 this
 will
 be
 to
 inform
 future
 necessary
 ini/a/ves,
 programs,
 or
 improvements
 that
 could
 be
 added
 to
 the
 near‐range
and
100
projects
sec/ons
of
the
ATP.

These
audits
should
 be
 conducted
 in
 day/me
 hours
 as
 well
 as
 aLer
 dark
 to
 iden/fy
 concerns
for
personal
 security;
which
will
beMer
 facilitate
targe/ng
of
 improvements.
 
 These
 should
 also
 include
 assessments
 by
 persons
 with
disabili/es93
 The
 Walking
 Audit
 developed
 by
 the
 Walkable
 and
 Livable
 Communi/es
Ins/tute
is
an
 excellent
tool
for
 use
in
Collingwood
for
 a
 number
 of
 reasons:
 it
 is
 a
 well
 established
 tool
 that
 has
 been
 used
 with
 hundreds
 of
 communi/es,
 and
 as
 of
 2012
 promoted
 by
 the


Walkability/bikeability
audits
will
help
idenNfy
how
well
the
 community
fits
the
“8/80”
rule;
which
indicates
the
 town’s
 overal
safety/comfort
for
pedestrians
and
cyclists
(Photo
by
 Sarah
Bowman,
WALC
InsNtute). As
 described
 by
 Walk
 and
 Bike
 for
 Life’s
 Trails
 for
 AcNve
 TransportaNon:
 Town
of
 Collingwood
 report
 (2009,
 pg
 44)
 the
8/80
rule
is: “Step
1:
 Think
 of
a
child
that
you
love
and
care
 for
who
is
 approximately
 8
 years
 of
 age.
 
 This
 could
 be
 a
 child,
 grandchild,
sister,
brother,
cousin,
et
cetera.
 Step
 2:
 Think
 of
an
older
 adult,
 approximately
80
 years
of
 age
 who
 you
 love
 and
care
 for.
 
 this
 could
 be
 a
 parent,
 grandparent,
friend,
et
cetera.
 Step
3:
 Ask
 yourself:
 would
you
send
that
 8
year
 old
along
 with
 the
 80
 year
 old
 on
 a
 walk,
 or
 a
 bike
 ride
 on
 that
 infrastructure?
 
If
you
would,
 then
it
 is
safe
enough,
 if
you
 would
not,
then
it
is
not
safe
enough.”

92

Ins/tute
of
Transporta/on
Engineers,
Designing
Walkable
Urban
Thoroughfares:
A
Context
SensiNve
Approach,
2010,
pg.
5

93
Walk21,
InternaNonal
Charter
for
Walking,
2010

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
91

United
 States
Environmental
 Protec/on
 Agency
as
a
community
tool;
 it
 uses
community
resources
of
volunteers;
it
helps
generate
solu/ons
 to
 specific
 problems.

The
Town
should
 also
 consider
augmen/ng
this
 methodology
 with
 others
 that
 are
 innova/ve
 such
 as
 the
 ones
 iden/fied
 by
 the
 intergovernmental
 network
 for
 coopera/on
 in
 research,
COST
(European
Coopera/on
 in
Science
 and
 Technology),
in
 their
report
Cost
358
Pedestrians’
Quality
Needs 94:
 a) Mapping
emo/ons
of
the
urban
pedestrian:
which
explores
 the
link
between
peoples’
emo/onal
 experiences
 to
urban
 spaces
and
pedestrian
movements; b) Urban
 atmospheres
 shaping
 the
 way
 we
 walk:
 which
 examines
how,
and
to
what
extent,
architectural
and
urban
 atmospheres
affect
pedestrians’
decisions;
 c) Coun/ng
children
to
assess
their
risk
exposure:
which
helps
 iden/fy
 comfort
 and
 walkability
 of
 areas
 based
 on
 the
 number
 and
 characteris/cs
 of
 child
 pedestrians
 within
 neighbourhood
areas.
 The
following
image
 shows
a
site
and
 what
a
por/on
of
a
community
 survey
looks
like 95

94
European
Coopera/on
in
Science
and
Technology,
Cost
358
Pedestrians’
Quality
Needs,
2012,
pg.
15 95
Environmental
Protec/on
Agency,
Walking
Audit
Survey
Tool,
2012,
pg.
4

N
92

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

The
 images
 above
 are
 a
photograph
 of
 a
 street
 that
 was
 audited
and
a
porNon
of
a
ciNzen’s
audit
sheet. These
 walkability
 audits
 will
 provide
 needed
 informaNon
 relaNng
 to
 the
 posiNve
 and
 negaNve
 aspects
 of
 the
 built
 environment
that
affect
 pedestrian,
and
cyclist
travel
in
the
 community.
 
This
will
provide
 measurable
evidence
for
 the
 community
 to
 take
 further
 acNon.
 
 Note
 that
 this
kind
of
 informaNon
can
 oZen
 be
a
necessary
 component
 of
future
 grant
applicaNons.
 (Walkability
 Workbook,
WALC
InsNtute,
 hcp://www.walklive.org/project/walkability‐workbook/)

Mountain Road

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
e Hum

Be

ac

hw

ood

Ra

6t

reet h St

od

“ol

rio Huronta Street

d”

treet High S

Hi

gh

wa

y2

6

This
map
illustrates
the
general
sub‐areas
for
the
walkability/bikability
audits.

N

93




IV.
 


100
Day
Implementa3on
Projects

Immediate
Projects
‐
yearly

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
40% 20%
94

The
Elements
in
this 
Sec/on
are 
of
a 
scale 
that
 they
 can
be 
completed
in
approximately
 100
days.
 
