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Course Design Guide MTH/221 Version 1

College of Information Systems & Technology MTH/221 Version 1 Discrete Math for Information Technology
Copyright 2010 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.

Course Description Discrete (as opposed to continuous) mathematics is of direct importance to the fields of Computer Science and Information Technology. This branch of mathematics includes studying areas such as set theory, logic, relations, graph theory, and analysis of algorithms. This course is intended to provide students with an understanding of these areas and their use in the field of Information Technology. Policies Faculty and students/learners will be held responsible for understanding and adhering to all policies contained within the following two documents: University policies: You must be logged into the student website to view this document. Instructor policies: This document is posted in the Course Materials forum.

University policies are subject to change. Be sure to read the policies at the beginning of each class. Policies may be slightly different depending on the modality in which you attend class. If you have recently changed modalities, read the policies governing your current class modality. Course Materials Grimaldi, R. P. (2004). Discrete and combinatorial mathematics: An applied introduction. (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Addison Wesley. Article References Albert, I. Thakar, J., Li, S., Zhang, R., & Albert, R. (2008). Boolean network simulations for life scientists. Source Code for Biology and Medicine, 14(3), 16. Alikhani, S., & Peng, Y-H. (2009). Chromatic zeros and the golden ratio. Applicable Analysis & Discrete Mathematics, 3(1), 12022. Arvind, V., Cheng, C. T., & Devanur, N. R. (2008). On computing the distinguishing numbers of planar graphs and beyond: A counting approach. SIAM Journal on Discrete Mathematics, 22(4), 12971324. Banning, J., Eversole, B., Most, D., & Kuk, L. (2008). Crisp sets and Boolean algebra: A research strategy for student affairs. College Student Journal, 42(3), 84752. Benedikt, M. & Koch, C. (2009). From XQuery to relational logics. ACM Transactions on Database Systems, 34(4). Cusi, A. & Malara, N. (2010). Improving awareness about the meaning of the principle of mathematical induction. PNA: Revista de Investigacin en Didctica de la Matemtica, 4(1), 1522. Drumheller, R. (2010). Streaming media market trends. Faulkner Information Services. Liu, P-F., Cai, Y-D., Qian, Z-L., Ni, S-Y., Dong, L-H., Lu, C-H., Lu, W-C. (2009). FastCluster: A graph theory

Course Design Guide MTH/221 Version 1

based algorithm for removing redundant sequences. Journal of Biomedical Science & Engineering, 2, 621 625. Nybolm, M. A. (2008). Counting the perfect powers. Mathematical Spectrum, 41(1), 2731. Spielman, D. A. & Teng, S-H. (2009). Smoothed analysis: An attempt to explain the behavior of algorithms in practice. Communications of the ACM, 52(10), 7684. Yaacov, I. B. (2008). Continuous first order logic for unbound metric structures. Journal of Mathematical Logic, 8(2), 197223. All electronic materials are available on the student website.

Week One: Basic Enumeration and Logic & Set Theory


14.5/16 (90.62%) - A-

Details
1.1 Apply basic enumeration techniques. 1.2 Simplify assertions and compound statements in first-order logic. 1.3 Apply basic set-theoretic concepts.

Due

Points

Objectives

Readings

Read Ch. 1, sections 1.11.4, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Read Ch. 2, Fundamentals of Logic, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Read Ch. 3, sections 3.13.3, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Read the Week One Read Me First. Read this weeks Electronic Reserve Readings. Respond to weekly discussion questions by Saturday and follow-up on others responses by Monday
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Participation & Discussion Questions Nongraded Activities and Preparation

Select a method for turning in textbook exercises. Due to the nature of this course, symbols are actively used in individual assignments. You may choose one of the following methods to complete the assignments:
Write out the names of symbols rather than using the symbols. Download Microsoft Equation Editor. There is a tutorial available on your student website if you choose this method. Handwrite your assignments and scan them if you have access to a scanner.

Learning Team Instructions

Resources: The Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) website, the Society of Individual and Applied Mathematics (SCIAM) website, and the University Library
Create the Learning Team Charter.

Course Design Guide MTH/221 Version 1

Begin working on the Research Paper & Presentation, due in Week Five. Prepare a 15- to 20-slide Microsoft PowerPoint presentation describing existing research efforts in one of the following areas: Computer vision, such as automatic recognition of objects, boundaries, and so on Computational linguistics, such as information extraction, corpus analysis, and so on Automatic proof programs Automated routing programs, such as shipping, circuitry, electric power, and so on Ultra-high-speed or high-precision computation

Note. You may select other topic areas with facilitator approval. Include a discussion of concepts discussed in this course, such as the following: Individual Selected Textbook Exercises Logic and set theory Enumeration Algorithmic concepts Relations and functions Graph theory Trees Boolean algebra 12

Complete 12 questions below by choosing at least four from each section. Ch. 1 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o Supplementary Exercises 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15(a), 18, 24, & 25(a & b)

Ch. 2 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o o o o o Exercise 2.1, problems 2, 3, 10, & 13, Exercise 2.2, problems 3, 4, & 17 Exercise 2.3, problems 1 & 4 Exercise 2.4, problems 1, 2, & 6 Exercise 2.5, problems 1, 2, & 4

Ch. 3 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o o o Exercise 3.1, problems 1, 2, 18, & 21 Exercise 3.2, problems 3 & 8 Exercise 3.3, problems 1, 2, 4, & 5

Course Design Guide MTH/221 Version 1

Week Two: Algorithmic Concepts and Relations & Functions, Part 1


Details
Objectives 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Apply the principles of mathematical induction and recursion. Solve problems of iteration. Manipulate relations and simple functions, and their inverses. Apply the basic concepts of computational complexity and algorithmic analysis.

