THE WHITE HOUSE COOK BOOK BY: MRS. F.L.

GILLETTE AND HUGO ZIEMANN CATEGORY: COOKING, FOOD, AND WINE – COOKING RECIPES

THE WHITE HOUSE COOK BOOK

COOKING, TOILET AND HOUSEHOLD RECIPES, MENUS, DINNER-GIVING, TABLE ETIQUETTE, CARE OF THE SICK, HEALTH SUGGESTIONS, FACTS WORTH KNOWING, Etc., Etc.

THE WHOLE COMPRISING

A COMPREHENSIVE CYCLOPEDIA OF INFORMATION FOR THE HOME

BY MRS. F.L. GILLETTE AND HUGO ZIEMANN, Steward of the White house

1887

TO THE WIVES OF OUR PRESIDENTS, THOSE NOBLE WOMEN WHO HAVE GRACED THE WHITE HOUSE, AND WHOSE NAMES AND MEMORIES ARE DEAR TO ALL AMERICANS, THIS VOLUME IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED BY THE AUTHOR.

PUBLISHERS' PREFACE In presenting to the public the "WHITE HOUSE COOK BOOK," the publishers believe they can justly claim that it more fully represents the progress and present perfection of the culinary art than any previous work. In point of authorship, it stands preeminent. Hugo Ziemann was at one time caterer for that Prince Napoleon who was killed while fighting the Zulus in Africa. He was afterwards steward of the famous Hotel Splendide in Paris. Later he conducted the celebrated Brunswick Cafe in New York, and still later he gave to the Hotel Richelieu, in Chicago, a cuisine which won the applause of even the gourmets of foreign lands. It was here that he laid the famous "spread" to which the chiefs of the warring factions of the Republican Convention sat down in June, 1888, and from which they arose with asperities softened, differences harmonized and victory organized. Mrs. F.L. Gillette is no less proficient and capable, having made a

life-long and thorough study of cookery and housekeeping, especially as adapted to the practical wants of average American homes. The book has been prepared with great care. Every recipe has been _tried_ and _tested_, and can be relied upon as one of the _best_ of its kind. It is comprehensive, filling completely, it is believed, the requirements of housekeepers of all classes. It embodies several original and commendable features, among which may be mentioned the _menus_ for the holidays and for one week in each month in the year, thus covering all varieties of seasonable foods; the convenient classification and arrangement of topics; the simplified method of explanation in preparing an article, in the order of manipulation, thereby enabling the most inexperienced to clearly comprehend it. The subject of carving has been given a prominent place, not only because of its special importance in a work of this kind, but particularly because it contains entirely new and original designs, and is so far a departure from the usual mode of treating the subject. Interesting information is given concerning the _White House_; how its hospitality is conducted, the menus served on special occasions, views of the interior, portraits of all the ladies of the White House, etc. Convenience has been studied in the make-up of the book. The type is large and plain; it is sewed by patent flexible process, so that when opened it will not close of itself, and it is bound in enameled cloth, adapted for use in the kitchen. THE PUBLISHERS.

CONTENTS. ARTICLES REQUIRED FOR THE KITCHEN 588 BISCUITS, ROLLS, MUFFINS, ETC. 249 BREAD 238 BUTTER AND CHEESE 219 CAKES 282 CANNED FRUITS 438 CARVING 7 CATSUPS 176 COFFEE, TEA AND BEVERAGES 448 COLORING FOR FRUIT, ETC. 444 CONFECTIONERY 446

CUSTARDS, CREAMS AND DESSERTS 344 DINNER GIVING 600 DUMPLINGS AND PUDDINGS 381 DYEING OR COLORING 591 EGGS AND OMELETS 225 FACTS WORTH KNOWING 566 FILLINGS FOR LAYER CAKES 287 FISH 49 FOR THE SICK 510 FRENCH WORDS IN COOKING 587 FROSTING OR ICING 284 HEALTH SUGGESTIONS 521 HOUSEKEEPERS' TIME-TABLE 542 ICE-CREAM AND ICES 376 MACARONI 216 MANAGEMENT OF STATE DINNER AT WHITE HOUSE 507 MEASURES AND WEIGHTS IN ORDINARY USE 603 MEATS 107 MENUS 478 MISCELLANEOUS 587 MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES 543 MODES OF FRYING 48 MUTTON AND LAMB 136 PASTRY, PIES AND TARTS 320 PICKLES 179 PORK 144 POULTRY AND GAME 81 PRESERVES, JELLIES, ETC. 423 SALADS 168 SANDWICHES 236 SAUCES AND DRESSING 156 SAUCES FOR, PUDDING 417 SHELL FISH 67 SMALL POINTS ON TABLE ETIQUETTE 595 SOUPS 27 SOUPS WITHOUT MEATS 41 SPECIAL MENUS 503 TOAST 276 TOILET RECIPES AND ITEMS 577 VARIETIES OF SEASONABLE FOOD 473 VEGETABLES 191 [Illustration: HELEN HERRON TAFT. Copyright, Photo Clinediust, Washington.]

WHITE HOUSE COOK BOOK.

CARVING. Carving is one important acquisition in the routine of daily living, and all should try to attain a knowledge or ability to do it well, and withal gracefully. When carving use a chair slightly higher than the ordinary size, as it gives a better purchase on the meat, and appears more graceful than when standing, as is often quite necessary when carving a turkey, or a very large joint. More depends on skill than strength. The platter should be placed opposite, and sufficiently near to give perfect command of the article to be carved, the knife of medium size, sharp with a keen edge. Commence by cutting the slices thin, laying them carefully to one side of the platter, then afterwards placing the desired amount on each guest's plate, to be served in turn by the servant. In carving fish, care should be taken to help it in perfect flakes; for if these are broken the beauty of the fish is lost. The carver should acquaint himself with the choicest parts and morsels; and to give each guest an equal share of those _tidbits_ should be his maxim. Steel knives and forks should on no account be used in helping fish, as these are liable to impart a _very_ disagreeable flavor. A fish-trowel of silver or plated silver is the proper article to use. Gravies should be sent to the table very _hot_, and in helping one to gravy or melted butter, place it on a vacant side of the plate, not _pour_ it over their meat, fish or fowl, that they may use only as much as they like. When serving fowls, or meats, accompanied with stuffing, the guests should be asked if they would have a portion, as it is not every one to whom the flavor of stuffing is agreeable; in filling their plates, avoid heaping one thing upon another, as it makes a bad appearance. A word about the care of carving knives: a fine steel knife should not come in contact with intense heat, because it destroys its temper, and therefore impairs its cutting qualities. Table carving knives

should not be used in the kitchen, either around the stove, or for cutting bread, meats, vegetables, etc.; a fine whetstone should be kept for sharpening, and the knife cleaned carefully to avoid dulling its edge, all of which is quite essential to successful carving. * * * * *

[Illustration] BEEF. HIND-QUARTER. No. 1. Used for choice roasts, the porterhouse and sirloin steaks. No. 2. Rump, used for steaks, stews and corned beef. No. 3. Aitch-bone, used for boiling-pieces, stews and pot roasts. No. 4. Buttock or round, used for steaks, pot roasts, beef _a la mode_; also a prime boiling-piece. No. 5. Mouse-round, used for boiling and stewing. No. 6. Shin or leg, used for soups, hashes, etc. No. 7. Thick flank, cut with under fat, is a prime boiling-piece, good for stews and corned beef, pressed beef. No. 8. Veiny piece, used for corned beef, dried beef. No. 9. Thin flank, used for corned beef and boiling-pieces. FORE-QUARTER. No. 10. Five ribs called the fore-rib. This is considered the primest piece for roasting; also makes the finest steaks. No. 11. Four ribs, called the middle ribs, used for roasting. No. 12. Chuck ribs, used for second quality of roasts and steaks. No. 13. Brisket, used for corned beef, stews, soups and spiced beef.

No. 14. Shoulder-piece, used for stews, soups, pot-roasts, mince-meat and hashes. Nos. 15, 16. Neck, clod or sticking-piece used for stocks, gravies, soups, mince-pie meat, hashes, bologna sausages, etc. No. 17. Shin or shank, used mostly for soups and stewing. No. 18. Cheek. The following is a classification of the qualities of meat, according to the several joints of beef, when cut up. _First Class_.--Includes the sirloin with the kidney suet (1), the rump steak piece (2), the fore-rib (11). _Second Class_.--The buttock or round (4), the thick flank (7), the middle ribs (11). _Third Class_.--The aitch-bone (3), the mouse-round (5), the thin flank (8, 9), the chuck (12), the shoulder-piece (14), the brisket (13). _Fourth Class_.--The clod, neck and sticking-piece (15, 16). _Fifth Class_.--Shin or shank (17). [Illustration] VEAL. HIND-QUARTER. No. 1. Loin, the choicest cuts used for roasts and chops. No. 2. Fillet, used for roasts and cutlets. No. 3. Loin, chump-end used for roasts and chops. No. 4. The hind-knuckle or hock, used for stews, pot-pies, meat-pies. FORE-QUARTER.

No. 5. Neck, best end used for roasts, stews and chops. No. 6. Breast, best end used for roasting, stews and chops. No. 7. Blade-bone, used for pot-roasts and baked dishes. No. 8. Fore-knuckle, used for soups and stews. No. 9. Breast, brisket-end used for baking, stews and pot-pies. No. 10. Neck, scrag-end used for stews, broth, meat-pies, etc. In cutting up veal, generally, the hind-quarter is divided into loin and leg, and the fore-quarter into breast, neck and shoulder. _The Several Parts of a Moderately-sized, Well-fed Calf_, about eight weeks old, are nearly of the following weights:--Loin and chump, 18 lbs.; fillet, 12-1/2 lbs.; hind-knuckle, 5-1/2 lbs.; shoulder, 11 lbs.; neck, 11 lbs.; breast, 9 lbs., and fore-knuckle, 5 lbs.; making a total of 144 lbs. weight. [Illustration] MUTTON. No. 1. Leg, used for roasts and for boiling. No. 2. Shoulder, used for baked dishes and roasts. No. 3. Loin, best end used for roasts, chops. No. 4. Loin, chump-end used for roasts and chops. No. 5. Rack, or rib chops, used for French chops, rib chops, either for frying or broiling; also used for choice stews. No. 6. Breast, used for roast, baked dishes, stews, chops. No. 7. Neck or scrag-end, used for cutlets, stews and meat-pies. NOTE.--A saddle of muton or double loin is two loins cut off before the carcass is split open down the back. French chops are a small rib

chop, the end of the bone trimmed off and the meat and fat cut away from the thin end, leaving the round piece of meat attached to the larger end, which leaves the small rib-bone bare. Very tender and sweet. Mutton is _prime_ when cut from a carcass which has been fed out of doors, and allowed to run upon the hillside; they are best when about three years old. The fat will then be abundant, white and hard, the flesh juicy and firm, and of a clear red color. For mutton roasts, choose the shoulder, the saddle, or the loin or haunch. The leg should be boiled. Almost any part will do for broth. Lamb born in the middle of the winter, reared under shelter, and fed in a great measure upon milk, then killed in the spring, is considered a great delicacy, though lamb is good at a year old. Like all young animals, lamb ought to be thoroughly cooked, or it is most unwholesome. [Illustration] PORK. No. 1. Leg, used for smoked hams, roasts and corned pork. No. 2. Hind-loin, used for roasts, chops and baked dishes. No. 3. Fore-loin or ribs, used for roasts, baked dishes or chops. No. 4. Spare-rib, used for roasts, chops, stews. No. 5. Shoulder, used for smoked shoulder, roasts and corned pork. No. 6. Brisket and flank, used for pickling in salt and smoked bacon. The cheek is used for pickling in salt, also the shank or shin. The feet are usually used for souse and jelly. For family use the leg is the most economical, that is when fresh, and the loin the richest. The best pork is from carcasses weighing from fifty to about one hundred and twenty-five pounds. Pork is a white and close meat, and it is almost impossible to over-roast or cook it too much; when underdone it is exceedingly unwholesome.

[Illustration] VENISON. No. 1. Shoulder, used for roasting; it may be boned and stuffed, then afterwards baked or roasted. No. 2. Fore-loin, used for roasts and steaks. No. 3. Haunch or loin, used for roasts, steaks, stews. The ribs cut close may be used for soups. Good for pickling and making into smoked venison. No. 4. Breast, used for baking dishes, stewing. No. 5. Scrag or neck, used for soups. The choice of venison should be judged by the fat, which, when the venison is young, should be thick, clear and close, and the meat a very dark red. The flesh of a female deer about four years old, is the sweetest and best of venison. Buck venison, which is in season from June to the end of September, is finer than doe venison, which is in season from October to December. Neither should be dressed at any other time of year, and no meat requires so much care as venison in killing, preserving and dressing. [Illustration:] SIRLOIN OF BEEF. This choice roasting-piece should be cut with one good firm stroke from end to end of the joint, at the upper part, in thin, long, even slices in the direction of the line from 1 to 2, cutting across the grain, serving each guest with some of the fat with the lean; this may be done by cutting a small, thin slice from underneath the bone from 5 to 6, through the tenderloin. Another way of carving this piece, and which will be of great assistance in doing it well, is to insert the knife just above the bone at the bottom, and run sharply along, dividing the meat from the

bone at the bottom and end, thus leaving it perfectly flat; then carve in long, thin slices the usual way. When the bone has been removed and the sirloin rolled before it is cooked, it is laid upon the platter on one end, and an even, thin slice is carved across the grain of the upper surface. Roast ribs should be carved in thin, even slices from the thick end towards the thin in the same manner as the sirloin; this can be more easily and cleanly done if the carving knife is first run along between the meat and the end and rib-bones, thus leaving it free from bone to be cut into slices. _Tongue_.--To carve this it should be cut crosswise, the middle being the best; cut in very _thin_ slices, thereby improving its delicacy, making it more tempting; as is the case of all well-carved meats. The root of the tongue is usually left on the platter. [Illustration] BREAST OF VEAL. This piece is quite similar to a fore-quarter of lamb after the shoulder has been taken off. A breast of veal consists of two parts, the rib-bones and the gristly brisket. These parts may be separated by sharply passing the carving knife in the direction of the line from 1 to 2; and when they are entirely divided, the rib-bones should be carved in the direction of the line from 5 to 6, and the brisket can be helped by cutting slices from 3 to 4. The carver should ask the guests whether they have a preference for the brisket or ribs; and if there be a sweetbread served with the dish, as is frequently with this roast of veal, each person should receive a piece. Though veal and lamb contain less nutrition than beef and mutton, in proportion to their weight, they are often preferred to these latter meats on account of their delicacy of texture and flavor. A whole breast of veal weighs from nine to twelve pounds. [Illustration] A FILLET OF VEAL. A fillet of veal is one of the prime roasts of veal; it is taken from

the leg above the knuckle; a piece weighing from ten to twelve pounds is a good size and requires about four hours for roasting. Before roasting, it is dressed with a force meat or stuffing placed in the cavity from where the bone was taken out and the flap tightly secured together with skewers; many bind it together with tape. To carve it, cut in even thin slices off from the whole of the upper part or top, in the same manner as from a rolled roast of beef, as in the direction of the figs. 1 and 2; this gives the person served some of the dressing with each slice of meat. Veal is very unwholesome unless it is cooked thoroughly, and when roasted should be of a rich brown color. Bacon, fried pork, sausage-balls, with greens, are among the accompaniments of roasted veal, also a cut lemon. [Illustration] NECK OF VEAL. The best end of a neck of veal makes a very good roasting-piece; it, however, is composed of bone and ribs that make it quite difficult to carve, unless it is done properly. To attempt to carve each chop and serve it, you would not only place _too_ large a piece upon the plate of the person you intend to serve, but you would waste much time, and should the vertebrae have not been removed by the butcher, you would be compelled to exercise such a degree of strength that would make one's appearance very ungraceful, and possibly, too, throwing gravy over your neighbor sitting next to you. The correct way to carve this roast is to cut diagonally from fig. 1 to 2, and help in slices of moderate thickness; then it may be cut from 3 to 4, in order to separate the small bones; divide and serve them, having first inquired if they are desired. This joint is usually sent to the table accompanied by bacon, ham, tongue, or pickled pork, on a separate dish and with a cut lemon on a plate. There are also a number of sauces that are suitable with this roast. [Illustration] LEG OF MUTTON. The best mutton, and that from which most nourishment is obtained is

that of sheep from three to six years old, and which have been fed on dry, sweet pastures; then mutton is in its _prime_, the flesh being firm, juicy, dark colored and full of the richest gravy. When mutton is two years old, the meat is flabby, pale and savorless. In carving a roasted leg, the best slices are found by cutting quite down to the bone, in the direction from 1 to 2, and slices may be taken from either side. Some very good cuts are taken from the broad end from 5 to 6, and the fat on this ridge is very much liked by many. The cramp-bone is a delicacy, and is obtained by cutting down to the bone at 4, and running the knife under it in a semicircular direction to 3. The nearer the knuckle the drier the meat, but the under side contains the most finely grained meat, from which slices may be cut lengthwise. When sent to the table a frill of paper around the knuckle will improve its appearance. [Illustration] FORE-QUARTER OF LAMB. The first cut to be made in carving a fore-quarter of lamb is to separate the shoulder from the breast and ribs; this is done by passing a sharp carving knife lightly around the dotted line as shown by the figs. 3, 4 and 5, so as to cut through the skin, and then, by raising with a little force the shoulder, into which the fork should be firmly fixed, it will easily separate with just a little more cutting with the knife; care should be taken not to cut away too much of the meat from the breast when dividing the shoulder from it, as that would mar its appearance. The shoulder may be placed upon a separate dish for convenience. The next process is to divide the ribs from the brisket by cutting through the meat in the line from 1 to 2; then the ribs may be carved in the direction of the line 6 to 7, and the brisket from 8 to 9. The carver should always ascertain whether the guest prefers ribs, brisket, or a piece of the shoulder. [Illustration] HAM. The carver in cutting a ham must be guided according as he desires to practice economy, or have at once fine slices out of the prime part. Under the first supposition, he will commence at the knuckle end, and

Slices of venison should be cut thin.--The modern way of serving a pig is not to send it to the table whole. and is carved very similar to almost any roasted or boiled leg. The fat of this meat is like mutton. which must be very sharp and thin. The head may be divided and placed on the same platter. first. To be served as hot as possible. [Illustration: HAUNCH OF VENISON] HAUNCH OF VENISON A haunch of venison is the _prime_ joint. in the directions shown by the dotted lines from 3 to 4. but as there is a special sauce made with red wine and currant jelly to accompany this meat. and cut down as far as you can. then the leg in the same manner. be served always on warm plates. _Roast Pig_. always cutting down to the bone. apt to cool soon. also separating the ribs into convenient portions. cutting both lean and fat together. A Spare Rib of Pork is carved by cutting slices from the fleshy part. after which the bones should be disjointed and separated. and become hard and disagreeable to the palate. do not serve gravy before asking the guest if he pleases to have any.cut off thin slices toward the thick and upper part of the ham. and gravy given with them. Then again many carve a ham by first cutting from 1 to 2. put in the point of the knife. then across the other way from 3 to 4. and the platter kept over a hot-water dish. it should be first cut crosswise down to the bone following the line from 1 to 2. then there can be taken out as many slices as is required on the right and left of this. a tuft of fringed paper twisted about the knuckle. but have it carved partially by the cook. A leg of pork may be carved in the same manner as a ham. The slices should be even and thin. and plenty of fresh parsley around the dish. the knife. by dividing the shoulder from the body. it should. or spirit lamp. should be carried quite down to the bone through the thick fat in the direction of the line from 1 to 2. therefore. Some cut a circular hole in the middle of a ham gradually enlarging it outwardly. This will always insure an inviting appearance. Many cooks dish it up with a white paper frill pinned around the . then turn the platter with the knuckle farthest from you. Remove the skin after the ham is cooked and send to the table with dots of dry pepper or dry mustard on the top. To reach the choicer portion of the ham.

lying in small dish-like cavities on each side of the back. An expert carver places the fork in the turkey. cutting neatly through the joint next to the body. even slices. but allowed to remain on the dish. put the knife in at fig. as represented in the lines from 1 to 2. [Illustration] ROAST GOOSE. may be cut off. and turning the leg back as you cut through the joint. by cutting a piece from the rear part 1. Consult the tastes of the guests as to which part is preferred. The back and lower side bones. [Illustration] TURKEY. 1. called the apron. Next. One of the most delicate parts of the turkey are two little muscles. the breast may be carved in long. A turkey having been relieved from strings and skewers used in trussing should be placed on the table with the head or neck at the carver's right hand.knuckle bone. but . if no choice is expressed. First insert the fork firmly in the lower part of the breast. then sever the legs and wings on both sides. and divide the joint. 2. placing the pieces neatly on one side of the platter. insert the fork in the small end of the pinion. that on the second joints. pressing it closely to the body. When the legs and wings are off. as many even slices of the white meat as may be desired. is rarely ever helped to any one. first begin by separating the leg from the body. a little behind the leg attachments. if the whole is to be carved. To carve a goose. tough and stringy. Now unjoint the legs and wings at the middle joint. serve a portion of both light and dark meat. the next most delicate meat fills the cavities in the neck bone. as well as the two lower side bones by the wing. A haunch of mutton is carved the same as a haunch of venison. Make an opening into the cavity of the turkey for dipping out the inside dressing. letting these parts lie on the platter. The lower part of the leg (or drumstick. and next to this. 1. and press it close to the body. as it is called) being hard. then passing the knife under at 2. and does not remove it until the whole is divided. just forward of fig. To take off the wing. by putting the fork into the small end of the limb. which can be done very skillfully by a little practice. cut downward from the breast from 2 to 3.

Now turn the fowl over. the knife must be inserted exactly at the joint. quite down to the tail. only dividing the joint with the knife. when they will break off from the part that sticks to the breast. First insert the knife between the leg and the body. the wings and breast are considered the best parts. To separate the breast from the body of the fowl. back upwards. Some are fond of the feet. the same as carving a pheasant. and the fowl is carved. these should be . and if the fowl is tender the joint will give away easily. 3. When the duck is full size. put the knife into the bone midway between the neck and the rump. cut through the tender ribs close to the breast. for if not accurately hit. and cut to the bone. In the case of a capon or large fowl. The wing is broken off the same way. after being separated from the drumsticks. a tough goose is very difficult to carve. the legs and wings being taken off first on either side. Serve a little of the dressing from the inside. but in young ones the legs are the most juicy. some difficulty will be experienced to get them apart. Turn now the rump from you. these last are to be removed by putting the knife in at figs. pressing it hard. by making a circular slice in the apron at fig. then turn the leg back with the fork. as is represented by the lines 1 to 2.the best pieces of the goose are the breast and thighs. A goose should never be over a year old. first cutting it in slices from the breast. and when dressing the duck. and on raising the lower end it will separate readily. in the direction from 1 to 2. [Illustration] ROAST DUCK. and take off very neatly the two side bones. slices may be cut off at the breast. take off the merry-thought and the neck-bones. In separating the thigh from the drumstick. There is no difference in carving roast and boiled fowls if full grown. beginning close to the wing and proceeding upward towards the breast bone. carve it like a goose. The four quarters having been removed in this way. this is easily acquired by practice. FOWLS. but in very young fowls the breast is usually served whole. as shown by the dotted lines at number 3. 3 and 4. A young duckling may be carved in the same manner as a fowl. An opening may be made by cutting out a circular slice. and certainly most difficult to eat.

but the custom of cooking them with the heads on is going into disuse somewhat. The breast. by following the lines 1 to 2. thus making four portions that may be served. which will detach it. and the wing 3 and 5. Wild duck is highly esteemed by epicures. Pigeons. Cut the other parts as in a fowl. leaving the breast for a third plate. by severing a wing and leg on either side from the body. Pass the knife through the line 6. then served. either across or down the middle. [Illustration] PHEASANT. Pheasants are frequently roasted with the head left on. when each portion may be divided into two pieces. if young and small they may be served entirely whole. . then take off the leg in the line from 3 and 4. it is trussed like a tame duck. and carved in the same manner. Grouse and prairie-chicken are carved from the breast when they are large. The third method is to thrust back the body from the legs. Partridges are generally cleaned and trussed the same way as a pheasant.neatly skinned and never removed. 1 and 2. Place your fork firmly in the centre of the breast of this large game bird and cut deep slices to the bone at figs. and cut both ways to 2 and 3. PARTRIDGES. PIGEONS. In taking off the wings. although the legs are considered very finely flavored. bring the head round under the wing. Another method is to cut it into three pieces. thus making two servings of those parts. in that case. 1. dividing it into two equal parts. and cut through the middle of the breast. when dressing them. may be cut in halves. if you do you will hit upon the neck-bone. A very good way of carving these birds is to insert the knife at fig. severing both sides the same. and under the merry-thought towards the neck. from which the wing must be separated. cutting them into two equal parts. and quartered or halved when of medium size. if not too large. The usual way of carving them is similar to a pigeon. and fix it on the point of a skewer. be careful not to cut too near the neck. the breast being the choicest part. wings and merry-thought of a pheasant are the most highly prized.

on the contrary. Consomme. cutting it lengthwise in slices in the direction of the line from 1 to 2. A slice of the thick with one of the thin. Oranges cut into halves are used as a garnish for dishes of small birds. being _too_ large for any ordinary sized family. being known by its silvery whiteness. then split them down the back. The mackerel is one of the most beautiful of fish. on a hot dish. snipe. Salmon is in season from the first of February to the end of August. making two servings. first run the knife down and along the upper side of the fish from 1 to 2. To carve it. BOILED SALMON. should be served to each guest. as that impairs its appearance. quail. Care should be taken when carving not to break the flakes of the fish. Other whole fish may be carved in the same manner. Serve the thick part. The fish is laid upon a little sauce or folded napkin. when fully grown. such as pigeons. where lies the fat. is about fourteen or sixteen inches long. woodcock. the middle cut is considered the choicest to boil. SOUPS. should hang a day or two in a cool place before they are dressed. as they very quickly lose their flavor. or in the direction from 5 to 6. It sometimes attains to the length of twenty inches.Tame pigeons should be cooked as soon as possible after they are killed. squabs. and the thin part breadthwise. and about two pounds in weight. forms the basis of all meat soups. etc. and also of all . To carve a baked mackerel. then again on the lower side from 3 to 4. or Stock. These small birds are either served whole or split down the back. This fish is seldom sent to the table whole. but usually. first remove the head and tail by cutting downward at 1 and 2. [Illustration] MACKEREL. Wild pigeons. so as to serve each person a part of each side piece. The flesh of the salmon is rich and delicious in flavor. The roe should be divided in small pieces and served with each piece of fish. and garnished with parsley.

while veal. something like marrow. As stated before. but the neck or "sticking-piece. in them." as the butchers call it. but for stock to keep it is not as good. makes a stronger and more nutritious soup. than any other part of the animal. and should be carefully skimmed to prevent it from becoming turbid. use boiling water from the tea-kettle. strain through a colander. Some cooks use meat that has once been cooked. to become a jelly. strain again through a hair sieve. but by breaking them they can be dissolved more. Fresh. and a teaspoonful of salt. Those contain higher fragrant properties. uncooked beef makes the best stock.principal sauces. with the addition of cracked bones. stock is not as good when made entirely from cooked meats. The shin bone is generally used. therefore. and if more water is needed. Take off every particle of scum as it rises. Allow a little less than a quart of water to a pound of meat and bone. cold or lukewarm water spoils the flavor. contains more of the substance that you want to extract. but. although quite glutinous. Mutton is too strong in flavor for good stock. the bones. in a covered pot. in order that the essence of the meat may be drawn out thoroughly. this renders little nourishment and destroys the flavor. When done. and a fatty fluid. Meats for soup should always be put on to cook in _cold_ water. especially if the meat is to be eaten. It is. or fold a clean towel in a colander set over an earthen bowl. which adds to the strength and thickness of the soup. Never salt it before the meat is tender (as that hardens and toughens the meat). unless it should be roasted meats. and bits and underdone pieces of . When there is an abundance of it. never allowed to _boil fast_ at any time. but in a family where it requires a large joint roasted every day. It might answer for ready soup. essential to the success of these culinary operations to know the most complete and economical method of extracting from a certain quantity of meat the best possible stock or broth. Brown meats contain more flavor than white. If for clear soups. as the glutinous matter contained in them renders it important that they should be boiled with the meat. and before the vegetables are put in. The flesh of old animals contains more flavor than the flesh of young ones. and allowed to simmer slowly for several hours. They are composed of an earthy substance--to which they owe their solidity--of gelatine. this is so encased in the earthy substance. or any dish large enough to hold the stock. when cold. it causes the stock. that boiling water can dissolve only the surface of the whole bones. so by putting the remains of roast meats in the stock-pot you obtain a better flavor. furnishes very little nutriment. _Two ounces_ of them contain as much gelatine as _one pound_ of meat.

remove all the fat from the top. For white soups. Pound a large handful of spinach in a mortar. none but white vegetables are used. In cold weather you can gather them up for several days and put them to cook in cold water. If this be melted in. squeeze out the seeds. without buying fresh meat for the purpose. which is known as caramel by French cooks. as that will cause it to turn sour very quickly. Soup will be as good the second day as the first if heated to the boiling point. which are of veal. Mock turtle. and would be sufficient. vermicelli. and put them into the soup with the other vegetables--or take the juice only. or the green leaves of celery put in soup. To color soup red. Hotel and private-house stock is quite different. lamb or chicken. still. and when done. these all assist in imparting a rich dark color to soup. the flavor of the soup will certainly be spoiled. and put aside until needed. but should be turned into a dish or shallow pan. will serve instead of spinach. then tie it in a cloth. It should never be left in the pot. it must be put in as soon as the soup is free from scum. should be this color. Pounded spinach leaves give a fine green color to soup. Never cover it up. Before heating a second time. if stewed as above. as directed for spinach. to furnish a family. and sometimes veal and lamb soups. Okras gives a green color to soup. bones of roasted poultry. pearl barley. Coloring is used in some brown soups. Parsley. put this in the soup you wish to color green five minutes before taking it up. . and wring out all the juice. for thickening. skin six red tomatoes. the chief of which is brown burnt sugar. rice. or macaroni. Grated carrot gives a fine amber color to soup. or the bony structure of turkey or chicken that has been left from carving. with the addition of a little fresh meat it would be more nutritious.beef. strain. Thickened soups require nearly double the seasoning used for thin soups or broth. and set aside to get cold.

with a weight on the upper one. with other ingredients. or mushroom catsup. okra. green peas. then chop it small. Of vegetables the principal ones are carrots. shallots and onions. tomatoes. red pepper. parsnips. knotted marjoram. Clear soups must be perfectly transparent. HERBS AND VEGETABLES USED IN SOUPS. vermicelli. . and serve them fried in fat. cinnamon. mace. The herbs usually used in soups are parsley. When soups and gravies are kept from day to day in hot weather. also flour browned by simply putting it into a saucepan over the fire and stirring it constantly until it is a dark brown. such as bay-leaves. and put into fresh-scalded pans or tureens. beans. tie it in a cloth. green corn. and lay it between two plates. The meat from which soup has been made is good to serve cold thus: Take out all the bones. orange peel and juice. wheat flour. with the addition of a little wheat flour and an egg. leeks. These materials. allspice. summer savory. mushroom. sliced onions fried with butter and flour until they are browned. with wine. made into almost an endless variety of excellent soups and gravies. and the various catsups. are. cloves. then rubbed through a sieve. tarragon. they should be warmed up every day. a few slices of onions fried very brown in butter are nice. nutmeg. or boil in the soup. and placed in a cool cellar. beetroot. or make a hash for breakfast. macaroni. which they use in most all soups and gravies and other made dishes. or make sandwiches of it. garlic. that makes very strong stock. turnips. and catsup. Soups that are intended for the principal part of a meal certainly ought not to be flavored like sauces. Scotch barley. common thyme. In temperate weather. black and white pepper. pearl barley. and other seasonings.Hotels use meat in such large quantities that there is always more or less trimmings and bones of meat to add to fresh meats. season with pepper and salt. asparagus. The latter imparts a finer flavor and the acid much milder. are excellent to heighten the color and flavor of brown sauces and soups. if liked. which are only intended to give relish to some particular dish. and thickened soups about the consistency of cream. An agreeable flavor is sometimes imparted to soup by sticking some cloves into the meat used for making stock. or make it into balls. slice it thin for luncheon or supper. rice. lemon peel and juice. every other day may be sufficient. combined in various proportions.

one tablespoonful of it is sufficient to impart a fine flavor to a dish of macaroni and various other dishes. poultry trimmings. two large onions. break the bones into small pieces. Keep it in small jars. one-half teaspoonful of whole pepper. When the bottom of the pan becomes covered with a pale. into pieces of about three inches square. add the four quarts of cold water. Stock is the basis of many of the soups afterwards mentioned. or fresh meat. on opposite page. Season and boil a few moments and serve hot. Cut up the meat and bacon.STOCK. [Illustration: FRANCES FOLSOM CLEVELAND. and place it on a sharp fire. when cool remove all grease. and simmer very gently for five or six hours. White stock is used in the preparation of white soups. or six pounds of knuckle of veal. Six pounds of shin of beef. Good soups of various kinds are made from it at short notice. . throw in a tablespoonful of salt to assist the scum to rise. and whatever vegetables and thickening preferred. one-quarter pound of lean bacon or ham. two ounces of salt. do not let it boil quickly. each stuck with cloves. one head of celery. in a cool place. and is made by boiling six pounds of a knuckle of veal. occasionally stirring its contents. or ham. and four slices of lean ham. It makes a good gravy for hash meats. the broken bones. four quarts and one-half-pint of cold water. Proceed according to directions given in STOCK. three carrots. one large blade of mace. As we have said before. When nearly cooked. It is best to partly cook the vegetables before adding to the stock. This stock will keep for many days in cold weather. Cover the stewpan. rub the butter on the bottom of the stewpan. add water. as much boiling injures the flavoring of the soup. one turnip. and this will be found quite strong enough for ordinary purposes. Remove every particle of scum whilst it is doing. then meat and all other ingredients. put in one-half a pint of water.] WHITE STOCK. any bones. cut up in small pieces. and strain it through a fine hair sieve. slice off a portion of the jelly. two ounces of butter. trimmings of poultry. jelly-like substance. one bunch of savory herbs except sage.

with a small quantity of salt. take the meat from the soup. Boil slowly. it may be heated. hardly above simmering. and immediately remove and strain through a thin flannel cloth. two tablespoonfuls of rice or pearl barley. Into the tureen put the yolk of one egg. in hot weather. two turnips. or until it begins to get tender. (Excellent. with the addition of a little boiling water. four hours. then add a little hot stock. one head of celery. boiling hot. add a piece of butter the size of a hickory nut. add the white of one egg to each quart of stock. put in two potatoes cut up in small pieces. then beat the whole hard and long. . Should any remain over the first day. stirring all the time. It is very nice pressed and eaten cold with mustard and vinegar. and if intended to be served with it. or catsup. and a teaspoonful of summer savory powdered fine. VEAL SOUP. Select a small shin of beef of moderate size. proceeding as follows: beat the whites of the eggs up well in a little water. Let it boil about two hours. with five or six quarts of _cold_ water. on this strain the soup. beat it well for a minute. remove from the fire. beat to a froth and pour gradually into the pot.TO CLARIFY STOCK. After these ingredients have boiled a quarter of an hour. Some fancy a glass of brown sherry added just before being served. and stir well into it a teacupful of cream. and garnish with sprigs of parsley. Place the stock in a clean saucepan. and a teaspoonful of pepper. BEEF SOUP. then season it with a tablespoonful of salt. new milk. then add to it one carrot. crack the bone in small pieces. let it boil half an hour longer. Just at the last.) Put a knuckle of veal into three quarts of cold water. set it over a brisk fire. boil it one hour longer. take out the bones and lay it closely and neatly on a dish. Serve very hot. wash and place it in a kettle to boil. and one small tablespoonful of uncooked rice. Serve made mustard and catsup with it. Four hours are required for making this soup. and served again. allow it to boil up once. the vegetables to be minced up in small pieces like dice. or. When boiling. when the liquor should be reduced to half the usual quantity.

or. and cover in a bowl. then put them into soup soon enough to be thoroughly done. Take out the pieces of bird. or with tomatoes. turnips and onions.SCOTCH MUTTON BROTH. scalded. all cut into two or three pieces. butter for frying. skim well. add carrots. cook the soup an hour longer. half a pound of lean ham. Cut best end of mutton into cutlets. and then simmer for one and one-half hours. cut off scrag. salt and two stalks of white celery cut into inch lengths. if you have neither. dividing it with two bones in each. The other half of the mutton should be served on a separate dish. and stew gently two hours. peeled and cut into pieces. fried bread. Worcestershire. Two grouse or partridges. pepper. two medium-sized onions. stir in barley. Six pounds neck of mutton. . GAME SOUP. with whole turnips boiled and laid round it. add salt to taste. strain. and put it in stewpan with three quarts of water. heat slowly. skim the moment the meat boils. Pour upon fried bread in the tureen. with the addition of a tablespoonful of brown flour wet into a paste with cold water. You may thicken the soup with rice or barley that has first been soaked in cold water. or with young corn. one pound of lean beef. and send it to table in the tureen with the soup. Pour on the water. fry all in butter to a light brown. Cut the meat off the scrag into small pieces. use a pair of rabbits. add a little pepper. put in little chopped parsley and serve. cool. cut down from the cob. take off nearly all fat before you put it into broth. cut the ham and onions into small pieces. a little salt. let all stew together for three and one-half hours. As soon as it boils. five turnips. two onions. or with green peas. four tablespoonfuls barley. Soak mutton in water for an hour. three quarts of water. cut into strips. Joint your game neatly. or other pungent sauce. adding a tablespoonful of catsup. Put into a soup-pot with the beef. about one-half hour before sending it to table. and a glass of Madeira or brown sherry. five carrots. drop in the celery and simmer ten minutes. three quarts water. and every ten minutes afterwards. Many persons are fond of mutton that has been boiled in soup. Venison soup made the same.

peas and string beans--all cut into small uniform thickness. Take good strong stock (see pages 27 and 30). Put it into a stewpan with four ounces of fresh butter. allowing it to run through without moving or squeezing it. the water and more seasoning if necessary. Pour this mixture into a saucepan containing the stock. An old chicken for soup is much the best. In the spring and summer season use asparagus. which will rise and float upon the surface in the form of a thick white scum. a teaspoonful of salt. Cover them with boiling water. wash and boil enough spinach to measure a pint. put it into a soup kettle with half a pound of corned ham. and a teaspoonful of granulated sugar. when on the point of boiling. add four quarts of cold water. place it over the fire and heat the contents gradually. to which add the cooked vegetables. CHICKEN CREAM SOUP. JULIENNE SOUP. Now remove it and pour it into a folded towel laid in a colander set over an earthen bowl. and cook until soft. add a teaspoonful of salt. In another saucepan have two quarts of boiling stock (see pages 27 and 30). Add to this two quarts of strong stock (see pages 27 and 30). Cook and stir it about ten minutes. stirring often to prevent the egg from sticking to the bottom of the saucepan. also celery into thin slices. This should be a clear amber color. well whipped together. Bring slowly to a gentle boil. and keep .CONSOMME SOUP. Cut carrots and turnips into quarter-inch pieces the shape of dice. and quickly serve very hot. when cooked. half a teaspoonful pepper. Cut it up into quarters. Allow it to boil gently until the stock looks perfectly clear under the egg. remove all fat from the surface. and for each quart of the stock allow the white and shell of one egg and a tablespoonful of water. chopped and pounded into a soft paste. let boil up. mix with it a tablespoonful of butter. Season with more salt if needed. and an onion. Serve hot. and. Pick. Set it over the fire again. a little grated nutmeg. then rub it through a strainer. CREAM OF SPINACH.

pepper and salt. Take them out. two carrots. one ounce of butter. a tablespoonful of salt. one head of celery. two slices of ham. Put in one-half pint of water. PLAIN ECONOMICAL SOUP. Now stir in two cups of rich milk thickened with a little flour. two turnips. Fill up the stewpan with water. pieces of beefsteak. mashing the vegetables so that they will all pass through. . simmer for five minutes and serve. chopping it and adding it to the soup. wash them. and flavor with the catsup and port wine. and the meat drops from the bones. two tablespoonfuls of catsup. one leek. then add half a cup of rice. and stir it over a quick fire till the juices are drawn. and put them in a stewpan with the butter. Skim well. Skim off the fat. Sippits are bits of dry toast cut into a triangular form. [Illustration: EDITH CAREW ROOSEVELT. Mix one tablespoonful of flour with two of water. skim and strain the soup. thicken with flour. Boil the whole gently four hours. when boiling. Season with salt. Cut the vegetables in slices and add them with the herbs. and.] OX-TAIL SOUP. three onions. separating them at the joints. then the meat should be taken out. Cook slowly until the rice is tender. Cut up the tails.this up until the liquid has diminished one-third. or until the tails are tender. Take a cold roast-beef bone. Put them into a pot with three or four quarts of water. Put back the tails. one-half glass of port wine. reserving some of the white part of the meat. three turnips. pepper and a bunch of chopped parsley. add the salt. the rack of a cold turkey or chicken. pepper. one onion. The chicken could be fried in a spoonful of butter and a gravy made. a few cloves. stir it into the soup and boil the whole ten minutes. three quarts of water. then strain it through a colander. Serve this soup with sippits of toast. and return the soup to the pot. A seasonable dish about the holidays. Two ox-tails. and simmer very gently for four hours. one bunch of savory herbs. two carrots.