These
 are
quick
ac/on
projects.
 
 These
Elements 
are
low‐ cost,
 high‐impact
 type
 projects 
 that
 will 
 affect
 all
 aspects 
of
 ac/ve 
transporta/on
 in
 the
 community:
 p l a c e m a k i n g ;
 n e t w o r k
 d e v e l o p m e n t
 a n d
 improvements;
 community
 asset
 development;
 community
par/cipa/on;
communica/on;
and
ac/ve
 transporta/on
culture
support.



60%

Preferences for project timeframes defined in the ATP

Near-range Mid-range 100 Day Projects Long-range

In
the
2012
community
survey
relaNng
to
the
ATP,
people
were
asked
 what
 their
 preference
 was
 for
 the
 four
 SecNons
 that
 describe
 the
 implementaNon
 projects.
 
 The
 majority
 of
 people
 were
 most
 interested
in
the
shorter‐range
projects
by
a
significant
margin.



N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
95


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


1)

Bikeable
Collingwood
Wiki
Map
 
 
 2)

Shared
Walkways/Promenade
Strategy
 
 3)

Downtown
Parking
Analysis

 
 
 
 4)

Downtown
“Walking
Time”
Wayfinding
Signage
 
 5)

ATP
Ci3zen
“DO‐TANK”
Task
Force
 
 
 6)

Town
Facility
Bike
Parking
Program

 
 7)

Annual
ATP
Mee3ng
of
the
Public
 
 
 8)

Annual
Public
Informa3on
Program
 
 
 9)

Annual
Community
AT
Audit
 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


pg
96 pg
98 pg
100 pg
102 pg
104 pg
106 pg
108 pg
110 pg
112


1.
Bikeable
Collingwood
Wiki
Map
Challenge

An
 effec/ve
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 bike
 network
 includes
 not
 only
 designated
 routes
 and
 signage,
 but
 also
 other
 suppor/ve
 features
 such
 as
 bike
 parking
 and
 air
 pumping
 sta/ons.
 
 Addi/onally,
 community
members
need
to
be
made
aware
of
these
if
the
culture
of
 ac/ve
transporta/on
is
to
be
supported.

 This
Element
is
intended
to
provide
an
online
informa/on
resource
for
 the
 community
 that
 both
 informs
 people,
 but
 also
 engages
 them
 in
 the
development
of
this
helpful
tool.



Ac3on

For
 this
 Element
 the
 Town
 will
 work
 with
 a
 group
 of
 ci/zens
 to
 develop
an
online
wiki
map
of
Collingwood’s
bike
infrastructure.

 This
 Element
 will
 help
 build
 the
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 culture
 within
 Collingwood,
 and
 by
 working
 with
 ci/zens
 this
 will
 help
 the
 Town
 access
 community
 knowledge;
 while
 building
 support
 for
 ac/ve
 transporta/on.
 
 
 Each
 feature
 on
 the
 map
 will
 include
a
 photo
 and
 descrip/on.

 As
 a
 wiki‐map
 there
 will
 be
 no
 publishing
 costs
 associated
 with
 its
 produc/on
and
distribu/on.

N
Pictured
here
is
an
example
 of
bike
parking
provided
at
a
local
 business.
 
This
kind
of
locaNon
will
be
 included
in
the
 Bikeable
 Collingwood
Wiki
Map.



D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
96

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
The
 wiki
map
will
 be
 an
ongoing
and
evolving
resource
for
 the
 ciNzens
 and
 visitors
 of
 Collingwood.
 
 It
 is
 expected
 that
 eventually
 this
 tool
 will
 be
 linked
 with
 other
 maps
 and
 wikis
 associated
with
acNve
transportaNon.


97


2.
Shared
Walkways/Promenade
Strategy
Challenge

To
 improve
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 opportuni/es
 throughout
 the
 community
 a
 number
 of
 “shared
 walkways”
 have
 been
 created
 in
 recent
years.

These
were
intended
to
provide
a
safe
alterna/ve
to
on‐ street
riding
for
 cyclists.

These
have
been
 implemented
along
two
of
 Collingwood’s
busiest
streets
(First
and
High
Streets);
with
preliminary
 design
 work
 completed
 for
 a
 similar
 arrangement
 on
 Hume
 Street
 when
it
is
redeveloped.

Similar
shared
walkways
are
located
as
part
of
 the
 redevelopment
 of
 the
 shipyards,
 and
 along
 the
 waterfront
 of
 Sunset
Point
Park.
 The
 difficulty
with
 these
 is
 related
 to
 the
 conflict
 poten/al
 between
 cyclists
and
pedestrians;
and,
conflicts
at
driveways
between
 cars
and
 cyclists.
 These
 are
 issues
 related
 to
 expecta/ons,
 familiarity,
 travel
 speed,
and
lack
of
signage.

Note
that
 these
facili/es
are
generally
too
 narrow
 to
 allow
 for
 separa/on
 of
 users.
 
 The
 TAC
 Bikeway
 Traffic
 Control
 Guidelines
for
 Canada
 states
 the
 preference
 not
 to
 separate
 these
 uses
 but
 indicates
 that
 the
 Pathway
 Organiza/on
 Signs
can
 be
 used
in
specific
instances:
 On
 mulN‐use
 paths,
 segregaNon
 of
 bicycles
 and
 pedestrians
 should
 be
 avoided,
 wherever
 possible.
 