Due

Points

Readings

Read Ch. 4, Properties of the Integer: Mathematical Induction, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Read Ch. 5, Relations and Functions, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Read the Week Two Read Me First. Read this weeks Electronic Reserve Readings. Respond to weekly discussion questions by Saturday and follow-up on others responses by Monday 4

Participation & Discussion Questions Individual Selected Textbook Exercises

Complete 12 questions below by choosing at least three from each section. Ch. 4 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o o Exercise 4.1, problems 4, 7, & 18 Exercise 4.2, problems 11 & 16

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Ch. 4 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o o o Exercise 4.3, problems 4, 5, 10, & 15 Exercise 4.4, problems 1 & 14 Exercise 4.5, problems 5 &12

Ch. 5 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o o o o o o Exercise 5.1, problems 5 & 8 Exercise 5.2, problems 2, 5, 12, & 27(a & b) Exercise 5.3, problems 1 & 8 Exercise 5.4, problems 13 & 14 Exercise 5.5, problems 2 & 7(a) Exercise 5.6, problems 2, 3, 4, & 5

Ch. 5 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o o Exercise 5.7, problems 1 & 6 Exercise 5.8, problems 5 & 6

Course Design Guide MTH/221 Version 1

Week Three: Relations & Functions, Part 2, and More Enumeration


Details
Objectives 3.1 Use the properties of relations. 3.2 Apply the properties of equivalence relations and partitions. 3.3 Use the principle of inclusion and exclusion. Read Ch. 7, sections 7.17.4, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Read Ch. 8, sections 8.18.2, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Review Ch. 5, Relations and Functions, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Read the Week Three Read Me First. Read this weeks Electronic Reserve Readings. Respond to weekly discussion questions by Saturday and follow-up on others responses by Monday 4

Due

Points

Readings

Participation & Discussion Questions Individual Selected Textbook Exercises

Complete 12 questions below by choosing at least four from each section. Ch. 7 o o o Exercise 7.1, problems 5, 6, 9, & 14 Exercise 7.2, problems 2, 9, &14 (Develop the algorithm only, not the computer code.) Exercise 7.3, problems 1, 6, & 19

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Ch. 7 o Exercise 7.4, problems 1, 2, 7, & 8

Ch. 8 o o Exercise 8.1, problems 1, 12, 19, & 20 Exercise 8.2, problems 4 & 5

Week Four: Graph Theory and Trees


Details
Objectives 4.1 Apply properties of general graphs. 4.2 Identify graph isomorphisms, planarities, connected components, and chromatic numbers. 4.3 Identify properties of a tree.

Due

Points

Course Design Guide MTH/221 Version 1

Readings

Read Ch. 11, An Introduction to Graph Theory, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Read Ch. 12, sections 12.112.3 & 12.5, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Read the Week Four Read Me First. Read this weeks Electronic Reserve Readings. Respond to weekly discussion questions by Saturday and follow-up on others responses by Monday 4

Participation & Discussion Questions Individual Selected Textbook Exercises

Complete 12 questions below by choosing at least four from each section. Ch. 11 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o Exercise 11.1, problems 3, 6, 8, 11, 15, & 16

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Ch. 11 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o o o o o Exercise 11.2, problems 1, 6, 12, & 13, Exercise 11.3, problems 5, 20, 21, & 22 Exercise 11.4, problems 14, 17, & 24 Exercise 11.5, problems 4 & 7 Exercise 11.6, problems 9 &10

Ch. 12 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o o o o Exercise 12.1, problems 2, 6, 7, & 11 Exercise 12.2, problems 6 & 9 Exercise 12.3, problems 2 & 3 Exercise 12.5, problems 3 & 8

Week Five: Boolean Logic and Algebra


Details
Objectives 5.1 Apply the basic concepts of Boolean algebra. 5.2 Use the basic laws of Boolean algebra. 5.3 Convert Boolean expressions into a disjunctive or conjunctive normal form. Read Ch. 15, of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Read the Week Five Read Me First. Read this weeks Electronic Reserve Readings. Respond to weekly discussion questions by Saturday and follow-up on others responses by Monday 4

Due

Points

Readings

Participation & Discussion Questions

Course Design Guide MTH/221 Version 1

Individual Selected Textbook Exercises

Complete 12 questions below. Ch. 15 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o Supplementary Exercises, problems 1, 5, & 6

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Ch. 15 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o Exercise 15.1, problems 1, 2, 11, 12, 14, & 15

Ch. 15 of Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics o Exercise 15.2, problems 4, 5, 8b, & 9 20

Learning Team Research Paper & Presentation

Submit the final Research Presentation. Submit the paper and power-point presentation with detailed speaker notes.

Copyright
University of Phoenix is a registered trademark of Apollo Group, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries. Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. All other company and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies. Use of these marks is not intended to imply endorsement, sponsorship, or affiliation. Edited in accordance with University of Phoenix editorial standards and practices.

Ramana -Ramana Kappagantu, Ph.D. University of Phoenix, Online Faculty Ph. 734 340 3452 (H), TZ: EST Email: rkappagantu@email.phoenix.edu
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