For making two quarts of soup. or any vegetables you choose. to season and thicken it a little. adding half a pound of lean ham or bacon cut into slices or pieces. chopping them fine first. 1. about an hour and a half before dinner. when the meat is well cooked. instead of having plain water for the foundation. also a teaspoonful of salt and a little pepper. summer savory may also be added. wash clean. Cook slowly from three to four hours. adding a third of a teaspoonful of soda. Serve with small squares of toasted bread. No. salt and pepper to your taste. It should be quite quick. two well-beaten eggs. In the morning put them in a kettle with a close fitting cover. and next day. put one dozen ears of corn to a gallon of water. Corn soup may also be made nicely with water in which a pair of grown fowls have been boiled or parboiled. Strain through a colander. a tablespoonful of good butter rubbed up with two tablespoonfuls of flour. If not rich enough. When the soup begins to boil. and boil the cobs in water for at least an hour. then add the grains. CORN SOUP. Cut the tops from one of the bunches and cook them twenty minutes in . Let this stand in a cool room. use two bundles of fresh asparagus. skim the froth from the surface. You should begin to make it the day before you wish to eat the soup. Pour over them three quarts of cold water. covered. take out the bones. Add a little onion. continue the boiling a while longer. which will be reduced to three quarts by the time the soup is done. skim off the crust or cake of fat which has risen to the top. cut up and added. then pour on a pint of new milk. carrot. and boil until they are thoroughly done. Cut the corn from the cob. Take two tails. and some celery chopped fine. CREAM OF ASPARAGUS. let them remain in it over night to swell.Another way to make an appetizing ox-tail soup. Wash well a pint of split peas and cover them well with cold water. and leave out the meat. adding a little more boiling water to keep up the quantity as it boils away. SPLIT PEA SOUP. add a small handful of salt. and stir in. and put in a kettle with nearly a gallon of cold water. stirring occasionally till the peas are all dissolved. add a small piece of butter.

and so much underdone that the juices remain in it. you may put it into the pot and its bones along with it. Turn this mixture into the boiling stock and boil twenty minutes. stirring constantly. then add three tablespoonfuls of dissolved flour. enough to cover them. DRIED BEAN SOUP. cover it. and the soup in a tureen. and put in the beans (having first drained them) and a head of celery cut small. then add the asparagus that has been boiled in the stock.salted water. Boil it slowly till the meat is done to shreds. and the beans all dissolved. GREEN PEA SOUP. Season the meat with pepper only. cook this five minutes. and pour on it six quarts of water. and a pound of lean bacon. and put into it small squares of toasted bread with the crust cut off. being careful not to scorch it. Then strain it through a colander into the tureen. add them to the soup. As soon as it boils. and let it boil for half an hour. then having scraped the skins from a quart of small young potatoes. add the milk and cream and the asparagus heads. Wash a small quarter of lamb in cold water. Serve the meat on a dish with parsley sauce over it. cut very small. If you have the remains of a piece of beef that has been roasted the day before. work quarter of a pound of butter and a dessertspoonful of flour together. which should be put on as early in the day as possible. If water is used in place of stock. Cut an onion into thin slices and fry in three tablespoonfuls of butter ten minutes. use all cream. or a tablespoonful of pounded celery seed. Take two pounds of the lean of fresh beef--the coarse pieces will do. add a quart of shelled peas. Rub through a sieve. Cook the remainder of the asparagus about twenty minutes in a quart of stock or water. add to it two tablespoonfuls of salt. then skim it clear. cover the pot and let it boil for half an hour longer. and put it into a soup-pot with six quarts of cold water. Put two quarts of dried white beans to soak the night before you make the soup. and add them to the soup ten or twelve minutes before taking it off the fire. take off the scum. and a teaspoonful of pepper. . cook five minutes longer. and set it over a moderate fire--let it boil gently for two hours. Cut them up and put them into your soup-pot with the bones belonging to them (which should be broken in pieces).

say a gallon. SQUIRREL SOUP. This approaches so near in flavor to the real turtle soup that few are able to distinguish the difference. fry them in butter. then dip the beans out of the pot and strain them through a colander. thus pressed. into the pot in which they were boiled. add a red pepper. Toast two slices of bread. Cover the pot close. skim the liquid. Soak over night one quart of black beans. and let it boil in the mixture. salt. two sliced onions. but especially good will you find corn. Irish potatoes. _not_ boil.TURTLE SOUP FROM BEANS. salt and pepper. take out the meat. and a few force meat balls. stir it. Tie up in a thin cloth some thyme. cut them into dice one-half inch square. add boiling water. directly after breakfast. in a gallon of cold water. Add a tablespoonful of cold butter. Put two pounds of tripe and four calves' feet into the soup-pot and cover them with cold water. cut the tripe into small pieces. next day boil them in the proper quantity of water. and half a glass of wine just before serving the soup. sweet basil. drop in some egg balls. When the vegetables have boiled until almost tender. sliced potatoes. thicken with a piece of butter rubbed in flour. and boil closely until the calves' feet are boiled very tender. and boil fifteen minutes more. add this to the soup with a sliced lemon. Have ready four hard-boiled yolks of eggs quartered. Then return to the pot. Strain the soup through a coarse colander when the meat has boiled to shreds. with a small tablespoonful of salt. and then . Add vegetables just the same as you do in case of other meat soups in the summer season. add a piece of butter rolled in flour. Wash and quarter three or four good sized squirrels. and after boiling a while longer. and thyme. so as to get rid of the squirrels' troublesome little bones. add half a teaspoonful of sweet marjoram. if there is not enough liquid. PHILADELPHIA PEPPER POT. put them into the bottom of your tureen. and set it on the back part of the stove to simmer gently. tomatoes and Lima beans. Take up and serve hot. and put it back into the liquid. a teaspoonful of summer savory and parsley. put them on. Celery and parsley leaves chopped up are also considered an improvement by many. Then return the flour of the beans.

Pour over it one gallon of cold water. or until the liquid is reduced to about one-half. add boiled rice in a separate dish. pass it through a colander. add one tablespoonful of currie powder. season with salt and pepper. A teaspoonful of flour should be dissolved and stirred in. No. and other soup vegetables. and let it boil three minutes. a piece of butter the size of an egg. Remove the meat and put into the broth a quart of tomatoes. 3. then allowed to boil half an hour longer. Let the meat and water boil slowly for three hours. and one head of celery into three quarts of liquor. MULLAGATAWNY SOUP. Strain and serve hot. Canned tomatoes in place of fresh ones may be used. TOMATO SOUP. keep it over a brisk fire till it boils. 2. and one chopped onion. in which one or two fowls have been boiled. add three tablespoonfuls of rolled cracker. and let it simmer twenty minutes. Peel two quarts of tomatoes.pour the soup boiling hot upon them. If you find it too thick. TOMATO SOUP. (As made in India. Very good. Strain it so that no seeds remain. and one tablespoonful of flour. two turnips. strain and add a level tablespoonful of flour dissolved in a third of a cup of melted butter.) Cut four onions. add a little boiling water and a teaspoonful of . Place over the fire a quart of peeled tomatoes. set it over the fire again. It must be of good yellow color. and add a quart of hot boiled milk. then place it on a corner of the fire. Canned tomatoes may be used in place of fresh ones. TOMATO SOUP. mix the whole well together. and not too thick. and serve hot. Serve very hot over little squares of bread fried brown and crisp in butter. serve with pieces of roast chicken in it. Place in a kettle four pounds of beef. salt and pepper to taste. No. stew them soft with a pinch of soda. add pepper and salt. 1. one carrot. An excellent addition to a cold meat lunch. No. boil them in a saucepan with an onion.

This will separate the grains of rice.sugar. and cover with some of the broth. Half veal and half chicken answers as well. juice of one lemon. Add four quarts of water. let it simmer for two hours. with fine herbs to taste. and a quarter bottle of Madeira or sherry. or until the meat will easily slip from the bone. to be served separately with this soup. strain it through a colander. onions. the juice of one lemon. and in it put a quarter of a pound of lean ham. Stew very slowly. and put it into the boiling water in saucepan. do not let it cease boiling during this time. save the broth. in three waters. pepper and salt. Wash well. strain it. This is also the proper way to boil rice for curries. a little salt. a quarter teaspoonful pounded mace and a dessert-spoon sugar. If these directions are strictly carried out every grain of the rice will separate. add about a pint of the broth. let this boil. After it has come to the boil--which it will do in about two minutes--let it boil twenty minutes. half a pound of rice. let all stew quietly for ten minutes and rub it through a medium sieve. tie it up in a cloth. a bunch of sweet herbs. take out. and stew four hours with the herbs. Put it back in the saucepan. let it boil until quite tender. put it in a stewpan. Scald a well-cleansed calf's head. MOCK TURTLE SOUP. OF CALF'S HEAD. cut it in small square pieces. and place it near the fire until hot enough to send to the table. now add the remainder of the broth. add them to the soup. One turtle. season with a very little cayenne pepper. and be thoroughly cooked. At the end of four hours strain the soup. two onions. and five minutes after serve hot. remove the brain. In another stewpan melt some butter. GREEN TURTLE SOUP. add the calf's head. After removing the entrails. and. and pour over it two quarts of cold water. cut small. a glass of Madeira. . when cool. and boil an hour. A dish of rice. Having previously prepared force meat balls. must be thus prepared: put three pints of water in a saucepan and one tablespoonful of salt. also parsley and one onion. and then dredge in a small quantity of flour. and set aside. five quarts of water. if desired. and throw them into cold water. cut up the coarser parts of the turtle meat and bones.

fry in butter. cut into lumps an inch long._--Six tablespoonfuls of turtle meat chopped very fine. a tablespoonful of butter. and. Rub to a paste. add a little summer savory and celery chopped fine. scald. beat up at once and pour out. thicken and put in the green fat. which has been simmered one hour in two quarts of water. then drain it and cut it in pieces of an inch length. return to the soup-pot. boil it in clear water until it is tender. thicken with a little flour (browned). Some cooks add the finer meat before straining. Fry out the fat of a slice of bacon or fat ham. This is a cheap but good soup. boil it for fifteen minutes in the soup and serve. in which there is no seasoning other than pepper or salt. If there are eggs in the turtle. half a teaspoonful of white sugar and a pinch of salt. boil them in a separate vessel for four hours.and add the finer parts of the turtle and the green fat. boiling all together five hours. Green turtle can now be purchased preserved in air-tight cans. with the yolk of two hard-boiled eggs. Just before serving. This makes a handsomer soup than if the meat is left in. put in force meat balls. a little oyster liquor. To a rich beef or other soup. salt and a small piece of butter. GUMBO OR OKRA SOUP. Season with cayenne. dip in egg. If not. peel and cut up two . and drop into the soup when it is served. and in it fry the slices of a large onion brown. and season with pepper. Take the turkey bones and boil three-quarters of an hour in water enough to cover them. MACARONI SOUP. and the wine. then the juice of the lemon. mace. drain it off. _Force Meat Balls for the Above. and throw into the soup before taking up. then powdered cracker. using the remains of cold turkey which might otherwise be thrown away. then strain. TURKEY SOUP. Bind all with a well-beaten egg. Thicken with brown flour. shape into small balls. take half a pound of small pipe macaroni. and simmer gently for an hour longer. if convenient.

salt. but not burn. Serve hot. add butter and serve. in a stew-kettle with about three quarts of hot broth of any kind. SOUPS WITHOUT MEAT. one pint of cream or milk. If you have no cream. cook slowly for three hours. use milk. TAPIOCA CREAM SOUP. In chicken broth the same quantity of okra pods. in which case add a tablespoonful of butter at the same time. a large one of flour. used for thickening instead of tomatoes. Beat the yolks of the eggs well. return to the fire. season with salt and pepper. Strain on the tapioca and stock. one tablespoonful of butter. six large onions. . Season with salt and pepper. pepper. Cut the onions into thin slices and drop in the butter. then cover tight and set back where they will simmer. Stir until they begin to cook. salt. Now put the milk on to boil. two cupfuls of cold water. together with a little chopped parsley. forms a chicken gumbo soup. put them. Put the butter in a frying pan. for half an hour. stirring constantly. two stalks celery. season with salt and pepper. Cook three minutes. This is a refreshing dish when one is fatigued. one-third of a cupful of tapioca. and cut thin one quart okra. One quart of white stock. add the cream to them and stir into the soup. Cut the onion and celery into small pieces. Cook it and the stock together very gently for one hour. One quart of milk. and put on to cook for twenty minutes with the milk and mace. a small piece of mace. ONION SOUP. Pour over fried croutons in a soup tureen. when in season (use canned tomatoes otherwise). pepper. Wash the tapioca and soak over night in cold water. Rub the soup through a strainer. one onion.quarts fresh tomatoes. then turn the mixture into the milk and cook fifteen minutes. and then add the dry flour to the onions and stir constantly for three minutes over the fire. three tablespoonfuls of butter. yolks of four eggs. one cup full of cream.

the yolks of three eggs. then add it to a good beef. two shredded lettuces. and fry all with a little butter until a light yellow. Croutons. When done. Simmer gently for a full hour. one cup milk. . salt and pepper. parsley and butter. beat up three eggs well. a small bunch of parsley. or rice may be added. one onion. veal. toss it over the fire. onion. SPRING VEGETABLE SOUP. taking off the scum carefully. with quarter of a pound of sweet butter. Cut down the white of half a dozen heads of celery into little pieces and boil it in four pints of white stock. one pint of water. with one pint of water. SWISS WHITE SOUP. and at the moment of serving add this with the vegetables to the strained-off soup. with a quarter of a pound of lean ham and two ounces of butter. let the soup boil for fifteen minutes after it is added. one and a half quarts of soup stock. or chicken soup or broth. two ounces butter. Half pint green peas. CELERY SOUP. vermicelli. two cloves.WINTER VEGETABLE SOUP. VERMICELLI SOUP. Put in a stewpan the lettuce. A sufficient quantity of broth for six people. add a bunch of celery and three or four leeks cut in pieces. Scrape and slice three turnips and three carrots and peel three onions. then strain through a sieve. and put two-thirds of the liquor with the stock. Italian pastes. lamb. and let them simmer till tender. boil it. cover with three quarts of water and simmer for three hours. pour these gradually through a sieve into the boiling soup. pepper and a little grated nutmeg. salt. Beat up the yolks of the eggs with the other third. stir and fry all the ingredients for six minutes. two spoonfuls of flour. Strain and use. add one clove of garlic. when fried. Swell quarter of a pound of vermicelli in a quart of warm water. Celery soup may be made with _white stock_. two stalks of parsley. Season with salt and pepper. strain off the vegetables.

the hands to be well floured. Serve hot. mix them lightly together. and if liked. all cut up rather fine. the yolks of four hard-boiled eggs rubbed smooth together with a tablespoon of milk. and to prevent them sticking. two heads of celery. roll out very thin. PEA SOUP. and if the soup becomes too thick add more water. NOODLES FOR SOUP. Serve with toasted bread. keep them floured a little until you are ready to drop them into your soup which should be done shortly before dinner. and the mixture to be made into little balls the size of a nutmeg. mix with this a handful of fine bread crumbs. drop into the soup about twenty minutes before serving. and stir in a few spoonfuls of cream with great care. then roll it up into a tight scroll. season with pepper and salt. Put a quart of dried peas into five quarts of water. Strain through a colander and stir in a tablespoonful of cold butter. Peel and boil eight medium-sized potatoes with a large onion sliced. FORCE MEAT BALLS FOR SOUP. then add three or four large onions. a carrot. .return the liquor to the pan. with small pieces of toasted bread placed in the bottom of the tureen. like a sheet of music. Let it remain on the bread board to dry for an hour or more. add a half teaspoon of flour. boil for four hours. minced. Beat up one egg light. and flour enough to make a _very stiff_ dough. let it heat well and serve hot. then thin it with rich milk and add a lump of butter. if necessary. for if boiled _too long_ they will go to pieces. Boil two hours longer. One cupful of cooked veal or fowl meat. IRISH POTATO SOUP. more seasoning. thicken with a little flour. some herbs. After all are cut. two turnips. Begin at the end and slice it into slips as thin as straws. and bind all together with two beaten eggs. Season to taste. like thin pie crust. salt and pepper. press all through a colander. Season with pepper and salt. dredge with flour to keep from sticking. add a pinch of salt.

into boiling soup. dissolved in a spoonful of water. three eggs. To be dropped by spoonfuls into the broth and boiled twenty minutes. rather _thick_ batter free from lumps. which skin. and cut it in long thin slices. SUET DUMPLINGS FOR SOUP. make it in balls. pass it through a wire sieve (use the remainder in stock). one level teaspoonful of soda._--One cupful of sour cream and one cupful of sour milk. Take the yolks of six hard-boiled eggs and half a tablespoonful of wheat flour. of lean veal from the fillet. and drop them into the boiling soup a few minutes before taking it up. then take 1 lb. drop this batter. This requires steady boiling. one teaspoonful of salt. SOYER'S RECIPE FOR FORCE MEATS. mix all well together. a tablespoonful at a time. or until no raw dough shows on the outside. scrape with a knife till nothing but the fibre remains. and enough flour added to make a _very stiff_ batter. and as much wheat flour as will make a smooth. A very good form of pot-pie. and the cover not to be removed until taken up to serve. Three cups of sifted flour in which three teaspoonfuls of baking powder have been sifted. pound it ten minutes or until in a puree. of good fresh beef suet. put it in a mortar. of panada (that is. rub them smooth with the yolks of two raw eggs and a teaspoonful of salt. being closely covered. Used in green turtle soup. Wet all with sweet milk to make a dough as stiff as biscuit. with a teaspoonful of salt. one cup of finely chopped suet. Drop into the soup three-quarters of an hour before being served. whites and yolks separately. To half a pint of milk put two well-beaten eggs. bread soaked . well floured.EGG BALLS FOR SOUP. Make into small balls as large as peaches. EGG DUMPLINGS FOR SOUP. then add 6 oz. put it in a mortar and pound it. well rubbed into the flour. well beaten. _Another Mode. shred and chop very fine. Take 1-1/2 lbs.

and is quite tasteless. continually pounding the contents of the mortar. then strain and cook again until it jellies. then add four eggs by degrees. Select a large. drop into the frying pan enough of these bits of bread to cover the surface of the fat. and of a good flavor. Place a saucepan over the fire with a good-sized piece of sweet butter and a sliced onion. When the fish is cooked. clean it thoroughly. and if it is delicate. fine fish. When browned. remove with a skimmer and drain. place them in a baking pan. it is ready for use.in milk. cook all together until the onions are well browned. add some butter. cut them up into little squares three-fourths of an inch thick. shrimps and all kinds of pan-fish. CROUTONS FOR SOUP. and add the veal. take a small piece in a spoon. clams. then add a bunch of sweet herbs. In a frying pan have the depth of an inch of boiling fat. . pawns. When well mixed. butter them well. work all well together. Some prefer them prepared in this manner: Take very thin slices of bread. and poach it in some boiling water. and sufficient water to make the required amount of stock. allowing for each pound of fish one quart of water. salt and pepper. put it over the fire with a sufficient quantity of water. add an onion cut fine and a bunch of sweet herbs. A small tablespoonful of Worcestershire sauce may be added if liked. and brown in a quick oven. add to the hot soup and serve. also have prepared slices of stale bread cut up into little half-inch squares. and boiled till nearly dry) with the suet. After this has cooked for half an hour pound it with a wooden pestle. 1/4 teaspoonful of pepper. FISH SOUP. season with 1 teaspoonful of salt. Serve with small squares of fried bread and thin slices of lemon. strain all through a colander. firm. FISH STOCK. salt and pepper to taste. 1/2 that of nutmeg. buttered side up. then add as many different kinds of fish as you can get--oysters. return to the fire. crabs. put into that some sliced tomatoes. smelts. pound them well together.

Some prefer all water in place of milk. Bruise part of the coral in a mortar. Serve with small dice of bread fried brown in butter. Add the yolks of four eggs. and also an equal quantity of the meat. add a little of the hot liquor to them gradually. salt and pepper. salt. add the water. two good tablespoonfuls of butter. Mix them well together. Simmer it gently for ten minutes. Two quarts of oysters. and make them up into force meat balls. all mixed well together. Add one quart of rich milk to the liquor. When near the boil. Scald one gallon of oysters in their own liquor. and add the force meat balls and a little butter rolled in flour. Then thicken it with the remaining coral (which you must first rub through a sieve). Boil it together about twenty minutes. No. after beating the eggs. pepper. No. one quart of milk. Strain all the liquor from the oysters. and stir them rapidly into the soup. Take three quarts of the veal broth and put it into the meat of the lobster cut into mouthfuls. Have ready a good broth made of three pounds of veal boiled slowly in as much water as will cover it. It must then be well strained. then the oysters. until they "ruffle. OR BISQUE. Having boiled one fine middle-sized lobster.LOBSTER SOUP. add the butter and whatever seasoning you fancy besides plain . as that will injure the color. Add mace." Stir in the butter. [Illustration: IDA SAXTON McKINLEY. extract all the meat from the body and claws. Stir in the boiling milk and send to table. and one of flour. and when it comes to a boil. till the meat is reduced to shreds. one teacupful of hot water. then. Lastly.] OYSTER SOUP. cayenne. Cook about five minutes from the time they begin to simmer. add the seasoning. and heat. cook one minute. and pour into the tureen. skim out the oysters and set aside. OYSTER SOUP. but do not let it come to a boil. but in this order--first. 2. the milk. two tablespoonfuls of butter. binding the mixture with the yolk of an egg slightly beaten. 1.

CLAM SOUP. others would prefer a little marjoram or thyme. Fry half a minced onion in an ounce of butter. add to it a pint of hot water. or an amount sufficient to float . or two crackers rolled fine. strain and rub the pulp through a sieve into the liquid. Some like a little mace and lemon juice in the seasoning. simmer slowly two hours. For the first method a shallow iron frying kettle. The fat should half fill the kettle. and serve with or without pieces of fried bread--called _croutons_ in kitchen French. heat it gently to near the boiling point. boil up again and add one quart of milk boiling hot. add the chopped clams and a pint of clam-juice or hot water. Put over the fire the liquor that was drained from them. then season to taste with pepper and salt and a piece of butter as large as an egg. but from inconvenience most households use the half-frying method of frying in a small amount of fat in a frying pan. add it to the soup. Boil fifteen minutes and strain into a saucepan. others again mace and a bit of onion. which must both be put in to taste with caution. (French Style. Twenty-five clams chopped fine. stir in a tablespoon of flour made to a cream with a little cold milk. which prevents burning) and whisk it into the soup. Boil three half-pints of milk in a saucepan (previously wet with cold water. taste for seasoning. a pinch of mace. CLAM SOUP. Dissolve a teaspoonful of flour in cold milk. pour into a tureen previously heated with hot water.pepper and salt. Return it to the saucepan and keep it lukewarm. large at the top and small at the bottom. four cloves. Celery salt most persons like extremely. Use your own discretion in this regard. and a cup of water.) Mince two dozen hard shell clams very fine. add the chopped clams and boil half an hour. is best to use. one allspice and six whole pepper corns. MODES OF FRYING The usual custom among professional cooks is to entirely immerse the article to be cooked in boiling fat.

but my experience is. lift the cake from the water on which it lies. it crusts over the outside before the inside has fully risen. All such remnants and skimmings should be clarified about twice a week. skimmings from the soup kettle. with the addition of occasionally a pound of suet from the market. If fritters. then turn off carefully so as to leave it clear from the sediment that settles at the bottom. restaurants and many private households for culinary purposes. put up in packages of two and four quarts. the heat of the fat should get to such a degree that. it will become brown almost instantly. When the fat is all melted. In families of any size. but should not be so hot as to burn the fat. and then it is ready for use. should.whatever is to be fried. using a frying pan with a small quantity of fat or grease. the intense heat quickly searing up the pores of the article and forming a brown crust on the lower side. croquettes. while hot strain into a small clean stone jar or bright tin pail. in the first place. hard article. especially for frying. it should be strained with the water and set aside to cool. Always after frying anything. considering it more wholesome and digestible. that is a mistake. The second mode of frying. to amply supply the need. etc. where there is much cooking required. there are enough drippings and fat remnants from roasts of beef. when a piece of bread or a teaspoonful of the batter is dropped in it. have the frying pan hot over the fire.. to be done properly. and also ruining the fat. giving it a burnt flavor. Many French cooks prefer beef fat or suet to lard for frying purposes. Some cooks say that the fat should be smoking. It is now sold by leading grocers. it being quite as delicate a medium as frying with olive oil. and will doubtless in future supersede animal fats. and still be kept at the boiling point. the fat should stand until it settles and has cooled somewhat. as that soon ruins the fat. by boiling them all together in water. or adhere or soak into the article cooked as pork fat. After the fat on the top has hardened. Refined cotton-seed oil is now being adopted by most professional cooks in hotels. then turning over and browning the other the same way. . then melt over again the fat. scrape off all the dark particles from the bottom. are dropped into fat that is too hot. crullers. and the fat in it _actually boiling_ before the article to be cooked is placed in it. does not impart as much flavor. making a heavy. As soon as it begins to smoke it should be removed a little to one side.

Place it over the fire. To do this correctly. Very large fish. there is another mode of frying. spoons. pepper. The usual modes of cooking fish are boiled. and brown it quickly. choose those only in which the eye is full and prominent. When boiling fish. they should never be put into warm water. Large fish are generally boiled. the smaller kinds fried or broiled. it seasons and prevents the nutriment from being drawn out. The garnishes for boiled fish are: for turbot. the process is somewhat similar to broiling. but the ordinary conveniences in private houses do not admit of the possibility of enjoying this delicate way of cooking it. etc. by adding a little vinegar and salt to the water. oil over the bottom of the pan with a piece of suet. a thick bottomed frying pan should be used. halibut. broiled. if not.. when sufficiently cooked. Do not use the knives. the scales bright and fins stiff. wrap in a well-floured cloth. the flesh thick and firm. that is if the meat is all lean. FISH. as they are usually called. basting often with butter and water. Bake fish slowly. it is not necessary to grease the bottom of the pan. first on one side. that are used in cooking fish. and boil or steam. parsley. They should be thoroughly cleaned before cooking. Fill the fish with a nicely prepared stuffing of rolled cracker or stale bread crumbs. baked. for other food. seasoned with butter. the hot frying pan or spider replacing the hot fire. either hot or cold. Lay in the meat quite flat. salt. dish on a _hot_ platter and season the same as broiled meats. or the outside will break before the inner part is done. Fish to be boiled should be put into _cold water_ and set on the fire to cook very gently. then on the other. fried and occasionally stewed. sage and any other aromatic herbs fancied. medium-sized ones baked or boiled. the vinegar acting on the water hardens the water.. are considered tidbits by many. are cut in steaks or slices for frying or broiling. such as cod. these are usually cooked whole.. with the exception of brook-trout and smelts. fried smelts. as they will be apt to impart a fishy flavor. as the cod. with the heads on. are served without the heads. Small fish. for other boiled fish. sliced beets. tied closely with twine. The heads of some fish. In selecting fish. nor should water. Steaming fish is much superior to boiling. Salmon is considered the most nutritious of all fish. etc. and when it is so hot that it will siss. or pan-fish. Unless the fish are small. halibut. be poured _on_ to the . etc. lemon or sliced boiled egg. sew up.Still.

for two or three hours. brush them over with beaten egg. garnish with slices of lemon. When it is hard and dry. cut off the head. with hot lard or drippings. and. . and the water must be changed three or four times. as it is liable to break the skin. turning when lightly browned. and roll in bread or fine cracker crumbs--trout and perch should not be dipped in meal. When fish is not very salt. the same as frying crullers. fry slowly. Dip in Indian meal or wheat flour. with their inside well sprinkled with salt and pepper. it ought to be poured in gently at the side of the vessel. and fry in hot lard or drippings sufficient to cover. after they are dressed. roll in bread crumbs. If the fat is very hot. if it should be necessary to add a little water while the fish is cooking. The following method may be deemed preferable: Dredge the pieces with flour. Clean well. twenty-four hours. the pan may be moved to a cooler place on the stove. the fish will fry without absorbing it. put into a thick bottomed iron frying pan. will suffice. but it should be kept by itself and not put to any other use. that the process may be finished more slowly. Fat in which fish has been fried is just as good to use again for the same purpose. draining when done. cut out the backbone. according to the time it has been in salt. When frying fish the fire must be hot enough to bring the fat to such a degree of heat as to sear the surface and make it impervious to the fat. Salt fish should be soaked in water before boiling. if quite large. and it will be palatably cooked. and slice the body crosswise into five or six pieces.fish. PAN-FISH. or in beaten egg. When browned on one side. or even one night. Most of the smaller fish (generally termed pan-fish) are usually fried. and at the same time seal up the rich juices. Fish to be broiled should lie. As soon as the fish is browned by this sudden application of heat. it will require thirty-six hours soaking before it is dressed. season with salt and pepper. This is a particularly good way to fry slices of large fish. Serve with tomato sauce. turn it over in the fat and brown the other. TO FRY FISH. the flesh side down.

in which has been stirred a tablespoonful of minced parsley and the juice of a lemon. drain off the fat. taking care not to break it. Fill the spaces with smaller fish. BOILED SALMON. have ready a cup of sweet cream or rich milk to which a few spoons of hot water has been added. Have ready a large cupful of drawn butter. . Cut slices from an inch to an inch and an half thick. stir in two large spoons of melted butter and a little chopped parsley._ BAKED PICKEREL. A perforated sheet of tin. The middle slice of salmon is the best. or as directed in note on fish. heat all by setting the cup in boiling water. bake slowly. season with salt and pepper. and boil a quarter of an hour to the pound in hot salted water. to be sent to the table. fitting loosely. Philadelphia. improves the appearance if not the flavor. unwrap with care. When they are fried quite brown and ready to turn. Sew up neatly in a mosquito-net bag. put a dinner plate over them. place the fish in a hot dish and pour over it the sauce. drain. dry them in a cloth. and slip them on a warm platter. dredge them in sifted flour. Or an egg sauce may be made with drawn butter. and lay upon a hot dish. When the other side is brown. Carefully clean and wipe the fish. just as you please. stir in the yolk of an egg quickly. and when _hot_ slip back the fish. and they will be left unbroken on the plate. It can be stuffed or not. very rich. and let it boil up once. BROILED SALMON. Lay it in a circle on its belly. and broil on a gridiron rubbed with suet. _Hotel Lafayette. in perfect shape. turn on a plate as before. Put the lard back into the pan. Pour half upon the salmon and serve the rest in a boat. Garnish with slices of lemon. Leaving the heads on and the fish a crispy-brown. head and tail touching. and then a teaspoon of chopped parsley. When done. then invert the pan. basting often with butter and water. Garnish with parsley and sliced eggs. and lay in a dripping pan with enough hot water to prevent scorching. or several muffin rings may be used to keep it off the bottom. and tied.Place them in a thick bottomed frying pan with heads all one way. When done. add the gravy from the dripping-pan.

_--Cut the slices one inch thick. having water warm. changing water several times. butter a sheet of white paper. and. when done. or desiring a very salt relish. with tomato sauce. pour caper sauce over it and serve. one shallot. take it out and drain for a minute or two. and add the other ingredients. Cut the slices three-quarters of an inch thick. or dip them in egg and crumbs. This recipe will answer for all kinds of salt fish. and boil it in salted water as if for eating. cut it into large pieces. When higher seasoning is required. fry a light brown. broil sharply. Lay the salmon in a baking dish. This mode answers for all fish cut into steaks. place pieces of butter over it. rubbing a little of the seasoning into the fish. Then drain it. one-half teaspoonful of chopped parsley. add a few chopped herbs and a little spice. and set it in a cold place till next day. and changing. wrap it in a dry cloth. Two slices of salmon. BROILED SALT SALMON OR OTHER SALT FISH. it may do to soak a short time. PICKLED SALMON. Soak salmon in tepid or cold water twenty-four hours. . and season them with pepper and salt. dredge them with flour. Take a fine. At the hour wanted. or let stand under faucet of running water. lay it in a dish. SALMON AND CAPER SAUCE. Season well with salt and pepper. place it in the oven and baste it frequently. is very delicious. Then make the pickle._Another Mode. envelop them in it with their ends twisted. parboiling slightly. If in a hurry. which must be in proportion to the quantity of fish. broil gently over a clear fire. Salmon dressed in this way. having cleaned it. and serve with anchovy or caper sauce. lay each slice on a separate piece. salt and pepper to taste. FRESH SALMON FRIED. one-quarter pound butter. covering with butter. Season to suit taste. fresh salmon.

a little white pepper. This is the nicest way of preserving salmon. and is approved by all who have tried it. a few sprigs of parsley finely minced. cool place. which will make it keep the longer. with the flesh side to the fire. SALMON PATTIES. Season to taste with cayenne pepper and salt. Let this boil up once and add six tomatoes peeled and cut into tiny pieces. one clove. and one wine-glassful of sherry. Cut one and one-half pounds of salmon into pieces one inch square. very cold. This dish is good. Smoked salmon is very nice when shaved like smoked beef. pour it over the salmon. a little salt. Cut cold. one blade of mace. and it will be good for many months. put the pieces in a stewpan with half a cupful of water. Let all simmer gently for three-quarters of an hour. SMOKED SALMON. Heat about a pint of the dice in half a pint of cream. When the vinegar thus prepared is quite cold. cooked fish of any kind may be made into patties in this way. for luncheon or breakfast. one shallot and a heaping teaspoonful of mustard mixed smoothly with half a teacupful of vinegar. three pieces of sugar. This way of cooking fresh salmon is a pleasant change from the ordinary modes of cooking it. Cold. and served with coffee or tea. Use any fish sauce you choose--all are equally good. one ounce of whole black pepper. Serve very hot. . FRICASSEE SALMON. put it in a dry. Boil all these together in a kettle closely covered to prevent the flavor from evaporating. Fill the shells and serve. one nutmeg grated and a dozen blades of mace.To one quart of the water in which the salmon was boiled. Cover it closely. cooked salmon into dice. and garnish with dry toast cut in triangular pieces. and put on the top a tablespoonful of sweet oil. Smoked salmon to be broiled should be put upon the gridiron first. allow two quarts of the best vinegar.

or puff-paste. Clear the fish from the bones. neatly folded and placed on the platter. let it stand an hour in a cool place. lay the shad upon it. the body in a circle. seasoned with pepper and salt. pour in some made melted butter. with a line of the paste first laid round the edge.--If of cooked fish. You may form a covering either of bread crumbs. Split and wash the shad and afterwards dry it in a cloth. Butter it well and send it to the table. bread crumbs. pour over it half a pint of vinegar. Season it with salt and pepper. or alternately with both. 1/4 hour. 1 teaspoonful of finely chopped parsley. Secure the tail of the fish in its mouth. 2 dozen oysters. nutmeg and chopped parsley. Grease your gridiron well. if made of fresh fish and puff-paste. or a little thin white sauce. and bake. and as soon as it is hot. decorate the napkin around the fish with sprigs of curled parsley. 1/2 teaspoonful of grated nutmeg. oysters. and laid in cross-bars over the fish. which should be browned. When the meat easily separates from the bone it is done. and put it in a steamer over boiling water. . the flesh side down.FISH AND OYSTER PIE. STEAMED FISH. Drain well and serve on a very clean white napkin. or longer for large fish. pour off the vinegar. Covering it while broiling gives it a more delicious flavor. BAKED SHAD. TO BROIL A SHAD. cover with a dripping-pan and broil it for about a quarter of an hour. 3/4 hour. or more. and the oyster-liquor. bright coals. or with fanciful beet cuttings. and steam twenty minutes. such as cod or haddock. which sprinkle with pepper and salt. and put a layer of it in a pie-dish. then a layer of bread crumbs. Before putting on the top. which should be cut off into long strips. Any remains of cold fish. Have ready a bed of clear. Repeat this till the dish is quite full. according to the thickness. pepper and salt to taste. sufficient for the quantity of fish. _Time_.

set the saucepan over the fire. then dredge thickly with flour. (Another Way. After thoroughly cleaning it place in a saucepan with enough water to cover it. pepper. add two tablespoonfuls of salt. TO COOK A SHAD ROE. Garnish with slices of lemon. Pour over it a little water and some butter. TO COOK SHAD ROE. a little pepper. _Dressing for Baked Shad. etc. and sew it up or fasten a string around it. dredge with flour and fry as any fish. Serve in a sauce boat. a tablespoonful of brown flour which has been wet with cold water. and a glass of sherry or Madeira wine. take out and season them with salt. water cress. Cook in the oven for half an hour. and when it has boiled about five minutes try to pull out one of the fins. butter and parsley. flour. lay it on a platter. the juice of a lemon. BOILED BLUEFISH. fill the fish with it. Dredge well with salt and pepper and spread soft butter over it. Butter a tin plate and lay the drained roe upon it. butter and water.) First partly boil them in a small covered pan. A shad will require from an hour to an hour and a quarter to bake. surround it with half a dozen hard-boiled eggs. . pepper. then take from the fire and drain. and serve it with a sauce. Boiled the same as BASS. if it loosens easily from the body carefully take the fish out of the water.Many people are of the opinion that the very best method of cooking a shad is to bake it. basting frequently with salt. put in a large tablespoonful of catsup._--Boil up the gravy in which the shad was baked. BOILED BASS. Stuff it with bread crumbs. Drop into boiling water and cook gently for twenty minutes. salt. and mix this up with the beaten yolk of egg. and bake as you would a fowl.

as directed for other fish. wash them and wipe them dry. Thoroughly clean the fish. or into egg and bread crumbs. put one-fourth of them in a saucepan. and when taken off the fire. Serve with the following dressing: Reduce the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs to a smooth paste with two tablespoonfuls good salad oil. as preferred. cut off the head or not. Select a medium-sized fish. SHEEPSHEAD WITH DRAWN BUTTER. until thoroughly smooth. They should be browned all over and thoroughly done. prepared as follows: Take two ounces of butter and roll it into small balls. Rub the fish over slightly with butter. heat through. and as they begin to melt. then lay it whole upon a hot side-dish. place this over a pot of fast-boiling water and steam one hour. and wrap with several coils of white tape. stir in half a teaspoon English mustard. and place the fish in it. while stirring. sew up with fine twine. and rub a little salt over it.BAKED BLUEFISH. add the yolks of two well-beaten eggs. FRIED EELS. pour into a hot sauce boat and serve. dredge these with flour. standing back upward. and serve with drawn butter. Serve with crisped parsley. Baked the same as BAKED SHAD--see page 55. squeeze dry. salt. After cleaning the eels well. cut them in pieces two inches long. BAKED WHITE FISH. salted. chop fine. add the bread. and bent in the form of an S. wrap it in a cloth and put it in a steamer. cut in pieces a large onion. cut out the backbone from the head to within two inches of the tail. and stuff with the following: Soak stale bread in water. in hot lard or beef dripping. and fry. whisk them. stuff the fish rather full. pepper and a little parsley or sage. two ounces of butter. one at a time. garnish with tufts of parsley and slices of lemon. and add pepper and vinegar to taste. half a tablespoonful of chopped parsley. add a tablespoonful of lemon juice. clean it thoroughly. fry in butter. add the remainder. Eels are sometimes dipped in batter and then fried. just cover the bottom of a baking pan with hot water. roll them in wheat flour or rolled cracker. .

serve with drawn butter or egg sauce. Select a three-pound piece of white halibut. then wash it and scrape it until quite clean. turn it over in the pot. The cut next to the tail-piece is the best to boil. Rub a little salt over it. with a sharp knife take off the skin. Serve hot. place it on a hot dish surrounded with a border of parsley and serve with egg sauce. Beat up two eggs and roll out some brittle crackers upon the kneading board until they are as fine as dust. tie it in a cloth and boil slowly over a moderate fire. No. turn and brown both sides. soak it for fifteen minutes in vinegar and cold water.HALIBUT BOILED. remove from frying pan and drain. and place them in a hot frying pan half full of boiling lard. allowing seven minutes' boiling to each pound of fish. FRIED HALIBUT. broiled . put it into the hot pork drippings and fry brown on both sides. STEAMED HALIBUT. After washing and drying two pounds of sliced halibut. dredge it well with flour. when it is half-cooked. First fry a few thin slices of salt pork until brown in an iron frying pan. set the steamer over a pot of fast-boiling water and steam two hours. 1. in which a little butter has been added to make the fish brown nicely. then take it up on a hot platter and keep it warm until the halibut is fried. Select choice. then serve the pork with the fish. then into the cracker crumbs (after you have salted and peppered the fish). Dip each slice into the beaten egg. Halibut broiled in slices is a very good way of cooking it. and. 2. cover it with a cloth and place it in a steamer. sprinkle it with salt and pepper. FRIED HALIBUT. after carefully washing and drying with a soft towel. Boiled halibut minced with boiled potatoes and a little butter and milk makes an excellent breakfast dish. firm slices from this large and delicate looking fish. No.