 However,
 where
 study
 has
 shown
 that
 this
 type
 of
 operaNon
is
suited,
these
signs
may
be
used.96

Ac3on

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
98

A
 mul/‐disciplinary
 team
 including
 Town
 staff
 from
 a
 variety
 of
 Departments
 (with
 specialized
 consultant
 assistance
 as
 determined
 necessary)
 will
 conduct
 a
 review
 of
 all
 the
 shared
 use
 pathways
 in
 Collingwood
 to
 determine
 the
 best
course
 of
 ac/on
 to
 improve
 their
 func/on.
 
 This
will
 be
developed
 with
 clear
 direc/on
 for
 the
specific
 characteris/cs
of
each
 pathway’s
context,
including
use,
neighbouring
 land
 uses,
appearance,
conflicts,
purpose
of
pathway,
and,
linkages
to
 other
ac/ve
transporta/on
routes. An
excellent
resource
that
has
recently
been
 published
is
from
the
UK
 Department
 for
 Transporta/on.
 
 Their
 September
 2012
 document
 Shared
 Use
 Routes
 for
 Pedestrians
 and
 Cyclists97,
 and
 other
 similar
 reference
 materials
 should
 be
 used
 to
 inform
 the
 underlying
 principles,
 cyclist
 categories,
 strategy,
 process,
 and
 design
 criteria
 used
throughout
this
project. This
process
will
include,
at
a
minimum,
the
following:

This
 Element
 will
 involve
 crea/ng
 an
 effec/ve
 community‐wide
 strategy
for
 these
shared
 pathways
to
improve
their
 func/onality
and
 safety
for
users.

Pictured
 is
an
example
 of
 signage
 that
 could
 be
 used
 in
 locaNons 
 where
 the
 use
 of
 bicycles
 on
 shared
 pathways
 would
 c r e a t e
 c o n fl i c t s
 a n d
 safety
 concerns
 for
 other
 users.

96
Transporta/on
Associa/on
of
Canada,
Bikeway
Traffic
Control
Guidelines
for
Canada,
February
2012,
pg.
25 97

Department
for
Transporta/on,
Shared
Use
Routes
for
Pedestrians
and
Cyclists,
September
2012

N

• • • • • 






Assessment
of
pathway
use
(including
on‐site
monitoring); Review
of
best
prac/ces
documents;
 Development
of
preferred
op/ons; On‐site
tes/ng
of
preferred
op/ons
with
monitoring; Review
 of
 findings
 and
 implementa/on
 of
 recommended
 ac/ons.


N

The
 shared
 pathways
 in
 Sunset
 Point
 Park
 are
 an
 example
 of
 infrastructure
 that
 is
 not
 appropriately
 designed
 to
 support
 both
 cycling
 and
 walking.
 
 As 
seen
 here,
 the
 radii
 of
 the
 path
 curves
 force
 cyclists
 to
 cut
 corners,
 creaNng
 conflicts
 with
 pedestrians.
 This
 Element
 will
 provide
 design
 and/or
 management
soluNons
to
these
kinds
of
conflicts
for
the
shared
 pathways
throughout
Collingwood.

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
99

Pictured
 are
 examples
 of
 the
 signage
 that
 could
 be
 used
 on
 shared
pathways
throughout
the
community.
 
This
Element
will
 determine
the
most
appropriate
use
of
such
signage.


3.
Downtown
Parking
Analysis
Challenge

The
 strategies
 and
 implementa/on
projects
 of
 this
 ATP
 are
 intended
 to
 address
 all
 forms
 of
 transporta/on
 in
 a
 way
 that
 makes
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 safe,
 and
 convenient.
 
 Integra/ng
 elements
 that
 facilitate
 the
 effec/ve
 use
 of
 vehicles
 into
 an
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 plan
is
a
unique
strategy
of
this
ATP. By
 making
 it
 more
 efficient
 for
 vehicles
 to
 park
 in
 the
 downtown
 district
 the
 Town
 we
 will
 be
 facilita/ng
 a
 park
once
 strategy
 whose
 intent
 is
to
 get
 people
 out
 of
their
cars
sooner
 and
having
them
 walk
 between
 nearby
 des/na/ons,
 as
 opposed
 to
 repeated
 parking
 throughout
 downtown.

 The
sooner
 people
 are
out
of
their
 cars,
the
 sooner
 they
 are
 pedestrians
 and
 reducing
 the
 amount
 of
 car
 traffic
 flowing
 throughout
 the
 downtown
 district,
benefi/ng
 vehicle
 traffic,
 pedestrian
traffic
and
commercial
establishments.



Ac3on

This
Element
will
directly
inform
the
Element
focused
on
right‐sizing
the
 parking
system
in
the
downtown
district.

N

Contemporary
 knowledge
 about
 parking
 genera/on
 rates,
 needs,
 management
 mechanisms,
and
 impact
 on
 the
 success
 of
 downtowns
 con/nues
to
be
refined
(especially
since
the
comple/on
of
the
Town’s
 2002
 Downtown
Parking
Study
 and
2009
 Parking
 Strategy
 Downtown
 Collingwood
 report).
 Therefore,
 this
 Element
 seeks
 to
 develop
 a
 community
generated
parking
analysis
of
the
Downtown
 district.

This
 will
be
 used
to
develop
 an
 ac/onable
 parking
strategy
for
downtown
 to
 support
 businesses,
 ac/ve
 transporta/on,
 and
 effec/ve
 parking
 (linked
with
the
Element
on
page
46).

