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Monterey, CA Raising Social Security Age From 65 To 67 Could Have Unintended Consequences : View From A Private Duty Caregiver Serving Carmel, Carmel Valley, Gilroy, Gonzalez, Greenfield, Hollister, King City, Marina, Monterey, Pacific Grove, Pebble Beach, Salinas, San Juan Bautista, Seaside And Soledad California

Monterey, CA Raising Social Security Age From 65 To 67 Could Have Unintended Consequences : View From A Private Duty Caregiver Serving Carmel, Carmel Valley, Gilroy, Gonzalez, Greenfield, Hollister, King City, Marina, Monterey, Pacific Grove, Pebble Beach, Salinas, San Juan Bautista, Seaside And Soledad California

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Published by Richard Kuehn

Raising the Social Security age from 65 to 67 may have unintended consequences.

Raising the Social Security age from 65 to 67 may have unintended consequences.

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Published by: Richard Kuehn on Dec 09, 2012
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09/17/2013

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Monterey, CA Raising Social Security Age From 65 To 67 Could Have Unintended Consequences : View From A Private Duty Caregiver

Serving Carmel, Carmel Valley, Gilroy, Gonzalez, Greenfield, Hollister, King City, Marina, Monterey, Pacific Grove, Pebble Beach, Salinas, San Juan Bautista, Seaside And Soledad California Most American's used to believe that at 65 the good times would begin. Retirement awaited, we have a great Medicare system and Social Security payments kick in and keep up with inflation so you can enjoy your retirement. That's likely to be a thing of the past. Republicans are calling for an increase in the retirement age to 67. The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) is lobbying hard against it for a number of reasons. For one, it may have unintended consequences such as increasing the cost of Medicare for seniors. This is a policy change that seems straightforward, but has some surprising ripple effects," Tricia Neuman, a Medicare expert with the Kaiser Family Foundation, told the Monterey Herald. "It's a simple thing to describe and the justification is that people are living longer, but I don't think people have thought through the indirect costs," she said. A study put out by Kaiser found that costs would go up for Medicare for seniors because keeping younger and healthier 65 and 66 year olds out of the program would increase the average cost of care for senior. In essence, since the average person on Medicare would be older, it's likely that the cost to serve them would be higher. In addition, Kaiser believes it would raise premiums on insurance for private plans because more 65 and 66 year olds would be added to the pool of insured, and they tend to use benefits more. It's an interesting argument and one which I hope politicians hear. I don't think there's been much focus on these unintended consequences, which would likely raise costs for employers as well as they would be subsidizing insurance plans for more 65 and 66 year olds at a high price. http://www.montereyherald.com/rss/ci_22143384?source=rss

About Richard Kuehn & Family inHome Caregiving: After more than a decade of caregiving, both in a professional environment and for a 97 year old family member I was dissatisfied with service from local caregiving agencies. I became convinced of the need for a service which provides very personal assistance to elderly and founded Family inHome Caregiving serving the Monterey Peninsula. Please visit my blog where I talk about important senior issues at: http://www.familyinhomecaregiving.com/Blog

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