When a fork will penetrate it easily. BAKED HALIBUT. Many think that they make a much better appearance as a dish when cooked whole with the heads on. stir in a tablespoonful of walnut catsup. They are nice served with slices of fried pork. put in a piece of butter to prevent their sticking. and flour them nicely. Take the gravy in the dripping pan. first seasoning with salt and pepper. previously wet with cold water. FRIED SMELTS. Boil up once and put in a sauce boat. . split them to the tail. fry quickly to a delicate brown. If you use lard instead of the fat of fried salt pork. wash and dry the fish. Lay them side by side on a heated platter. and form a delightful breakfast or supper dish. FRIED BROOK TROUT.the same as Spanish mackerel. Let the fat be hot. over a clear fire. and nicely garnished for the table. They are often cooked and served with their heads on. fried crisp. garnish and send hot to the table. These delicate fish are usually fried. They should be sufficiently browned on one side before turning on the other. It should be a fine. salt and pepper them. Wipe it dry and score the outer skin. placed on a hot dish when done. buttered well and covered closely. Clean. Broil the same as other fish. BOILED WHITE FISH. brown color. HALIBUT BROILED. should there not be enough. upon a buttered gridiron. it is done. a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce. Take a nice piece of halibut weighing five or six pounds and lay it in salt water for two hours. Fried with their heads on the same as brook trout. add a little boiling water. and thicken with brown flour. the juice of a lemon. and which causes them to brown nicely. Set it in a dripping pan in a moderately hot oven and bake an hour. basting often with butter and water heated together in a sauce pan or tin cup.

Wash and dry them thoroughly in a cloth. Put in the pan half a pint of claret. BAKED WHITE FISH. Remove the fish and strain the gravy. W. boil up once to thicken. Dress with gravy._Taken from Mrs. diluted with a few spoonfuls of hot water. cover tightly and simmer (not boil) one-half hour. basting often with butter and water.) Clean and stuff the fish. and when the trout is laid on a suitable hot dish. and cover with bread or cracker crumbs. for fear it might clot in heating. When done have ready in a saucepan a cup of cream. This same fish boiled. to one fish two tablespoonfuls of salt. This deliciously flavored game-fish is baked precisely as shad or white fish. Garnish with sprigs of parsley. nearly cover with water._ The most delicate mode of cooking white fish. and garnish with hard-boiled eggs. season with salt and pepper. Bake for fifteen or twenty minutes. 1824. a scant tablespoonful of flour. but should be accompanied with cream gravy to make it perfect. and bake for an hour and a quarter. put it into a dripping pan with the back down. in which have been stirred cautiously two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. and serve with the fish. Place a piece of butter over each. Ferry's Cook Book. and arrange them nicely in a flat baking-dish. the pan should be buttered. Milwaukee. to the fish. It should be baked slowly. add the gravy from the dripping-pan. Prepare the fish as for broiling. and a little chopped parsley. a little butter and pepper. (Bordeaux Sauce. laying it open. pour this sauce around it. a teaspoonful of brown flour and a pinch of cayenne. previously rolled in flour. A. _Plankington House. Put it in a baking pan and add a liberal quantity of butter. TO BAKE SMELTS. served with the same cream gravy (with the exception of the fish gravy). Garnish . add to the latter a gill more of claret._ BAKED SALMON TROUT. is the proper way to cook it. also the fish. Mackinac. Heat this in a vessel set within another of boiling water.

When this thickens. put it to soak with the meat side down. to taste. Dish up the fish hot from the gridiron on a hot dish. Beat an egg light. Have ready a mixture of two tablespoonfuls of butter melted. with the flesh side downward. then turn the other side. Boiled Spanish mackerel is also very fine with most of the fish sauces. cook about thirty minutes. then drain them off. Split the fish down the back. salt and chopped parsley. not more. Broiled Spanish mackerel is excellent with other fish sauces. which should be cold. BAKED SALT MACKEREL.with fried parsley and cut lemon. dry it with a clean. Or make a cream sauce like the following: Heat a small cup of milk to scalding. Wash and clean off all the brine and salt. BROILED SPANISH MACKEREL. take out the backbone. or a few sprigs of parsley or water-cress. set in the oven and let it bake a little until brown. dry cloth. turn over the mixture and serve it while hot. in the morning rinse it in one or two waters. . Let them stand a couple of minutes. more especially "Matre d'Hotel Sauce. pour on a half teacupful of sweet cream. in cold water over night. pepper. a teaspoonful of salt. and stir one minute. pour the sauce gradually over it. over a clear fire. a tablespoonful of lemon juice. Stir into it a teaspoonful of cornstarch wet up with a little water. add a light sprinkle of pepper. Pour upon the fish. wash it in cold water. Take it carefully from the cloth. add two tablespoonfuls of butter. until it begins to brown. put them in a pan and pour on boiling water enough to cover. When the mackerel have soaked over night. some pepper. put the mixture again over the fire. Wrap each up in a cloth and put it into a kettle with considerable water." BOILED SALT MACKEREL. or rich milk. and serve it with some slices of lemon. take out the backbones and pour over a little melted butter and cream. sprinkle it lightly with salt and lay it on a buttered gridiron. and a little pepper. on the dish as a garnish. and put them in the pan with a few lumps of butter.

To a pint of meat put a little salt and pepper. taste. and continue so until the dish is full. with this exception they can be served in the same way as the salt mackerel. and fry in a little butter on a hot. thick-bottomed frying pan. and then spread a thin layer of butter on. black pepper and cinnamon. sprinkle crumbs over the top and moisten with the liquor. and a little vinegar added. wipe them dry. Serve with a little melted butter poured over. wash the shells clean. and garnish with a little parsley. a little at a time. remove from the oven. so that the steam cannot escape. After the fish has laid in salt water six hours. one-eighth cupful of allspice. Broiled ones are very nice with the same cream sauce. flour. be careful not to break the shell. changing them every two hours. or you can substitute egg sauce. Select as many salt mackerel as required. two eggs well beaten. Put the crabs into a kettle of boiling water. and throw in a handful of salt. and when it is cold it is to be cut in slices and served. Boil from twenty minutes to half an hour. . then the spices. This is a tea or lunch dish. Cut the fish in pieces and put into a half gallon stone baking-jar. and two tablespoonfuls of butter (even full). take it out. first a layer of fish. Fresh mackerel are cooked in water salted. and one teaspoonful of cloves. POTTED FRESH FISH. SCALLOPED CRABS. and fill each shell full of the mixture. Take them from the water when done and pick out all the meat. till suited. and if not enough add more. Grate in a very little nutmeg and add one spoonful of cracker or bread crumbs. and to every six pounds of fish take one-quarter cupful each of salt. then put them to soak all day in _cold_ water. cover with tightly fitting lid.FRIED SALT MACKEREL. stir all well together. wash and cleanse them well. BOILED FRESH MACKEREL. then put them into fresh water just before retiring. Fill the jar with equal parts of vinegar and water. bake five hours. roll them in flour. In the morning drain off the water.

Take one slice of sturgeon two inches thick. according to quantity. rolled out to twice the thickness of pie crust. in very hot fat. for one weighing two pounds take a tablespoonful of allspice and cloves mixed. or rather boil. thicken with one teaspoonful of butter and one teaspoonful of flour. add a teaspoonful of French mustard. Boil the bones and skin of the fish with a slice of onion and a _very_ small piece of red pepper. a saltspoonful of black pepper and the juice of half a lemon. drain. a bit of this the size of a kernel of coffee will make the sauce quite as hot as most persons like it. so as to make it air tight. these spices should be put into little bags of not too thick muslin. put alternate layers of fish. to make a smooth sauce. put sufficient salt directly upon each fish. They are eaten at breakfast or supper. POTTED FISH. roll in bread crumbs and fry. Flake up cold boiled halibut and set the plate into the steamer. half a teaspoonful of salt. FRESH STURGEON STEAK MARINADE. which serve with the fish. put it in a bowl and add a gill of vinegar. Send to the table hot. that the fish may heat without drying. over which sprinkle a little cayenne pepper. FISH IN WHITE SAUCE. Add one drop of extract of almond. Ready when cold. drain and dry on a napkin. and over this. two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. mixed together. turning it occasionally. arranged on large dishes.set in the oven till of a nice brown. . Pour this sauce over your halibut and stick bits of parsley over it. cover with the best cider vinegar. then roll in cloth. cover the jar closely with a plate. half of the marinade. Make the edges of paste. Boil this stock down to half a pint. dip it in egg. MAYONNAISE FISH. let it stand in hot water five minutes. let it stand six hours. Put the jar into a pot of cold water and let it boil from three to five hours. Beat up the yolks of two raw eggs. and by degrees. spice and sage in an earthen jar. a few minutes will do it. put a covering of dough. Take out the backbone of the fish. to adhere closely to the sides of the jar.

rock or cod). two pint bowls of whole raw peeled potatoes. Above this put a layer of pork and repeat the order given above--onions. Spread the remainder over the top. boil up and pour over the chowder. either black or cayenne. watching that the water does not sink too low. two teaspoonfuls of white sugar. put them back into the bottom of the pot with their own gravy. Serve the fish in a glass dish. Should it leave the upper layer exposed. Mix in a bowl a dressing as follows: The yolks of four boiled eggs rubbed to a smooth paste with salad oil or butter. mustard. one well-beaten egg. CODFISH BALLS. or butter. with half the dressing stirred in with it. (Rhode Island. stew gently for an hour.) Fry five or six slices of fat pork crisp in the bottom of the pot you are to make your chowder in. replenish cautiously from the boiling tea-kettle. six tablespoonfuls of vinegar. add a piece of butter the size of an egg. Take a pint bowl of codfish picked very fine. sliced thickly. pickles and stewed tomatoes with it. (This is much better than having the slices whole. to be eaten with it. FISH CHOWDER. until your materials are exhausted. Thicken the gravy with a tablespoonful of flour and about the same quantity of butter. not chop. Beat the mixture until light. seasoning (not too much). stir in lightly the frothed white of a raw egg. which have been soaked in warm water until moistened through. or whole cream crackers. Mash them with the potato masher. lastly.) Cut four pounds of fresh cod or sea-bass into pieces two inches square. a little parsley. pepper. Then a layer of split Boston. Cover the pot. and. crackers and pork. into pieces an inch in length. but cut. take them out and chop them into small pieces. put them together in plenty of cold water and boil until the potatoes are thoroughly cooked. that the guests may add if they like. take out with a perforated skimmer and put into a tureen. When the chowder is thoroughly done. Follow with a layer of chopped onions. and lay lettuce leaves (from the core of the head of lettuce) around the edges. summer savory and pepper. Serve sliced lemon.Take a pound or so of cold boiled fish (halibut. remove from the fire and drain off all the water. and lay enough of these on the pork to cover it. but not ready to break. Pour in enough cold water to barely cover all. Let the topmost layer be buttered crackers well soaked. . add to these salt. and just before pouring it over the fish.

Do not freshen the fish before boiling with the potatoes. BOILED FRESH COD. Many cooks fry them in a quantity of lard similar to boiled doughnuts. white piece of salt codfish. salt and pepper. placed on a small platter. Pick any cold fresh fish. serve in the same dish. lay it in cold water for a few minutes to soften it a little. mix. turn off this water carefully. enough to render it more easily to be picked up.) Take a thick. however. and add a pint of milk to the fish. _Hotel Brighton. boil in salted water (boiling from the first). Pick up a teacupful of salt codfish very fine and freshen--the desiccated is nice to use. into . and just before serving stir in two well-beaten eggs. when hot. STEWED CODFISH. Sew up the piece of fish in thin cloth. let it come to a boil. (Salt. two cups mashed potatoes. The eggs are an addition that could be dispensed with. or salt codfish. fitted to shape. CODFISH A LA MODE. half a cup butter. Stew five minutes longer. bake in an earthen baking dish from twenty to twenty-five minutes. or more according to quantity. a shake of pepper and a thickening of a tablespoonful of flour in enough cold milk to make a cream. put in the balls and fry a nice brown. Set it over the fire again and let it boil slowly about three minutes. put it over the fire in a stew pan with cold water. left from the dinner._ SCALLOPED FISH. as it is very good without them. covered with a fine napkin. allowing about fifteen minutes to the pound. one pint cream or milk. Carefully unwrap and pour over it warm oyster sauce. two well-beaten eggs. A whole one boiled the same.and three spoonfuls of cream or rich milk. now add a good-sized piece of butter. Put an ounce each of butter and lard into a frying pan. Flour your hands and make into balls or cakes. Shred it in very small bits. An excellent breakfast dish.

enough to make thicker than batter cakes. four eggs. then roll it in a clean cloth dredged with flour. Lay the fish in cold. a pinch of salt. and so on until the dish is full. pick it up very fine. Put the fish into boiling . bring it to a boil. stir up a batter of a pint of milk. very slowly. or a side dish for dinner. salted water half an hour before it is time to cook it. BOILED SALT CODFISH. Take a pint of milk in a suitable dish and place it in a saucepan of boiling water. Put first a layer of the minced fish. cover with cold water. with plenty of _cold_ water. turn off the water. let this boil with the fish about fifteen minutes. put into it a few slices of onion cut very fine. FISH FRITTERS. a sprinkle of white pepper. Very fine accompaniment to a good breakfast. carefully removing all the bones. then stir in two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch. Many cooks prefer soaking the fish over night. making the fish quite dry. or flour. pour off water and cover again with cold water. In the meantime. strain off this water. (New England Style. put it into a saucepan. sew up the edges in such a manner as to envelop the fish entirely. set on the back part of the stove. let it stand about four hours and simmer. and set aside to cool. Take a piece of salt codfish.) Cut the fish into square pieces. BOILED CODFISH AND OYSTER SAUCE.fine bits. Stir in the fish and fry like any fritters. let all boil up and remove from the fire. then a layer of fish again. Take a dish you wish to serve it in. yet have but _one_ thickness of cloth over any part. rubbed in a little cold milk. butter the sides and bottom. a sprig of parsley minced fine. spread cracker or bread crumbs last on the top to prevent the milk from scorching. when hot. then cover with a drawn-butter gravy and serve. and add another of cold water. then sprinkle over that some cracker or bread crumbs. one large teaspoonful of baking powder in flour. then a layer of the cream. not boil. making a nice breakfast dish. add a piece of butter as large as an egg. a pinch of salt. put the fish on a platter. This is a very good way to use up cold fish.

and let them stand two hours. and warm milk enough to make it quite soft. pepper and salt. served in a gravy boat. CODFISH STEAK. Simmer a moment. Make a sauce of drawn butter. Arrange neatly on a folded napkin. BAKED CODFISH. with two hard-boiled eggs sliced. sprinkle a little salt over them. Take six oysters to every pound of fish and scald (blanch) them in a half-pint of hot oyster liquor. fry the steaks in it to a dark brown color on both sides. pull gently on the fins. let the cream come to a boil. when cold make into croquettes. and when the pork fat is smoking hot. salmon and seasoning. pepper. . soak. cut it in steaks crosswise of the fish. add a dash of freshly ground pepper. and stir in the flour and butter. add a few whole cloves and peppers and a bit of lemon peel.) Select a medium-sized fresh codfish. and until a rich brown. three eggs. stir in one well-beaten egg. dip in beaten egg. Canned salmon can be used. Egg sauce is good with this fish. two tablespoonfuls of butter. and when they come out easily the fish is done. SALMON CROQUETTES. well-buttered Johnny Cake. or cold. one cup of cream. the same as for fish-balls. shake over a little sifted flour. rub butter over the top. Cut into dice a pound of salt fat pork. (New England Style. boiled. Put it into a buttered dish. salt. Add an equal quantity of mashed potatoes. and send to table in a sauce boat. boil one minute. and bake about thirty minutes. roll in crumbs and fry. One pound of cooked salmon (about one and a half pints when chopped). boil and pick the fish. whip into it a gill of milk containing half of a teaspoonful of flour. chopped potatoes. a bit of mace and an ounce of butter. about an inch and a half thick. garnish and serve with oyster sauce. one tablespoonful of flour. old-fashioned. fry out all the fat from them and remove the crisp bits of pork. one pint of crumbs. a large piece of butter. take out the oysters and add to the liquor. If salt fish. Squeeze over them a little lemon juice. add the oysters. put the codfish steaks in a pan of corn meal.water slightly salted. and serve with hot. dredge them with it. mix the flour and butter together. chop the salmon fine. and remove from the fire.

SHELL-FISH STEWED WATER TURTLES. Virginia. but shake it over the fire while stewing. a teaspoonful of salt. Cut the meat into pieces. the females being the best. . where the contents will keep hot but not boil. (See recipe. Move the saucepan to the back part of the stove or range. a quarter of a teaspoonful of white pepper. extract the meat. and powdered nutmeg and mace. enriched with a large lump of fresh butter. and sufficient fresh butter to stew it well. If there are no eggs in the terrapin. This is now the usual mode of dressing terrapins in Maryland. two heaping tablespoonfuls of butter and one of dry flour. they are unfit to eat. and remove carefully the sand-bag and gall. Select the largest. the same of grated nutmeg. and will be found superior to any other. to be used by those who like it. Send the terrapins to the table hot in a covered dish. and omitted by those who prefer the genuine flavor of the terrapins when simply stewed with butter. keeping the pan carefully covered. then gradually stir in a pint of cream. or from ten to fifteen minutes. and when it has almost come to a boil take it off. Let it stew till quite hot throughout. and the sauce separately in a sauce tureen. Serve hot. that none of the flavor may escape.) STEWED TERRAPIN. Wash and put them alive into boiling water. "egg balls" may be substituted. thickest and fattest. add a little salt. Stir this sauce well over the fire. and salt to taste. and many other parts of the South. stir it over the fire until it bubbles. put in a pint of terrapin meat and stir all until it is scalding hot. and put it into a stewpan with its eggs. after which take off the shell. In another pan make a sauce of beaten yolk of egg. Place in a saucepan. and a very small pinch of cayenne. also all the entrails. they should be alive when brought from market. but pour it immediately into a tureen containing a gill of good Madeira and a tablespoonful of lemon juice. and boil them until thoroughly done. OR TERRAPINS. and are no longer used in cooking terrapins for the best tables. highly flavored with Madeira or sherry. WITH CREAM. Next. a gill of currant jelly. then stir in four well-beaten yolks of eggs. do not allow the terrapin to boil after adding the eggs. a pinch of cayenne pepper.

and the tail is . the meat being coarse and tough. then remove them and let them get cold. It may readily be distinguished from the female. If boiled too long the meat will be hard and stringy. before you are ready to dish them. black and cayenne pepper. Those of the hen lobster are not so. the flesh is firmer and the shell a brighter red. Very large lobsters are not the best. If there are eggs in them put them aside in a dish. adding salt. adding the blood and juice that have flowed out in cutting up. having first brushed it and tied the claws together with a bit of twine. Then cut up the liver and all the rest of the terrapin into small pieces. _Rennert's Hotel.] OILED LOBSTER. sprinkle a little flour over them as you place them in the stewpan. Baltimore. lay it on its claws to drain. and be very careful not to break the gall. to prevent boiling. let them stew slowly ten minutes. Put a handful of salt into a large kettle or pot of boiling water. and the two uppermost fins within the tail are stiff and hard. hard boiled. add half a pint of water. then add a gill of the best brandy and half a pint of the very best sherry wine. take off the shell and outer skin. being careful to save all the blood possible in opening them. It lies within the liver. Plunge the terrapins alive into boiling water. and a very small blade of mace. add half a pint of rich cream. with flour. and then wipe it dry. let it simmer over a slow fire very gently.STEWED TERRAPIN. About ten minutes or so. When it is done take it out. which must be immediately removed or it will make the rest bitter. take all the inside out. the tail is narrower. and let them remain until the sides and lower shell begin to crack--this will take less than an hour. This recipe is for four terrapins. It is scarcely necessary to mention that the head of a lobster and what are called the lady fingers are not to be eaten. Keep it boiling from twenty minutes to half an hour. If there should be no eggs use the yolks of hens' eggs. in proportion to its size. The male is best for boiling. When the water boils very hard put in the lobster. two or three minutes before taking them off the fire peel the eggs carefully and throw them in whole._ [Illustration: BASTING THE TURKEY. and half a pound of sweet butter.

put with it not quite as much fine bread crumbs. to extract the meat. tough. stir in a heaping teaspoonful of butter. as too much cooking toughens the meat. Put on bits of butter. until the dish is filled. add a little melted butter. season with pepper. Take any of the lobster remaining from table and pound it until the dark. as they are indigestible and have caused much trouble. with just enough hot water to keep from burning. split open the body and tail and crack the claws. Lettuce and other concomitants of a salad should also be placed on the table or platter. DEVILED LOBSTER. then stir it into the saucepan. After being cooked and cooled. and which ought to boil but once before the coral is put in. on account of their coral. They should be alive and freshly caught when put into the boiling kettle. so on. Take out all the meat from a boiled lobster. Care should be exercised that none of the feathery. about two tablespoonfuls . with pepper and salt. Serve on a platter. rub the coral smooth. The dressing should be prepared before the meat is put on the fire. They are supposed to be the cause of so-called poisoning from eating lobster. alternately.broader. Butter a deep dish and cover the bottom with fine bread crumbs. SCALLOPED LOBSTER. salt and a very little cayenne pepper. gill-like particles found under the body shell get mixed with the meat. and when it boils again it is done and should be taken up at once. light meat and coral are well mixed. salt and some kind of table sauce. The sand pouch found near the throat should be removed. put on this a layer of chopped lobster. stew until well mixed and put it in a covered saucepan. cayenne. Hen lobsters are preferred for sauce or salad. LOBSTER CROQUETTES. having crumbs on top. season highly with mustard. reserving the coral. moistening with vinegar until it is thin enough to pour easily. moisten with milk and bake about twenty minutes. The head and small claws are never used.

add the yolk of one egg and two oz. roll them in egg. then in fine crumbs. place therein first a layer of the crab meat. form into egg-shaped or round balls. to the thickness of cream. and save the other half to sauce them with after they are baked. and so . and cover it with a paste. set it to cool. cut your cover in two. squeeze in a lemon. have the baking pan well buttered. melted in saucepan. butter. shrimps or prawns the same way. and fry in boiling lard. with a little butter. and they are all proper for plates or little dishes for a second course. Mix with the contents of a can of crabs. cut up in pieces about as large as a hickory nut. and warm these over the fire enough to melt the butter. Put in the same pan with a piece of butter size of a walnut. Put to the lobster the bigness of an egg of butter. Take one whole lobster. Cream sauce for above is made as follows: 1 oz. LOBSTER PATTIES. when it is baked. flour. Cut some boiled lobster in small pieces. with a few bread crumbs. so that what is under may be seen. or sieve.if the bread is rather dry. 2 oz. to the thickness of a cream. bake it within three-quarters of an hour before you want it. then a layer of the minced ham. Pepper and salt the whole to taste. thin down to proper consistency with boiling cream. Chicago. then take the small claws and the spawn._ BAKED CRABS. _Rector's Oyster House. prepared as above. and jam them to a paste with a potato masher. mince some cold ham. a little pepper and salt. two inches distant. put them in a suitable dish. cut up your cover. bread crumbs or pounded crackers. and thicken with heavy cream sauce. You may bake crawfish. and lay it on the top. then put in your lobster. set it over the fire and boil. and sheet your patty pan or a plate or dish with good puff paste. season with salt and pepper to taste. Now add to them a ladleful of gravy or broth. LOBSTER A LA NEWBURG. mixed with butter. of sherry wine. and warm up the other half of your sauce above mentioned. with a little squeezed lemon. strain it through a strainer. and put half of it to your lobsters. and pour it over your patty.

and bake. They make a fine dish when stewed. Boil them for a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes. according to the size. sprinkle bread crumbs over the tops. pepper. (Soft Shell. CRAB CROQUETTES. along with some salt.on. Half a dozen fresh crabs. A crab shell will hold the meat of two crabs. and put them in boiling water. salt and melted butter. egg and bread. a handful at a time. Half the quantity can be made. DEVILED CRABS. Put all this into the shell and brown in a hot oven. alternately until the pan is filled. Add two or three well-beaten eggs to bind the mixture. Work the butter to a light cream. pepper and salt. two ounces of butter. put three small pieces of butter upon the top of each. a tablespoonful of cream and crumbs. TO MAKE A CRAB PIE. garnish the dish with the claws laid around it. then stir in very carefully. Form the croquettes. crumb them and fry them delicately in boiling lard. and mix it with crumbs of bread. one small teaspoonful of mustard powder. . Put the meat into a bowl and mix carefully with it an equal quantity of fine bread crumbs. put it into a saucepan with butter. A crab shell will hold the meat of two crabs. the mixed crabs. Chop all together. Season to taste with pepper. CRABS. Pick the meat of boiled crabs and chop it fine. cayenne pepper and salt to taste. It is better to use a wire frying basket for croquettes of all kinds. and brown them quickly in a hot oven. When cold pick the meat from the claws and body. boiled and minced. Season to taste with cayenne pepper and salt. a pinch of mace and a very little water. Take out the meat from the shell. fill the crab shells with the mixture. They will puff in baking and will be found very nice. Procure the crabs alive. then stiffen it slightly with bread or cracker crumbs. Moisten it well with rich milk or cream.) Crabs may be boiled as lobsters. dredge with flour and let simmer five minutes over a slow fire. Cover the top with bread crumbs and bits of butter. salt. and a little butter. Serve hot. mix the mustard well with it.

prepare them the same as frying fish. The small ones. pepper and salt to taste. fritters. and put the oysters in a batter. OYSTERS FRIED IN BATTER. Fry a nice brown and garnish with parsley. hot lard. OYSTERS. Oysters must be fresh and fat to be good. Serve them crisp and hot. Make some lard hot in a deep frying pan. add the milk gradually. Scald the oysters in their own liquor. They are in season from September to May. _Ingredients. the largest of this sort are nice for frying or pickling for family use._ Some prefer to roll oysters in corn meal and others use flour. and then a few bread crumbs should be . turning them on both sides by sliding a broad-bladed knife under them. Take large oysers from their own liquor into a thickly folded napkin to dry them. also the sand bag. such as are sold by the quart. until it will take up no more. Place them in the hot grease and fry them a delicate brown.The usual way of cooking them is frying them in plenty of butter and lard mixed. a little nutmeg. or stews. Break the eggs into a basin. when liked. but they are much more crisp with egg and cracker crumbs. then dip each one into egg and cracker crumbs rolled fine. FRIED OYSTERS. Season the oysters with pepper and salt. take them up with a sharp pointed skewer and dish them on a napkin. _Boston Oyster House. one-half pint of milk. sufficient flour to make the batter. beard them. when done. mix the flour with them. then make hot an ounce each of butter and lard in a thick-bottomed frying pan. and lay them on a cloth to drain thoroughly. Fried oysters are frequently used for garnishing boiled fish. with nutmeg and seasoning. The spongy substance from the sides should be taken off. two eggs. put in the oysters one at a time._--One-half pint of oysters. are good for pies.

PLAIN OYSTER STEW. DRY OYSTER STEW. If thickening is preferred. using only oyster liquor and water instead of milk or cream. stirring constantly. adding more butter after taking up. Serve with oyster or cream crackers.) Drain the liquor from two quarts of oysters. Serve in hot soup plates or bowls. Take six to twelve large oysters and cook them in half a pint of their own liquor. OYSTER SOUP. add a little salt and pepper and set it over the fire in a saucepan. and when they "ruffle" add two tablespoonfuls of butter. STEWED OYSTERS. fry in butter over a slow fire for about ten minutes. cook for five minutes. Let it boil up once.added to the flour. put in a pint of boiling milk and take the saucepan from the fire. cover the hollow of a hot platter with tomato sauce. For oyster soup. _Boston Oyster House. Serve while hot. _Fulton Market. Same as milk or cream stew. The instant it is melted and well stirred in. put in the oysters. but not covering. place the oysters in it. garnished with chopped parsley sprinkled over the oysters._ BOSTON FRY. New York. mix with it a small teacupful of hot water. stir in a little flour or two tablespoonfuls of cracker crumbs. see SOUPS. (In Milk or Cream. let them come to a boil. season with butter and white pepper._ . Prepare the oysters in egg batter and fine cracker meal.

shells and all. wash and wipe them. and salt. or not. dip each in melted butter well peppered. Serve at once while hot. salt . pepper and a heaping spoonful of butter. Serve on buttered toast. If the oysters are fine. put them in a shallow pan and place in a steamer over boiling water. No. being careful to save all the juice in the other. over or on live coals. Put one quart of oysters in a basin with their own liquor and let them boil three or four minutes. OYSTER ROAST. and place with the upper or deep shell down. those usually termed "Saddle Rocks. season with a little salt. about fifteen to twenty minutes. with the edges ruffled. Dry a quart of oysters in a cloth. Wash and drain a quart of counts or select oysters." formerly known as a distinct variety. the style. laying them the upper shell downward. then in bread or cracker crumbs also peppered. Place this dish or vessel over a pot of boiling water where they will get the steam. Broil on a wire broiler over live coals three to five minutes. with butter. Select the large ones. then in beaten egg. _par excellence_. STEAMED OYSTERS. remove the shallow one. ROAST OYSTERS IN THE SHELL. 1. Serve hot. Wash and place them in an air-tight vessel. so that the liquor will not run out when they open. 2. but which are now but the large oysters selected from any beds. and they are just cooked enough and served hot. to catch the juice. Place to a heated dish. pepper. place them. Boil them rapidly until the shells open. _Baltimore Style_ STEAMED OYSTERS IN THE SHELL. No. but no longer.BROILED OYSTERS. and serve. and send to the table hot to be seasoned by each person with butter and pepper to taste. Dip over each a little melted butter. When they open their shells. cover and steam till they are plump. on a hot platter. this is. seasoned with butter.

or more if required. round the slices to fit patty-pans. Serve in patty pans. put in over them a little oyster liquor. butter. cook till the beards are ruffled. half a pint of large oysters. 1. good-sized oysters. replace. the slow cooking bringing out the flavor. and place in the oven. then fry in butter and lard._ PAN OYSTERS. according to fire. toast. and put a small piece of butter on top of each pan. remove the cover. first moistened with the hot juice from the pan. 2. place on the toast a layer of oysters. New Orleans. Cut some stale bread into thin slices. Envelope an oyster in a spoonful of this batter (some cut them in halves or chop them fine). Send to the table very hot. and flour enough to make batter like griddle-cakes. Lay in a thin pie tin or dripping-pan. Are a very good substitute for oysters roasted in the shell. Select plump.and pepper. _Delmonico. and cook one minute longer. sprinkle lightly with salt. place them in the pans and moisten with three or four teaspoonfuls of oyster liquor. turning to fry brown on both sides. They will cook in seven or eight minutes if the oven is hot. or. drain off the juice. four well-beaten eggs. have the pan large enough so that each oyster will lie flat on the bottom. _French Restaurant. _New York Style._ . They are delicious. take them up and place on toast. place them carefully in a hot oven and just heat them through thoroughly--do not bake them--which will be in three to five minutes. PAN OYSTERS. taking off all the crust. mixed in a frying pan the same as we fry eggs. covering tightly. place all the pans in a baking-pan. La. and to a cup of this juice add a cup of milk. but not enough to float. No._ OYSTER FRITTERS. a little salt. sprinkle with pepper. No.

Line patty-pans with thin pastry. Remove the oysters for one minute from the fire. OYSTER PATTIES. Cover them with paste and brush them over with the white of an egg. Take nine large oysters out of the shell. in a quantity of hot lard. and then pour half a pint of oyster liquor and half a pint of milk into the flour and butter. dry and roast over a charcoal fire. but this is not always convenient. Butter a deep earthen . and to make the patty cases hot before you fill them. and bake in a quick oven fifteen to twenty minutes. glaze this also with egg. Remove the bread or paper when half cold. Put two tablespoonfuls of butter and two of flour into a thick saucepan. This is served for one person when calling for a roast of this kind. wash. place on the centre of each. on a broiler.) Stir till it is a thick. (If you have cream use it instead of milk. Take them off quickly. FULTON MARKET ROAST. Two minutes after the shells open they will be done. Fill the patties with this oyster fricassee. Have ready about a pint of fine cracker crumbs. Cut an inch square of thin pastry. pressing it well to the tin. saving the juice in a small shallow.Most cooks fry oyster fritters the same as crullers. Cut each in four and strain the liquor. stir them together over the fire till the flour smells cooked. Scald as many oysters as you require (allowing two for each patty. taking care to make it hot by standing in boiling water before dinner on the day required. butter them and sprinkle with pepper. It is often poured over a slice of toast. SCALLOPED OYSTERS. tin pan. then stir the eggs into them till the sauce looks like thick custard. Put the oysters into it and let them boil once. keep hot until all are done. Beat the yolks of two eggs. smooth sauce. three if small) in their own liquor. either way they are excellent. Put a piece of bread or a ball of paper in each. It is still known in New York from the place at which it was and is still served.