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
100

There
have
been
no
 significant
coordinated
programs
implemented
 for
 parking
management
in
 downtown
(some
of
which
are
outlined
in
 the
 2009
 Strategy
 Report)
 that
 address
 the
 “perceived”
 or
 practical
 90%
 capacity
for
off‐street
parking
and
support
growth,
such
as:
progressive
 pricing
structures;
zoned
space
allocation;
refinements
to
zoning
and
ITE
 based
estimates
for
 our
 local
 context;
opportunities
for
 more
 efficient
 on‐street
parking
inventory
still
available
as
a
result
of
recent
downtown
 improvements;
 active
 transportation
 and
 transit
 use;
 and,
 employee
 parking
demand
management
strategies.
 The
 2004
 Edition
 of
 the
 Institute
 of
 Transportation
 Engineers
 (ITE)
 Parking
 Generation
 Report
 (commonly
 used
 to
 determine
 parking
 generation
 rates)
clearly
states
 characteristics
of
 its
data
 that
skew
 its
 applicability
 for
 our
 parking
 context,
 making
 this
 kind
 of
 updated
 approach
necessary:

 Most
of
the
data
currently
available
are
from
suburban
 sites
with
isolated
single
land
uses
with
free
parking.

The
information
provided
in
these
reports
is
also
admitted
by
the
ITE
to
 not
 yet
 address
 factors
 such
 as
 type
 or
 area,
parking
 pricing,
 transit
 availability,
 multi‐stop
 trips,
 land
 use
 mix,
 and
 pedestrian
 friendly
 design;
all
of
which
are
downtown
 characteristics.

 
In
reference
to
the
 parking
generation
rates
of
the
ITE
Report,
the
Transportation
Planning
 Handbook
states
“thus,
they
need
downward
adjustments
where
these
 conditions
do
not
apply,
especially
in
CBDs”.
 Combined
 with
 assistance
 from
 the
 BIA,
 this
 Element
 will
 allow
 the
 Town
 to
 more
 fully
 understand
 the
 need/use
 of
 parking
 in
 the
 downtown;
 access
 to
 modes
 of
 transportation;
 and
 how
 they
 work
 together.
 
This
 will
 facilitate
implementation
 of
key
recommendations
 from
past
parking
strategy
and
review
studies,
along
with
contemporary
 best
practices.


N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
All
 parking
spaces
are
 not
equal
in
terms
of
their
 funcNon.
 
The
 Victoria
 TransportaNon
 Policy
 InsNtute
 notes 
 that
 “100 
 public
 parking
spaces 
can
 be
equivalent
 to
150
to
250
private
 parking
 spaces”;
 something
that
is
also
not
addressed
in
the
ITE
 manual
 or
Town
parking
requirements.

 AddiNonally,
 InternaNonally
 recognized
 transportaNon
 engineering
 experts
 Nelson/Nygard
 note
 that
 “if
 you
 require
 more
than
3
spaces
per
1000 
sq.
Z
you’re
requiring
more
parking
 than
land
use”.
 ParNcularly
as
it
relates
to
off‐street
parking
lots,
 the
 fact
 that
 the
 raNo
of
 parking
to
land
use
 is
so
 high
in
our
 downtown
 should
 be
 seriously
 examined
 in
 terms
 of
 overall
 economic
 prosperity,
 walkability,
 ROI,
 lost
 tax
 revenues
 from
 development,
 TransportaNon
 Demand
 Management
 (TDM)
 strategies,
et
cetera.


101


4.
Downtown
“Walking
Time”
Wayfinding
Signage
Challenge

“A
recent
poll
indicated
that
82%
of
Canadians
would
like
to
walk
more
 and
 that
 66%
 would
 like
 to
 bike
 more”.98 
 
 To
 support
 a
 culture
 of
 walking
 where
 this
 desire
 is
 so
 strong,
 is
 important
 to
 provide
 coherent
and
consistent
informa/on
and
signage
systems. 99


 This
 Element
 meets
 the
 challenge
 of
 developing
 a
 signage
 program
 that
 is
centred
 around
 the
experience
of
the
pedestrian;
to
 do
so
will
 require
a
keen
sense
of
the
needs
of
downtown
pedestrians.

Ac3on


The
 idea
 is
 to
 create
 a
signage
 system
 based
 on
 the
 /me
 it
 takes
 a
 pedestrian
 to
 walk
from
one
 loca/on
 to
 another.
 
This
 approach
will
 beMer
 address
 how
 people
 understand
 their
 environment
 and
 how
 they
travel
 through
 it
 than
 does
 signage
 that
 iden/fies
 distances
 to
 loca/ons.
 
 By
 developing
 an
 easily
 used
 tool
 that
 can
 be
 used
 to
 navigate
throughout
 the
 district,
and
 to
 important
sites
and
 services,
 the
downtown
will
become
more
pedestrian
friendly.
 This
approach
 will
help
highlight
the
walkable
 scale
of
the
district
and
 overall
 town
 to
 both
 those
 that
 currently
choose
 to
 walk
 and
 those
 that
 do
 not
 yet,
 but
 could
 be
 encouraged
 to
 through
 beMer
 understanding
of
the
community
and
ac/ve
transporta/on
op/ons.

98
Go
for
Green
The
Ac/ve
Living
&
Environment
Program,

Filng
Places:
How
the
Built
Environment
Affects
AcNve
Living
and
AcNve
TransportaNon,
pg.
2 99
Walk21,
InternaNonal
Charter
for
Walking,
2010 100
Media5
Interac/ve
Corpora/on
web
site,
www.media5.org

N
102

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

The
 inspira/on
 for
 these
 signs
 comes
 from
 University
 of
 North
 Carolina
 at
 Chapel
 Hill
 student
 MaM
 Tomasulo
 (who)
 decided
 to
 engage
 in
 some
 “guerilla
 urbanism”
 with
 fellow
 fans
 of
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 ac/vity,
 pos/ng
 27
 signs
 at
 three
 Raleigh,
 NC
 intersec/ons
 as
 part
 of
 the
 “Walk
 Raleigh”
 project.
 
