P. 1
ToolBook 11.5: Advanced Features

ToolBook 11.5: Advanced Features

|Views: 85|Likes:
Published by CubemanPDX

More info:

Published by: CubemanPDX on Nov 28, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/04/2012

pdf

text

original

ActiveX controls are software components that you can use to add custom features and functionality
to your application or Web page. An ActiveX control can be simple (such as a calendar) or complex
(such as the Microsoft Web Browser control). You can create your own ActiveX control, using
another programming environment such as Visual Basic, or purchase one from a software vendor.

When you use an ActiveX control in ToolBook, keep in mind that you are adding software that may
or may not be designed to work in ToolBook. Because many ActiveX controls are built to run over
the Internet, you may encounter unusual behavior when you run them in the ToolBook
environment. Additionally, a control may have dialog boxes that appear to be a part of ToolBook
but are actually created by the control itself. While some ActiveX controls include documentation
that describes the features of the control, many do not.

You should test any ActiveX controls you add to your application. For tips on making a control work in
ToolBook, see “Troubleshooting ActiveX controls,” later in this chapter.

Automation provides a mechanism for opening, controlling, and communicating with Automation
server applications such as Microsoft Word, Excel, and Outlook. Because it uses Microsoft’s
Component Object Model (COM) technology, the same underlying technology used by ActiveX
controls, you can control and interact with Automation objects in very much the same way that you
control and interact with ActiveX controls. Unlike ActiveX controls, Automation objects are not
programmable using the Actions Editor.

In order for your ToolBook application to create and interact with an Automation object, the
Automation server application must be installed on the same computer. If you distribute your
application, your users must have the same Automation server application installed on their
computers.

For tips on making Automation objects work in ToolBook, see “Troubleshooting Automation,” later
in this chapter. To see an example of how Automation can be used with ToolBook, explore the
ToolBook Profiler at:

C:\Program Files\ToolBook\Samples\Profiler.exe

Profiler is a sample application that demonstrates one use of Automation: using Automation to
access and manipulate programmable features in Word. For more information about Profiler and
Automation, refer to the Profiler book at:

C:\Program Files\ToolBook\Samples\OLE\Profiler.pdf

Using ActiveX and Automation in an application

Copyright © 2012 SumTotal Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

53

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->