Beat up an egg in a cup of milk and turn over all. Some prefer baking the upper crust on a pie plate. S. I. a generous piece of butter. then add another layer of cracker crumbs and oyster juice. Have ready nice light biscuit dough. pepper. next have a layer of oysters. line it with puff paste. cover closely. rolled twice as thick as pie crust. and so on. until the dish is full. drop them into the boiling stew. salt and butter. A nice side _entree_. wet this with some of the oyster liquor. drain the liquor into a pan and put the oysters into a stewpan with barely enough of the liquor to keep them from burning. While the paste is baking. stir the oysters into the juice and serve all together in one dish. Remove the upper crust of pastry and fill the dish with the oysters and gravy. uncover the top. thicken with flour and cold milk. cut out into inch squares. sprinkle with salt and pepper. then slipping it off on top of the pie after the same pie is filled with the oysters. Having buttered the inside of a _deep_ pie plate.dish. _Prince's Bay. let the oysters simmer. set it into the oven and bake the paste well. set on the upper grate and brown. When taken up. and cook forty minutes. remove the lid and take out the towel. Scald a quart can of oysters in their own liquor. Replace the cover and serve hot. when done. and one or two crackers rolled fine. OYSTER POT-PIE. or common pie crust. the same size as the pie. as that will shrivel them. the top layer to be cracker crumbs. put a clean towel into the dish (folded so as to support the lid). Having picked off carefully every bit of shell that may be found about them. salt and butter. put a layer of the cracker crumbs on the bottom. add a little sweet cream or milk._ BOSTON OYSTER PIE. season well with salt and pepper. and prepare another sheet of paste for the lid. when it boils. but _not boil_. When baked through. Cover the dish and set it in the oven for thirty or forty-five minutes. then oysters. To the liquor add a pint of hot water. skim out the oysters and set them aside in a warm place. and lay small bits of butter upon them. prepare the oysters. . season them with pepper.

or until the top is nicely browned. or enough to cover the bottom. while green and tender. sweet marjoram. Take a slice of raw ham. and add to it gradually some of the hot broth. a little chopped parsley. When placed upon the table. which has been pickled. and soak in boiling water for half an hour. . butter it. skim well and add one scant tablespoon of cornstarch. Grate the corn. one small onion._ STEWED CLAMS. stir constantly. and then boil rapidly for two or three minutes. _Boston Oyster House. but not smoked. after which. and fry a light brown on both sides. and add them to the corn. and remove the oysters to a deep dish. mixed smoothly in one-third cup of milk. For each pie take a tin plate half the size of an ordinary dinner plate. season with salt. spread over this an egg batter. the liquor from a quart of oysters. well strained. In taste. when cooked. into a deep dish. and. making small openings in it with a fork. cut it in quite small pieces. let them simmer for twenty minutes. butter them and season with a little salt and plenty of pepper. beat the whites and yolks separately. stir it into the pan. beat one egg. FRICASSEED OYSTERS. as for pies. Drop spoonfuls of this batter into a frying pan with hot butter and lard mixed. The corn _must_ be _young_. Small Oyster Pies. and cover the bottom with a puff paste. and when it boils add the oysters and one ounce of butter. with a coarse grater. and pour the whole over the oysters. squeeze the juice of a lemon over it. allow one egg. lay on it five or six select oysters. and pepper. with one tablespoonful of wheat flour and one of butter. and cover with a crust of the paste. For two ears of corn. Bake in a hot oven fifteen to twenty minutes.MOCK OYSTERS. minced fine. a teaspoonful of salt and pepper to taste. just let it come to a boil. and put in a saucepan with two-thirds of a pint of veal or chicken broth. they have a singular resemblance to fried oysters.

beat the batter until it is smooth and perfectly free from lumps. cut each in two. _Rye Beach. uneatable "fringe" from each with strong. put a pint bowl of wheat flour into a basin. Boil a pint of milk. if large. wash the clams very thoroughly and put them in a pot with half a pint of water. Or. fry out the pork very gently. Now add the clams. lay them on a thickly-folded napkin. as soon as the shells open take out the clams. Take fifty small or twenty-five large sand clams from their shells. if you desire) of potatoes cut into eighths or sixteenths of original size. or. and put over the fire. pepper well and thicken the gravy with flour stirred into melted butter. the same of onions finely chopped. when the shells are open they are done. half a pint of sweet milk and nearly as much of their own liquor. put them into a stewpan with the broth from the pot. ROAST CLAMS IN THE SHELL. or in a hot oven. let them fry gently." on hot stones. cut off the hard. when one side is a delicate brown turn the other. when they open. pile them in a large iron pot. clean scissors. Longer boiling will make the clams almost indigestible._ CLAM FRITTERS. Put plenty of lard or beef fat into a thick-bottomed frying pan. with half a cupful of hot water in the bottom. and boil slowly till they are quite tender. add the clams.Wash clean as many round clams as required. then stir in the clams. The materials needed are fifty round clams (quahogs). you may get two dozen freshly opened _very_ small clams. a dash of white pepper and a small pat of butter. saving all the clam water for the chowder. Roast in a pan over a hot fire. a large bowl of salt pork cut up fine. add to it three well-beaten eggs. CLAM CHOWDER. and when the scraps are a good brown take them out and put in the chopped onions to . and the same (or more. let it become boiling hot. Let them come to a boil and serve. put in the batter by the spoonful. at a "Clam Bake. with butter. empty the juice into a saucepan. pepper and a very little salt. then take them from the shells and chop fine.

season. Ask the dealer to open the first dozen. care being used not to injure the shells. Purchase a dozen large soft clams in the shell and three dozen opened clams. strew over the top a thin layer of cracker dust. and bake in the oven until brown. add the potatoes. FROGS FRIED. add to each a dash of white pepper. the same as oysters. and half a teaspoonful of minced celery.) Add a quart of hot water to the onions. add four of these to each shell. Clean them well. With the addition of six sliced tomatoes. add more water. or half a can of the canned ones. which are to be used in cooking the clams. SCALLOPED CLAMS. and add a quart of fresh milk. . Frog are usually fried. (The chief secret in chowder-making is to fry the onions so delicately that they will be missing in the chowder. Some prefer them stewed the same as oysters. and are considered a great delicacy. Cut a slice of fat bacon into the smallest dice.fry. thicken it with a cup of powdered crackers. this is the best recipe of this kind. Clean the shells well. and put two soft clams on each half shell. Dip them in beaten egg and fry in the same manner as oysters. Just before it is taken up. _New Bedford Recipe_. No seasoning is needed but good black pepper. SCALLOPS. and is served in many of our best restaurants. If too rich. or the chowder will burn. and when they are cooked. place a piece of table butter on top. They are delightful when properly prepared. After it boils. they should be fried in a frying pan. Only the hind-legs and quarters are used. clam-water and pork scraps. and fry in egg batter. If bought in the shell boil them and take out the hearts. and the chowder kettle be made very clean before they are put in it. or dip in beaten egg and fine cracker crumbs. which is the only part used. the chowder is finished. put in the clams.

FROGS STEWED. shake over them a tablespoonful of sifted flour and stir it into them. The body should be thick and the breast fat. and the surest way to determine whether they are young is to try the skin under the leg or wing. and the eyes full and bright. Young pigeons have light red flesh upon the breast. and fry about two minutes. the legs smooth. it is young. with light. The wings of good ducks. a bay leaf. When poultry is young the skin is thin and tender. the feet moist and limber. the game has been hung a long time. fresh-colored and brittle beaks. POULTRY AND GAME In choosing poultry. the flesh of the breast is firm and plump and the skin clear. and the flesh is purplish where it shows under the skin on the legs and back. three slices of onion. if it is dark and discolored. lay in the frogs. Old turkeys have long hairs. Now put into a stewpan two ounces of butter. drain them. If it is easily broken. tender flesh. remove the legs. if the joint yields readily. Fine game birds are always heavy for their size. pheasants and woodcock are tender to the touch. leg-joints which will break by the weight of the bird. semi-transparent fat. fresh-colored legs. turn the wing backwards. put the legs in a suitable dish. pour over the gravy and serve. the tips of the long wing feathers of partridges are pointed in young birds and . when the legs are thin and the breast very dark the birds are old. soft breast bone. add a sprig of parsley. stirring them to prevent burning. strain and mix into the gravy the yolks of two eggs. and windpipes that break when pressed between the thumb and forefinger. a pinch of powdered summer savory. a cup of hot water and one of cream. it is tender. They are best in fall and winter. the flesh of freshly-killed birds will be fat and fresh-colored. When it is melted. and full. geese. Wash and skin the quarters. salt and pepper. Boil gently until done. parboil them about three minutes. and if a few feathers be plucked from the inside of the leg and around the vent. select those that are fresh and fat. About March they deteriorate in quality. or. Young ducks and geese are plump. well beaten to a cream.

add a teaspoonful of baking soda. take strips of cloth. Soda. and destroys that unpleasant taste which we frequently experience in the dressing when fowls have been killed for . then pluck off the feathers. being very careful not to break any of the internal organs. but it should be picked and drawn as soon as possible. thereby retaining the aroma and essences by absorption while confined. say to a quart of water. Quail. then "draw" it nicely. remove the crop carefully. taking care not to tear the skin. being cleansing. Poultry may be baked so that its wings and legs are soft and tender. and also various kinds of game. until the flavor of them diffuses itself all through the meat. and it is a great improvement on the old plan. or even just rub them over with lard. require a more thorough cleansing than those sold in country places. These pans are a recent innovation. when it is picked clean. and are made double with a small opening in the top for giving vent to the accumulation of steam and gases when required. The head. acts as a corrective. dip them into a little melted lard. remove all the feathers carefully. In large cities they lay for some length of time with the intestines undrawn. and in next to the last water. This process neutralizes all sourness. Roast meats of any kind can also be cooked in the same manner. Poultry should never be cooked until six or eight hours after it has been killed. and a string tied tightly around the body. cut off the head. When roasting a chicken or small fowl there is danger of the legs browning or becoming too hard to be eaten. where as a general thing the meat is wholly dressed. set fire to it and singe off all the hairs. especially if it is not freshly killed. and in the next to the last. Now rinse the inside of the turkey out with several waters. Fowls. Plunge it in a pot of scalding hot water. singe it over a burning newspaper on the top of the stove. it is safe. neck and feet should be cut off. Select a young turkey. roll up a piece of white paper. and wind them around the legs. when bought at our city markets. mix a teaspoonful of baking soda. snipe and small birds should have full.round in old ones. oftentimes the inside of a fowl is very sour. and the ends of the legs skewered to the body. after taking out the intestines. To avoid this. by being placed in a deep roasting pan with close cover. to rinse out in several waters. tender breasts. Remove them in time to allow the legs to brown delicately. and helps to destroy all unpleasant taste in the meat. rendering it distasteful. and tie the neck close to the body by drawing the skin over it. ROAST TURKEY. In this case.

gizzard and liver to the liquor in which they were stewed. and set in the oven. rub the inside with some salt. When all is pressed dry. put it into a suitable dish and pour tepid water (not warm. return the chopped heart. as it soaks very quickly. as you go along. liver and gizzard into a stewpan with a pint of water._--When you put the turkey in to roast. for that makes it heavy) over it. when well incorporated with the other ingredients. thin slices of ham. put the neck. or the green herb minced fine. chop the heart and gizzard. toss it all up lightly through your fingers. dredge with a little flour. having first skimmed off the fat from the surface of the dripping-pan. also parsley. heart. inside and out. rub it over with a little soft butter. with a clean cloth. DRESSING OR STUFFING FOR FOWLS. this process makes it very light. mash the liver and throw away the neck. fried sausages. boil three minutes and thicken with flour. The garnishes for turkey or chicken are fried oysters. Now. or force meat balls. with the addition of a few slices of onion chopped fine. _Gravy for Turkey. the same amount of sage. add half a cup of melted butter. let it stand one minute. placing it. the bird is done. Now take up a handful at a time and squeeze it hard and dry with both hands. For an eight or ten pound turkey. tie the legs and wings to the body. set it all over the fire. in another dish. slices of lemon. and it is ready for dressing either fowls. For geese and ducks the stuffing may be made the same as for turkey. or not. then stuff the breast and body with "Dressing for Fowls. If any part is likely to scorch. A fifteen pound turkey requires between three and four hours to bake. Work thoroughly all together. turning it around occasionally so that every part will be uniformly baked. Baste the turkey often. boil until they become quite tender. wipe the turkey dry. When pierced with a fork and the liquid runs out perfectly clear. and a beaten egg." Then sew up the turkey with a strong thread.some time. place it in a dripping-pan. pin over it a piece of buttered white paper. A little chopped sausage in turkey dressing is considered by some an improvement. . pour in a cup of boiling water. cut the brown crust from slices or pieces of stale bread until you have as much as the inside of a pound loaf. Serve with cranberry sauce. sprinkle over some salt and pepper. and when the turkey is done it should be added to the gravy that dripped from the turkey. fish or meats. salt--about a teaspoonful--also a teaspoonful of powdered summer savory. take them out of the water. set it to one side. after washing. now add pepper. It will not need brown flour to color the gravy.

This is used mostly with boiled turkey and chicken. when _used_ for stuffings or for puddings. place in salted boiling water with the breast downward. Prepare as you would for baking or roasting. TURKEY SCALLOP. either milk or water. Some roll the turkey in a cloth dipped in flour. made as the above. These recipes were obtained from an old colored cook. fill with an oyster stuffing. Boil a nicely pickled piece of salt pork. sprinkle with pepper and salt. The liquor can be saved and made into a nice soup for the next day's dinner. BOILED TURKEY. and serve at table a thin slice to each plate. as they were much lighter. and so on until the dish is nearly full. _always_ soak stale bread in _cold_ liquid. but not till the skin breaks. If the liquor is to be used afterwards for soup. remove the plate and let it brown. with the exception of half a can of oysters drained and slightly chopped and added to the rest. Put a layer of bread crumbs on the bottom of a buttered dish. two tablespoonfuls of milk. by adding the same seasoning as for chicken soup. served generally in a separate dish. skim it often and boil about two hours. Ten minutes before serving. and cut small pieces of butter over the top. then take two eggs. a little salt and cracker crumbs as much as will make it thick enough to spread on with a knife. This is made with the same ingredients as the above. the cloth imparts an unpleasant flavor. and his advice was. one of melted butter. who was famous for his fine dressing for fowls. put bits of butter over it. add a little hot water to the gravy left from the turkey and pour over it. to be dipped out as a person desires. Some prefer bacon or ham instead of pork. moisten them with a little milk.OYSTER DRESSING OR STUFFING. Tie the legs and wings close to the body. . Pick the meat from the bones of cold turkey and chop it fine. and the remainder of the can of oysters used to make an oyster sauce to be poured over the turkey when served. then put in a layer of turkey with some of the filling. then another layer of bread crumbs. Serve with oyster or celery sauce. Hot liquid makes them heavy. fish and meats. and cover with a plate. Bake three-quarters of an hour.

dredge in a little flour. if you have any. . Season with salt. run the knife down each side of the breast bone and up the legs. or white stock. and preserving the skin whole. Have already made the following gravy to pour over all:-Into the frying pan put a large spoonful of butter. and pass the knife down close to the bone. let the liquor thus prepared boil up once. surround it with pieces of small thick slices of bread or biscuit halved. This is a difficult dish to attempt by any but skillful hands. then place the platter in a warm oven with the door open. then take out the bones. give it one boil-up. until the quart is reduced to a pint. BONED TURKEY. pepper and add a little of the dark meat chopped _very_ fine. to make it the consistency of cream. TURKEY WARMED OVER. and serve with tomato sauce. Cut the remnants of turkey from a previous dinner into pieces of equal size. keeping close to the bone. one or two cupfuls of milk. Carve across in slices. and serve in a hot dish. then split the back half way up. Clean the fowl as usual. With a sharp and pointed knife. begin at the extremity of the wing. place it on a warm platter. Some like a glass of port wine in the gravy. basting often with salt and water. Let the sauce cook a few moments. wet in a little cold milk or water. Lard with two or three rows of slips of fat bacon on the top. and any gravy that may be left over. Boil the bones in a quart of water. restoring the fowl to its natural form. then put in the pieces of turkey. and to the liquor in which they were boiled add turkey gravy. This will be found a really nice dish. and draw out the bones. fill the places whence the bones were taken with a stuffing. then add sufficient flour. or a small piece of butter with salt and pepper. first dipping them in hot salted water. then pour over the biscuit and fowl. and sew up all the incisions made in the skin. cutting all the flesh from the bone. Pieces of cold turkey or chicken may be warmed up with a little butter in a frying pan. and a little butter.TURKEY HASHED. Bring it to a boil.

take it up. and baste frequently with salt and water (some add vinegar). baste frequently. as for roasting. turn often so that the sides and back may be nicely browned. adding a little soda to the last but one to sweeten it. wash out well in two or three waters. English style. bring to a boil and serve. hearts and gizzards chopped small. half an hour will roast a full grown chicken. thicken with a little flour and butter rubbed together. black pepper and salt. baste again. gizzards. strain it and mix it hot with the gravy that has dripped from the fowls. or part butter and part salt pork. pour off the fat. Baste a floured cloth around each and put into a pot with enough boiling water to cover them well. and to the brown gravy left add the chopped giblets which have previously been stewed until tender. together with the water they were boiled in. and the fatter the more tender and juicy the meat. Or. ROAST CHICKEN." Lay it in a dripping-pan. Thicken it with a little browned flour. and a small teaspoonful of pepper. Do not stuff very full. add to it a small tablespoonful of salt. put the giblets in the pan with the chicken and let them roast. add to it the livers. Cranberry sauce should accompany them. and which must be first skimmed. livers and hearts in a very little water. Clean. wash and stuff. and fill the crop and body with a stuffing the same as "Dressing for Fowls. if the fire is right. Stuff with the following mixture: Three pints of bread crumbs. Dry it well with a clean cloth. and let it roast quickly. baste with it. or any tart sauce. Send the fowls to the table with the gravy in a boat. Bake two hours or more. . one teaspoonful each of sage. When done. and stitch openings firmly together to keep flavor in and fat out. put a pint of hot water and a piece of butter in the dripping-pan. dredge a little flour over. when nearly done. without scorching. The goose should not be more than eight months old. Pick and draw them. Having stewed the necks.ROAST GOOSE. if there is doubt as to its being fresh. six ounces of butter. one chopped onion. when it melts. and let it finish. when done take from the pan. put a piece of butter the size of a large egg to the water in the pan. Place in a baking pan with a little water. BOILED CHICKEN.

Cut up two young chickens. a piece of butter as large as an egg. when done. Dress a full-grown spring chicken the same as for roasting. The broth will not be so rich as if the fowls are put on in cold water. and a little celery. (See SAUCES. FRICASSEE CHICKEN. Cover closely and let them heat very slowly. seasoning it with salt and pepper inside and out. STEWED WHOLE SPRING CHICKEN. If they are old chickens they will require long.The hot water cooks the skin at once and prevents the escape of the juice. When tender. The egg should be added to a little of the cooled gravy before putting with the hot gravy. then pour the gravy into a saucepan. and some cooks add nutmeg or celery salt. or until tender. for the first half hour especially. season with salt and pepper. cover and steam an hour and a half. then fill the body with oysters. Set the pail in a pot of fast-boiling water and cook until the chicken is tender. often from three to four hours. The dressing is made as follows: Boil one pint of gravy from the kettle without the fat. let all boil up one minute. guiding yourself by size and toughness. then cut up. bread or oyster sauce. Boil an hour or more. Dish up the chicken on a warm dish. Serve with egg. Stew very slowly. keep hot while dressing is prepared. arrange the chicken on a warm platter. and serve with the dressing over it. add cayenne pepper and half a teaspoonful of salt. arrange on the platter.) STEAMED CHICKEN. put into it a tablespoonful of butter. place it in a tin pail with a close-fitting cover. then stew them over an hour. Stir up two tablespoonfuls of flour in a little water or milk and add to the stew. if liked. place in a steamer in a kettle that will keep it as near the water as possible. Rub the chicken on the inside with pepper and half a teaspoonful of salt. Cornstarch may be used instead of the flour. slow boiling. put them in a stewpan with just enough cold water to cover them. pour some of the gravy over it and send the rest to the table in a boat. half a cupful of . but this is a proof that the meat will be more nutritious and better flavored. also two well-beaten yolks of eggs. stir a tablespoonful of flour into a quarter of a pint of cream until smooth and add to the gravy.

three hard-boiled eggs chopped fine. Let all boil up and then pour it over the chicken. press down the . cold ham. Mix them well. Mince up finely the remains of a cold chicken together with half the quantity of lean. Then drain them well and serve immediately on a napkin. it is good for luncheon at any time. Season it with pepper and salt. Cut the paste into pieces. CHICKEN PATTIES. add spices if preferred. A minute or two will be sufficient for this. frog them by cutting the cords under the wings and laying the wings out flat. After dressing and washing the chickens as previously directed. Put two or three tiny pieces of butter over each. RISSOLES OF CHICKEN. either roasted or boiled. pressing the edges neatly together and forming them into little rolls. fill scalloped shells that are lined with pastry with the mixture. split them open through the backbone. Now have light paste rolled out until about a quarter of an inch or a little more in thickness. cut the sinews under the second joint of the leg and turn the leg down. put meat in a stone jar and pour over it three pints of cold. TO BROIL CHICKEN. and it will be ready for use in two days. one inch by two in size. and fry until they become a golden-brown color. Boil four chickens till tender enough for meat to fall from bones. some minced herbs and a tablespoonful of flour.cream or rich milk. or other frying medium. Moisten it with chicken gravy or cream sauce. Mince up fine cold chicken. good cider vinegar and a pint and a half of the water in which the chickens were boiled. adding enough white sauce to moisten them. and bake brown in a hot oven. Serve hot. and sprinkle bread crumbs over the tops. and lay a little of the mixture upon the centres of half of the pieces and cover them with the other halves. and a little minced parsley and onion. This is a popular Sunday evening dish. PICKLED CHICKEN. Have your frying pan ready with plenty of boiling hot lard.

and cover with a crust a quarter of an inch thick. Garnish the top with small bright celery leaves. the chicken must be closely watched while broiling. Pour over the gravy. CHICKEN PIE. Add the rest of the chicken and season as before. take out the largest bones. FRIED CHICKEN. Brush over the top with beaten white of egg and bake for half to three-quarters of an hour. that the heat may be reduced. A broiled chicken brought to the table with its wings and legs burnt. Serve with poached eggs on a separate dish. seasoned. throw the bones away. and the gravy thickened. or dip each piece in beaten egg and then . pepper and salt. Garnish with parsley. a few new potatoes in their season might be added. Wash and cut up a young chicken. take it from the fire. put the gridiron over a slow fire. but not scorched. then turn and proceed in the same manner with the other side. wipe it dry. putting a large lump of butter and a tablespoonful of hot water upon the plate. to keep it flat.breast-bone without breaking it. a quarter of an inch thick. The chicken should be perfectly cooked. put in part of the chicken. a few lumps of butter. is very disagreeable. season with salt and pepper. made with a hole in the centre the size of a teacup. neatly arranged in a circle. lay it upon the gridiron with the inside first to the fire. and turning the chicken two or three times that it may absorb as much of the butter as possible. put a little ashes on the fire under that part. When the chicken is stewed tender. and its breast half cooked. some cold boiled eggs cut in slices. let it broil ten minutes. and place a tin sheet and weight upon the chicken. and the fire must be arranged so that the heat shall be equally dispensed. being sure to have enough to fill the dish. Dish a broiled chicken on a hot plate. When the fire is too hot under any one part of the chicken. line the sides of a four or six quart pudding-dish with a rich baking powder or soda biscuit dough. if needed. dredge it with flour. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. scrape the meat from the neck and backbone. To avoid this. It takes from thirty to forty minutes to broil a chicken well. Prepare the chicken as for fricassee.

then fry brown in plenty of butter in a thick-bottomed frying pan. a large tablespoonful of flour. CHICKEN CROQUETTES. or use an equal quantity of both. tender chickens. add an equal quantity of smoothly mashed potatoes. FRIED CHICKEN A LA ITALIENNE. a bit of minced onion or parsley. some minced parsley. Cut up young. 1. mix. instead of the cream or milk. Some like chopped parsley added to the gravy. one cup of fine bread crumbs. or like fried cakes in plenty of hot lard. and when it boils add a lump of butter as large as an egg. No. dry them well and dip each piece in the batter. dip in flour or cracker crumb and egg. dip in egg and bread crumbs and fry a light . Take any kind of fresh meat or fowl. boil up and pour over the chicken. put into a stewpan with a little water and simmer gently till tender. and fry as above. round. chop very fine. if not too much. Stir into the gravy left. CHICKEN CROQUETTES. dip in egg and bread crumbs and fry like fish cakes in butter and good sweet lard mixed. half a teaspoonful of pepper. make it smooth. Flour your hands and make into small. Use the broth the chicken was cooked in to make the gravy. salt and pepper. 2. and season with butter.in cracker crumbs. a little prepared mustard. remove from the fire. set it over the fire. flat cakes. drain it and set aside in a covered dish. Serve with tomato sauce. Serve hot. one onion chopped. Take them up with a skimmer and lay them on brown paper to free them from the grease. in which has been mixed a tablespoonful of flour. make into cakes. either roasted or boiled. Lay in the chicken and fry brown on both sides. Put a cup of cream or milk in a saucepan. If the chicken is old. beat up two eggs and work in with the whole. Lastly. mix into it a cupful of chopped tomatoes. and a little cayenne pepper. No. salt. add a cup of cream or milk. and when cool mix into it a teaspoonful of salt. season with salt and pepper. Serve hot. and a pint of finely-chopped cooked chicken. black pepper. Make common batter. Take up. Let it boil up thick. Have in a frying pan one ounce each of butter and sweet lard made boiling hot. season with salt and pepper.

Remove the bones and gristle. even slices. season them well with salt and pepper. placing a platter on the top. spread the crumbs on a large plate or pie-tin. TO FRY CROQUETTES. and a heavy weight on the platter. then turn it back into the stew-kettle. All kinds of poultry and meat can be cooked quicker by adding to the water in which they are boiled a little vinegar or a piece of lemon. . roll enough crackers until you have a cupful of crumbs. season with salt and pepper. Beat up two eggs in a deep bowl. roll them in the crumbs. it will not jelly if too weak. and if not used too freely no taste of it will be acquired. CHICKEN LUNCH FOR TRAVELING. This. Cut a young chicken down the back. By the use of a little acid there will be a considerable saving of fuel. Have over the fire a kettle containing two or three inches of boiling lard. When nearly cooked. where the broth was left (after skimming off all fat). then dip them in the beaten egg. as well as shortening of time. and the meat drops easily from the bones. Let them stew down until the water is nearly all boiled out. chop the meat rather coarsely. wash and wipe dry. put in a dripping-pan and bake in a moderate oven three-quarters of an hour. Its action is beneficial on old tough meats. drop them in the smoking hot fat and fry them a light golden brown. will turn out like a mold of jelly and may be sliced in smooth. Stew in just enough water to cover them. The success of this depends upon not having too much water.brown. if properly prepared. A nice relish for tea. or if the water is allowed to boil away entirely while cooking. This is much better for traveling lunch than when seasoned with butter. or the same of fine stale bread crumbs. then again roll them in crumbs. rendering them quite tender and easy of digestion. PRESSED CHICKEN. Clean and cut up your chickens. Turn it into a square bread pan. Tainted meats and fowls will lose their bad taste and odor if cooked in this way. As fast as the croquettes are formed. and let it heat through again. A good way to cook old fowls.

salt and cayenne pepper to taste. half a small nutmeg. BREADED CHICKEN. BROILED CHICKEN ON TOAST. sprinkle in the spices gradually and keep pounding until reduced to a perfectly smooth paste. butter it well. having crumbs on top. Cut the meat into small pieces. while boiling. A luncheon or breakfast dish. a piece of soda as large as a bean. Serve with a garnish of parsley. Strip the meat from the bones of a cold roast fowl. bake slowly. Tiny new potatoes are nice in place of sliced ones when in season. Pour the gravy over the top and add a few bits of butter and bake till nicely browned. Two or three slices of ham minced and pounded with the above will be an improvement. basting often. one teaspoonful of pounded mace. season with pepper and salt and . Stir it well until cooked. Dip each piece in beaten egg. then in grated bread crumbs or rolled cracker. about a quarter of an inch in thickness. to every pound of meat allow a quarter of a pound of butter. Keep in a dry place. Pack it into small jars and cover with clarified butter. Prepare young chickens as for fricassee by cutting them into pieces.POTTED CHICKEN. Old fowls can be made very tender by putting into them. Place them in a baking pan and put on the top of each piece a lump of butter. Thicken the water in which the fowl was boiled with flour and season to taste with butter and salt. Divide a fowl into joints and boil till the meat leaves the bone readily. Serve while hot. season them with pepper and salt and a little minced parsley. a cupful of bread crumbs. add half of a cupful of hot water. There should be gravy enough to moisten the dish. Fill a deep dish with alternate layers of bread crumbs and chicken and slices of cooked potatoes. Take out the bones and chop the meat as small as dice. When sufficiently cooked take up on a warm platter. Into the pan pour a cup of cream or rich milk. pound it well with the butter. then pour it over the chicken. SCALLOPED CHICKEN. Broil the usual way and when thoroughly done take it up in a square tin or dripping-pan.

and the chicken curry in the centre. This makes a handsome side dish. Boil it briskly for twenty minutes. partridges. Put into a stewpan two quarts of water with a teaspoonful of salt in it. This is considered most excellent. Now pour over the liquor in which the chicken was stewed. add to the gravy in the pan part of a cupful of cream. next sprinkle over two teaspoonfuls of Curry Powder. Afterwards set the saucepan on the back of the stove. if properly boiled. if not. Cut up a chicken weighing from a pound and a half to two pounds. veal. and set it one side. a cupful.set it in the oven for a few minutes. until tender. Rice. mutton. skim them out and put in the chicken. CURRY CHICKEN." put up in bottles. rabbits or fresh fish may be substituted for the chicken. take the chicken up over it. if preferred. sprinkle in the rice. add a large teaspoonful of salt. and when it boils. and drain off the water. fry for three or four minutes. Serve with hot boiled rice laid around on the edge of a platter. All first-class grocers and druggists keep this "India Curry Powder. Lay slices of moistened buttered toast on a platter. _To Boil Rice or Curry. closely covered. and every grain stand alone. pour the liquor into a bowl._--Pick over the rice. then remove from the fire. stir in a beaten yolk of egg. to allow the rice to dry and the grains to separate. if you have it. keeping the pan covered. laid . pigeons. boil it. then leave it about twenty minutes in cold water. Thicken with a little flour and pour over the chicken. Serve it hot in a separate dish or served as above. stir all well together. should be soft and white. lastly. and a fine relish accompanying a full dinner of roast beef or any roast. use milk. duck. as for fricassee. and cook a few minutes longer. then stir into this a tablespoonful of sifted flour made thin with a little water. and stew for five minutes longer. Beef. and sent to the table with or without a dish of rice. wash it well. and put it into a stewpan with sufficient water to cover it. take out the chicken. and fry them with a piece of butter as large as an egg. with the lid off. and it is done. Wash it thoroughly in two or three cold waters. as soon as the onions are brown. Take it from the fire. Now cut up into the stewpan two small onions.

Roll out the dough not very thin. cover with cold water.around the chicken curry. and then the pieces of fowl. CHICKEN POT-PIE. then drop these into the boiling gravy. Cut and joint a large chicken. Also of beefsteak. squirrels or venison. Boil three-quarters of an hour. Cover the whole with a lid of dough. Season with salt and pepper. and let it boil gently until tender. having a slit in the centre. and plenty of it. Pour in a quart of water. A beefsteak. cut them up. wash the pieces. Bottom right D. Take a pair of fine fowls. No. Half an hour before you take it up. and line them with dough nearly to the top. put the pie on a large dish. to thicken the gravy. in order that no steam shall escape. A pot-pie may be made of ducks. Lay slices of cold ham at the bottom of the pot. wrap a cloth around it. MADDISON] . as most cooks consider that cooking crust so long destroys its spongy lightness. Have ready nice light bread-dough. You may intersperse it all through with cold ham. and season with pepper only. pared and quartered. No. When done. If you use no ham. 1. put in through the hole in the centre of the crust some bits of butter rolled in flour. This style of pot-pie was made more in our grandmother's day than now. mixed smooth with a piece of butter the size of an egg. rabbits. cut with the top of a wine-glass about a half an inch thick. [Illustration: Top left ABIGAIL ADAMS. and by no means allow the pot to cease boiling. Make a light biscuit dough. let them stand half an hour and rise. and thicken the gravy with two tablespoonfuls of flour. 2. or some porksteaks (the lean only). season with salt. and renders it too hard and dry. and pour the gravy over it. and cut most of it into long squares. Middle MARTHA WASHINGTON. Put the cover on the pot closely. through which the gravy will bubble up. Butter the sides of a pot. interspersed all through with squares of dough and potatoes. P. greatly improve a chicken pot-pie. Boil it steadily for two hours. as it is always much liked by the eaters of pot-pie. Bottom left MRS JAMES MONROE. Top right MARTHA JEFFERSON. CHICKEN POT-PIE.

Take chickens. CHICKEN ROLY-POLY. Roll the crust over and over. place it over the fire.CHICKEN STEWED WITH BISCUIT. heat all through and remove from the fire to become cool. veal or mutton. lay them on a large meat platter. as you are more sure of its being always light. When tender stir into it half of a cup of butter and one beaten egg. add a small tablespoonful of sifted flour dissolved in a little water. This is a much better way than boiling this kind of biscuit in the stew. covering it. add two hard-boiled eggs coarsely minced and a small glass of wine. split them apart by breaking them with your hands. wet the edge with cold water and put a large spoonful of the minced meat on one-half of the round. two teaspoonfuls of cream tartar mixed with the flour. They may also be cooked in a moderate oven. put them into a stewpan with just _enough_ water to cook them. Select young chickens. then fry them in hot drippings or fat a nice brown. One quart of flour. Boil up once and serve with jelly. CHICKEN DRESSED AS TERRAPIN. one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a teacupful of milk. Put it into a saucepan. When cooled roll out some plain pie-crust quite thin. moisten it with a little water and gravy. cut out in rounds as large as a saucer. and on it lay minced chicken. Season it with salt and pepper. and put it on a buttered plate and place in a steamer for half an hour. giving a slice to each person with gravy served with it. just before you are ready to dish it up. or a piece of butter. Chop cold roast chicken very fine. have ready two baking-tins of rich soda or baking-powder biscuits. a teaspoonful of salt. CHICKEN TURNOVERS. fold the other half over and pinch the edges well together. do not use shortening of any kind. The meat must be seasoned with pepper and salt and be free from gristle. take them from the oven hot. Serve for breakfast or lunch. Season with salt and pepper. clean and cut them into pieces. . then pour the hot chicken stew over all. a teaspoonful of powdered thyme. Send to the table hot. but roll out the mixture half an inch thick. and make a fricassee.

Butter a deep pudding dish. Serve on a platter. Boil half a pound of macaroni until tender. put them in a saucepan with just enough water to cover them well. then take the chicken from the broth and remove all the large bones. if necessary. and wipe dry. Pour over this the following batter:-Eight eggs beaten light and mixed with one quart of milk. Make a gravy of the broth that remained from the cooking of the chicken. adding a few bits of butter. Do not stuff very full. clean thoroughly. and bake half an hour. Cut the neck close to the back. beat the breast-bone flat with a rolling pin. first breaking it up to pieces an inch long. CHICKEN AND MACARONI. three tablespoonfuls of melted butter. season with salt and pepper. Boil a chicken until very tender. tie the wings and legs securely. (Tame. or part butter and salt pork. ROAST DUCK. black pepper and salt. putting in more water if necessary. two chopped onions and one teaspoonful each of sage. Serve hot in a gravy boat with the pudding. Place the meat in a well-buttered pudding dish. put on the bottom a layer of the cooked macaroni. season again. pepper and salt. then some of the chicken liquor. added to enough sifted flour to make a batter like griddle-cakes. over this put another layer of macaroni. let them simmer ten or fifteen minutes longer. Pour a cup of cream over the whole. bits of butter. the dish is filled. draw. Cut up two young chickens into good-sized pieces.) Pick. When boiled quite tender. adding a tablespoonful of flour stirred into a third of a cup of melted butter. until. then a layer of the minced chicken. a teaspoonful of salt and two large teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Bake one hour in a _moderate_ oven. and pick up the meat quite fine. and sew up the openings . and so on.CHICKEN PUDDING. and stuff with the following:-Three pints bread crumbs. take out all the bones. six ounces butter. let it boil up.

BRAISED DUCK. so that the sides and back may all be nicely browned. Prepare a pair of fine young ducks. with frequent basting. and after dishing up the ducks. Season with pepper. Now strain and thicken the gravy. and a little thyme and parsley. and some vinegar. Stew another half hour until the duck is tender. The preferred seasonings are one tablespoonful of Madeira or sherry. and a little cayenne pepper. strain through a hair sieve. baste with butter and a little flour. garnishing with the pieces of turnip. but. _Palmer House. closely covered. an onion stuck with two cloves. and full-grown ones for an hour or more. Then season with salt and pepper. Young ducks should roast from twenty-five to thirty minutes. Let them stew slowly for an hour.firmly to keep the flavor in and the fat out. Lay two or three very thin slices of salt pork upon the bottom of a stewpan. turn often. A turnip should then be cut up and fried in some butter. it should be larded with salt pork. half a teaspoonful of powdered sage. These directions will apply to tame geese as well as ducks. The giblets. adding to the broth a gill of white wine. or some green sage minced fine. or tie a slice upon the breast. one small onion. when done. Place the pan over a gentle fire and allow the ducks to simmer until done. pour a little over the ducks and serve the remainder in a boat. may be chopped fine and added to the juice. Some prefer them underdone and served very hot. Chicago. When done remove them from the pan. place them in a stewpan together with two or three slices of bacon. thorough cooking will prove more palatable. Place in a baking pan. basting them frequently. Served with jellies or any tart sauce. When nicely browned. as a rule. If not fat enough. lay the pieces of duck upon the pork. Make a gravy out of the necks and gizzards by putting them in a quart of cold water. the same as for roasting. pour it over them. a carrot. that must be reduced to a pint by boiling. with a little water. a blade of mace. one chopped onion. When nearly done. Prepare them by cutting them up the same as chicken for fricassee. drain the pieces and cook them until tender in the liquor in which the ducks were braised._ STEWED DUCK. and cover the whole with a broth. and place them where they will keep hot. Stir up a large tablespoonful of brown flour in a little water and add it . and baste frequently with salt and water--some add onion.

Most wild ducks are apt to have the flavor of fish. add a piece of butter. and bake a light brown. and cover with water and the cold gravy left from the roast. thirty to forty minutes in the right kind of an oven being sufficient. let all boil up once and if not quite thick enough. lay them in a frying pan. put the meat into a deep dish. a little salt and cayenne pepper and the juice of half a lemon. and when in the . A nice dish for breakfast. _California Style. accompanied with green peas. WARMED UP DUCK.to the stew. Chicago. stir in a little dissolved flour. cover them and let boil. cover with pastry slit in the centre with a knife. Serve on a very hot dish._ WILD DUCKS. pick out all the little tidbits in the recesses. can be made from the remains of a roast of duck._ DUCK PIE. ROAST WILD DUCK. make it hot. Wild duck should not be dressed too soon after being killed. then baste frequently with butter and water. Pour into a hot gravy boat. pour on enough of the stock made from the bones to moisten. Let it boil up. and send to table as hot as possible with a cut lemon and the following sauce:-Put in a tiny saucepan a tablespoonful each of Worcestershire sauce and mushroom catsup. remove from the fire and stir in a teaspoonful of made mustard. Mix well. and serve all together in one dish. If the weather is cold it will be better for being kept several days. If over-done it loses flavor. letting it remain for five or ten minutes without basting to keep in the gravy. Lick House. Cut all the meat from cold roast ducks. put the bones and stuffing into cold water. Cut the meat from the bones. Bake in a hot oven. _Palmer House. and very relishing. Serve hot.