 The
 signs
 contained
 snippets
about
 how
many
minutes
it
would
take
to
walk
to
 must‐see
 des/na/ons
 like
 Raleigh
 City
 Cemetery,
 as
 well
 as
 QR
 codes
for
downloading
direc/ons.100

 By
using
the
assistance
of
a
“DO
TANK”
team,
as
described
 in
another
 Element
 of
 the
ATP,
the
 Town
 will
 develop
 the
walking
 /me
 signage
 designs
 and
program.
 
This
will
 also
 be
done
in
 coopera/on
 with
 the
 Downtown
BIA
for
their
input.

 Once
 a
 final
 recommended
 signage
 program
 has
 been
 developed
 to
 fulfill
 this
 Element,
it
 will
 be
 presented
 to
 Council
 for
 final
 approval
 and
authoriza/on
for
implementa/on.





N
103

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
Pictured
 are
 examples
 of
 the
 pedestrian
 oriented
 “walking
 Nme”
signage
that
inspired
this
Element
of
the
ATP.


5.
ATP
Ci3zen
“DO‐TANK”
Task
Force
Challenge

One
 of
 the
 greatest
 challenges
 with
 efforts
 to
 improve
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 in
 Collingwood
 is
 gemng
 ci/zens
 and
 stakeholders
 engaged
 and
 mobilized.
 
 It
 is
 only
 through
 the
 collec/ve
 efforts
 and
 resources
of
the
broader
community
that
the
goals
and
projects
of
the
 ATP
 can
 be
 completed;
 therefore
 the
 Town
 needs
 to
 be
 crea/ve
 in
 mee/ng
this
challenge.
 The
 Town
 has
 extensively
 used
 commiMees
 to
 support
 its
 work.
 
 However,
the
mandates
of
these
are
oLen
not
 dynamic
 or
focused
on
 specific
 ac/onable
 projects
 to
 be
 fully
 effec/ve
 with
 short‐term
 or
 changing
circumstances.

This
Element
 seeks
to
create
a
more
flexible
 and
 empowered
 volunteer
 task
 force
 structure
 to
 assist
 the
 Town’s
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 staff
 in
 implemen/ng
 the
 ATP.
 
 
 The
 challenge
 will
 be
 to
 develop
 the
 structure
 for
 a
 “DO‐TANK”
 with
 a
 project
 specific
 revolving
 membership,
 that
 is
 made
 up
 of
 ci/zens
 that
 volunteer
 their
 /me
and
skills
 for
 the
implementa/on
 of
Elements
of
 this
Plan.


Ac3on

To
 implement
 this
 Element
 a
 recruitment
 process
 and
 selec/on
 parameters
will
be
defined
for
bringing
together
 the
needed
members
 of
this
special
working
task
force.


 The
membership
of
the
DO‐TANK
is
important
as
it
must
be
broad
and
 skilled. 101

The
ci/zens
that
 are
part
of
this
evolving
group
will
include:
 professionals
 (Planners,
 Landscape
 Architects,
 Engineers);
 business
 owners;
moms
and
 dads;
to
ensure
that
the
diversity
of
the
interests
 and
 exper/se
 are
 achieved.
 
 These
 groups
 will
 also
 include
 youth
 members
because
they
have
a
fresh
and
unique
perspec/ve
and
skills
 rela/ng
to
the
local
environment
as
it
pertains
to
their
needs.

This
will
 also
 help
 iden/fy
 issues
 associated
 with
 social
 inclusivity,
 limited
 mobility
of
children,
and
the
loca/ons
where
they
generally
travel
and
 the
specific
hinderances
they
encounter. 102 This
 Element
 will
 be
 developed
 to
 ensure
 that
 the
 DO‐TANK
 is
 a
 “working”
 task
 force,
 where
 the
 members
 will
 be
 expected
 to
 fully
 par/cipate
 and
 contribute
 concrete
 materials
 and
 ac/ons,
 and
 products
beyond
 just
 their
 opinions
and
review
of
 others’
work.

This
 group
will
be
focused
on
gemng
things
done! Upon
 the
ini/al
 forma/on
 of
this
evolving
 group,
the
Town
 will
 work
 with
the
membership
to
develop
a
work
plan
rela/ng
to
the
Elements
 of
the
ATP.

101
Walk21,
InternaNonal
Charter
for
Walking,
2010
“Consult,
on
a
regular
basis,
local
organiza/ons
represen/ng
people
on
foot
and
other
relevant
groups
including
young
people,
the
elderly
and
those
 with
limited
ability”. 102
Catherine
O’Brien,
PhD.
Centre
for
Sustainable
Transporta/on,
Child
and
Youth
Friendly
Planning,
presenta/on,
2008

N
104

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

N

Collingwood’s
 ATP
 DO‐TANK
 will
 be
 carefully
 structured
 to
 have
 a
 diverse
 representaNon
as
well
as
appropriate
 skill
sets 
for
execuNng
its
evolving
work
 program.

 The
 membership
of
this
groups
will
 be
 flexible
 and
changing
depending
upon
 the
work
being
done
at
the
Nme.


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
105


6.
Town
Facility
Bike
Parking
Program
Challenge

Municipal
buildings,
and
parks
typically
have
parking
facili/es
provided
 for
 vehicles;
and
 given
 the
high
 cost
 of
providing
these
parking
stalls,
 this
represents
a
large
investment
 of
 public
funds
being
made
by
the
 Town
 to
 provide
access
for
 those
that
 use
vehicles
as
 transporta/on.
 
 Unfortunately
many
 of
 these
 loca/ons
 do
 not
 provide
 the
 same
 for
 bicycle
parking.

Yet
the
provision
of
bike
parking
facili/es
throughout
 the
 community
 at
 all
 Town
 facili/es
 has
 been
 recommended
 as
 necessary
in
a
recent
review
conducted
for
the
Town. 103

Ac3on

Through
a
staged
 program
the
Parks
Recrea/on
and
Culture
staff,
will
 help
develop
and
 implement
 a
strategy
to
 have
 safe
and
 convenient
 bicycle
parking
installed
at
all
municipal
facili/es,
including
parks.

This
 shall
be
designed
to
suit
the
specific
context
of
each
site
and
its
use.


The
 challenge
 of
 this
 Element
 is
 to
 provide
 bicycle
 parking
 at
 all
 municipal
 buildings
 and
 parks
 to
 support
 ac/ve
 transporta/on.
 This
 Element
 is
about
 more
 than
just
 providing
needed
 infrastructure;
it
is
 also
intended
to
facilitate
the
culture
of
ac/ve
transporta/on.

This
is
 an
 appropriate
 and
 easy
 way
 for
 the
 Town
 to
 take
 the
 lead
 in
 providing
safe
and
convenient
bike
parking
in
the
community.

103
Victor
Ford
and
Associates
Inc.,
On
&
Off
Road
Cycling/Pedestrian
FaciliNes
&
TransiNons:
Safety
&
Improvement
RecommendaNons,
December
2009,
pg.
58

N
106

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

Example
of
bike
parking
being
used
at
a
local
park
 by
school
children
who
use
 the
locaNon
as
a
school
bus
stop
transfer
area.

 This
is
an
excellent
example
 of
how
different
modes
of
transportaNon
are
 used
 by
people
to
make
their
trips.


N
107

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12


7.
Annual
ATP
Mee3ng
of
the
Public
Challenge

The
Town
 has
extensively
used
 a
variety
of
methods
to
 communicate
 with
 the
 public,
 including
 contemporary
 methods
 using
 online
 tools
 and
social
media.

However,
while
some
of
these
methods
work
beMer
 for
 informing
 people,
 they
 all
 share
 similar
 limita/ons
 in
 terms
 of
 there
successes
and
ability
to
really
engage
people.

The
most
effec/ve
 way
to
 have
 meaningful
 exchange
 with
 Collingwood’s
 ci/zens
 is
 s/ll
 face‐to‐face.

 There
is
no
forum
currently
available
for
 the
people
of
Collingwood
to
 get
together
with
representa/ves
from
the
Town
on
a
regular
basis
to
 exchange
 ideas
 and
 informa/on.
 
 This
 is
 just
 as
 much
 about
 “educa/ng”
 people
 as
 it
 is
 about
 learning
 from
 them.
 
 The
 Transporta/on
 Associa/on
of
Canada
speaks
to
 how
important
this
is
 in
 rela/on
 to
 implemen/ng
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 ini/a/ves:
 “Public
 educa/on
 will
 be
a
major
 key
to
success.
 
Without
 it
 poli/cal
 leaders
 will
not
have
the
mandate
to
move
in
the
right
direc/on”.
104 Therefore,
the
challenge
for
 this
Element
is
to
 create
 such
a
forum
to
 facilitate
 open
 and
 effec/ve
 communica/on
 between
 the
 people
 of
 Collingwood
and
the
Town
rela/ng
to
ac/ve
transporta/on.

Ac3on

N
108

104
Transporta/on
Associa/on
of
Canada,
Urban
Transporta/on
Council,
A
New
Vision
for
Urban
TransportaNon,
Reprint
November
1998,
pg.
6

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12

The
 Town
 will
 develop
 a
 process/schedule
 and
 conduct
 annual
 “Mee/ng
of
the
Public”
events
focused
on
 ac/ve
transporta/on.

This
 will
 provide
 opportuni/es
 for
 ongoing
 community
 input
 into
 the
 evolu/on,
 implementa/on,
and
 audi/ng
of
 the
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 plan.
 
 The
 results
 of
 these
 annual
 mee/ngs
 will
 help
 inform
 work
 programs,
 engage
 ci/zens,
 and
 foster
 meaningful
 rela/onships
 between
various
stakeholders;
all
of
which
will
posi/vely
influence
the
 culture
 of
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 and
 overall
 effec/veness
 of
 the
 implementa/on
of
the
ATP.



Pictured
 are
 the
 over
 75
 people
 that
 acended
 the
 AcNve
 TransportaNon
Workshop
in
November
2011
 with
Town
staff
 and
 Dan
Burden
of
the
Walkable
and
Livable
CommuniNes
InsNtute. Work
 from
 this
 event
 directly
 influenced
the
 form
 and
content
 of
 the
ATP.



N
109

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
Establishing
 good
 communicaNon
 between,
 and
 amongst,
 the
 Town
 and
 the
 ciNzens
of
Collingwood
 is
criNcally
 important
 to
 having
a
successful
implementaNon
of
the
Elements
idenNfied
in
 the
 ATP.
 
 The
 exchange
 of
 ideas
 and
 informaNon
 is 
a
 value
 acNvity
 and
resource
that
must
be
 leveraged
in
an
Asset
 Based
 Community
 Development
 approach;
 as
 is
 engrained
 in
 the
 structure
and
intent
of
this
ATP.