It is generally preferred a little underdone. place it in a dripping-pan. season well with salt and pepper. season it with pepper and salt. basting often. but unless you use onions in the stuffing the carrot is preferable. Roast the same as tame duck. etc. they will require from twenty to thirty minutes' cooking._ ROAST PIGEONS. Make a gravy of the giblets or not. singeing. leaving the pork still in. and the delicious flavor is best preserved when roasted quickly with a hot fire. add hot water enough to partially cover them. The epicurean taste declares that this special kind of bird requires no spices or flavors to make it perfect. Pigeons lose their flavor by being kept more than a day after they are killed. pepper. This absorbs the unpleasant taste. Clean and stuff with onion dressing. Place it when done on a hot dish.hands of inexperienced cooks are sometimes unpalatable on this account. _Delmonico. Before roasting them. add extra thyme. and keep turning until the pigeons and . as the meat partakes of the flavor of the food that the bird feeds upon. and roast it half an hour. drawing. Or put into the duck a whole onion peeled. then turn off some of the liquid. thyme. and add a little flour and butter. let it fry a while in a pot so that the fat comes out and it begins to brown a little. and keep turning them so they will brown nicely. An onion will have the same effect. truss the head under the wing. Serve hot with the gravy it yields in cooking and a dish of currant jelly. being mostly wild celery. then heat and add the liquor poured off. pour over it the gravy it has yielded in baking and serve it immediately while hot. parboil them with a small peeled carrot put within each duck.. cover tightly and boil an hour or so until tender. After dressing the duck in the usual way by plucking. bake in a hot oven twenty minutes.--do not sew up. then lay the pigeons all around in the fat. plenty of salt and pepper and a glass of claret. CANVAS-BACK DUCK. They may be prepared and roasted or broiled the same as chickens. take five or more slices of corned pork. wipe it with a wet towel. STEWED PIGEONS. put it in the oven.

gravy are nicely browned. a dash of mace or nutmeg. Cut up four potatoes into small squares. Cut into dice three ounces of salt pork. white pepper. garnish with parsley. Split them down the back and broil the same as chicken. and truss it by bringing the beak of the bird under the wing. and fastening the pinion to the thigh. add hot water enough to cover the ingredients. remove the skin. BROILED PIGEONS OR SQUABS. stuff each one with a dressing the same as for turkey. cover with a "short" pie-crust and bake in a moderate oven three-quarters of an hour. pluck the feathers. Thicken with a little flour. very thin. Chicago. then season them with salt and pepper and butter. dredge with flour. and prepare a dozen small dough balls. line the sides with a rich crust. Cover with a crust and bake. Put them in a stewpan with water enough to cover them._ WOODCOCK. season with salt. and then the balls of dough. PIGEON PIE. Broil slices of salt pork. remove and cool. Put a piece of bread under each bird to catch the drippings. _Palmer House. twist the legs at the knuckles and press the feet upon the thigh. potatoes and squabs. seasoning well with salt. pepper and plenty of butter. Put in a layer of egg and birds and gravy until the dish is full. Take half a dozen pigeons. Butter a pudding dish. Skin the head and neck of the bird. Thicken the gravy with flour. and roast fifteen or twenty minutes with a sharp fire. Have ready some hard-boiled eggs cut in slices. When done. Put into a yellow. let them cook until nearly tender. but do not separate them. divide six wild squabs into pieces at the joints. place a slice over each bird and serve. SQUAB POT-PIE. and serve with the gravy poured over them. deep baking dish the pork. cut the bread in diamond . ROASTED. baste with butter. loosen the joints with a knife.

salt and dredge with flour. place them in the oven. wash thoroughly but quickly. . and baste with butter and water before taking up. first splitting down the back. ROAST QUAIL. they will require less time to roast. thicken the gravy. serve with green grape jelly. garnish with slices of lemon. or you can leave out the pork and use only butter. and smother in butter. and roast with a quick fire ten or fifteen minutes. SNIPE. and may be served in the same manner. having seasoned them with salt and pepper. TO ROAST PARTRIDGES. and garnish with parsley. Serve with cream gravy. Boil up and serve in a boat. season with salt and pepper and roast inside the stove. GAME PIE. or cook them without stuffing. Carefully cut out all the shot. Pick and draw them very carefully. place them aslant on your dish. PHEASANTS. cover with a baking tin. each piece large enough to stand one bird upon. placing on the gridiron the inside down. Snipe are similar to woodcock. Roast from twenty to twenty-five minutes. rinse again. then dredge with flour. QUAIL OR GROUSE. and serve with gravy enough to moisten the bread. Stuff them and sew them up. larder the breast with very thin slices of fat salt pork. Skewer the legs and wings to the body. using soda in the water. You can put in each one an oyster dipped in butter and then in bread crumbs before roasting.shape. and dry with a clean cloth. Rinse well and steam over boiling water until tender. REED BIRDS. Serve on toast with butter and pepper. and broil slowly at first. These are all very fine broiled. They are also very nice broiled. Make a gravy of the drippings thickened with browned flour. serve some in the dish and some in the tureen.

woodcock. using care that there be enough water to cover the birds. snipe. One dozen thoroughly cleaned birds. Cut up half a pound of salt pork into dice. and split them in half. gray and fox. the chief difference being in the smaller size and shorter legs and ears of the latter. lay in the birds. and three whole cloves. red. Gophers and chipmunks may also be classed as another but smaller variety. SQUIRREL. They are cooked similar to rabbits. There are many species common to this country. when it boils. A very close relationship exists between the hare and the rabbit. Thicken this with two tablespoonfuls of browned flour and let it boil up. with any fancy design placed in the centre across the slit. The manner of dressing and preparing each for the table . and bake. remove from the fire and let it cool. among them the black. an ounce of butter. The top can be ornamented with pastry leaves in a wreath about the edge. Pour over the gravy. then birds and so on. with a slit cut in the centre. and. put them in a saucepan with about two quarts of water. Stir in a piece of butter as large as an egg. salt and pepper. Have ready a pint of potatoes cut as small as dice. cover the dish with a crust and bake in moderate oven.Clean well. a bunch of minced parsley. in fact.. are excellent when broiled or made into a stew. put on the top crust. and a rich crust made. and add two ounces of boiled salt pork and three raw potatoes cut into slices. inside and out. skim off all scum that rises. then some of the potatoes. put them into a yellow dish. _Rockaway Beach. Line the sides of a buttered pudding dish with the crust. and let all boil until tender. a dozen small birds. are very good in all the different styles of cooking similar to rabbit. quail. one onion chopped fine. stuff each with an oyster._ SNOWBIRDS. until the dish is full. ROAST HARE OR RABBIT. then add salt and pepper. add a pint of oyster liquor. etc.

Serve hot with onion sauce. an onion finely minced. stirring all the while. let it boil for a moment. remove the saucepan from the fire. and let it boil ten minutes. squeeze in the juice of a lemon. If a little musty from being emptied before they were hung up. and then in fine bread crumbs. Take them out. half a nutmeg. therefore. cut into joints. Cover and stew until tender. rub the insides with vinegar and afterward remove all taint of the acid by a thorough washing in lukewarm water. and a thickening made of a tablespoonful of flour and a little milk. basting it constantly with butter and dredging with flour. put it into boiling water.) Garnish with sliced lemon. truss it. To prepare them for roasting. pretty nearly the same. . When all are ready. and afterward neglected. season with salt and pepper. put the pan over the fire. Add to the gravy a cup of cream (or milk). Put into a saucepan with a pint of cold water. and turn over the rabbits. wash well in cold water and rinse thoroughly in lukewarm water. after the rabbits are roasted. turn in a cup of milk or cream. stir into it a heaping tablespoonful of flour. Take out the rabbits and set in a dish where they will keep warm. Do not cook the head or neck. and pour over the rabbits. Then stir in a pint of boiling water. let all boil up. To make a gravy. dip into beaten egg.is. a bunch of sweet herbs. but do not pour the bottom or brown part of the drippings. Clean two young rabbits. cut it into joints. two well-beaten eggs. a pinch of mace. a tablespoonful of butter. After the rabbit has been thoroughly cleaned and washed. Boil up once. Send hot to the table in a tureen with the hot rabbits. until well browned. and stir until the flour browns. sew the animal up. (See SAUCES. Season the gravy with salt and pepper. After being well wiped with a soft cloth put in a dressing as usual. pour nearly all the fat out of the pan. stirred in a little at a time. a pinch of pepper and half a pound of salt pork cut in small thin slices. Serve with currant jelly. and soak in salt and water half an hour. and when cold. FRICASSEE RABBIT. fry them in butter and sweet lard. FRIED RABBIT. mix over a moderate fire until brown on both sides. just before taking up. thicken the gravy with a spoonful of flour. first skin. drain it. and roast for half or three-quarters of an hour.

place them on a buttered gridiron. bruise the bodies well. pound them flat. a bay-leaf. in .RABBIT PIE. merely add to them two sliced onions. the birds must be scarcely more than half roasted for it. cut a slit in the middle. This is a nice mode of serving the remains of roasted game. or strong broth. and bake one hour. pressing the bones well to obtain all the flavor. strain the gravy. This pie can be made the same as "Game Pie" excepting you scatter through it four hard-boiled eggs cut in slices. BROILED RABBITS. After skinning and cleaning the rabbits. carve them very neatly. with a little water. and boil it briskly until reduced nearly half. lay them on a very hot platter. remove the papers. and next a paste of flour and water about three-quarters of an inch thick. arrange the birds in good form in the centre. and pour it on them. SALMI OF GAME. secure the whole well with twine. and put them with the skin and other trimmings into a very clean stewpan. Cover and keep hot in a warming oven until served. but when a superlative salmi is desired. laying paper over the top should it brown too fast. wash it slightly in tepid water and dry it thoroughly by rubbing it with a clean. In either case. then wrap them in letter paper well buttered. pepper and plenty of butter. Cover with puff paste. and put down to roast. cover this again with two or three sheets of stout paper. season with salt. soft cloth. and broil over a clear. add a little cayenne and lemon juice. heat the game very gradually in it. turning them often. then pour in a pint or more of good veal gravy. ROAST HAUNCH OF VENISON. wings and breasts. wipe them dry. a small blade of mace and a few peppercorns. When sufficiently cooked. and strip every particle of skin and fat from the legs. skim off the fat. turning them over and over to soak up the butter. Lay over the fat side a large sheet of thickly-buttered paper. give the sauce a boil. place pieces of fried bread around a dish. brisk fire. If for a simple and inexpensive dinner. but do not on any account allow it to boil. To prepare a haunch of venison for roasting. split them down the back lengthwise.

with a quart of good stock boiling hot and a small piece of butter. pour over two tablespoonfuls of currant jelly melted with a piece of butter. About twenty minutes before the joint is done remove the paste and paper. place the saddle of venison in the pan. Cut some salt pork in strips about two inches long and an eighth of an inch thick. and roast the joint from three to four hours. according to its weight and quality. basting well every five minutes. Delicious steaks. and use a cream sauce with it. baste the meat in every part with butter. The shoulder is a roasting piece and may be done without the paper or paste.) Venison should never be roasted unless very fat. are cut from the loin. In a large dripping-pan cut two carrots. Doe venison will require half an hour less time than buck venison. or stir cream into the venison gravy. Wash the saddle carefully. BAKED SADDLE OF VENISON. Montreal. with which lard the saddle with two rows on each side. two cloves. Let the fire be clear and strong. Use a saddle of venison of about ten pounds. and it has had abundant opportunities to fatten upon this and other fresh food. Serve hot on hot plates.the dripping-pan. let it take a pale brown color. (For cream sauce see SAUCES. so that the blood runs when cut. see that no hairs are left dried on to the outside. serve with jelly or a wine sauce. _Windsor Hotel. four kernels of allspice. half a lemon sliced. When sufficiently done. then put it in a hot oven and bake. Venison steaks should be broiled over a clear fire. baste the paper immediately with butter or clarified drippings. when wild berries are plentiful. corresponding to the shape of mutton chops. turning often. If the venison is desired well done. cook much longer. and season with salt and pepper. Venison is much better when the deer has been killed in the autumn. It requires more cooking than beef. add two bay-leaves. and let it boil about fifteen minutes on top of the stove. until it is medium rare. one onion and some salt pork in thin slices. and serve hot with unflavored gravy made with a thickening in a tureen and good currant jelly. season with salt and pepper. ._ BROILED VENISON STEAK. and dredge it very lightly with flour.

breast and shoulder are the parts used for a venison pie or pastry. Stir in some currant jelly. Cut the meat into pieces (fat and lean together) and put the bones and trimmings into the stewpan with pepper and salt.In ordering the saddle request the butcher to cut the ribs off pretty close. Then strain the liquid into a stewpan. and put in your meat. salt. Pour in the gravy which you have prepared from the trimmings. and brush it over with beaten egg. Then strain it. and keep it over the fire just long enough to warm it through. In the meantime make a good rich paste. add to it some bits of butter. FRIED VENISON STEAK. and water or veal broth enough to cover it. push it back and let it slightly brown. Bake two or more hours according to the size._ VENISON HASHED. Cover the pie with a thick lid of paste and ornament it handsomely with leaves and flowers formed with a tin cutter. pull it forward in the oven. Montreal. _Windsor Hotel. and the ribs can be put into your stock-pot to boil for soup. and give it a boil up. and roll it rather thick. . Cover the bottom and sides of a deep dish with one sheet of it. Lay on the top some bits of butter rolled in flour. rolled in flour._ VENISON PIE OR PASTRY. as it has been once cooked already. but do not allow it to boil. nutmeg and mace. but are always sold with the saddle. Just before it is done. The neck. and a glass of port wine. _Windsor Hotel. and put the trimmings and bones into a saucepan with barely water enough to cover them. Simmer it till you have drawn out a good gravy. Let them stew for an hour. as the only part that is of much account is the tenderloin and thick meat that lies along the backbone up to the neck. The ribs which extend from this have very little meat on them. and whatever gravy was left of the venison the day before. When neatly cut off they leave the saddle in a better shape. Then put in the meat. having seasoned it with pepper. Cut the meat in nice small slices. Montreal.

fore and middle ribs. which will vary according to the thickness of the roast. if put into a cool oven it loses its juices. pickled beets. dredge a heaping teaspoonful of flour into the butter in the pan. the fat white. and put a tin cover over. tasteless roast. and the result is a tough. A glass of wine. stir it with a spoon until it is brown. or rolled crackers. with a tablespoonful of white sugar dissolved in it. if the rind is rough and hard it is old. Will also have abundant kidney fat or suet. rub the steaks over with a mixture of a little salt and pepper. and fry a rich brown. [Illustration] MEATS. Pork. In roasting meat. A great deal of the success in roasting depends on the heat and goodness of the fire. may be used for the gravy. allow from fifteen to twenty minutes to the pound. then strain it over the meat and serve. to be good. take them up on a dish. the lean will break on being pinched smooth when nipped with the fingers.Cut a breast of venison into steaks. and served with boiled vegetables. firm and juicy and a close grain. fine grained and of a delicate pinkish color. and sauce. without burning. it immediately sears up the pores of the meat and the juices are retained. put to it a small teacupful of boiling water. . if the oven is of the proper heat.. and will feel tender when pinched with the fingers. if young. etc. stir it for a few minutes. the joints stiff. also the skin will break and dent. Venison may be boiled. in beef it should be a smooth. of a clear bright red color. Mutton is good when the flesh is a bright red. whereas. make a quarter of a pound of butter hot in a pan. fine grain. when both sides are done. The most choice pieces for roast are the sirloin. Veal. and plenty of kidney fat. dip them in wheat flour. the fat firm and white. instead of the jelly and water. with a tablespoonful of currant jelly dissolved into it. In the selection of meat it is most essential that we understand how to choose it. should have the flesh firm and dry.

without being burned. allowing twenty minutes to each pound. thereby confining its natural juices. or when it begins to get tender. If the oven is too hot to hold the hand in for only a moment. After meat commences to boil the pot should _never stop_ simmering and always be replenished from the _boiling_ tea-kettle. then it is right to receive the meat. but _no water_ should be put into the pan. some pieces of suet or cold drippings laid under it. One method. and. Remove the onion before serving. red coals free from smoke. which flow from the meat when partly cooked. and well seasoned. closely covered and boiled _slowly_. and require thirty minutes _very slow_ boiling. so desirable in a roast. if fresh. veal and pork should be cooked rather slower than beef. Broiled meats should be placed over clear. especially roast of pork. for this would have a tendency to soften the outside of the meat. is by putting one ounce or more (as the case requires) of beef drippings. The other method is to _completely immerse_ the article to be cooked in sufficient _hot_ lard to cover it. and _thoroughly_ cooked till the flesh parts from the bone. in order to quickly crisp the surface and close the pores of the meat. which may be procured at house-furnishing stores.The oven should be the hottest when the meat is put into it. then wiped dry with a clean dry cloth. The roast should first be washed in pure water. Larding meats is drawing ribbons of fat pork through the upper surface of the meat. and when at the _boiling point_ lay in the meat. Boiling or stewing meat. for each pound. This is accomplished by the use of a larding needle. gives a nice flavor. and the generating of the steam prevents its crispness. Salt meats should be covered with _cold_ water. An onion sliced and put on top of a roast while cooking. Lamb. when partly cooked. similar to frying doughnuts. pour off the first water and put it in another of boiling water. cooking both sides a nice brown. covering the fat with a piece of paper. . Frying may be done in two ways. lard or butter into a frying pan. The water can never get so hot as the hot fat upon the surface of the meat. with a more _moderate_ fire. if it is very salt. placed in a baking pan without any seasoning. leaving both ends protruding. from the time the water boils. salted. and nicely browned. or it may be soaked one night in cold water. adding spices and vegetables. should be put into _boiling_ water. which is most generally used. It should be frequently basted with its own drippings.

giving out a good heat, but not too brisk, or the meat will be hardened and scorched; but if the fire is dead the gravy will escape and drop upon the coals, creating a blaze, which will blacken and smoke the meat. Steaks and chops should be turned often, in order that every part should be evenly done--never sticking a fork into the lean part, as that lets the juices escape; it should be put into the outer skin or fat. When the meat is sufficiently broiled it should be laid on a _hot_ dish and seasoned. The best pieces for steak are the porterhouse, sirloin and rump. THAWING FROZEN MEAT, ETC. If meat, poultry, fish, vegetables, or any other article of food, when found frozen, is thawed by putting it into _warm water_ or placing it before the fire, it will most certainly spoil by that process, and be rendered unfit to eat. The only way to thaw these things is by immersing them in _cold_ water. This should be done as soon as they are brought in from market, that they may have time to be well thawed before they are cooked. If meat that has been frozen is to be boiled, put it on in cold water. If to be roasted, begin by setting it at a distance from the fire, for if it should not chance to be thoroughly thawed all through to the centre, placing it at first too near the fire will cause it to spoil. If it is expedient to thaw the meat or poultry the night before cooking, lay it in cold water early in the evening, and change the water at bed-time. If found crusted with ice in the morning, remove the ice, and put the meat in fresh cold water, letting it lie in it till wanted for cooking. Potatoes are injured by being frozen. Other vegetables are not the worse for it, provided they are always thawed in cold water. TO KEEP MEAT FROM FLIES. Put in sacks, with enough straw around it so the flies cannot reach through. Three-fourths of a yard of yard-wide muslin is the right size for the sack. Put a little straw in the bottom, then put in the ham and lay straw in all around it; tie it tightly and hang it in a cool, dry place. Be sure the straw is all around the meat, so the flies cannot reach through to deposit the eggs. (The sacking must be done early in the season before the fly appears.) Muslin lets the air in and is much better than paper. Thin muslin is as good as thick, and will last for years if washed when laid away when emptied. _National Stockman._

ROAST BEEF. One very essential point in roasting beef is to have the oven well heated when the beef is first put in; this causes the pores to close up quickly, and prevents the escape of the juices. Take a rib piece or loin roast of seven or eight pounds. Wipe it thoroughly all over with a clean wet towel. Lay it in a dripping-pan, and baste it well with butter or suet fat. Set it in the oven. Baste it frequently with its own drippings, which will make it brown and tender. When partly done season with salt and pepper, as it hardens any meat to salt it when raw, and draws out its juices, then dredge with sifted flour to give it a frothy appearance. It will take a roast of this size about two hours' time to be properly done, leaving the inside a little rare or red--half an hour less would make the inside quite rare. Remove the beef to a heated dish, set where it will keep hot; then skim the drippings from all fat, add a tablespoonful of sifted flour, a little pepper and a teacupful of boiling water. Boil up once and serve hot in a gravy boat. Some prefer the clear gravy without the thickening. Serve with mustard or grated horse-radish and vinegar. YORKSHIRE PUDDING. This is a very nice accompaniment to a roast of beef; the ingredients are, one pint of milk, four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, one teaspoonful of salt, and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted through two cups of flour. It should be mixed very smooth, about the consistency of cream. Regulate your time when you put in your roast, so that it will be done half an hour or forty minutes before dishing up. Take it from the oven, set it where it will keep hot. In the meantime have this pudding prepared. Take two common biscuit tins, dip some of the drippings from the dripping-pan into these tins, pour half of the pudding into each, set them into the hot oven, and keep them in until the dinner is dished up; take these puddings out at the last moment and send to the table hot. This I consider much better than the old way of baking the pudding under the meat. BEEFSTEAK. No. 1. The first consideration in broiling is to have a clear, glowing bed of

coals. The steak should be about three-quarters of an inch in thickness, and should be pounded only in extreme cases, _i.e._, when it is cut _too_ thick and is "stringy." Lay it on a buttered gridiron, turning it often, as it begins to drip, attempting nothing else while cooking it. Have everything else ready for the table; the potatoes and vegetables dished and in the warming closet. Do not season it until it is done, which will be in about ten to twelve minutes. Remove it to a warm platter, pepper and salt it on both sides and spread a liberal lump of butter over it. Serve at once while hot. No definite rule can be given as to the _time_ of cooking steak, individual tastes differ so widely in regard to it, some only liking it when well done, others so rare that the blood runs out of it. The best pieces for broiling are the porterhouse and sirloin. BEEFSTEAK. No. 2. Take a smooth, thick-bottomed frying pan, scald it out with hot water, and wipe it dry; set it on the stove or range, and when _very_ hot, rub it over the bottom with a rag dipped in butter; then place your steak or chops in it, turn often until cooked through, take up on a warm platter, and season both sides with salt, pepper and butter. Serve hot. Many prefer this manner of cooking steak rather than broiling or frying in a quantity of grease. BEEFSTEAK AND ONIONS. Prepare the steak in the usual way. Have ready in a frying pan a dozen onions cut in slices and fried brown in a little beef drippings or butter. Dish your steak, and lay the onions thickly over the top. Cover and let stand five minutes, then send to the table hot. BEEFSTEAK AND OYSTERS. Broil the steak the usual way. Put one quart of oysters with very little of the liquor into a stewpan upon the fire; when it comes to a boil, take off the scum that may rise, stir in three ounces of butter mixed with a tablespoonful of sifted flour, let it boil one minute until it thickens, pour it over the steak. Serve hot. _Palace Hotel, San Francisco._

TO FRY BEEFSTEAKS. Beefsteak for frying should be cut much thinner than for broiling. Take from the ribs or sirloin and remove the bone. Put some butter or nice beef dripping into a frying pan and set it over the fire, and when it has boiled and become hot lay in the steaks; when cooked quite enough, season with salt and pepper, turn and brown on both sides. Steaks when fried should be thoroughly done. Have ready a hot dish, and when they are done take out the steaks and lay them on it, with another dish cover the top to keep them hot. The gravy in the pan can be turned over the steaks, first adding a few drops of boiling water, or a gravy to be served in a separate dish made by putting a large tablespoonful of flour into the hot gravy left in the pan after taking up the steaks. Stir it smooth, then pour in a pint of cream or sweet rich milk, salt and pepper, let it boil up once until it thickens, pour hot into a gravy dish and send to the table with the steaks. POT ROAST. (Old Style.) This is an old-fashioned dish, often cooked in our grandmothers' time. Take a piece of fresh beef weighing about five or six pounds. It must not be _too fat_. Wash it and put it into a pot with barely sufficient water to cover it. Set it over a slow fire, and after it has stewed an hour salt and pepper it. Then stew it slowly until tender, adding a little onion if liked. Do not replenish the water at the last, but let all nearly boil away. When tender all through take the meat from the pot and pour the gravy in a bowl. Put a large lump of butter in the bottom of the pot, then dredge the piece of meat with flour and return it to the pot to brown, turning it often to prevent its burning. Take the gravy that you have poured from the meat into the bowl and skim off all the fat; pour this gravy in with the meat and stir in a large spoonful of flour wet with a little water; let it boil up ten or fifteen minutes and pour into a gravy dish. Serve both hot, the meat on a platter. Some are very fond of this way of cooking a piece of beef which has been previously placed in spiced pickle for two or three days. SPICED BEEF. (Excellent.) For a round of beef weighing twenty or twenty-four pounds, take one-quarter of a pound of saltpetre, one-quarter of a pound of coarse brown sugar, two pounds of salt, one ounce of cloves, one ounce of allspice and half an ounce of mace; pulverize these materials, mix

them well together, and with them rub the beef thoroughly on every part; let the beef lie for eight or ten days in the pickle thus made, turning and rubbing it every day; then tie it around with a broad tape, to keep it in shape; make a coarse paste of flour and water, lay a little suet finely chopped over and under the beef, inclose the beef entirely in the paste, and bake it six hours. When you take the beef from the oven, remove the paste, but do not remove the tape until you are ready to send it to the table. If you wish, to eat the beef cold, keep it well covered that it may retain its moisture. BEEF A LA MODE. Mix together three teaspoonfuls of salt, one of pepper, one of ginger, one of mace, one of cinnamon, and two of cloves. Rub this mixture into ten pounds of the upper part of a round of beef. Let this beef stand in this state over night. In the morning, make a dressing or stuffing of a pint of fine bread crumbs, half a pound of fat salt pork cut in dice, a teaspoonful of ground thyme or summer savory, two teaspoonfuls sage, half a teaspoonful of pepper, one of nutmeg, a little cloves, an onion minced fine, moisten with a little milk or water. Stuff this mixture into the place from whence you took out the bone. With a long skewer fasten the two ends of the beef together, so that its form will be circular, and bind it around with tape to prevent the skewers giving way. Make incisions in the beef with a sharp knife; fill these incisions very closely with the stuffing, and dredge the whole with flour. Put it into a dripping-pan and pour over it a pint of hot water; turn a large pan over it to keep in the steam, and roast slowly from three to four hours, allowing a quarter of an hour to each pound of meat. If the meat should be tough, it may be stewed first in a pot, with water enough to cover it, until tender, and then put into a dripping-pan and browned in the oven. If the meat is to be eaten hot, skim off the fat from the gravy, into which, after it is taken off the fire, stir in the beaten yolks of two eggs. If onions are disliked you may omit them and substitute minced oysters. TENDERLOIN OF BEEF. To serve tenderloin as directed below, the whole piece must be extracted before the hind-quarter of the animal is cut out. This must be particularly noted, because not commonly practiced, the tenderloin

being usually left attached to the roasting pieces, in order to furnish a tidbit for a few. To dress it whole, proceed as follows: Washing the piece well, put it in an oven; add about a pint of water, and chop up a good handful of each of the following vegetables as an ingredient of the dish, _viz._, Irish potatoes, carrots, turnips and a large bunch of celery. They must be washed, peeled and chopped up raw, then added to the meat; blended with the juice, they form and flavor the gravy. Let the whole slowly simmer, and when nearly done, add a teaspoonful of pounded allspice. To give a richness to the gravy, put in a tablespoonful of butter. If the gravy should look too greasy, skim off some of the melted suet. Boil also a lean piece of beef, which, when perfectly done, chop fine, flavoring with a very small quantity of onion, besides pepper and salt to the taste. Make into small balls, wet them on the outside with eggs, roll in grated cracker or fine bread crumbs. Fry these force meat balls a light brown. When serving the dish, put these around the tenderloin, and pour over the whole the rich gravy. This dish is a very handsome one, and, altogether, fit for an epicurean palate. A sumptuous dish. STEWED STEAK WITH OYSTERS. Two pounds of rump steak, one pint of oysters, one tablespoonful of lemon juice, three of butter, one of flour, salt, pepper, one cupful of water. Wash the oysters in the water and drain into a stewpan. Put this liquor on to heat. As soon as it comes to a boil, skim and set back. Put the butter in a frying pan, and when hot, put in a steak. Cook ten minutes. Take up the steak, and stir the flour into the butter remaining in the pan. Stir until a dark brown. Add the oyster liquor and boil one minute. Season with salt and pepper. Put back the steak, cover the pan, and simmer half an hour or until the steak seems tender, then add the oysters and lemon juice. Boil one minute. Serve on a hot dish with points of toast for a garnish. SMOTHERED BEEFSTEAK. Take _thin_ slices of steak from the upper part of the round or one large thin steak. Lay the meat out smoothly and wipe it dry. Prepare a dressing, using a cupful of fine bread crumbs, half a teaspoonful of salt, some pepper, a tablespoonful of butter, half a teaspoonful of sage, the same of powdered summer savory, and enough milk to moisten it all into a stiff mixture. Spread it over the meat, roll it up carefully, and tie with a string, securing the ends well. Now fry a few thin slices of salt pork in the bottom of a kettle or saucepan, and into the fat that has fried out of this pork, place this roll or

rolls of beef, and brown it on all sides, turning it until a rich color all over, then add half a pint of water, and stew until tender. If the flavor of onion is liked, a slice may be chopped fine and added to the dressing. When cooked sufficiently, take out the meat, thicken the gravy, and turn over it. To be carved cutting crosswise, in slices, through beef and stuffing. BEEFSTEAK ROLLS. This mode is similar to the above recipe, but many might prefer it. Prepare a good dressing, such as you like for turkey or duck; take a round steak, pound it, but not very hard, spread the dressing over it, sprinkle in a little salt, pepper, and a few bits of butter, lap over the ends, roll the steak up tightly and tie closely; spread two great spoonfuls of butter over the steak after rolling it up, then wash with a well-beaten egg, put water in the bake-pan, lay in the steak so as not to touch the water, and bake as you would a duck, basting often. A half-hour in a brisk oven will bake. Make a brown gravy and send to the table hot. TO COLLAR A FLANK OF BEEF. Procure a well-corned flank of beef--say six pounds. Wash it, and remove the inner and outer skin with the gristle. Prepare a seasoning of one teaspoonful each of sage, parsley, thyme, pepper and cloves. Lay your meat upon a board and spread this mixture over the inside. Roll the beef up tight, fasten it with small skewers, put a cloth over it, bandage the cloth with tape, put the beef into the stewpot, cover it with water to the depth of an inch, boil gently six hours; take it out of the water, place it on a board without undoing it; lay a board on top of the beef, put a fifty pound weight upon this board, and let it remain twenty-four hours. Take off the bandage, garnish with green pickles and curled parsley, and serve. DRIED BEEF. Buy the best of beef, or that part which will be the most lean and tender. The tender part of the round is a very good piece. For every twenty pounds of beef use one pint of salt, one teaspoonful of saltpetre, and a quarter of a pound of brown sugar. Mix them well together, and rub the beef well with one-third of the mixture for three successive days. Let it lie in the liquor it makes for six days,

then hang up to dry. A large crock or jar is a good vessel to prepare the meat in before drying it. BEEF CORNED OR SALTED. (Red.) Cut up a quarter of beef. For each hundred weight take half a peck of coarse salt, a quarter of a pound of saltpetre, the same weight of saleratus and a quart of molasses, or two pounds of coarse brown sugar. Mace, cloves and allspice may be added for spiced beef. Strew some of the salt in the bottom of a pickle-tub or barrel, then put in a layer of meat, strew this with salt, then add another layer of meat, and salt and meat alternately, until all is used. Let it remain one night. Dissolve the saleratus and saltpetre in a little warm water, and put it to the molasses or sugar; then put it over the meat, add water enough to cover the meat, lay a board on it to keep it under the brine. The meat is fit for use after ten days. This recipe is for winter beef. Rather more salt may be used in warm weather. Towards spring take the brine from the meat, make it boiling hot, skim it clear, and when it is cooled, return it to the meat. Beef tongues and smoking pieces are fine pickled in this brine. Beef liver put in this brine for ten days, and then wiped dry and smoked, is very fine. Cut it in slices, and fry or broil it. The brisket of beef, after being corned, may be smoked, and is very good for boiling. Lean pieces of beef, cut properly from the hind-quarter, are the proper pieces for being smoked. There may be some fine pieces cut from the fore-quarter. After the beef has been in brine ten days or more, wipe it dry, and hang it in a chimney where wood is burned, or make a smothered fire of sawdust or chips, and keep it smoking for ten days; then rub fine black pepper over every part to keep the flies from it, and hang it in a _dry, dark, cool place_. After a week it is fit for use. A strong, coarse brown paper, folded around the beef, and fastened with paste, keeps it nicely. Tongues are smoked in the same manner. Hang them by a string put through the root end. Spiced brine for smoked beef or tongues will be generally liked.

ROAST BEEF PIE WITH POTATO CRUST. When you have a cold roast of beef, cut off as much as will half fill a baking-dish suited to the size of your family; put this sliced beef into a stewpan with any gravy that you may have also saved, a lump of butter, a bit of sliced onion and a seasoning of pepper and salt, with enough water to make plenty of gravy; thicken it, too, by dredging in a tablespoonful of flour; cover it up on the fire, where it may stew gently, but not be in danger of burning. Meanwhile there must be boiled a sufficient quantity of potatoes to fill up your baking-dish, after the stewed meat has been transferred to it. The potatoes must be boiled done, mashed smooth, and beaten up with milk and butter, as if they were to be served alone, and placed in a thick layer on top of the meat. Brush it over with egg, place the dish in an oven, and let it remain there long enough to be brown. There should be a goodly quantity of gravy left with the beef, that the dish be not dry and tasteless. Serve with it tomato sauce, Worcestershire sauce or any other kind that you prefer. A good, plain dish. ROAST BEEF PIE. Cut up roast beef, or beefsteak left from a previous meal, into thin slices, lay some of the slices into a deep dish which you have lined _on the sides_ with rich biscuit dough, rolled very thin (say a quarter of an inch thick); now sprinkle over this layer a little pepper and salt; put in a small bit of butter, a few slices of cold potatoes, a little of the cold gravy, if you have any left from the roast. Make another layer of beef, another layer of seasoning, and so on, until the dish is filled; cover the whole with paste leaving a slit in the centre, and bake half an hour. BEEFSTEAK PIE. Cut up rump or flank steak into strips two inches long and about an inch wide. Stew them with the bone, in just enough water to cover them, until partly cooked; have half a dozen of cold boiled potatoes sliced. Line a baking-dish with pie paste, put in a layer of the meat with salt, pepper, and a little of thinly-sliced onion, then one of the sliced potatoes, with bits of butter dotted over them. Then the steak, alternated with layers of potato, until the dish is full. Add the gravy or broth, having first thickened it with brown flour. Cover with a top crust, making a slit in the middle; brush a little beaten egg over it, and bake until quite brown.

FRIZZLED BEEF. Shave off _very thin_ slices of smoked or dried beef, put them in a frying pan, cover with cold water, set it on the back of the range or stove, and let it come to a very slow heat, allowing it time to swell out to its natural size, but not to boil. Stir it up, then drain off the water. Melt one ounce of sweet butter in the frying pan and add the wafers of beef. When they begin to frizzle or turn up, break over them three eggs; stir until the eggs are cooked; add a little white pepper, and serve on slices of buttered toast. FLANK STEAK. This is cut from the boneless part of the flank and is secreted between an outside and inside layer of creamy fat. There are two ways for broiling it. One is to slice diagonally across the grain; the other is to broil it whole. In either case brush butter over it and proceed as in broiling other steaks. It is considered by butchers the finest steak, which they frequently reserve for themselves. TO BOIL CORNED BEEF. The aitch-bone and the brisket are considered the best pieces for boiling. If you buy them in the market already corned, they will be fit to put over the fire without a previous soaking in water. If you corn them in the brine in which you keep your beef through the winter, they must be soaked in cold water over night. Put the beef into a pot, cover with sufficient _cold_ water, place over a brisk fire, let it come to a boil in half an hour; just before boiling remove all the scum from the pot, place the pot on the back of the fire, let it boil very slowly until quite tender. A piece weighing eight pounds requires two and a half hours' boiling. If you do not wish to eat it hot, let it remain in the pot after you take it from the fire until nearly cold, then lay it in a colander to drain, lay a cloth over it to retain its fresh appearance; serve with horse-radish and pickles. If vegetables are to accompany this, making it the old-fashioned "boiled dinner," about three-quarters of an hour before dishing up skim the liquor free from fat and _turn part of it out into another kettle_, into which put a cabbage carefully prepared, cutting it into

four quarters; also half a dozen peeled medium-sized white turnips, cut into halves; scrape four carrots and four parsnips each cut into four pieces. Into the kettle with the meat, about half an hour before serving, pour on more water from the boiling tea-kettle, and into this put peeled medium-sized potatoes. This dinner should also be accompanied by boiled beets, sliced hot, cooked separate from the rest, with vinegar over them. Cooking the cabbage separately from the meat prevents the meat from having the flavor of cabbage when cold. The carrots, parsnips and turnips will boil in about an hour. A piece of salt pork was usually boiled with a "New England boiled dinner." SPICED BEEF RELISH. Take two pounds of raw, tender beefsteak, chop it _very fine_, put into it salt, pepper and a little sage, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter; add two rolled crackers made very fine, also two well-beaten eggs. Make it up into the shape of a roll and bake it; baste with butter and water before baking. Cut in slices when cold. FRIED BEEF LIVER. Cut it in rather thin slices, say a quarter of an inch thick; pour over it _boiling_ water, which closes the pores of the meat, makes it impervious to the fat, and at the same time seals up the rich juice of the meat. It may be rolled in flour or bread crumbs, seasoned with salt and pepper, dipped in egg and fried in hot fat mixed with one-third butter. PRESSED BEEF. First have your beef nicely pickled; let it stay in pickle a week; then take the thin, flanky pieces, such as will not make a handsome dish of themselves, put on a large potful, and let them boil until perfectly done; then pull to pieces, and season just as you do souse, with pepper, salt and allspice; only put it in a coarse cloth and press down upon it some very heavy weight. The advantage of this recipe is that it makes a most acceptable, presentable dish out of a part of the beef that otherwise might be wasted. FRENCH STEW.

Grease the bottom of an iron pot, and place in it three or four pounds of beef; be very careful that it does not burn, and turn it until it is nicely browned. Set a muffin ring under the beef to prevent its sticking. Add a few sliced carrots, one or two sliced onions, and a cupful of hot water; keep covered and stew slowly until the vegetables are done. Add pepper and salt. If you wish more gravy, add hot water, and thicken with flour. Serve on a dish with the vegetables. TO POT BEEF. The round is the best piece for potting, and you may use both the upper and under part. Take ten pounds of beef, remove all the fat, cut the lean into square pieces, two inches thick. Mix together three teaspoonfuls of salt, one of pepper, one of cloves, one of mace, one of cinnamon, one of allspice, one of thyme, and one of sweet basil. Put a layer of the pieces of beef into an earthen pot, sprinkle some of this spice mixture over this layer, add a piece of fat salt pork, cut as thin as possible, sprinkle a little of the spice mixture over the pork, make another layer of the beef with spices and pork, and so on, until the pot is filled. Pour over the whole three tablespoonfuls of Tarragon vinegar, or, if you prefer it, half a pint of Madeira wine; cover the pot with a paste made of flour and water, so that no steam can escape. Put the pot into an oven, moderately heated, and let it stand there eight hours; then set it away to use when wanted. Beef cooked in this manner will keep good for a fortnight in moderate weather. It is an excellent relish for breakfast, and may be eaten either warm or cold. When eaten warm, serve with slices of lemon. STEWED BRISKET OF BEEF. Put the part that has the hard fat into a stewpot with a small quantity of water; let it boil up and skim it thoroughly; then add carrots, turnips, onions, celery and a few pepper-corns. Stew till extremely tender; then take out all the flat bones and remove all the fat from the soup. Either serve that and the meat in tureen, or the soup alone, and the meat on a dish garnished with some vegetables. The following sauce is much admired served with the beef: Take half a pint of the soup and mix it with a spoonful of catsup, a teaspoonful of made mustard, a little flour, a bit of butter and salt; boil all together a few minutes, then pour it round the meat.