8.
Annual
Public
Informa3on
Program

Challenge

Community
awareness
 and
 educa/on
 is
 an
 important
 component
 of
 effec/ng
 change
 and
 providing
 good
 governance.
 
 Most
 municipal
 plans,
reports,
and
strategies
quickly
fall
from
ci/zens’
awareness
and
 interest
 shortly
 aLer
 their
 adop/on.
 
 This
 is
 par/ally
 due
 to
 their
 complexity
and
the
oLen
 technical
nature
 of
their
 presenta/on.
 
It
 is
 also
partly
due
to
the
lack
of
updated
informa/on
on
these.

 The
 Ontario
 Professional
 Planners
 Ins/tute
 discusses
 how
 this
 informa/on/educa/on
 plays
 an
 important
 role
 in
 ac/ve
 transporta/on: 

 Individual
 travel
 behaviour
 is
 influenced
 by
 a
 combinaNon
 of
 factors
 –
 infrastructure,
 promoNon,
 educaNon
 –
all
 of
which
 are
 integral
 to
 increasing
 the
 number
 of
 acNve
 transportaNon
 users.
 
 In
 addiNon
 to
 building
 new
 acNve
 transportaNon
 infrastructure,
 it
 is
 important
 to
 promote
 new
 faciliNes
 and
 offer
 informaNon
on
 safe
 cycling
skills
 and
sharing
the
road.

105

The
challenge
of
 this
 Element
is
 for
the
Town
 to
improve
the
level
 of
 awareness
 and
 educa/on
 the
public
 has
on
 ac/ve
transporta/on
 and
 the
implementa/on
of
the
ATP.


The
Town
 of
Collingwood
has
used
tradi/onal
methods
to
 inform
and
 engage
 people:
newspaper
no/ces;
public
 mee/ngs;
and,
workshops/ open
house
mee/ngs.

The
Town
has
also
recently
lead
efforts
within
 the
region
to
use
social
media
such
as:
blogs;
Facebook;
the
town
web
 site;
 volunteer
 trails
 commiMee;
 flyers;
 school
 no/ces;
 and,
 news
 paper
 ads
to
address
this
communica/on
challenge
with
various
levels
 of
success.



105
Ontario
Professional
Planners
Ins/tute,
Healthy
CommuniNes
and
Planning
for
AcNve
TransportaNon:
A
Call
to
AcNon,
2012,
pg.
5

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
110

Ac3on

By
 providing
 an
 Element
 in
 the
 ATP
 that
 focuses
 on
 community
 awareness
 and
 educa/on
 the
 Town
 of
 Collingwood
 is
 rising
 to
 the
 challenge
 by
 addressing
 a
 significant
 recommenda/on
 made
 by
 the
 Chief
Coroner,
which
states:
 A
 comprehensive
 public
 educaNon
 program
 should
 be
 developed
 to
promote
 safer
 sharing
 of
 the
 road
 by
 all
 users…
 Such
 a
 program
 should
 include:
 ‐
 a
 targeted
 public
 awareness
 campaign,
 in
 the
 spring/summer
 months,
with
key
messages
around
cycling
safety.
106

106
Office
of
the
Chief
Coroner
for
Ontario,
Cycling
Death
Review,
June
2012,
pg.
22

N

D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
111

The
schedule,
media
sources,
and
content
of
this
informa/on
program
 will
 be
 developed
 by
 Town
 staff
 with
 close
 coopera/on/assistance
 from
the
ci/zen
DO‐TANK
described
in
a
previous
Element.



This
 Element
 will
 help
 build
 awareness
 and
 knowledge
 about
 acNve
transportaNon
and
the
ATP
in
the
 community.
 
It
will
also
 provide
a
way
of
improving
the
culture
of
acNve
transportaNon
 and
 keep
 stakeholders
 engaged
 in
 the
 progress
 toward
 the
 implementaNon
of
the
ATP.





9.
Annual
Community
AT
Audit
Challenge

OLen
plans
such
as
this
are
referred
to
a
“living
documents”,
implying
 that
 they
 are
 amendable
 to
 deal
 with
 changes
 in
 community
 circumstances
 or
 needs.
 
Unfortunately
there
is
 seldom
 a
process
 or
 mechanism
 for
 the
 plan,
 or
 even
 its
 elements,
 to
 be
 reviewed
 and
 poten/ally
changed
within
a
/meline
that
is
effec/ve
and
not
reac/ve.
 
 When
 changes
are
made
 to
these
kinds
 of
plans
 it
 is
oLen
 done
 well
 past
 the
 /me
 when
 it
 could
 have
 been
 most
 effec/ve
 to
 deal
 with
 evolving
 circumstances,
 and
 instead
 results
 in
 a
 plan
 that
 becomes
 inherently
 less
 effec/ve
 at
 guiding
the
 community’s
 ac/ons.
 
 These
 kinds
 of
amendment
 processes
also
generally
require
extensive
study
 for
 their
 periodic
 reviews
 because
there
is
no
 baseline
 or
 benchmark
 informa/on
 available
 about
 the
 plan
 and
 it’s
 impacts,
 except
 that
 which
was
used
at
the
ini/al
wri/ng
of
the
plan.


 To
make
this
ATP
 more
nimble
and
proac/ve
in
its
ability
to
influence
 posi/ve
 change
 for
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 in
 Collingwood,
 an
 annual
 audit
process
will
be
 undertaken.

The
AT
audits
will
 help
 inform
and
 “calibrate”
 the
 ATP.
 
 The
 results
 of
 this
 will
 be
 used
 to
 provide
 direc/on
rela/ng
to
any
needed
changes
to
 the
Plan,
and
as
a
way
of
 benchmarking
and
measuring
progress
for
future
analysis.