DRIED BEEF WITH CREAM. Shave your beef _very fine_. Put it into a suitable dish on the back of the stove; cover with cold water and give it time to soak out to its original size before being dried. When it is quite soft and the water has become hot (it must not boil) take it off, turn off the water, pour on a cup of cream; if you do not have it use milk and butter, a pinch of pepper; let it come to a boil, thicken with a tablespoonful of flour wet up in a little milk. Serve on dipped toast or not, just as one fancies. A nice breakfast dish. BEEF CROQUETTES. No. 1. Chop fine one cup of cold, cooked, lean beef, half a cup of fat, half a cup of cold boiled or fried ham; cold pork will do if you have not the ham. Also mince up a slice of onion. Season all with a teaspoonful of salt, half a teaspoonful of pepper, and a teaspoonful of powdered sage or parsley if liked. Heat together with half a cup of stock or milk; when cool add a beaten egg. Form the mixture into balls, slightly flattened, roll in egg and bread crumbs, or flour and egg. Fry in hot lard or beef drippings. Serve on a platter and garnish with sprigs of parsley. Almost any cold meats can be used instead of beef. BEEF CROQUETTES. No. 2. Take cold roast or corned beef. Put it into a wooden bowl and chop it fine. Mix with it about twice the quantity of hot mashed potatoes well seasoned with butter and salt. Beat up an egg and work it into the potato and meat, then form the mixture into little cakes the size of fish balls. Flatten them a little, roll in flour or egg and cracker crumbs, fry in butter and lard mixed, browning on both sides. Serve piping hot. MEAT AND POTATO CROQUETTES. Put in a stewpan an ounce of butter and a slice of onion minced fine; when this simmers add a level tablespoonful of sifted flour; stir the mixture until it becomes smooth and frothy; then add half of a cupful of milk, some seasoning of salt and pepper; let all boil, stirring it all the while. Now add a cupful of cold meat chopped fine, and a cupful of cold or hot mashed potato. Mix all thoroughly and spread on

but no longer. take them out with a skimmer and drain them on a piece of brown paper. 2. then add a . Cut up a quarter of an onion and fry it brown. WARMED. Still another nice way of using cold meats is to mince the lean portions very fine and add to a batter made of one pint of milk. put it in a plate or pan with a spoonful or two of water. thin slices. Cut from the remains of a cold roast the lean meat from the bones into small. cover them with buttered letter paper. or a cupful of cold fish minced fine in place of the meat. COLD ROAST. sprinkling them with finely chopped herbs. when it becomes hot. Put over the fire a frying pan containing a spoonful of butter or drippings. add the meat gravy left from the day before. seasoning with salt. Put in a frying pan a round tablespoonful of cold butter. No. covering closely. and if not thick enough add a little flour. if the meat is in small pieces. WARMED. Cold steak may be shaved very fine with a knife and used the same way. and set in the oven until hot. Serve hot. No.a plate to cool. shape it with your hands into balls or rolls. pepper and bits of butter. then add two-thirds of a cupful of cold milk or water. Season this with salt and pepper and allow it to come to a boil. When it is cool enough. COLD ROAST. BAKED. and boil them on the gridiron. then remove the onion. COLD MEAT AND POTATO. Turn the pieces of meat into this and let them _simmer_ a few minutes. Or. Cold rare roast beef may be made as good as when freshly cooked by slicing. one cup of flour and three eggs. salt and pepper. Fry like fritters and serve with drawn butter or sauce. stir into it a teaspoonful of chopped onion and a tablespoonful of flour. These are very nice. stirring it constantly until it is smooth and frothy. Cold rice or hominy may be used in place of the potato. Dip them in beaten egg and roll in cracker or bread crumbs. 1. twist each end tightly. Serve immediately while hot. Drop them into hot lard and fry about two minutes a delicate brown.

Chop cold roast beef. fry half an onion in a piece of butter. if you have any. Cold hominy.cupful of cold meat finely chopped and cleared from bone and skin. if so. bone or stringy pieces. also chop twice as much cold boiled potatoes. _Prof. as much cooking toughens the meat. stirring occasionally. BEEF HASH. cook long enough to be hot. Chop it until a perfect mince. and to keep the hash from sticking to the bottom of the pan. moisten with the beef gravy. and cook for fifteen or twenty minutes in a moderate hot oven._ Some prefer to let a crust form on the bottom and turn the hash brown side uppermost. Season with salt and pepper. when the onion is brown. nor yet dry. HAMBURGER STEAK. Spread hot or cold mashed potatoes over the top. but have sufficient adhesiveness to stand well on a dish or buttered toast. make into cakes as large as a . No. No. or rice may be used in place of mashed potatoes. it cannot be chopped too fine. let this all heat thoroughly. and is equally as good. Blot. Many like the flavor of onion. or pieces of beefsteak. so that the ingredients be evenly distributed. 2. without any fat. add the chopped beef. if not. with sufficient water and a little butter. with hot water. Chop rather finely cold roast beef or pieces of beefsteak. add pepper and salt. season with a little salt and pepper. moisten with beef gravy if you have it. then turn it into a shallow dish well buttered. in which put a piece of butter as large as required to season it well. cover and let it steam and heat through thoroughly. but no longer. Served with poached eggs on top. 1. if not. Also chop a small onion quite fine and mix well with the meat. Corned beef makes excellent hash. BEEF HASH. When done it should not be at all watery. An excellent breakfast dish. Put over the fire a stewpan or frying pan. Take a pound of raw flank or round steak. fry two or three slices in the butter before adding the hash.

then pour a little warm water into the pan. Serve it with the gravy. Wash a fresh tongue and just cover it with water in the pot. _Palmer House. Stir up a tablespoonful of browned flour with a small quantity of water and thicken the whole. Served with currant jelly. Wash it carefully and open it sufficiently to remove the ventricles. pepper and salt and a piece of butter. After washing the heart thoroughly cut it up into squares half an inch long. then soak it in cold water until the blood is discharged. dredge in some flour. roast it about an hour and a half. as for turkey. fry it a light brown. wipe it dry and stuff it nicely with dressing. or into one large flat cake a little less than half an inch thick. add some parsley if liked. Boil up and serve. a head of celery chopped fine. strain the liquor and put back the meat. Sheep's kidneys may be split open. Now take out the meat. Garnish with celery top around the edge of the platter and two or three slices of lemon on the top of the meat. some parsley. Chicago. A brown gravy made from the grease the steak was fried in and poured over the meat enriches it. when boiling hot put in the steak and fry brown. also add a sliced onion. Have ready a frying pan with butter and lard mixed. If any scum rises skim it off. which should be thickened with some of the stuffing and a glass of wine. take out the slices. Cut the kidney into slices._ STEWED BEEF KIDNEY. broiled over a clear fire and served with a piece of butter placed on each half. BOILED BEEF TONGUE. put them into a saucepan with water enough to cover them. BEEFS HEART STEWED. let them stew very gently. but quite flat. Stew until the meat is very tender. put in slices of kidney again.biscuit. It is very nice hashed. season highly with pepper and salt. put in a . TO ROAST BEEF HEART.

TO BOIL TRIPE. when done scrape off the paste and skim. and add them to the tripe just before you send it to table. After it has boiled four hours. of course omitting the salt when boiling. It is best to give tripe its first and longest boiling the day before it is wanted. add more water as it evaporates. Cut into small pieces. Wipe out your saucepan and put them on again. drain them in a colander and mash them. If wanted for future use. season the tripe with pepper and salt. A cupful of salt will do for three tongues. smear it all over the tongue and place in a pan to bake slowly. after peeling a tongue. Boil in a saucepan ten or a dozen onions. If salt tongues are used. which it will . baste well with lard and hot water. Pickle two weeks. and put it on to boil five hours before dinner in water enough to cover it very well. if you have that number to boil. Boil it an hour in the milk and water. Or.pint of salt and a small red pepper. half a cup vinegar. SPICED BEEF TONGUE. take it out. a piece of saltpetre the size of a pea and a tablespoonful of ground cloves. and cook until the liquor is evaporated. with a bit of butter rolled in flour and a wine-glass of cream or milk. and trim it nicely. four tablespoonfuls sugar. put it in a brine made of three-quarters of a pound of salt to two quarts of water and keep covered. Wash it well in warm water. Boil the tripe the day before till it is quite tender. but do not fail to keep water enough in the pot to keep them covered while boiling. and put it into a pot with milk and water mixed in equal quantities. then wash well and dry with a cloth. soak them over night. do not peel until it is required. taking off all the fat. so as to keep the tongue nearly covered until done--when it can be easily pierced with a fork. place it in a saucepan with one cup of water. vinegar and mustard. Eat it with pepper. Let them boil up. When they are quite soft. Rub into each tongue a mixture made of half a pound of brown sugar. pour off the water. roll out a thin paste made of flour and water. and if wanted soon. TO FRY TRIPE. take off the skin and set it away to cool.

When it is boiling hot put in the tripe. or work it with the butter. dredge in a large teaspoonful of flour. put a small cup of water or milk to it. Next day cut it into long slips. and afterwards roll them in grated bread crumbs. You may serve it with onion sauce. add the contents of the pan and serve. Remove from the fire. Boiled tripe that has been left from the dinner of the preceding day may be fried in this manner. A bunch of parsley cut small and put with it is an improvement. serve hot. Then cover it and set it away. Drippings accumulated from different cooked meats of beef or veal can be clarified by putting it into a basin and slicing into it a raw potato. which causes all impurities to disappear. . stir the pan to prevent burning. Cut a pound of tripe in narrow strips. Cover the bottom of a platter with tomato sauce. salt and cayenne. Cut up half a pound of cold boiled tripe into neat squares. and dip each piece into beaten yolk of egg. FRICASSEED TRIPE. till of a light brown. Turn it into basins or small jars and set it in a cool place for future use. let it simmer gently for half an hour. Have ready in a frying pan over the fire some good beef drippings. TO CLARIFY BEEF DRIPPINGS. add to the tripe a teaspoonful of chopped parsley and a little strong vinegar. allowing it to boil long enough for the potato to brown. When mixed with an equal amount of butter it answers the same purpose as clear butter for frying and basting any meats except game and poultry. and fry it about ten minutes. and when cool drain it off from the sediment that settles at the bottom.not be in less than four or five hours. add a bit of butter the size of an egg. TRIPE LYONNAISE. Some put in oysters five minutes before dishing up. season with pepper and salt. Put two ounces of butter and a tablespoonful of chopped onion in a frying pan and fry to a delicate brown.

Select a nice fillet. Cold fillet of veal is very good stewed with tomatoes and an onion or two. place in a dripping-pan with the thick side down. and baste often. dredge in some flour. and put in a rather hot oven. or stuff it . a fillet. ROAST FILLET OF VEAL. For a gravy. and fresh cucumbers if in season. stir until brown. unroll the loin. and also put a good layer under the fat. BOILED FILLET OF VEAL. boil a few minutes. Before serving carefully remove the twine. delicate fillet. according to the size. A roast of four to five pounds will bake in about two hours. Choose a small. serve with ham or bacon. In roasting veal. Is very nice sliced cold for lunch. should be well washed in cold water before cooking and wiped thoroughly dry with a clean cloth. should have on the caul until nearly done enough. and Worcestershire or Chili sauce forms a fine relish. put the stuffing well around the kidney. around which put considerable salt. skim off some of the fat if there is too much in the drippings. Make a dressing the same as for fowls. prepare as for roasting. Truss it of a good shape by drawing the fat round and tie it up with tape. Roast from three to four hours. Serve with green peas and lemon jelly. that the fat may not burn. and baste with butter. add some hot water if necessary. stir in such sweet herbs as fancied. Prepare it the same as any roast. should be covered with greased paper. leaving in the kidney. ROAST LOIN OF VEAL. care must be taken that it is not at first placed in too hot an oven. the fat of a loin. also. graduated after it commences to roast to moderate. fold and secure with several coils of white cotton twine wound around in all directions. in another half hour turn over the roast. take out the bone. in half an hour add a little hot water to the pan.Mutton drippings impart an unpleasant flavor to anything cooked outside of its kind. and put in a gravy boat. Cook it rather moderately at first. like all other meat. It should have careful attention and frequent basting. and when about done dredge lightly with flour and baste with melted butter. one of the most delicate joints of veal. fill up the space with stuffing. After it is dished pour melted butter over it. Veal.

A boiled tongue should be served with it. Line a pudding-dish with a good suet crust. place it over. keeping continually boiling until done. well seasoned with salt and pepper and dredged with flour. a small sprig of thyme and a seasoning of pepper and salt. (Plain. and with this gravy it makes a nice breakfast dish. Cover it closely and allow it to stew gently on the back of the range for fifteen minutes. a tureen of oyster sauce.with an oyster force meat. When the gravy is boiled up well return the meat to the pan and gravy. Just boil it up and then let it stand to cool. cover it with water and let it boil very gently three and a half or four hours. Send it to the table with a rich white sauce. When boiling hot lay in the cutlets. lay in the veal and bacon. and if you have more grease than is necessary for the gravy put it aside for further use.) . FRIED VEAL CUTLETS. place the pan over a slow fire for about ten minutes. Garnish with stewed celery and slices of bacon. rich brown color. then remove the meat. after having washed it thoroughly. keeping it well skimmed. or. until it is a smooth. with the back of the spoon. Brown nicely on both sides. and afterwards turning off some of the grease they were fried in and then adding to that left in the pan a few drops of hot water. VEAL PUDDING. then add gradually a cup of _cold water_ and season with pepper and salt. Reserve a tablespoonful or more and rub into it a tablespoonful of flour. then lay in the veal and a few slices of bacon. Another mode is to simply fry the cutlets. roll out a piece of paste to form a lid. Put into a frying pan two or three tablespoonfuls of lard or beef drippings. tie the basin in a pudding cloth and put it into a saucepan of boiling water. if stuffed with oysters. turning the whole over the fried chops. put a piece of butter the size of an egg into a very clean frying pan to melt. then add two or three spoonfuls of warm water. This softens the meat. press it close with the thumb. FRIED VEAL CHOPS. pour the gravy over it. Cut about two pounds of lean veal into small collops a quarter of an inch in thickness. or about one hour.

which will take twenty minutes. salt. moistening with butter as you proceed. put a small bit of butter on each. one onion. chopped with bread crumbs. and one egg well beaten. or hot lard and butter mixed. VEAL OLIVES. Pound the slices separately in a mortar. sliced and fried in the same grease the cutlets were. Serve with horse-radish. fastening the four corners together with little bird skewers. a pinch of mace. or sliced cold for lunch. sweet marjoram. Boil up and serve hot with the gravy in separate dish. Keep it well covered and in a dry place. Cut veal from the leg or other lean part into pieces the size of an oyster. so that when cut it will look variegated. season to taste with salt and pepper. dredge with flour and set in a hot oven. put this mixture upon the pieces of veal. VEAL CROQUETTES. first the tongue and then the veal. add a tablespoonful of flour to the gravy they were fried in and turn in cream or milk. This dish is very fine accompanied with a few sound fresh tomatoes. then pack it in a jar or pail. rub some over each piece. Season with pepper. mixing it in alternate layers. Mix up a little salt pork. then into cracker crumbs and fry. Cut up a slice of a fillet of veal. dip in egg. and fry in drippings. salt and a little mace.Sprinkle over them salt and pepper. adding a little cold ham and two or three slices of onion. If you wish a gravy with them. lay them in a pan with sufficient veal gravy or light stock to cover the bottom of the pan. Mince a coffee cup of cold veal in a chopping bowl. then dip them in beaten egg and cracker crumbs. powdered . and let them remain until quite tender. and all dished on the same platter. Prepare equal quantities of boiled sliced veal and smoked tongue. Nice for sandwiches. VEAL COLLOPS. When browned on top. VEAL CHEESE. They both look and taste like oysters. into squares of three inches. about half an inch thick. a little pepper. Press it down hard and pour melted butter over the top.

and add to the rest. egg and bread crumbs. and wet with milk sufficient to make a soft dough. when quite light. and by no means allow the pot to _stop boiling_. when it will be ready to cut. season with pepper and salt. then the above mixture. Remove from the fire. in order that no steam shall escape. The crust for pot-pie should be raised with yeast. boil quite hard. when cooled flatten each. (Fine. in summer. but do not roll or mould them. skim it well and pour in a teacupful of cold water. they retain all the flavor. and spread it on a platter. knead it well and set it away to rise. VEAL POT-PIE. then turn over the meat in order that all the scum may rise. twist the ends. a little grated nutmeg. dip them into bread crumbs and minced herbs. put the lid on the pot closely. so as to cover it.) Two or three pounds of veal cutlets. In summer you had better add one-half a teaspoonful of soda when you . mould and knead it again. dipped in hot lard. roll it into balls. salt and pepper to taste. one hour. and broil over a clear fire. To three pints of flour add two ounces of butter. well jointed. let the whole boil slowly one hour. in winter. just before it comes to a boil. when done remove the paper. two tablespoonfuls of minced savory herbs. and fry in a wire basket. dip them in egg and bread crumbs. always remembering that the crust will take up part of the seasoning. Let a pint of milk or cream come to the boiling point. remove all the scum. put the pot over a slow fire. Cooked this way. wrap a cloth around it. one-half hour. put the pieces into the pot with one quart of water to every five pounds of meat.parsley and pepper. flatten them. and brush them over with the yolk of an egg. and fold each cutlet in a piece of white letter paper well buttered. Cut the cutlets about three-quarters of an inch in thickness. Procure a nice breast or brisket of veal. when this is done cut off your crust in pieces of equal size. stirring with care. a little salt. and let it stand. then add a tablespoonful of cold butter. some salt. lay them on top of the meat. cook it all about ten minutes. Beat up two eggs and mix with a teaspoonful of cornstarch or flour. season with pepper and salt to your taste. If the lid does not fit the pot closely. BROILED VEAL CUTLETS.

cut a slit in the centre and make several small incisions on either side of it. Wash it. let it boil twenty minutes and serve in a deep dish. put the crust on. while it is boiling. add pepper and salt to your taste. and a small piece of butter. butter a tin or earthen basin or pudding-pan. a little salt. bake one hour in a quick oven. if milk use a small . a spoonful at a time. and flour enough to make it a little thicker than for pancakes. Many are fond of thin slices of sweet ham cooked with the veal for pie. two spoonfuls of cream or milk. and roll it to nearly half an inch thickness. when it boils. take off the scum as it rises. have ready a batter made with two eggs. puff-paste it. shake pepper over. Cut up two or three pounds of veal into pieces three inches long and one thick. cut in thin slices and parboiled with the meat. put it in a stewpan with hot water to cover it. pare and cut in halves twelve small Irish potatoes. three tablespoonfuls of cream or milk. take out all the small bones. butter the size of an egg. put them into the stewpan. trim the edges neatly with a knife. VEAL LOAF. put bits of butter in the size of a hickory nut all over the meat. skim it well. Three pounds of raw veal chopped very fine. giving it two or three turns. or you may wet it with water and add another bit of butter. cover the pan closely so that no steam can escape. three eggs. VEAL STEW. half a pound of nice corned pork. butter will be required for the pie. then fill it nearly to the top with some of the water in which the meat was boiled. when pork is used not other salt will be necessary. if any. and when all the scum is removed. Cut the veal into rather small pieces or slices. lay some of the parboiled meat in to half fill it. line it with pie paste. when all is in. A breast of veal will make two two-quart basin pies. put it into your stewpan with two quarts of water. roll a cover for the top of the crust.knead it the second time. VEAL PIE. and very little. will make it very nice. drop this into the stew. when the meat is tender turn it into a dish to cool. add to it a tablespoonful of salt and set it over the fire. let it boil. dredge wheat flour over until it looks white.

and milk to form a thin batter. picked (not chopped) up. the centre of each. Make the patties of a light. when it may be turned out and served in very thin slices. BRAISED VEAL. the size of a small sauceplate. into a kettle or stone crock and let it get hot. make a paste of flour and water as stiff as it can be rolled out. mix with the veal four pounded crackers. Butter a good-sized bowl. in the bowl a layer of veal. and so on. and it is ready for the patties. flaky crust. omitting the salt. remove the cloth and paste. alternating with veal and ham. put the bowl into a saucepan. and. then take it from the fire. or other vessel. cover the contents of the bowl with the paste. with water just up to the rim of the bowl. cut half way through. where it will simmer slowly for . basting with butter and water while baking. lay on the top and serve. Take a piece of the shoulder weighing about five pounds. cover it tightly and put it over a medium fire until the meat is brown on both sides. VEAL PATTIES. until the bowl is filled. together with a few shavings of onion. VEAL FOR LUNCH. and boil three hours. and line it with thin slices of hard-boiled eggs. one large tablespoonful salt. then a layer of ham. with a little salt pork cut fine. the yolk of one egg. Cut portions of the neck or breast of veal into small pieces. stew gently for ten or fifteen minutes. Stewed oysters or lamb may be used in place of veal. Salt and pepper the veal and put it into the kettle. as for tarts. with pepper and salt. for about three inches.piece of butter. one teaspoonful of black pepper. stir in a paste made of a tablespoonful of flour. to be raised and serve as a cover. also of the yellow top. and over this tie a double cotton cloth. season with pepper and salt. have veal and ham both in very thin slices. Have the bone removed and tie up the meat to make it firm. Then set the kettle back on the stove. then a layer of veal. place. Serve cut in thin slices. turning it occasionally. Put a piece of butter the size of half an egg. mix well together and form into a loaf. let all come to a boil. and a small piece of celery chopped coarsely. and let it stand until the next day. An excellent lunch in traveling. Bake two and one-half hours. cut round. mix the eggs and cream together. one large tablespoonful of sage. Put a spoonful of the stew in each crust.

Well wash the brains and soak them in cold water until white. chop it small. turn it that it may brown evenly. with the slices of lemon. put bits of butter.about two hours and a half. and set it in a hot oven. Divide them into small pieces with a knife. It can be served hot with the hot meat. and. dip the prepared pieces of the head in wheat flour or batter. then fold the cloth closely over it. or cold with the cold meat. When the roast is done put it on a hot dish. baste once or twice. put in about two tablespoonfuls of hot water. lay a plate over. CALF'S HEAD CHEESE. then thoroughly drain them and place them on a board. lay the fried pieces around it. and dredge on flour until it looks white. Parboil them until tender in a small saucepan for about a quarter of an hour. and on it a gentle weight. Boil a calf's head (after having cleaned it) until tender. lay in a cloth in a colander. then set it on a trivet or muffin rings in a dripping-pan. and then roll . then split it in two. until the meat leaves the bones. Boil a calf's head in water enough to cover it. and serve with the meat. Before setting the meat back on the stove. if liked. the size of an oyster. and keep the best half (bone it if you like). take from it every particle of bone. and strain it into a gravy boat. When cold it may be sliced thin for supper or sandwiches. all over the best half of the head. and a tablespoonful of browned flour. put a cup of water into the pan. BRAIN CUTLETS. BAKED CALF'S HEAD. Whilst this is doing. and if not. season with pepper and salt and slices of lemon. and cover it with a tin cover. put the minced meat into it. Let it boil up once. sprinkle pepper over it. add a tablespoonful of finely chopped sweet herbs. then take it with a skimmer into a wooden bowl or tray. Dip each piece into flour. Spread each slice with made mustard. cut the meat from the other in uniform pieces. if liked. and fry in hot lard or beef drippings a delicate brown. put the gravy from the dripping-pan into the pan in which the pieces were fried. a heaping tablespoonful of salt and a teaspoonful of pepper will be sufficient. if necessary. the size of a nutmeg. season with pepper and salt. see if the juice of the meat together with the butter do not make gravy enough. a little hot water. When the gravy is cold it will be like jelly.

fry the bacon to a nice crisp. and then stew them gently in rich stock. dredge it with flour and set it in the oven to brown. If you wish a gravy with it. skin and chop them (not too finely). take it out and keep it hot. Remove the scum and add a little salt. cover it with cold water and bring it gradually to boil. give it one boil and . then fry the liver in the same pan.) When perfectly clean take out the eyes. take it out.them in egg and bread crumbs. Serve very hot with gravy. CALFS HEAD BOILED. into which lay the head. Simmer it very gently from two and a half to three hours. and then have ready a stewpan. put in about two ounces of butter. pour off most of the fat from the frying pan. or until the bones will slip out easily. set it on the back of the range to keep it hot. Serve it with a slice of bacon on the top of each slice of liver. and when nearly done. Slice the liver a quarter of an inch thick. and fry them in butter or well-clarified drippings. like stewed sweetbreads. Score the top and rub it over with melted butter. a tablespoonful of flour well rubbed in. and cut the same number of thin slices as you have of liver. which soak for an hour in warm water. add a tablespoonful of minced parsley which has been previously scalded. take it up and drain very dry. salt. lay it in the hot bacon fat and fry it a nice brown. hold it by the ear. They are also nice plainly boiled and served with parsley and butter sauce. When you serve the head. which increases it and causes it to rise to the top. Put the head into boiling water and let it remain about five minutes. When the head is done. also a pinch of pepper. having first seasoned it with pepper and salt and dredged in a little flour. CALF'S LIVER AND BACON. or as much as you require. pour hot water over it and let it remain for a few minutes to clear it from blood. then dry it in a cloth. and with the back of the knife scrape off the hair (should it not come off easily dip the head again in boiling water. Take a pound of bacon. have it accompanied with a gravy boat of melted butter and minced parsley. cut off the ears and remove the brain. Put the head to soak in hot water a few minutes to make it look white. then stir into this four tablespoonfuls of melted butter. Another way of doing brains is to prepare them as above. boil the brains fifteen or twenty minutes. add a cup of water. salt and pepper.

SWEETBREADS. Serve hot with sliced lemon or parsley. There are two in a calf. then into the beaten egg._--Cut the liver in nice thin slices. . which are considered delicacies. then put them into boiling salted water with a tablespoonful of vinegar. then throw into hot water to whiten and harden. and cook them twenty minutes. put them on a brown paper a moment to free them from grease. Before cooking in any manner let them lie for half an hour in tepid water. and again in the cracker dust. Have ready a frying kettle half full of fat over the fire. one tablespoonful of butter. remove the little pipes. They should always be thoroughly cooked. _Another Way. chop them very fine. letting it cook until thoroughly done. When the croquettes are fried a nice golden brown. Season with salt. and cut into thin slices. add the beaten yolks of three raw eggs. wet the hands with cold water and make the mixture in shape. The color should be clear and a shade darker than the fat. and sufficient fine cracker crumbs to make stiff enough to roll out into little balls or cork-shaped croquettes. pour boiling water over it and let it stand about five minutes. then drop them again into cold water to harden. after which draw off the outer casing. a dish containing three smoothly beaten eggs. afterwards rolling them in the cracker dust. Calf's liver and bacon are very good broiled after cutting each in thin slices. then serve with a cream or milk gravy poured over it. CROQUETTES OF SWEETBREADS. pepper and a teaspoonful of grated onion. half a cupful of cream. a large platter of cracker dust. After preparing them as above they are put into hot fat and butter. Season with butter. pepper and salt. then drain and put in a dripping-pan with three or four thin slices of salt pork or bacon. almost to a paste. Select the largest. soak them for an hour in cold salted water. Take four veal sweetbreads. Now remove them. smooth them on the outside and drop them carefully in the hot fat. FRIED SWEETBREADS. first removing the pipes and membranes. pepper and salt and put in the oven.serve in a gravy boat.

The pieces mostly used for roasting are the hind-quarter of the sheep. and draws out too much of the blood or juices. first rolling them in egg and cracker crumbs. Three sweetbreads. then wash well and dry with a clean cloth. ROAST MUTTON. put them into warm water to draw out the blood. and pour round. then put them into boiling water. about twelve minutes to the pound. Choose large. and let them bake for nearly three-quarters of an hour. and about a quarter of an hour before you think it will be done dredge the meat very lightly with flour and baste it with butter. and allow them to simmer for about ten minutes which renders them firm. BAKED SWEETBREADS. but not over. sprinkle with bread crumbs. and to improve their color. dip them in egg again. them a good brown gravy. as that tends to harden it. Make three pieces of toast. cut into thin slices. also broiled the same. called the loin and leg. If they are uncooked. Take them up. white sweetbreads. if your fire is strong. brown gravy. add a well-beaten egg. Skim . cover it with a sheet of white paper. let them remain for rather more than one hour. the fore-quarter. egg and bread crumbs. Allow. Drop on them a little oiled butter. MUTTON AND LAMB. It should not be salted at first. and put the sweetbreads into a moderately heated oven. two tablespoonfuls of cream and a tablespoonful of chopped parsley. three slices of toast. in roasting. place the sweetbreads on the toast. lay it in your dripping-pan and put in a little water to baste it with at first. If there is danger of its browning too fast. FRICASSEED SWEETBREADS. the shoulder. brush over the egg. but salt soon after it begins to roast well. and then into more bread crumbs. that is. Every part should be trimmed off that cannot be eaten. drain them. oiled butter. then afterward with its own gravy. Baste it often. also the chine or saddle. which it should be. stir all together for a few minutes and serve immediately. let them simmer in a rich gravy for three-quarters of an hour. which is the two loins together.and fried the same as lamb chops.

basting the leg occasionally with its own liquor. then pour over half a pint of water. Fill the hole whence the bone was taken with a stuffing made the same as for fowls. Having lined the bottom of a thick iron kettle or stewpan with a few thin slices of bacon. and seasoning it with salt and pepper as soon as it begins to be tender. then cut off most of the fat. put it in a roasting pan. and boil the meat in a cloth. Bind and tie it up compactly. Serve with currant jelly or other tart sauce. placed in the cavity after having the bone removed. If the broth is to be used for soup. Cover with a tight cover and stew very gently for four hours. if not.the gravy well and thicken very slightly with brown flour. and boil gently from two to three hours. let it finish by remaining in the steam for ten or fifteen minutes. into which a teacupful of capers or nasturtiums have been stirred. BOILED LEG OF MUTTON. skimming well. and trim the knuckle. salt it well when partly done. basting it occasionally. also a dish of currant jelly. BRAISED LEG OF MUTTON. Sew the leg up underneath to prevent the dressing or stuffing from falling out. without spoiling the skin if possible. When thoroughly cooked. Put it into a pot with water enough to cover it. Serve it up with a sauce boat of melted butter. pour some of it over the meat and send the . skim the grease from the top of the drippings. put over the bacon four carrots. To prepare a leg of mutton for boiling. three onions. BONED LEG OF MUTTON ROASTED. When partly cooked season with salt and pepper. or cooking it without. remove and place the leg on a warm platter. Cover the whole with a few more slices of bacon. When cooked strain the gravy. wash it clean. This recipe can be varied either by preparing the leg with a stuffing. add a cup of water and thicken with a spoonful of dissolved flour. Send the gravy to the table in a gravy dish. turn in a cup of hot water and place it in a moderately hot oven. cut a small piece off the shank bone. and keeping the pot well covered. adding to it part of an onion finely minced. then over these place the leg of mutton. Then take it from the fire. put in a little salt while boiling. Take the bone out of a small leg of mutton. thicken with a spoonful of flour (it should be quite brown). a bunch of savory herbs.

and set in a cool place four or five days. . all powdered and mixed. Remove all the rough fat from the mutton and lay it in a deep earthen dish. Take the bones and other trimmings. Lay the meat and vegetables upon it. brown sugar. English mustard. LEG OF MUTTON A LA VENISON. turnips. to be served with the mutton when carved. Having skimmed it well. Cover the bottom of the dish with slices of buttered toast. strain the gravy into a stew-pan. Wash and put the leg in a steamer and cook it until tender. thicken the liquid with flour and strain through a fine sieve. Serve with currant jelly. Set the pan on the fire and let it simmer till the meat is warmed through. This is a fine dish when the directions are faithfully followed. as it has been once cooked already. and put the mutton into it. black pepper. to serve with the meat. cover the kettle tightly and stew for four hours. Garnish the dish around the leg with potatoes cut in the shape of olives and fried a light brown in butter. after which pour over it slowly a teacup of good vinegar. and some sliced onions. STEAMED LEG OF MUTTON. place over it an inverted shallow pan. Have ready-boiled some carrots. allspice. Cut into small pieces the lean of some cold mutton that has been underdone. one each of celery-salt. Do not lat the water touch the meat. salt and dredge well with flour and set it in a hot oven until nicely browned. and let them stew till you have drawn from them a good gravy. and some sweet herbs. HASHED MUTTON. then place in a roasting pan. the water that remains in the bottom of the steamer may be used for soup. put them in a sauce-pan with as much water as will cover them. Add a cup of hot water to the pickle remaining and baste with it. also a relish of currant jelly. put in a kettle a quart of boiling water. potatoes and onions. and pour over them the gravy. the dame as for venison.remainder to the table in a tureen. but do not allow it to boil. and on it lay the meat just as removed from the pickle. and season it with pepper and salt. cover tightly. rub into it thoroughly the following: One tablespoonful of salt. turning it and basting often with the liquid each day. Slice them and add to the meat and gravy. When done. To cook.

MUTTON CUTLETS. hot enough to fry crullers. a small piece of butter. and serve very hot and expeditiously. let it boil up thick. and serve them up hot and dry. pepper and salt. you may boil them and put them to the hashed mutton. (Baked. Put in a frying-pan a tablespoonful of cold lard and butter mixed. season with pepper and salt. on a warm platter. turn off the superfluous grease. fry on both sides a fine brown. dish them on a very hot dish.Tomatoes will be found an improvement. Prepare the chops by trimming off all extra fat and skin. FRIED MUTTON CHOPS. rub the bars with a little fat. as too many cool the fat. turned over a dish of hot fried or broiled chops. if any. or rolled cracker. Cut the chops from a tenderloin of mutton. dip again in the egg and crumbs. have some fine mutton chops without much fat. When dine. stir into the hot gravy remaining a heaping spoonful of cold water or milk. and lay on the chops. Loin of mutton. Tomato sauce is considered fine. take them up and place on a hot dish. frying only a few at a time. then in rolled cracker or bread-crumbs. Drop into this hot lard the chops. If green peas or Lima beans are in season. slightly beat and level them. BROILED MUTTON CHOPS. NO. While broiling frequently turn them. 1. and in about eight minutes they will be done. and beaten egg. or serving them up separately. remove a portion of the fat. and trim them into a nice shape. You can serve it in a separate dish or pour it over the chops. 2. Season with pepper and salt. Have ready a deep spider containing a pound or more of lard. FRIED MUTTON CHOPS. trim off the skin. rub a small piece of butter on each chop. then lay them into the hot grease.) . dip each chop in beaten egg. place the gridiron over a bright clear fire. NO. Dip into wheat flour. and so on until they are well coated with the crumb. leaving out the other vegetables. season them with salt and pepper. Fry them brown. sprinkle with salt and pepper. If you wish a made gravy. Nice with tomato sauce poured over them.

Put a little butter and water in a baking-pan with the . Wash and peel some good potatoes and cut them into slices the thickness of a penny-piece. Make a little brown gravy and turn over them when they are served. potatoes for each person. then arrange them neatly (in layers) in a brown stone dish proper for baking purposes. rendering the whole most delicious. Bake quickly.Prepare them the same as for frying. and baste often with butter and water. the potatoes appear to be getting too dry. where it may be allowed to remain until sufficiently cooked. After the potatoes are sliced. and water if required. turn them over so as to brown the other side also. When the upper sides of the chops are a nice crisp brown. While the chops are baking the gravy drips from them among the potatoes. salt. Roll up the slices. BAKED MUTTON CHOPS AND POTATOES. Add a little more salt and pepper. trim off most of the fat. of course. and return the dish to a cooler part of the oven. When the potatoes are nicely browned. lay them in a dripping-pan with a _very_ little water at the bottom. sage and summer savory. be decided according to the number of persons to whom they have to be served. and add a sufficient quantity of cold water to prevent their burning. make them into a neat round shape by putting a small skewer through each. pinning with little skewers or small wooden toothpicks to keep the dressing in. beaten egg. in the cooking. On each slice lay a spoonful of stuffing made with bread crumbs. pepper. remove the dish from the oven. spoil their appearance. If. and place the chops on the top. Cut from a leg of mutton slices about half an inch thick. Sprinkle a little salt and pepper between each layer. The dish in which the chops and potatoes are baked must be as neat looking as possible. of course. which will be in about three-quarters of an hour. wash them in two or three waters to thoroughly cleanse them. Place the dish in a very hot oven--oil the top shelf--so as to brown the potatoes in a few minutes. but it is a safe plan to allow two. The quantity of potatoes must. MUTTONETTES. a little more water may be gently poured in at one corner of the dish. Have ready some nice loin chops (say one--for each person). or even three. only care must be taken to see that the water is hot this time--not cold as at first. as it has to be sent to the table. butter. Those who have never tasted this dish have no idea how delightful it is. turning the potatoes out would.

SCALLOPED MUTTON AND TOMATOES. wet the edges of the paste around the top of the basin. and between each layer of meat. place them in stewpan in alternate layers of sliced potatoes and chops. When done. with steaks cut from the leg. let it stew gently till vegetables are ready to mash and the greater part of the gravy is absorbed. turn it out carefully on a platter and serve with a rich gravy under it. eight potatoes. and a piece of butter as large as an English walnut. and constantly stir until the eggs begin to stiffen. slightly trimmed. Two cups of chopped cold mutton. and cook in hot oven three-quarters of an hour. two tablespoonfuls of hot water. The time required for cooking is about three hours. add turnips and onions cut into pieces. or. and then with the thumb and forefinger twist the edges of the paste over so as to give it a corded appearance. MUTTON PUDDING. Take some chops from loin of mutton. This is a very good recipe for cooking small birds. then place in a dish. When the meat is hot. fill the lining with thick mutton cutlets. serve it up hot. cover stewpan closely. nearly a quart of water. garnish with parsley. Over the bottom of an earthen baking-dish place a layer of bread . put some slices of potatoes. This pudding can be set in a steamer and steamed. Season with pepper and salt.muttonettes. and when done thicken the gravy. pour over the meat. a little thyme and two slices of onion chopped fine. Line a two-quart pudding basin with some beef suet paste. Two and a half pounds of chops. When the pudding is filled. season with pepper and salt some parsley. four turnips. pour in nearly a quart of cold water. break in three eggs. IRISH STEW. four small onions. Fasten down the edge by bearing all around with the thumb. if preferred. Time about two hours. SCRAMBLED MUTTON. and cover with a piece of paste rolled out the size of the basin. Baste often. and serve on hot platter. or boiled.

pepper and bits of butter. Procure a nice hind-quarter. season each with salt. let it heat through slowly. (See SAUCES. green peas and mint sauce. With this liquor baste the meat occasionally. chop very fine. place it in a moderate oven. with a teaspoonful of salt. serve with lettuce.) ROAST QUARTER OF LAMB. spread over with bread crumbs. The sauce should be made some time before dinner. season with salt and pepper and serve. Wash them well in salted water and parboil fifteen minutes. then dredge it with salt and flour. A breast of lamb roasted is very sweet and is considered by many as preferable to hind-quarter.crumbs. surrounded with tomato sauce. owing to their excellence being recognized by but few buyers. Make the gravy from the drippings. and let it stand a few minutes. The mint sauce is made as follows: Take fresh. wash and drain them or dry on a cloth. Bake three-quarters of an hour. then pour over it six tablespoonfuls good cider or white-wine vinegar. LAMB SWEETBREADS AND TOMATO SAUCE. trim neatly and put them in a pan with just butter enough to prevent their burning. thickened with flour. . remove some of the fat that is around the kidney. mix. which can invariably be had at a low price. Lamb sweetbreads are not always procurable. and over it alternate layers of cold roast mutton cut in thin slices. A quarter of lamb weighing seven or eight pounds will require two hours to roast. and serve immediately. The top layer should be of tomatoes. put in a gravy tureen. toss them about until a delicate color. quicken the fire. skewer the lower joint up to the fillet. as laid in. when cool. It requires nearly as long a time to roast as the quarter. and tomatoes peeled and sliced. but a stroll through the markets occasionally reveals a small lot of them. so that the flavor of the mint may be well extracted. put half a pint of water into the dripping-pan. young spearmint leaves stripped from stems. and should be served in the same manner. and to three tablespoonfuls of mint add two of finely powdered cut-loaf sugar.

when done. pepper and salt--exactly like beefsteak. then add a few thin slices of salt pork. turn the meat around frequently to prevent its burning. with just enough cold water to cover it well. cut in two parts. all hot. when tender. either shoulder or leg. should be put to boil in the morning with water just enough to cover it. then keep it over the fire until _very_ tender and the juice nearly boiled out. It should stew gently until it is partly done. Serve. Serve with cream sauce. chop it up like hash. Drop in a few made dumplings. Cut up the lamb into small pieces (after removing all the fat) say about two inches square. that all parts may cook alike. one or two onions sliced up fine. Cook fifteen minutes longer. renew the coals occasionally. and put it in a cool place to harden. Cover it closely and stew until the meat is tender. It takes some time to broil it well.TO BROIL THE FORE-QUARTER OF LAMB. Nice cut up cold into thin slices. LAMB STEW. Serve in a gravy boat. Remove it from the fire-place in a wooden chopping bowl. some pepper and salt if needed. but when done it will be found to be equal to broiled chicken. turn over as soon as cooked on one side. Wash it well and put it over the fire. season with butter. Take off the shoulder and lay it upon the gridiron with the breast. press out all the juice. and a weight upon that. let it boil up once. then add. made like short biscuit. PRESSED LAMB. season with salt and pepper. put a tin sheet on top of the meat. made as follows: Heat a tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan. to facilitate its cooking. The pressing is generally done by placing a dish over the meat and putting a flat-iron upon that. adding vegetables and spices. add a teaspoonful of flour and stir until perfectly smooth. and season to taste with salt and pepper and a teaspoonful of finely chopped fresh parsley. the flavor being more delicate than when cooked otherwise. a cup of cold milk. cut out _very_ small. and let it heat gradually. slowly stirring in. and the broth left from the meat would make a nice soup served with it. Thicken the gravy with a little flour moistened with milk. . Place it in a bread-pan. season more if necessary. and two or three raw potatoes cut up into inch pieces. The meat.

They should be put together with care. a little flour and butter. and crumbs of bread may be used. shoulders and middlings are usually salted. making an addition to the breakfast or lunch table. ROAST PIG. . These are made of any scraps or bits of good food that happen to be left from one or more meals. Prepare your dressing as for DRESSING FOR FOWLS. Take a young pig about six weeks old. these can be found (in the dried. the sparerib and chine. and in such small quantities that they cannot be warmed up separately. thyme and sweet marjoram. Serve on small squares of buttered toast. set it inside. summer savory. Pork requires more thorough cooking than most meats. When dressing or stuffing is used. it will look cool and smooth. one spoonful of minced beef. still those raised and gathered at home are considered more fresh. and cannot be easily impressed with the finger. swill or still-fed pork is unfit to cure. the leg. for example. pork or ham. and those usually used for roasting. there are more or less herbs used for seasoning--sage. thick like fish-balls and browned well with butter in a frying pan or on a griddle. mixed with one raw egg. it is old. bits of poultry. cold rice. As. bits of salt tongue. when fresh. PORK. and with cold celery if in season. and boiling water. a couple of spoonfuls of frizzled beef and cream. so as not to have them too dry to be palatable. light packages) at most of the best druggists. the shoulder. chopped fine. These things well chopped and seasoned. the lean meat of one mutton chop. bacon. The best parts. To choose pork: If the rind is thick and tough. Fresh pork is in season from October to April. a chick's leg. adding half an onion. are the loin. pulverized form. every kind of fresh meat. if the least underdone it is unwholesome. two cold hard-boiled eggs. put up in small. or too moist to cook in shape. all the gristle and hard outside taken from the meat. a little mashed potato. Scraps of hash. boiled oatmeal left from breakfast. Most housekeepers would be surprised at the result. and only corn-fed pork is good. pickled and smoked. The hams. a little cold chopped potato.CROQUETTES OF ODDS AND ENDS. then made into round cakes.

Apple sauce and potatoes should be served with it. baste with butter and water a few times as the pig warms. cut a slit in the knuckle with a sharp knife. Make a gravy with flour stirred into the pork drippings. season with pepper and let all boil up once. This will keep the skin from cracking and it still will be crisp. and rinse out the inside again. as a high heat hardens the rind before the meat is heated through. surrounded with parsley or celery tops. It will take from two to three hours to roast. Strain. Serve in a gravy boat. cut off its head first. and if you like wine in it. place it in a dripping-pan with a _very little_ water under it. When it begins to smoke all over rub it often with a rag dipped in melted butter. chopped sage and onions. Place the pig upon a large. Serve with apple sauce and pickles. stir into that remaining in the pan a good tablespoonful of flour. When half done. by turning off all the superfluous fat and adding a spoonful of flour stirred with a little water. turn it into a gravy boat. hot platter.wash it thoroughly inside and outside. and fill the space with sage and onion chopped. place a green wreath around the neck. score the skin in slices. giving it its original size and shape. A stuffing might be made of bread crumbs. take off its hams and shoulders. If it is very lean. making it full and plump. ROAST LEG OF PORK. it should be rubbed with fresh lard or butter when put into the pan. as many persons have a great aversion to its flavor. cook it moderately at first. Sew it up. tying the legs in proper position. afterwards with gravy from the dripping-pan. The gravy is to be made the same way as for beef roast. but do not cut deeper than the outer rind. this method is better than putting it in the meat. . salt the inside and stuff it with the prepared dressing. and a little pepper and salt. Score the skin in strips about a quarter of an inch apart. Choose a small leg of fine young pork. and separate the ribs. add water to make the right consistency. ROAST LOIN OF PORK. turn in water to make it the right consistency. and baked separately on a pie dish. Pour a little hot salted water into the dripping-pan. allow more time if it should be very fat. and a sprig of celery in its mouth. place it in a kneeling posture in the dripping-pan. add half a glass. wipe it dry with a fresh towel. A loin weighing about six pounds will roast in two hours. pepper and salt. In carving. Make the gravy by skimming off most of the grease. split down the back. and in another water put a teaspoonful of baking soda.

work into light dough a _small_ bit of butter. Have ready another kettle. which improves the color. with sufficient cold water to cover it. three hours after the water boils. _Time. cover tight. Put it into a boiling-pot. compact. leaving only sufficient to cover the pot half an inch above the rim that rests on the stove. after removing all the fat and cracking the bones. roll it out thin. and do not allow it to boil fast. rub with salt and sprinkle with pepper. into which remove all the bones and most of the gravy. ROAST SPARERIB. half an hour before time for serving the dinner thicken the gravy with a little flour. Boil a sparerib. Trim off the rough ends neatly. If the pork is purchased ready salted. and remove the scum as it rises. stuff with turkey dressing. ascertain how long the meat has been in pickle and soak it accordingly. sew up tightly. or the knuckle will fall to pieces before the middle of the leg is done. some of which should be laid around the dish as a garnish. well-filled leg._--A leg of pork weighing eight pounds. cut it in small. until tender. turning and rubbing it every day. For boiling. PORK TENDERLOINS. turning over once so as to bake both sides equally until a rich brown. Carrots. and lay them on the moulding-board until very light. choose a small. No steam should possibly escape while the crust is cooking. . baste frequently. let it remain in pickle for a week or ten days. crack the ribs across the middle. FRESH PORK POT-PIE. and rub it well with salt. and to be simmered very gently. fold over. and when tender season with salt and pepper. square cakes. let it gradually come to a boil. and by no means allow the pot to cease boiling. place in a dripping-pan with a pint of water. turnips or parsnips may be boiled with the pork. remove the scum as it rises. An hour before dressing it put it into cold water for an hour. To prepare the crust.BOILED LEG OF PORK. put in the crust. Simmer it very gently until tender. and boil steadily forty-five minutes.

stir until browned. and finish cooking. keeping them closely covered. skim the gravy. cutting them around the apple so that the core is in the centre of each piece. if not enough add a little butter or lard. FRIED PORK CHOPS. turning them often. require to be well-buttered before serving. They may be either fried or broiled. Season the chops with salt and pepper and a little powdered sage. give it one boil. and sprinkle on salt and pepper. and then in the seasoning. and add a little milk or cream. then cut out the core. the latter being drier. and on a flat dish a mixture of bread crumbs. Add to them a little water. dish around the chops or on a separate dish. trim them and beat them. Pork cutlets prepared in this manner may be stewed instead of being fried. Put some lard or drippings into a frying pan over the fire. and when it boils put in the cutlets. pour off part of the gravy into another pan to make a gravy to serve with them.The tenderloins are unlike any other part of the pork in flavor. Fry them in a little lard. Fry about twenty minutes or until they are done. Have apple sauce to eat with them. except when you remove the lid to skim them. minced onion and sage. When they are browned on one side and partly cooked. turn them carefully with a pancake turner. Then fry apples which you have sliced about two-thirds of an inch thick. turning them to have them cooked through. and pour over the dish. dip them into bread crumbs. Fry them twenty or thirty minutes. stir briskly. Put them on a hot dish. and stew them slowly till thoroughly done. remove. having dipped every one first in the egg. PORK CUTLETS. Prepare some beaten egg in a pan. if you choose. dredge in a little flour. . and keep hot while making a gravy by dredging a little flour into the hot fat. which should be done on a hot platter before the butter becomes oily. and remove the skin. A little Worcestershire sauce may be added to the gravy if desired. when done. and then pour it on the dish round the cutlets. Cut them from the leg. PORK CHOPS AND FRIED APPLES. After you have taken them out of the frying pan.

Some prefer to cook the meat until partly done. put a layer at the bottom of a pie-dish. skim off some of the fat in the pan and stir in a spoonful of flour. sprinkle over them a little powdered sage or summer savory. Make a good plain paste. Boil up and serve in a gravy boat. enough for the required want. Chicago_. closely covered. and a spoonful or two of catsup. and cook forty minutes. (Baked. and a little pepper and salt. Now pour into the dish a cupful of stock or water. then season with pepper and salt and turn in a pint of sweet milk. only be sparing of the nutmeg. two eggs. Wash and chop finely a handful of parsley. pepper and salt. Put a little paste around the edge of the dish. as it will require to be baked at least two hours. scald it well with hot water so as to wash out the briny taste. Sprinkle a small portion of these over the pork. season with pepper. cut into very thin slices three inches long by two inches wide. Add another layer of pork. Drop this into the kettle or broth by spoonfuls. place the pie at the bottom of the oven. with some paper over it. put on the cover and place the pie in a rather hot oven. also a slice or two of the fat of salt pork. also an onion. Take pieces of ribs of lean salt pork. before putting into the crust. When it all commences to boil again. and over that some more of the seasoning. well beaten. PORK PIE.) . stir it until free from lumps. dissolve in a spoonful of water as much flour as will make a very stiff batter. If a sausage flavor is liked. and if a gravy is liked. Cover it and boil an hour. Continue this till the dish is full. When the paste has risen and begins to take color. with very little fat on it. a level teaspoonful of soda. then add half a dozen potatoes cut into quarters. Put it into a kettle and cover it with cold water. PORK POT-PIE. _Palmer House.Fry them the same as mutton chops. Take from two and a half to three pounds of the thick ends of a loin of pork. PORK AND BEANS. drop in dumplings made from this recipe:-One pint of sour or buttermilk. a teaspoonful of salt.

If you do not like to use pork. a little pepper. salt the beans when boiling. of a clear white. let them come to a boil. as too long baking the pork destroys its solidity. When the meat becomes crisp and looks cooked. pick them over the night before. first scalding it with hot water. and scoring the rind across the top. cover with hot water. stir in while hot one or two tablespoonfuls of flour. a quarter of an inch apart to indicate where the slices are to be cut. and add a lump of butter when preparing them for the oven. half a teaspoonful of soda. hold one on a toasting fork . put them into an earthen pot. boil slowly till soft (not mashed). and bake six hours or longer. in the morning wash and drain in another water. Put on to boil in plenty of cold water with a piece of soda the size of a bean. place in the centre a pound of salt pork. about half a pint of milk. put in a deep pan. put to cook with them a piece of salt pork. Cut in thin slices. adding a tablespoonful of salt. hot. and salt if over freshened. Take quite thin slices of the thick part of side pork. and fry crisp. FRIED SALT PORK. add hot water from the tea-kettle as needed. cover with water once more. Drain the beans again. put to soak in cold water. let stand a few minutes. roll in flour. then add a tablespoonful of molasses. then turn off the water and put on more. A teaspoonful of finely-chopped parsley will add pleasantly to the appearance of the gravy. let them soak over night in cold water. white beans. gashed. and boil them fifteen minutes. and freshen in cold water. Pick over carefully a quart of small. in the morning put them in fresh water and let them scald. and bake one hour and a half. let it boil. Place the pot in the oven. remove it. or until the skin of the beans will crack when taken out and blown upon.Take two quarts of white beans. and thinly streaked with lean. on account of evaporation. drain and roll in flour as before. to keep the beans moist. drain off most of the grease from the frying pan. then drain again. stir in well. GRILLED SALT PORK. Keep the oven a moderate heat. If required quickly pour boiling water over the slices. BOSTON PORK AND BEANS. as much as would make five or six slices. and pour into a gravy dish.

Mix and mould it into little balls. put keep pouring some of the hot lard over them with a kitchen spoon. An economical way of using bacon and eggs that have been left from a previous meal is to put them in a wooden bowl and chop them quite fine. and fry in a spider the same as frying eggs. Do not turn them while they are frying. When done. Let it boil again. if any was left. Set the liquor in which the meat was boiled aside until cold. fry a light brown on both sides. serve hot. roll in raw egg and cracker crumbs. COLD BACON AND EGGS. Dish them on a hot platter. Cut slices of ham quite thin. adding a little mashed or cold chopped potato. Scrappel is a most palatable dish. when all are done. rinse out the pan. cut off the rind or skin. three minutes will cook them well. then chop fine. stirring constantly at first. in which immerse it frequently while cooking. by letting it slip through the fingers slowly to prevent lumps. Break the eggs separately in a saucer. . trim it off. taking care not to burn the slices. then turn off the top of the grease. When it boils put in the chopped meat and season well with pepper and salt. the white must retain its transparency so that the yolk will be seen through it. and put back the clear grease to fry the eggs. take the cake of fat from the surface and return to the fire. to remove the superfluous fat and render it more delicate. gristle and bones. heart and any lean scraps of pork. Take the head. drain off the lard. turning them often until crisp. and boil until the flesh slips easily from the bones. Lay a fried egg upon each slice of the ham. afterwards putting back on the range in a position to boil gently. pour into a long. this will do them sufficiently on the upper side. Cook an hour. and if any part of the white is discolored or ragged. Slip each egg gently into the frying pan. Put each slice as cooked in a warm covered pan. have at hand a dish of cold water. Remove the fat. put them into a hot frying pan. Serve hot.before a brisk fire to grill. and send to table hot. When done take them up with a tin slice. Very appetizing. and a little bacon gravy. FRIED HAM AND EGGS. They will be done enough in about three minutes. SCRAPPEL. that in case a bad one should be among them it may not mix with the rest. then thicken with corn meal as you would in making ordinary corn meal mush.

and dot the surface with spots of black pepper. When partly done. salt them. split them. and fried brown. put them into a saucepan with enough hot (not boiling) water to cover them. and cover it rather thickly over with a paste made of flour and water. and peel off the skin. put a frill of cut paper around the knuckle. If you wish them for breakfast. salt. It will take about four or five hours to bake it. a teaspoonful of butter. Place it over the fire in _cold_ water. Stick in also some whole cloves. dip each piece in this and fry in hot lard. place it on a platter. keeping it steadily at this point. and mould. Cut into slices when cold. Or. soak it for an hour in cold water. In cold weather this can be kept several weeks. allow it to remain in the pot until . Put it into an earthen dish. and pour over them spiced vinegar made hot. remove the skin by pealing it off. TO BAKE A HAM. a cup of milk. and set it in a moderately heated oven. Cut with a sharp knife the hardened surface from the base and butt of the ham. It requires four to five hours to boil them soft. They will be ready to use in a day or two. as you do mush.) Take a medium-sized ham and place it to soak for ten or twelve hours. Take twelve pigs' feet. scrape and wash them clean. First remove all dust and mold by wiping with a coarse cloth. as underdone ham is very unwholesome. take off the crust carefully.square pan. dip them in beaten egg and flour and fry. then wash it thoroughly. wipe it dry. and raspings of bread over the fat of the ham. is a cheap and delicious breakfast dish. If the ham is to be served cold. Pack them in a stone crock. with flour enough to make a thick batter. the fat side up. allowing it to cook twenty minutes for every pound of meat. not too deep. Then cut away the rusty part from underneath. (Corned. Souse is good eaten cold or warm. BOILED HAM. A ham weighing twelve pounds will require four hours to cook properly. or serve it glazed and garnished with cut vegetables. PIGS' FEET PICKLED. When the ham is to be served hot. When done. and let it come to a moderate boil. make a batter of two eggs. Cooked in this way the flavor is much finer than when boiled.

BROILED HAM.the water in which it was cooked becomes cold. marjoram and thyme mixed. cover it closely. POTTED HAM. Cold boiled ham is very nice for broiling. rather more than half a teaspoonful of cayenne. BOLOGNA SAUSAGE. pounded mace and nutmeg. This makes it more juicy. _Mode. placed on a warm platter. (Cooked._--Mince the ham. and also trim off the outer edge where the smoke has hardened the meat. and many prefer it to using the raw ham. Trim very closely the skin from the upper side of each slice. Cut your ham into thin slices. in the above proportion. the same . two pounds of fresh lean beef. fill up the jar with clarified lard. which should be a little less than one quarter of an inch thick. and bake for half an hour. and should be served the last thing directly from the gridiron. two teaspoonfuls of powdered mace. it will speedily toughen. half a nutmeg. Broil over a brisk fire. savory. If ham or bacon is allowed to stand by the fire after it has been broiled or fried. and will be found very convenient for sandwiches. It will require about five minutes. Never soak ham in tepid or hot water. as it will toughen the meat. Two teaspoonfuls of cayenne pepper. turning the slices constantly. To TWO pounds of lean ham allow one pound of fat. one ounce each of parsley.) Two POUNDS of lean pork. If well seasoned. ten tablespoonfuls of powdered sage. one pound of beef suet. two pounds of lean veal. and paste over it a piece of thick paper. grated. loosing all its grateful juices. and pound it well in a mortar. fat and lean together. put the mixture into a deep baking-dish. seasoning it with cayenne pepper. then press it well into a stone jar. with a little butter and a sprinkle of pepper on the top of each slice. it will keep a long time in winter. Serve it in the same manner as when served hot. two pounds of fat salt pork. If the ham is very salt lay it in _cold_ water for one hour before cooking. etc. then wipe with a dry cloth.

dark place. Chop the lean and fat pork finely. dry cellar. take out the skins and lay them to dry in the sun. and heat gradually to the boiling point. dry. mace and nutmeg. to be taken out as wanted and made into small round cakes with the hands. This is a matter of taste. in ten or twelve minutes they will be sufficiently browned and cooked. and place in a cool. three pounds of chine fat. Chop or grind the meat and suet. taste to see that it has the right flavor. pouring melted lard over it. or make long. Rub the outside of the skins with oil or melted butter. narrow bags of stout muslin. Some prefer to pack the meat in jars. two of black pepper. . water. either the cleaned intestines of the hog. Put a small piece of lard or butter into the frying pan.of black. _Marion Harland_. and stuff into beef skins. put into hot. A pound will cook brown in ten minutes in a hot oven. Six pounds lean fresh pork. not boiling. and hang them in a cool. These are very nice smoked like hams. TO FRY SAUSAGES. Sausages are nicely cooked by putting them in a baking-pan them in the oven. COUNTRY PORK SAUSAGES. In this way you avoid all smoke and disagreeable odor. season. Cut in round slices and lay sliced lemons around the edge of the dish. upon clean sweet straw or hay. covering the top. one minced onion. salt to taste. keep moving them about. Fill these with the meat. Prick the sausages with a fork. This is eaten without further cooking. If you wish to keep them more than a week. Another sure way to prevent the cases from bursting is to cover them with cold water and let it come to the boiling point. Many like spices added to the seasoning--cloves. lay them in the melted grease. one grated nutmeg. mix the seasoning in with your hands. one teaspoonful of cloves. Cook slowly for one hour. turn off the water and fry them. as many like to squeeze a few drops upon the sausage before eating. two of summer savory. dip in melted lard. then fried brown. three tablespoonfuls of salt. then wash it off before using. large enough to contain each enough sausage for a family dish. turning them once or twice. then put them into cases. prick each in several places to allow the escape of steam. four tablespoonfuls of pounded and sifted sage. rub ginger or pepper on the outside. tie these up. turning them frequently to prevent bursting.

Next. or just enough to cover the hams. After laying in this brine five or six weeks. press the bag between two flat surfaces. after being packed in a water-tight vessel. TO CURE HAMS AND BACON. to introduce an iron pan filled with hickory wood sawdust and small pieces of green wood. with just enough of the liquor in which it was boiled to prevent its burning. Let a large ham remain ten days. allow it to boil ten minutes. put it back in the same kettle it was boiled in. and place a piece of red-hot iron in the pan. and fix a place to put a cross-stick near the bottom. two pounds of brown sugar. hang the articles upon the cross-stick. out of water. which would be sufficient. salt. let it cool and pour over the meat. Chop it rather coarsely. Boil the forehead. introduce the iron pan in the opening. and smoke from two to three weeks. one ounce of red pepper. The best way for keeping hams is to sew them in coarse cloths. and heat it hot.) For each hundred pounds of hams. drain and wipe. in the side. Now pour it into a strong muslin bag. when cold and solid it can be cut in slices. mixing it well together. and from four to four and a half gallons of water.HEAD CHEESE. two ounces of saltpetre. Good cold. make a pickle of ten pounds of salt. and keep up a good smoke. ears and feet. stirring it frequently. . and season with pepper. take out. cover it with sawdust. First rub the hams with common salt and lay them into a tub. Take an old hogshead. warm it through thoroughly. Having turned the hogshead upside down. put them into a vessel over the fire. with a heavy weight on top. and nice scraps trimmed from the hams of a fresh pig. cut a hole near the top. that is to say. TO SMOKE HAMS AND FISH AT HOME. Then separate the meat from the bones. Take the above ingredients. put in a large chopping-bowl. to hang the article to be smoked on. Small pieces of bacon may remain in this pickle two weeks. sage and summer savory. or warmed up in vinegar. (A Prize Recipe. and all will be complete. or enough salt to make a brine to float a fresh egg high enough. stop up all the crevices. remove all the scum. until the meat will almost drop from the bones. white-washed on the outside.

Stir it frequently and let it simmer until nothing remains but brown scraps. strain through a coarse cloth into jars. the sweetest flavor is derived from black birch chips.TO CURE ENGLISH BACON." and is considered far preferable to the New England or Yankee style of putting prepared brine or pickle over the meat. then set it back on the range until clear. turning each piece every time. which is very distasteful to English people visiting this country. This process is called the "dry cure. Melted butter is the foundation of most of the common sauces. If it scorches it gives it a very bad flavor. the smoking with corn-cobs imparts a rank flavor to this bacon. but if these are not to be had. One lined with porcelain will be best. and put it into a kettle or saucepan. allow to every hundred pounds a mixture of four quarts of common salt. stirring it from the bottom until the salt is thrown in to settle it. SAUCES AND DRESSINGS. there will a brine form of itself from the juices of the meat. Have a covered saucepan for this purpose. when clear. Remember to watch it constantly. and. DRAWN BUTTER. . pour in a cupful of water to prevent burning. set it over the fire where it will melt slowly. which should be done two or three times a week. then place them into a tight tub or suitable cask. the next best wood is hickory. throw in a little salt to settle the fat. one quarter of a pound of saltpetre and four pounds of sugar. TO TRY OUT LARD. Skin the leaf lard carefully. enough at least to baste it with. then after it is dressed and cooled cut it up into proper pieces. Remove the scraps with a perforated skimmer. It requires three weeks or a month to smoke this bacon properly. _Berkshire Recipe_. cut it up. weighing not over two hundred pounds. In smoking this bacon. First the hog should not be too large or too fat. Take a quarter of a pound of the best fresh butter. Rub this preparation thoroughly over and into each piece. cut it into small pieces.

When it is thoroughly mixed. Cover the saucepan and set it in a large tin pan of boiling water. EGG SAUCE. three tablespoonfuls of vinegar. All these defects are to be carefully avoided. let them heat through thoroughly. and a dash of white pepper. Shake it round continually (always moving it the same way) till it is entirely melted and begins to simmer. If you set it on too hot a fire it will be oily. one of chopped cucumber pickle. one teaspoonful of salt. you may use milk instead of water. stirring briskly until it thickens and becomes like cream. Put together the same as mayonnaise dressing. . add the butter and flour. In melting butter for sweet or pudding sauce. This sauce is good for fried or boiled fish. one teaspoonful of sugar. Place over the fire a saucepan containing a pint of sweet milk and a saltspoon of salt. it will be thin and poor. half a teacupful of pure olive oil. Then let it rest till it boils up. If you have plenty of cream. fish salad. If the butter and flour are not well mixed. one of onion juice. sliced and chopped. If you put in too much water. TARTARE SAUCE. The raw yolks of two eggs. put it into the saucepan. adding the chopped ingredients the last thing.and mix with it about one tablespoonful of flour. use it and omit the butter. and may be used with fried and broiled meats. and serve in a boat. one tablespoonful of chopped capers. OR WHITE SAUCE. and add to it half a teacupful of hot water. boiled tongue. a quarter of a teaspoonful of pepper. when it reaches the boiling point. one of made mustard. Mix two tablespoonfuls of sifted flour with half a teacup of warm butter. By omitting the eggs. Have ready three cold hard-boiled eggs." OYSTER SAUCE. you have the same as "White Sauce. it will be lumpy. add them to the sauce.

Oyster sauce is used for fish. boiled turkey. the juice of half a lemon. . or until they begin to ruffle. thicken with a tablespoonful of flour stirred to a paste. one great spoonful of butter. To one gill of boiling water add as much milk. two tablespoonfuls of cold butter. Serve mashed potatoes with it. a pinch of cayenne and salt. SAUCE FOR BOILED COD. add a teaspoonful of made mustard. one tablespoonful of flour wet up with cold water.Take a pint of oysters and heat them in their own liquor long enough to come to a boil. with a wine-glass of water or vinegar. then rub it through a sieve. boil up and then add the oysters. SAUCE FOR SALMON AND OTHER FISH. as it thickens. a little chopped parsley and the juice of one lemon. the chopped yolk of one boiled egg. Pour part of the sauce over fish when dished. mace and cayenne pepper to taste. Take directly from the fire. the rest in a boat. stir into this while boiling two tablespoonfuls of butter gradually. Add the egg to thickened milk when you have stirred in the butter and liquor. season with pepper. salt. pound it to a smooth mass. One cupful of milk heated to a boil and thickened with a tablespoonful of cornstarch previously wet up with cold water. chickens and boiled white meats of most kinds. one raw egg beaten light. Pour it all over and around the salmon. Put the coral and spawn of a boiled lobster into a mortar with a tablespoonful of butter. and one raw egg beaten light. stir it until it is smooth and serve. Skim out the oysters into a warm dish. Lastly put in lemon juice and turn out immediately. the liquor from the salmon. melt nearly a quarter of a pound of sweet butter. LOBSTER SAUCE. take from the fire. stirring occasionally. and a little salt and pepper. season and let it stand in hot water three minutes. put into the liquor a teacup of milk or cream. Some of the meat of the lobster may be chopped fine and stirred into it. covered. and set covered in boiling water (but not over fire) five minutes. stir in the coral and spawn.

Chop the capers a very little. and may be used. When used as capers they should be chopped more. 2. add one tablespoonful of pepper sauce or Worcestershire sauce. Boil ten minutes. Mix two tablespoonfuls of flour with half a teacupful of butter. salt and pepper to taste. make half a pint of drawn butter. put the celery into the melted butter. They are grown on a climbing vine. This is very nice with boiled fowl or turkey. which strain off. cut into small bits. salt. then put it through a sieve. CELERY SAUCE. Pour over boiled fish and garnish with sliced lemon. with a large spoonful of the juice from the bottle in which they are sold. stir the flour and butter into the milk. and a tablespoonful of made mustard. If neither capers nor nasturtiums are at hand. Another way to make celery sauce is: Boil a head of celery until quite tender. [Illustration] .FISH SAUCE. and keep it stirred over the fire for five or ten minutes. 1. put the yolk of an egg in a basin. No. Make a pint of drawn butter. take three heads of celery. are preferred by many. Half a cupful of melted butter. and boil for a few minutes in water. a little salt and six hard-boiled eggs chopped fine. though larger. add the celery and a couple of spoonfuls of liquor in which the turkey was boiled. CAPER SAUCE. and. some pickles chopped up form a very good substitute in the sauce. have ready a pint of boiling milk. unless quite small. FISH SAUCE. half a cupful of vinegar. to which add the capers. let it just simmer and serve in a tureen. two tablespoonfuls of tomato catsup. in fact. Nasturtiums much resemble capers in taste. No. and are cultivated for their blossom and for pickling. Very nice. and beat it well with the strained juice of a lemon.

then strain the whole. and serve in sauce tureen. This sauce can also be used for grouse. put it over the fire in a stewpan. cloves and cinnamon. Boil until thick. Now melt in another pan an ounce of butter. Give it a boil. put in one slice of onion and two cloves. One cup of stale bread crumbs. roast beef. ONION SAUCE. poultry of mutton. Take a quart can of tomatoes. a little pepper and salt. TOMATO SAUCE. stir it until it browns and froths a little. and as it melts. etc. and is very nice. and gradually add two cups of boiling milk. Boil together two dozen ripe tomatoes. allspice. Roast partridges are nice served with bread crumbs. three small green peppers. or a half teaspoonful of cayenne pepper. then remove from the fire and strain it through a sieve. sprinkle in a tablespoonful of flour. and a teaspoonful each of ginger. set back on the fire and add a tablespoonful of salt. Mix the tomato pulp with it. boil about twenty minutes. This is very nice. MINT SAUCE. two ounces of butter. Serve with boiled veal. with cranberry or currant jelly laid beside them in the platter. Cut the onion fine. then add two cups of vinegar. pepper.BREAD SAUCE. remove and seal in glass bottles. a little mace. boil all five minutes. half a cup of sugar. chops. Excellent for mutton. then strain the milk on to the stale bread crumbs. Work together until light a heaping tablespoonful of flour and half a cupful of butter. one onion cut fine. and let it stand an hour. pepper and salt. CHILI SAUCE. Put it in a saucepan with the boiled onion. and boil it in milk till quite soft. one onion. Salt and pepper to taste. . and it is ready for the table. salt and mace. then stir into that four tender boiled onions that have been chopped fine. fried brown in butter. stir constantly until it come to a boil.

a teaspoonful of salt. two tablespoonfuls of minced onion. New Orleans_. two sprigs of parsley. Put three tablespoonfuls of butter in a saucepan.Take fresh young spearmint leaves stripped from the stems. Chop very fine. half a cup of melted butter. three tablespoonfuls of chopped parsley. _St. ten peppercorns. three tablespoonfuls of good cider vinegar. then add to this three slices of onion. Moisten the whole with a pint of stock or water and a cup of sweet cream. Excellent with all kinds of fish. WINE SAUCE FOR GAME. put in a gravy boat. quarter of a teaspoonful of nutmeg. half a glass of water. half a glass of port wine. Most excellent with roast veal. BECHAMEL SAUCE. a tablespoonful of cold butter. Simmer over the fire and stir well. This is most excellent with boiled meats. add three tablespoonfuls of sifted flour. a pinch of cayenne and salt. The sauce should be made some time before it is to be used. Put in a saucepan one tablespoonful of chopped onion. then pour over it six tablespoonfuls of good cider or white-wine vinegar. a little pepper and salt. mix and let it stand a few minutes. then strain through a sieve. Make a teacupful of drawn butter. Charles Hotel. MAITRE D'HOTEL SAUCE. put all together and boil until it thickens. Half a glass of currant jelly. wash and drain them. two slices of carrot. meats and fish. Fine with roast lamb. or dry on a cloth. three of tomato catsup. SHARP BROWN SAUCE. in which stir a tablespoonful of sifted flour. and to three tablespoonfuls of mint put two of white sugar. so that the flavor of the mint may be well extracted. six tablespoonfuls of water. Set it on the stove and cook slowly for half an hour. watching closely that it does not burn. a teaspoonful of powdered thyme or summer savory. the . a teaspoonful of salt. a bay leaf and half a dozen mushrooms cut up. two of thyme. beat all well together. fish and poultry. add to it the juice of a lemon.

one sprig of celery. MUSHROOM SAUCE. Stir until brown. adding the wine after it is strained. half a cupful of boiling water. A few spoonfuls of the gravy from the game may be added to it. then cover the onion with rich brown gravy.juice of half a lemon. Simmer all together a few minutes. beat the butter to a cream. and if too thick. Pour this when done through a fine sieve. then add the boiling water. one pint of stock. half a cupful of currant jelly. Denver_. salt. Wash a pint of small button mushrooms. the juice of half a lemon. add the yolks of eggs one by one. one tablespoonful of flour. Serve with game. two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Of course a larger quantity can be prepared at once than is mentioned here. Strain and skim off all the fat. This sauce is especially nice with venison. which is left from roast beef. add mustard. let this boil up. pepper. and simmer twenty minutes. stir a few minutes after taking from the fire. HOLLANDAISE SAUCE. one bay leaf. half a teaspoonful of salt. Three tablespoonfuls of butter. a pinch of cayenne pepper and three cloves. Cook the butter and onion until the latter begins to color. beating all the time. _Taber House. the yolk of two eggs. CURRANT JELLY SAUCE. add the stock. BROWN SAUCE. beat with an egg-beater until it begins to thicken which will be in about a minute. This is very nice with baked fish. Add the jelly and stir over the fire until it is melted. place the bowl in which is the mixture in a saucepan of boiling water. pepper and salt. beating all thoroughly. a speck of cayenne pepper. thin it with a little stock or gravy. or even a little hot water with butter. Add the flour and herbs. be careful not to cook it too long. and if you choose a tablespoonful of Worcestershire sauce. Half a teacupful of butter. then the lemon juice. stir until it begins to thicken like soft custard. one onion. remove the stems and outside . Delicious sauce for meats is made in this way: Slice a large onion and fry in butter till it is brown. salt and pepper.

Stew slowly until the pieces are very tender. A few pieces of lemon boiled in the syrup adds to the flavor. and are appreciated by the palate. In dressing mushrooms only those of a dull pearl color on the outside and the under part tinged with pale pink should be selected. sprinkle over them a heaping coffeecupful of sugar and one of water. APPLE SAUCE. This sauce is very fine with almost any kind of meat. the onion in the sauce will turn black. pour the sauce into bowls. place in a shallow stewpan with sufficient boiling water to cover them. add cinnamon if liked. then stir them thoroughly so there will be no lumps at all. to extract the juice. quite as nice as preserves. put them in a deep pudding-dish. and a cupful of sugar to every six apples. . salt and a little butter rolled in flour. and seasoning with pepper. remove to a dish carefully. Many prefer this to plain stewing. round greenings. Their flavor will be heightened by salting a few the night before.skins. When you wish to serve apple sauce with meat prepare it in this way: Cook the apples until they are very tender. adding an onion. If there is a poisonous one among them. pour it over the apples and eat cold. Each half should cook on the bottom of the pan. Apples cooked in the following way look very pretty on a tea-table. Pare and chop a dozen medium-sized apples. Place them in the oven and bake slowly two hours or more. Boil four quarts of new cider until it is reduced to two quarts. CIDER APPLE SAUCE. boil the syrup half an hour longer. In such a case throw the whole away. Used for poultry. pare neatly and cut in halves. and be removed from the others so as not to injure its shape. add the sugar and a little gelatine dissolved in warm water. a tablespoonful in a pint of sauce. beef or fish. then put into it enough pared and quartered apples to fill the kettle. Cranberry sauce can be treated in the same way. Select firm. stew them slowly in veal gravy or milk or cream. let the whole stew over a moderate fire four hours. OLD-FASHIONED APPLE SAUCE. and can be turned out on a plate. or until they are a deep red brown. and when cold it will be stiff like jelly. These sauces are a fine accompaniment to roast pork or roast goose.

into one gallon of sharp vinegar. sweet marjoram. two cupfuls of sugar and a pint of water. Take nine large. This is an unfailing recipe for a most delicious preparation of cranberries. One quart of cranberries. one tablespoonful of salt. then remove the cover of the saucepan. Almost all the flavorings used for meats and salads may be prepared in vinegar with little trouble and expense. add the sugar and let them all boil twenty minutes without the cover. eggs. you may put it all in a shallow pudding-dish or in two tin plates to bake. Apple omelet. then put them on the fire with the water. Tarragon. sage. a quarter of a teaspoonful of cayenne. two shallots. etc. one quart of vinegar. may be prepared by putting three ounces of either of these herbs. is very delicate. and will be found useful to impart an acid to flavors when lemons are not at hand. stew the apples till they are very soft.--Ten large cucumbers. Wash the cranberries. CUCUMBER VINEGAR. using three ounces of the seed as above. and bottle for use. mash them so that there will be no lumps. to be served with broiled sparerib or roast pork. two onions. bake this till it is brown. green mint. one cup of sugar. one tablespoonful of butter. FLAVORED VINEGARS. but let them cool before putting in the beaten eggs. two tablespoonfuls of pepper.CRANBERRY SAUCE. . let stand ten days. thyme. sweet basil. but in a covered saucepan. or twelve smaller ones.. Let them simmer until each cranberry bursts open. add the butter and sugar while they are still warm. Celery and cayenne may be prepared. add cinnamon or other spices to suit your taste. _Ingredients_. strain off clear. Very fine with turkey and game. The cranberries must never be stirred from the time they are placed on the fire. four. APPLE OMELET. burnet. Very good. tart apples. when in blossom.

and sauces for meats._Mode_. sift them and cork tight in a bottle. three ounces of turmeric. This vinegar is a very nice addition to gravies. take one ounce of ginger. To make curry powder. set it upon the stove or in a _very_ hot oven. put them in a stone jar. boil it all up. and add them. and store it away in small bottles well sealed. half an ounce of cardamoms. strain the liquor through a piece of muslin. TO BROWN FLOUR. one teaspoonful of curry powder. slice the onions and shallots. and stir continually. CURRY POWDER. as well as a great improvement to salads. This can be had ready prepared at most druggists. and one-quarter ounce of cumin seed. Spread flour upon a tin pie-plate. and it is much less trouble to purchase it than to make it at home. salt and pepper to taste. after it begins to color. one ounce of mustard. one large cupful of stock. with the vinegar. and when cold. Cut the onion fine. or to eat with cold meat. with all the other ingredients. One tablespoonful of butter. etc. one-quarter ounce of cinnamon. add the stock and season with the salt and pepper. or wide-mouthed bottle. and fry brown in the butter. one-quarter ounce of cayenne pepper. until .. then strain and serve. Put a lump of butter into a hot frying pan and toss it about until it browns. hashes. one large slice of onion. Add the flour and curry powder. Let it stand four or five days. Use it for coloring gravies. one ounce of pepper. Stir for one minute.--Pare and slice the cucumbers. Stir brown flour into it until it is smooth and begins to boil. to the cucumbers. CURRY SAUCE. one of flour. TO BROWN BUTTER. Pound all these ingredients very fine in a mortar. Simmer five minutes. This sauce can be served with a broil or _saute_ of meat or fish. three ounces of coriander seed.

mix well. take four spoonfuls of mustard. then set on the stove and cook three or four minutes. or for a few hours. Mix one ounce of ground ginger. and six ounces of salt. etc. a little at a time. one tablespoonful of granulated sugar. when cool. Keep in a tightly corked bottle. half an ounce each of black pepper. D. ground cinnamon. stirring all the time. Will keep for weeks. add one teacupful of vinegar. half of a teaspoonful of sugar. . KITCHEN PEPPER. TO MAKE MUSTARD. _Mrs. one teaspoonful of ground cloves.) To prepare cocoanut for future use. draw off the milk. Riegel_. working it all smooth. PREPARED COCOANUT. sprinkle it with sugar. first cut a hole through the meat at one of the holes in the end. SPICES. Keep it always on hand. add one tablespoonful of the best olive oil. taking care to get it all thoroughly worked in and smooth. When dry enough put away in dry cans or bottles. to dry. If there is more grated than is needed for present use. then grate it. It is excellent for coloring and thickening many dishes. Three tablespoonfuls of mustard. FRENCH MUSTARD. a tablespoonful of melted butter. then beat in an egg until it is smooth. Boil some vinegar. a saltspoonful of salt. Crack the nut and take out the meat. then loosen the meat by pounding the nut well on all sides. and spread out in a cool dry place. and place the pieces of meat in a cool open oven over night. (For Pies. well worked together. You will find this very nice. Puddings. _The Caterer_. put away in glass jars covered closely. nutmeg and allspice.it is brown all through.