The
intent
 is
 also
 to
 have
 informa/on
 from
 the
 audit
 help
 with
 defining
 new
 Elements
to
 be
 added
 to
 the
 100
Day
Projects
 Sec/on
 of
 the
 ATP
 to
 replace
those
that
have
been
completed.



Ac3on

The
 specific
 characteris/cs
 of
 the
 yearly
 audit
 will
 be
 determined
 at
 the
/me
of
its
development
with
assistance
from
the
DO‐TANK
group. However,
 these
 audits
 should
 at
 a
 minimum
 include
 tracking
 and
 measurements
 that
 fall
 into
 the
 following
 characteris/cs
 from
 the
 Share
 the
 Road
 Cycling
Coali/on’s
 “5
 Es”
 for
 reviewing
bike
 friendly
 communi/es
107: • Engineering
‐
a
review
and
assessment
of
what
is
on
the
ground
 and
what
has
been
built
to
promote
ac/ve
transporta/on
in
the
 community; • Educa/on
 ‐
 determining
 the
 amount
 of
 informa/on
 and
 educa/on
 there
 is
available
 for
 both
 ac/ve
 transporta/on
 and
 motorists; • Encouragement
 ‐
 assessing
 how
 the
 community
promotes
and
 encourages
bicycling; • Enforcement
 ‐
 examining
the
 way
 enforcement
 personnel
 are
 trained
and
conduct
 their
 du/es
specifically
associated
with
the
 rights
 and
 responsibili/es
 of
 all
 road
 users.
 
 The
 enforcement
 category
 contains
 ques/ons
 that
 measure
 the
 connec/ons
 between
the
cycling
and
law
enforcement
communi/es;
and, • Evalua/on
 &
 Planning
 ‐
 reviewing
 the
 systems
 and
 plans
 in
 place
 for
 AT
 and
 their
 success
 and/or
 progress
 toward
 implementa/on.

N
Livable
Communi/es

should
be
adapted
to
outline
the
basic
structure
of
the
audit
for
this
Element
of
the
ATP.

107
The
Share
the
Road
Cycling
Coali/on
uses
the
“5
Es”
outlined
when
reviewing
communi/es
for
their
Bicycle
Friendly
Community
award.

These,
along
with
the
walkability
audits
from
the
Walkable
and


D ov R , 2 AF 9, T 20 12
112

The
 2009
 Walk21
 presenta/on
 “Understanding
 the
 characteris/cs,
 needs
 and
abili/es
 of
walkers”
 iden/fies
the
kinds
 of
walking
specific
 indicators
that
should
be
part
of
the
audit:


• Walking
ac/vity; • Ac/vity
in
the
public
realm; • Local
accessibility; • Mo/va/ons; • Barriers; • Percep/on
of
the
walking
environment; • Measures
to
improve
the
walking
environment;
and, • Transport
spending
priori/es Opportuni/es
to
partner
with
the
local
school
 administra/on,
parents
 of
 students,
 and
 students,
 shall
 be
 integrated
 into
 this
 Element.
 
 These
partnerships
can
help
provide
“safe
route
to
school”
 and
 youth
 specific
 assessments
 of
 the
 quality,
 effec/veness,
 and
 evolu/on
 of
 Collingwood’s
ac/ve
transporta/on
system.

 The
criteria
used
 for
 this
 por/on
 of
 the
 annual
 audit
 should
 mirror
 the
 “Key
 Indicators
 of
 Success
for
 Safe
 Routes
to
School
Efforts”
described
 in
 the
Center
 for
 Health
 Training
 and
 the
 Na/onal
 Highway
 Traffic
 Safety
 Administra/on’s
 Safe
 Routes
 to
 School
 PracNce
 and
 Promise,
 (2010,
 pg.
14);
these
include
before
and
aLer
measures
of
the:
 • • • • • • Behavior
of
Children;
 Behavior
of
Drivers;
 Community
Facili/es;
 Crashes
and
Injuries;
 Community
Buy‐in;
and,
 Environmental
Quality.



the
 ATP
 audit
 include:
 Pedestrian
 Traffic
 Counts;
 Sta/onary
 Ac/vity
 Surveys;
Assessments
of
 Public
Space
Quali/es
(Atmosphere,
Physical
 Space,
Ground,
Connec/ons). 108




 The
 measures
 and
 benchmarks
 that
 are
used
 in
 the
 audit
 should
 be
 broadly
 based,
 including
 local,
 regional,
 and
 province‐wide
 comparables.


The
 community
audit
 shall
 also
 include
 developing
 an
 understanding
 of
 the
 people
 in
 Collingwood
 and
 how
 they
use
 the
 urban
 spaces
 of
 the
community.

There
are
many
resources
available
to
the
community
 and
 its
 ci/zens
 that
 can
 instruct
 and
 assist
 with
 this
 work.
 
 One
 noteworthy
example
is
 Neighbourhoods
for
 People,
Seacle
Toolkit
 by
 Gehl
Architects
(2010).

 This
document
was
specifically
designed
for
 a
 municipality
 and
 the
 diversity
of
 people
 that
 will
 be
 engaged
 in
 this
 audi/ng
 process:
 neighbourhoods,
 non‐profit
 organiza/ons,
 professionals,
and
 students.

 The
public
 life
and
 public
space
 analysis
 methods
 that
 are
 described
 in
 the
 document,
and
 could
 be
 used
 for

108
Gehl
Architects,
Neighbourhoods
for
People,
Seacle
Toolkit,
2010,
pg.
39


N

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113

N
114

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