They grow on a straight. _Nutmeg_ is the kernel of a small. They are purple when ripe. which. and now cultivated in the West Indies and Sierra Leone. Red or cayenne pepper is obtained by grinding the scarlet pod or seed-vessel of a tropical plant that is now cultivated in all parts of the world. smooth. a native of Ceylon. White pepper is obtained from the same berries. native of South America and the West Indies. There are two varieties of ginger--the white and black--caused by taking more or less care in selecting and preparing the roots. then wash and shake them.Ginger is the root of a shrub first known in Asia. gathered before they are quite unfolded. brown shell. thyme. native to the East Indies. they should be gathered fresh in their season. dry place. and continue fruitful until they are seventy or eighty years old.--A berry so called because it combines the flavor of several spices--grows abundantly on the allspice or bayberry tree. _Cinnamon_ is the inner bark of a beautiful tree. but blossoms. summer savory.--Native to the Molucca Islands. that grows from twenty to thirty feet in height and lives to be centuries old. _Cloves_. which are always dug in winter. the leaves downward. is known as mace. freed from their husk or rind. HERBS FOR WINTER. This shell has a soft. when the stems are withered. throwing out all poor sprigs. _Black pepper_ is made by grinding the dried berry of a climbing vine. and so called from resemblance to a nail (_clavis_). such as sage. tie into small bundles. smooth-barked tree. The trees commence bearing in the seventh year. or procure them from the market. and other parts of the East. In a few . The best nutmegs are solid. Examine them well. The white is the best. hang up in a warm. and emit oil when pricked with a pin. Around the nutmeg or kernel is a bright. about forty feet high. and tie over the bundles a piece of netting or old lace (to keep off the dust). The East Indians call them "changkek" from the Chinese "techengkia" (fragrant nails). when flattened out and dried. To prepare herbs for winter use. A single tree has been known to produce one hundred and fifty pounds of berries. scarlet covering. _Allspice_. The stem grows three or four feet high and dies every year. mint or any of the sweet herbs. Cloves are not fruits. pear-shaped fruit that grows on a tree in the Molucca Islands.

With roast veal: tomato sauce. cranberry sauce. currant jelly. With roast turkey: cranberry sauce. caper sauce. When wanted for use. With fresh salmon: green peas. jellies. caper sauce. cranberry sauce.days the herb will be thoroughly dry and brittle. rub fine. Horse-radish and lemons are good. Also cream sauce. With broiled shad: mushroom sauce. currant jelly. With roast goose: apple sauce. and sift through a sieve. or currant jelly warmed with port wine. mustard. cranberry sauce. pickles. Then pick off all the leaves and the tender tops of the stems. With boiled blue fish: white cream sauce. MEATS AND THEIR ACCOMPANIMENTS. Or you may place them in a cool oven and let them remain in it until perfectly dry. lemon sauce. With roast mutton: currant jelly. cranberry sauce. grated horse-radish. With boiled turkey: oyster sauce. With roast lamb: mint sauce. onion sauce. With roast pork: apple sauce. onion sauce and cranberry sauce. grape or currant jelly. lemon sauce. and in fact are suitable accompaniments to all kinds of meats in general. With roast beef: tomato sauce. With boiled fowls: bread sauce. mushroom sauce. . It is much better to put them in bottles as soon as dried. put them in a clean. With venison or wild ducks: cranberry sauce. cream sauce. parsley or egg sauce. With boiled fresh mackerel: stewed gooseberries. as long exposure to the air causes them to lose strength and flavor. large-mouthed bottle that is perfectly dry. With boiled mutton: onion sauce. Pickles are good with all roast meats.

Spinach is the proper accompaniment to veal; green peas to lamb. Lemon juice makes a very grateful addition to nearly all the insipid members of the fish kingdom. Slices of lemon cut into very small dice and stirred into drawn butter and allowed to come to the boiling point, served with fowls, is a fine accompaniment. VEGETABLES APPROPRIATE TO DIFFERENT DISHES. Potatoes are good with all meats. With fowls they are nicest mashed. Sweet potatoes are most appropriate with roast meats, as also are onions, winter squash, cucumbers and asparagus. Carrots, parsnips, turnips, greens and cabbage are generally eaten with boiled meat, and corn, beets, peas and beans are appropriate to either boiled or roasted meat. Mashed turnip is good with roast pork and with boiled meats. Tomatoes are good with almost every kind of meats, especially with roasts. WARM DISHES FOR BREAKFAST. The following of hot breakfast dishes may be of assistance in knowing what to provide for the comfortable meal called breakfast. Broiled beefsteak, broiled chops, broiled chicken, broiled fish, broiled quail on toast, fried pork tenderloins, fried pig's feet, fried oysters, fried clams, fried liver and bacon, fried chops, fried pork, ham and eggs fried, veal cutlets breaded, sausages, fricasseed tripe, fricasseed kidneys, turkey or chicken hash, corn beef hash, beef croquettes, codfish balls, creamed codfish, stewed meats on toast, poached eggs on toast, omelettes, eggs boiled plain, and eggs cooked in any of the various styles. VEGETABLES FOR BREAKFAST. Potatoes in any of the various modes of cooking, also stewed tomatoes, stewed corn, raw radishes, cucumbers sliced, tomatoes sliced raw, water cress, lettuce. To be included with the breakfast dishes: oatmeal mush, cracked wheat, hominy or corn-meal mush, these with cream, milk and sugar or syrup. Then numberless varieties of bread can be selected, in form of rolls, fritters, muffins, waffles, corn-cakes, griddle-cakes, etc., etc.

For beverages, coffee, chocolate and cocoa, or tea if one prefers it; these are all suitable for the breakfast table. When obtainable always have a vase of choice flowers on the breakfast table; also some fresh fruit, if convenient.

SALADS. Everything in the make-up of a salad should be of the freshest material, the vegetables crisp and fresh, the oil or butter the very best, meats, fowl and fish well cooked, pure cider or white wine vinegar--in fact, every ingredient first class, to insure success. The vegetables used in salad are: Beet-root, onions, potatoes, cabbage, lettuce, celery, cucumbers, lentils, haricots, winter cress, peas, French beans, radish, cauliflower--all these may be used judiciously in salad, if properly seasoned, according to the following directions. Chervil is a delicious salad herb, invariably found in all salads prepared by a French _gourmet_. No man can be a true epicure who is unfamiliar with this excellent herb. It may be procured from the vegetable stands at Fulton and Washington markets the year round. Its leaves resemble parsley, but are more divided, and a few of them added to a breakfast salad give a delightful flavor. _Chervil Vinegar_.--A few drops of this vinegar added to fish sauces or salads is excellent, and well repays the little trouble taken in its preparation. Half fill a bottle with fresh or dry chervil leaves; fill the bottle with good vinegar and heat it gently by placing it in warm water, which bring to boiling point; remove from the fire; when cool cork, and in two weeks it will be ready for use. MAYONNAISE DRESSING. Put the yolks of four fresh raw eggs, with two hard-boiled ones, into a cold bowl. Rub these as smooth as possible before introducing the oil; a good measure of oil is a tablespoonful to each yolk of raw egg. All the art consists in introducing the oil by degrees, a few drops at a time. You can never make a good salad without taking plenty of time.

When the oil is well mixed, and assumes the appearance of jelly, put in two heaping teaspoonfuls of dry table salt, one of pepper and one of made mustard. Never put in salt and pepper before this stage of the process, because the salt and pepper would coagulate the albumen of the eggs, and you could not get the dressing smooth. Two tablespoonfuls of vinegar added gradually. The _Mayonnaise_ should be the thickness of thick cream when finished, but if it looks like curdling when mixing it, set in the ice-box or in a _cold_ place for about forty minutes or an hour, then mix it again. It is a good idea to place it in a pan of cracked ice while mixing. For lobster salad, use the _coral_, mashed and pressed through a sieve, then add to the above. Salad dressing should be kept in a separate bowl in a cold, place, and not mixed with the salad until the moment it is to be served, or it may lose its crispness and freshness. DRESSING FOR COLD SLAW. (Cabbage Salad.) Beat up two eggs with two tablespoonfuls of sugar, add a piece of butter the size of half an egg, a teaspoonful of mustard, a little pepper, and lastly a teacup of vinegar. Put all of these ingredients into a dish over the fire and cook like a soft custard. Some think it improved by adding half a cupful of thick sweet cream to this dressing; in that case use less vinegar. Either way is very fine. SALAD CREAM DRESSING. No. 1. One cup fresh cream, one spoonful fine flour, the whites of two eggs beaten stiff, three spoonfuls of vinegar, two spoonfuls of salad oil or soft butter, two spoonfuls of powdered sugar, one teaspoonful salt, one-half teaspoonful pepper, one teaspoonful of made mustard. Heat cream almost to boiling; stir in the flour, previously wet with cold milk; boil two minutes, stirring all the time; add sugar and take from fire. When half cold, beat in whipped whites of egg; set aside to cool. When quite cold, whip in the oil or butter, pepper, mustard and salt; if the salad is ready, add vinegar and pour at once over it. CREAM DRESSING. No. 2. Two tablespoonfuls of whipped sweet cream, two of sugar and four of

vinegar; beat well and pour over the cabbage, previously cut very fine and seasoned with salt. FRENCH SALAD DRESSING. Mix one saltspoon of pepper with one of salt; add three tablespoonfuls of olive oil and one even tablespoonful of onion scraped fine; then one tablespoonful of vinegar; when well mixed, pour the mixture over your salad and stir all till well mingled. The merit of a salad is that it should be cool, fresh and crisp. For vegetables use only the delicate white stalks of celery, the small heart-leaves of lettuce; or tenderest stalks and leaves of the white cabbage. Keep the vegetable portion crisp and fresh until the time for serving, when add the meat. For chicken and fish salads use the "Mayonnaise dressing." For simple vegetable salads the French dressing is most appropriate, using onion rather than garlic. MIXED SUMMER SALAD. Three heads of lettuce, two teaspoonfuls of green mustard leaves, a handful of water cresses, five tender radishes, one cucumber, three hard-boiled eggs, two teaspoonfuls of white sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of pepper, one teaspoonful of made mustard, one teacupful of vinegar, half a teacupful of oil. Mix all well together, and serve with a lump of ice in the middle. "_Common Sense in the Household_." CHICKEN SALAD. Boil the fowls tender and remove all the fat, gristle and skin; mince the meat in small pieces, but do not hash it. To one chicken put twice and a half its weight in celery, cut in pieces of about one-quarter of an inch; mix thoroughly and set it in a cool place--the ice chest. In the meantime prepare a "Mayonnaise dressing," and when ready for the table pour this dressing over the chicken and celery, tossing and mixing it thoroughly. Set it in a cool place until ready to serve. Garnish with celery tips, or cold hard-boiled eggs, lettuce leaves, from the heart, cold boiled beets or capers, olives.

Crisp cabbage is a good substitute for celery; when celery is not to be had use celery vinegar in the dressing. Turkey makes a fine salad. LOBSTER SALAD. No. 1. Prepare a sauce with the _coral_ of a fine, new lobster, boiled fresh for about half an hour. Pound and rub it smooth, and mix very gradually with a dressing made from the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, a tablespoonful of made mustard, three of salad oil, two of vinegar, one of white powdered sugar, a small teaspoonful of salt, as much black pepper, a pinch of cayenne and yolks of two fresh eggs. Next fill your salad bowl with some shred lettuce, the better part of two leaving the small curled centre to garnish your dish with. Mingle with this the flesh of your lobster, torn, broken or cut into bits seasoned with salt and pepper and a small portion of the dressing. Pour over the whole the rest of the dressing; put your lettuce-hearts down the centre and arrange upon the sides slices of hard-boiled eggs. LOBSTER SALAD. No. 2. Using canned lobsters, take a can, skim off all the oil on the surface, and chop the meat up coarsely on a flat dish. Prepare the same way six heads of celery; mix a teaspoonful of mustard into a smooth paste with a little vinegar; add yolks of two fresh eggs; a tablespoonful of butter, creamed, a small teaspoonful of salt, the same of pepper, a quarter of a teaspoonful of cayenne pepper, a gill of vinegar, and the mashed yolks of two hard-boiled eggs. Mix a small portion of the dressing with the celery and meat, and turn the remainder over all. Garnish with the green tops of celery and a hard-boiled egg, cut into thin rings. FISH SALAD. Take a fresh white fish or trout, boil and chop it, but not too fine; put with the same quantity of chopped cabbage, celery or lettuce; season the same as chicken salad. Garnish with the tender leaves of the heart of lettuce. OYSTER SALAD. Drain the liquor from a quart of fresh oysters. Put them in hot vinegar enough to cover them placed over the fire; let them remain

until _plump_, but not cooked; then drop them immediately in cold water, drain off, and mix with them two pickled cucumbers cut fine, also a quart of celery cut in dice pieces, some seasoning of salt and pepper. Mix all well together, tossing up with a silver fork. Pour over the whole a "Mayonnaise dressing." Garnish with celery tips and slices of hard-boiled eggs arranged tastefully. DUTCH SALAD. Wash, split and bone a dozen anchovies, and roll each one up; wash, split and bone one herring, and cut it up into small pieces; cut up into dice an equal quantity of Bologna or Lyons sausage, or of smoked ham and sausages; also, an equal quantity of the breast of cold roast fowl, or veal; add likewise, always in the same quantity, and cut into dice, beet-roots, pickled cucumbers, cold boiled potatoes cut in larger dice, and in quantity according to taste, but at least thrice as much potato as anything else; add a tablespoohful of capers, the yolks and whites of some hard-boiled eggs, minced separately, and a dozen stoned olives; mix all the ingredients well together, reserving the olives and anchovies to ornament the top of the bowl; beat up together oil and Tarragon vinegar with white pepper and French mustard to taste; pour this over the salad and serve. HAM SALAD. Take cold boiled ham, fat and lean together, chop it until it is thoroughly mixed and the pieces are about the size of peas; then add to this an equal quantity of celery cut fine, if celery is out of season, lettuce may be substituted. Line a dish thickly with lettuce leaves and fill with the chopped ham and celery. Make a dressing the same as for cold slaw and turn over the whole. Very fine. CRAB SALAD. Boil three dozen hard-shell crabs twenty-five minutes; drain and let them cool gradually; remove the upper shell and the tail, break the remainder apart and pick out the meat carefully. The large claws should not be forgotten, for they contain a dainty morsel, and the creamy fat attached to the upper shell should not be overlooked. Line a salad bowl with the small white leaves of two heads of lettuce, add the crab meat, pour over it a "Mayonnaise" garnish with crab claws, hard-boiled eggs and little mounds of cress leaves, which may be mixed with the salad when served.

COLD SLAW. Select the finest head of bleached cabbage--that is to say one of the finest and most compact of the more delicate varieties; cut up enough into shreds to fill a large vegetable dish or salad bowl--that to be regulated by the size of the cabbage and the quantity required; shave very fine and after that chop up, the more thoroughly the better. Put this into a dish in which it is to be served, after seasoning it well with salt and pepper. Turn over it a dressing made as for cold slaw; mix it well and garnish with slices of hard-boiled eggs. PLAIN COLD SLAW. Slice cabbage very fine; season with salt, pepper and a little sugar; pour over vinegar and mix thoroughly. It is nice served in the centre of a platter with fried oysters around it. HOT SLAW. Cut the cabbage as for cold slaw; put it into a stewpan and set it on the top of the stove for half an hour, or till hot all through; do not let it boil. Then make a dressing the same as for cold slaw, and, while hot, pour it over the hot cabbage. Stir it until well mixed and the cabbage looks coddled. Serve immediately. TOMATO SALAD. Peel and slice twelve good, sound, fresh tomatoes; the slices about a quarter of an inch thick. Set them on the ice or in a refrigerator while you make the dressing. Make the same as "Mayonnaise," or you may use "Cream dressing." Take one head of the broad-leaved variety of lettuce, wash, and arrange them neatly around the sides of a salad bowl. Place the cold, sliced tomatoes in the centre. Pour over the dressing and serve. ENDIVE. This ought to be nicely blanched and crisp, and is the most wholesome of all salads. Take two, cut away the root, remove the dark green leaves, and pick off all the rest; wash and drain well, add a few

chives. Dress with "Mayonnaise dressing." Endive is extensively cultivated for the adulteration of coffee; is also a fine relish, and has broad leaves. Endive is of the same nature as chicory, the leaves being curly. CELERY SALAD. Prepare the dressing the same as for tomato salad; cut the celery into bits half an inch long, and season. Serve at once before the vinegar injures the crispness of the vegetables. LETTUCE SALAD. Take the yolks of three hard-boiled eggs, and salt and mustard to taste; mash it fine; make a paste by adding a dessertspoonful of olive oil or melted butter (use butter always when it is difficult to get _fresh_ oil); mix thoroughly, and then dilute by adding _gradually_ a teacupful of vinegar, and pour over the lettuce. Garnish by _slicing_ another egg and laying over the lettuce. This is sufficient for a moderate-sized dish of lettuce. POTATO SALAD, HOT. Pare six or eight large potatoes, and boil till done, and slice thin while hot; peel and cut up three large onions into small bits and mix with the potatoes; cut up some breakfast bacon into small bits, sufficient to fill a teacup and fry it a light brown; remove the meat, and into the grease stir three tablespoonfuls of vinegar, making a sour gravy, which with the bacon pour over the potato and onion; mix lightly. To be eaten when hot. POTATO SALAD, COLD. Chop cold boiled potatoes fine, with enough raw onions to season nicely; make a dressing as for lettuce salad, and pour over it. BEAN SALAD. String young beans; break into half-inch pieces or leave whole; wash and cook soft in salt water; drain well; add finely chopped onions,

pepper, salt and vinegar; when cool, add olive oil or melted butter. TO DRESS CUCUMBERS RAW. They should be as fresh from the vine as possible, few vegetables being more unwholesome when long gathered. As soon as they are brought in lay them in cold water. Just before they are to go to the table take them out, pare them and slice them into a pan of fresh cold water. When they are all sliced, transfer them to a deep dish; season them with a little salt and black pepper, and pour over them some of the best vinegar. You may mix with them a small quantity of sliced onions, not to be eaten, but to communicate a slight flavor of onion to the vinegar. CELERY UNDRESSED. Celery is sometimes sent to the table without dressing. Scrape the outside stalks, and cut off the green tops and the roots; lay it in cold water until near the time to serve, then change the water, in which let it stand three or four minutes; split the stalks in three, with a sharp knife, being careful not to break them, and serve in goblet-shaped salad glasses. To crisp celery, let it lie in ice-water two hours before serving; to fringe the stalks, stick several coarse needles into a cork, and draw the stalk half way from the top through the needles several times and lay in the refrigerator to curl and crisp. RADISHES. All the varieties are generally served in the same manner, by scraping and placing on the table in glasses containing some cold water to keep them fresh looking. PEPPERGRASS AND CRESS. These are used mostly as an appetizer, served simply with salt. Cresses are occasionally used in making salad. HORSE-RADISH.

Horse-radish is an agreeable relish, and has a particularly fresh taste in the spring; is scraped fine or grated, and set on the table in a small covered cup; much that is bottled and sold as horse-radish is adulterated with grated turnip. LETTUCE. Wash each leaf separately, breaking them from the head; crisp in ice-water and serve the leaves whole, to be prepared at table, providing hard-boiled eggs cut in halves or slices, oil and other ingredients, to be mixed at table to individual taste.

CATSUPS. TOMATO CATSUP. No. 1. Put into two quarts of tomato pulp (or two cans of canned tomatoes) one onion, cut fine, two tablespoonfuls of salt and three tablespoonfuls of brown sugar. Boil until quite thick; then take from the fire and strain it through a sieve, working it until it is all through but the seeds. Put it back on the stove, and add two tablespoonfuls of mustard, one of allspice, one of black pepper and one of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of ground cloves, half a teaspoonful of cayenne pepper, one grated nutmeg, one pint of good vinegar; boil it until it will just run from the mouth of a bottle. It should be watched, stirred often, that it does not burn. If sealed tight while _hot_, in large-mouthed bottles, it will keep good for years. TOMATO CATSUP. No. 2. Cook one gallon of choice ripe tomatoes; strain them, and cook again until they become quite thick. About fifteen minutes before taking up put into them a small level teaspoonful of cayenne pepper, one tablespoonful of mustard seed, half a tablespoonful of whole cloves, one tablespoonful of whole allspice, all tied in a thin muslin bag. At the same time, add one heaping tablespoonful of sugar, and one teacupful of best vinegar and salt to suit the taste. Seal up air-tight, either in bottles or jugs. This is a valuable Southern recipe.

GREEN TOMATO CATSUP. One peck of green tomatoes and two large onions sliced. Place them in layers, sprinkling salt between; let them stand twenty-four hours and then drain them. Add a quarter of a pound of mustard seed, one ounce allspice, one ounce cloves, one ounce ground mustard, one ounce ground ginger, two tablespoonfuls black pepper, two teaspoonfuls celery seed, a quarter of a pound of brown sugar. Put all in preserving-pan, cover with vinegar and boil two hours; then strain through a sieve and bottle for use. WALNUT CATSUP. One hundred walnuts, six ounces of shallots, one head of garlic, half a pound of salt, two quarts of vinegar, two ounces of anchovies, two ounces of pepper, a quarter of an ounce of mace, half an ounce of cloves; beat in a large mortar a hundred green walnuts until they are thoroughly broken; then put them into a jar with six ounces of shallots cut into pieces, a head of garlic, two quarts of vinegar and the half pound of salt; let them stand for a fortnight, stirring them twice a day. Strain off the liquor, put into a stewpan with the anchovies, whole pepper, half an ounce of cloves and a quarter of an ounce of mace; boil it half an hour, skimming it well. Strain it off, and, when cold, pour it clear from any sediment into small bottles, cork it down closely and store it in a dry place. The sediment can be used for flavoring sauces. OYSTER CATSUP. One pint of oyster meats, one teacupful of sherry, a tablespoonful of salt, a teaspoonful of cayenne pepper, the same of powdered mace, a gill of cider vinegar. Procure the oysters very fresh and open sufficient to fill a pint measure; save the liquor and scald the oysters in it with the sherry; strain the oysters and chop them fine with the salt, cayenne and mace, until reduced to a pulp; then add it to the liquor in which they were scalded; boil it again five minutes and skim well; rub the whole through a sieve, and, when cold, bottle and cork closely. The corks should be sealed. MUSHROOM CATSUP.

Use the larger kind known as umbrellas or "flaps." They must be very fresh and not gathered in very wet weather, or the catsup will be less apt to keep. Wash and cut them in two to four pieces, and place them in a wide, flat jar or crock in layers, sprinkling each layer with salt, and let them stand for twenty-four hours; take them out and press out the juice, when bottle and cork; put the mushrooms back again, and in another twenty-four hours press them again; bottle and cork; repeat this for the third time, and then mix together all the juice extracted; add to it pepper, allspice, one or more cloves according to quantity, pounded together; boil the whole, and skim as long as any scum rises; bottle when cool; put in each bottle two cloves and a pepper-corn. Cork and seal, put in a dry place, and it will keep for years. GOOSEBERRY CATSUP. Ten pounds of fruit gathered just before ripening, five pounds of sugar, one quart of vinegar, two tablespoonfuls each of ground black pepper, allspice and cinnamon. Boil the fruit in vinegar until reduced to a pulp, then add sugar and the other seasoning. Seal it hot. Grape catsup is made in the same manner. CUCUMBER CATSUP. Take cucumbers suitable for the table; peel and grate them, salt a little, and put in a bag to drain over night; in the morning season to taste with salt, pepper and vinegar, put in small jars and seal tight for fall or winter use. CURRANT CATSUP. Four pounds of currants, two pounds of sugar, one pint of vinegar, one teaspoonful of cloves, a tablespoonful of cinnamon, pepper and allspice. Boil in a porcelain saucepan until thoroughly cooked. Strain through a sieve all but the skins; boil down until just thick enough to run freely from the mouth of a bottle when cold. Cork and set aside. APPLE CATSUP.

Peel and quarter a dozen sound, tart apples; stew them until soft in as little water as possible, then pass them through a sieve. To a quart of the sifted apple, add a teacupful of sugar, one teaspoonful of pepper, one of cloves, one of mustard, two of cinnamon, and two medium-sized onions, chopped _very_ fine. Stir all together, adding a tablespoonful of salt and a pint of vinegar. Place over the fire and boil one hour, and bottle while hot; seal very tight. It should be about as thick as tomato catsup, so that it will just run from the bottle. CELERY VINEGAR. A quart of fresh celery, chopped fine, or a quarter of a pound of celery seed; one quart of best vinegar; one tablespoonful of salt, and one of white sugar. Put the celery or seed into a jar, heat the vinegar, sugar and salt; pour it boiling hot over the celery, let it cool, cover it tightly and set away. In two weeks strain and bottle. SPICED VINEGAR. Take one quart of cider vinegar, put into it half an ounce of celery seed, one-third of an ounce of dried mint, one-third of an ounce of dried parsley, one garlic, three small onions, three whole cloves, a teaspoonful of whole pepper-corns, a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg, salt to taste and a tablespoonful of sugar; add a tablespoonful of good brandy. Put all into a jar, and cover it well; let it stand for three weeks, then strain and bottle it well. Useful for flavoring salad and other dishes.

PICKLES. Pickles should never be put into vessels of brass, copper or tin, as the action of the acid on such metals often results in poisoning the pickles. Porcelain or granite-ware is the best for such purposes. Vinegar that is used for pickling should be the best cider or white-wine, and should never be boiled more than five or six minutes, as it reduces its strength. In putting away pickles, use stone or glass jars; the glazing on common earthenware is rendered injurious by the action of the vinegar. When the jar is nearly filled with the

Another way is to heat them in strong ginger tea. Alum in small quantities is useful in making them firm and crisp. turn it over them and cover closely. Take one gallon of medium-sized cucumbers. Put into enough _boiling_ water to cover them a small handful of salt. Slice up the cucumbers half of an inch thick. the vinegar should completely cover them. repeat this three mornings. and the pickles will keep sound much longer. and one of cinnamon. a small handful of whole cloves.pickles. and is used very much in pickling as a coloring. a teacup of horse-radish root cut up fine. _Mrs. half a cup of celery seed. South Vernon. Wright. a piece of alum the size of an egg. put green grape-vine leaves or green cabbage leaves between them when heating. "Turmeric" is India saffron._ . put them into a jar or pail. Now change the vinegar. CUCUMBER PICKLES. Select the medium. To green pickles. put into glass jars and sealed tightly. and if there is any appearance of their not doing well. Seal tight and they will keep good a year or more. especially tomato pickles. heat it all boiling hot and pour over the cucumbers. Pickles should be kept closely covered. adding one quart of brown sugar. Lydia C. and the fourth morning scald enough cider vinegar to cover them. one of ground cloves. heat some vinegar boiling hot and pour over them. heat it boiling hot and pour it over the cucumbers. Vermont. In using ground spices. A piece of horse-radish put into a jar of pickles will keep the vinegar from losing its strength. cover with fresh vinegar and spices. then tie up in a small muslin bag. standing again twenty-four hours. let them stand twenty-four hours. small-sized cucumbers. place them in glass jars and pour the scalding vinegar over them. putting on fresh vinegar. SLICED CUCUMBER PICKLE. then wipe them dry. turn off the vinegar. putting into it a piece of alum as large as a walnut. For one bushel make a brine that will bear up an egg. a pint of white mustard seed. tie them up in muslin bags. the same of cinnamon sticks. one teaspoonful of mustard.

then pour spiced vinegar over them and let them stand over night. no water. enough salt to make sufficient brine to cover them. then some of the sliced onions. then . take off the cloth. then of onions. and keep in a warm place until they are fresh enough. or enough to completely cover them. then pour that off and put on fresh. Now take a porcelain kettle and place in it some of the sliced tomatoes. sliced the day before you are ready for pickling. as a scum will rise and settle upon it. one tablespoonful of ground allspice. soak in hot water. If the flavor of onions is objectionable. wash.CUCUMBER PICKLES. also six red peppers chopped fine. Use plenty of salt and it will keep a year. Have two dozen medium-sized onions peeled and sliced. one tablespoonful of mustard. This is a choice recipe. and put in a firkin or half barrel layers or cucumbers and rock-salt alternately. not _too_ heavily. and rinse it every time you put in fresh cucumbers. in the morning drain off the liquor that will drain from them. (Sweet. sprinkling them through and through with salt. (Sour. keep them under the brine with a heavy board.) Wash and slice. To prepare pickles for use. Turn over three pints of good vinegar. This may be done over night. the pickle is equally as good without them. Have a dozen good-sized onions rather coarsely sliced. one cup of sugar.) A good way to put down cucumbers. a teaspoonful of cloves. GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. boil until tender. cover with a cloth.) One peck of green tomatoes. a few at a time:-When gathered from the vines. GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. shake in some black pepper and some of the chopped red peppers. Make some spiced vinegar by boiling for half an hour a quart of cider vinegar with whole spices in it. without peeling. pour over some of the spiced vinegar. take a suitable kettle and put in a layer of the sliced tomatoes. one peck of sound green tomatoes. and between each layer sprinkle the following spices: Six _red_ peppers chopped coarsely. put them into a jar in layers with a slight sprinkling of salt between. one tablespoonful of ground cinnamon. (For Winter Use. in the morning drain off the liquor that has accumulated.

tedious method of pickling the same vegetable. put a layer of cabbage and one of salt. Pack the cabbage in a stone jar. one ounce ground pepper. When cold tie down with bladder and keep in a dry place. let it remain over night. PICKLED MUSHROOMS. boil the vinegar and spices five minutes and pour on hot. with pounded mace and pepper in the above proportion. in the morning squeeze them and put them on the fire. shake them well over a clear fire until the liquor flows and keep them there until it is all dried up again. set it in a cool place for twenty-four hours. to each quart of mushrooms two blades pounded mace. It will be good in a month. then add one ounce of turmeric. Put them in a stewpan. onions. if very large. until the kettle is full. boil for half an hour. and a convenient substitute for the old-fashioned. PICKLED WHITE CABBAGE. and are generally considered excellent for flavoring stews and other dishes. spread it on a large flat platter or dish and sprinkle thickly with salt. but not too soft. A few slices of beetroot improves the color. salt to taste.repeat with the tomatoes. and cover with cold vinegar for twelve hours. dry place. then add as much vinegar as will cover them. a cup of sugar to every gallon of vinegar. Prepare a pickle by seasoning enough vinegar to cover the cabbage with equal quantities of mace. Take a peck of quartered cabbage. with four chopped onions covered with vinegar. then drain off the brine. one gill of black pepper. sprinkle salt over them. just let it simmer for one minute and store it away in stone jars for use. they will remain good for a length of time. and reject the black ones. Sufficient vinegar to cover the mushrooms. cinnamon and black pepper. as they are too old. This recipe recommends itself as of a delightful flavor yet easily made. allspice.) Cut a sound cabbage into quarters. pure cider vinegar and cook until tender. Turn into a jar well covered and set in a cool place. wipe it dry and lay it in the sun two hours. and a teaspoonful of celery seed to every pint.. PICKLED CABBAGE. one gill of celery . (Purple. Choose some nice young button mushrooms for pickling and rub off the skin with a piece of flannel and salt. and cut off the stalks. take out the red inside. Cover and set away in a cool. etc. cover with cold.

stir into each quart of it two teaspoonfuls of French mustard. Break the heads into small pieces and boil ten or fifteen minutes in salt and water. CHOWCHOW. and pour over them. Prepare a stuffing of two hard heads of white cabbage. and pour over it hot vinegar. in which has been scalded a liberal supply of whole cloves. Cover tightly and be sure to have the vinegar cover the pickle. extract the seeds by cutting a slit in the side (so as to leave them whole). and soak them in water for a day and a night. Cover tightly. one tablespoonful of allspice. half an ounce of mace. Tie the spices in a bag. and. green. mustard seed and ground cloves. remove from the water and drain carefully. take out the seed. Boil vinegar sufficient to cover them. (Superior English Recipe. with a cup of brown sugar. let them stand twenty-four hours. Make a strong brine and pour over them. then seal. PICKLED GREEN PEPPERS.seed. Four tablespoonfuls of made mustard should be added with the other ingredients. place them in a stone jar. then fill with chopped cabbage and green tomatoes. and when cold it is fit for use. and pour over spiced vinegar scalding hot. and half a cup of white sugar. and add a few red ones as they are ornamental and look well upon the table. on removing the vinegar from the fire. a few pieces of ginger. Let it boil half an hour longer. bell peppers.) . allspice and white mustard. Take them out of the brine. place in a jar. With a sharp knife remove the top. now turn off this water and scald some vinegar. seasoned with salt. and pour over the mangoes. When cold. chopped fine. seasoned slightly with salt and a cup of white mustard seed. letting them stand three days. in which put a small piece of alum. a few cloves. stitch up. Do this three mornings. GREEN PEPPER MANGOES. soak over night in salt water. mix it well and stuff the peppers hard and full. pepper. Sew on the top. sound. Take two dozen large. green peppers. PICKLED CAULIFLOWER. and two pounds of brown sugar. Select firm.

This excellent pickle is seldom made at home. dark place. two fresh heads of cauliflower. The best sort of onions for pickling are the small white buttons. then mangoes. strong enough to bear an egg. two of whole cloves. Put in bottles or glass jars. six red peppers. Let the mangoes. Now put these vegetables in a preserving kettle over the fire. add a lump of alum the size of a hickory nut. PICKLED MANGOES. cut into small pieces. each one cut in halves. then drain off _all_ the brine that has accumulated. then remove the seeds and put the mangoes in a kettle. two of celery seed. three quarts of green tomatoes. one of mace. then stuff them with the following mixture: One pound of ginger soaked in brine for a day or two. not over two inches long. mix them together. especially if sealed when hot. or two heads of white. watching and stirring it often. four tablespoonfuls of mustard seed. After preparing these articles. sprinkling salt between them sparingly. chopped coarsely. A tablespoonful of sweet oil may be put in the bottles before the cork. covering the top with leaves. put them in a stone jar. sliced and chopped very coarsely. a coffee cup of sugar. Peel small onions until they are white. two quarts of tender string beans. one ounce of black pepper. Keep in a dry. for two weeks. Scald them in salt and water until tender. then take them up. remove the leaves and let the pickles stand in this vinegar for a week. lie in salt water. two of whole allspice. and so on until all are in. then soak them in pure water for two days. and pour over them hot spiced vinegar. Let them stand twenty-four hours. and cut in slices. Pour on enough of the best cider vinegar to cover the whole well. cover tightly and simmer all well until it is cooked all through and seems tender. changing the water two or three times. two quarts of _very_ small white onions. or young musk-melons. hard cabbage. and two-thirds of a teacup of best ground mixed mustard. tiny cucumbers. as we can get the imported article so much better than it can be made from the usual recipes. one of . when cold cork them close. first a layer of grape leaves. PICKLED ONIONS. It grows better as it grows older. This we vouch for being as near the genuine article as can be made: One quart of young. sprinkling through them an ounce of turmeric for coloring. pour vinegar over them and boil them ten or fifteen minutes. put them into wide-mouthed bottles.

add a half pint of strong vinegar. and only a little is needed as a relish. PICKLE OF RIPE CUCUMBERS. one ounce of race ginger. keeps admirably. place the oysters in a jar and pour the liquor over them. carefully clear away the particles of shell. then put them into a kettle. half a pound of garlic. half an ounce of allspice and the same of turmeric. add salt to your taste. add one pint of small onions. alternating them with a layer of horse-radish. The sun should be permitted to _dry_. cut one solid head of cabbage fine. When perfectly cool.allspice. lay them in brine a day and a night. if this is not sufficient. When they are moderately dry. tie up tightly and set away. when cool pour this over the cucumbers. one of turmeric. wash them with vinegar and place them in layers in a jar. soaked for a day or two in brine and then dried. skimming it now and then so long as any skum rises. mustard seed. garlic and onions for each layer of cucumbers. full grown cucumbers. let them just come to the boiling point. it is made by _sun-drying_ thirty _old_. One gallon of oysters. one of black mustard seed and one of white mustard seed. put them in a stone jar and pour over them the best cider vinegar. then skim them out and lay in a dish to cool. PICKLED OYSTERS. dry place until they are canned. This is a French recipe and is the most excellent of all the high-flavored condiments. This pickle requires several months to mature it. (Sweet. a few small cucumbers and green tomatoes. but is delicious when old. bruise all the spices and mix with a teacup of pure olive oil. wash them well in their own liquor.) . to each mango add one teaspoonful of brown sugar. RIPE CUCUMBER PICKLES. one pint grated horse-radish. set them in a bright. strain the liquor over them. put a sprig of mace and a little cold pepper and allow the liquor to boil some time. Pour it into a pan and let it cool. This is for four dozen mangoes. not simply drain them. been salted and let stand twenty-four hours. Boil in one quart of vinegar. mix thoroughly. which have first been pared and split. or until the edges curl up. had the seeds taken out. then drain them well and add the imperfect mangoes chopped fine and the spices. add more until agreeable to taste. stuff the mangoes and tie them. In a month add three pounds of brown sugar.

Slice two of three green peppers. allspice. large enough to let them in or out without breaking. AN ORNAMENTAL PICKLE._ PICKLED EGGS. then put them into fresh vinegar. with two pounds of sugar and one ounce of cassia buds to one quart of vinegar. pack them in stone or wide-mouthed glass jars. Boil red . or cut it into fancy shapes. two tablespoonfuls of ground pepper. and add in very small quantities. Boil all together twenty minutes. occasionally putting in a tablespoonful of white and black mustard seed mixed. Drain all through a sieve or colander. Stir it often to prevent scorching. a small piece of race ginger. Drain them. turn over it two quarts of vinegar. Johns. two of cinnamon. boil all together twenty minutes. with one cup of salt well stirred in. one pound of sugar. as preferred. one of cloves.Pare and seed ripe cucumbers. Boil fresh eggs half an hour. whole cloves. horse-radish ungrated. then put them in cold water. Take as much vinegar as you think will cover them entirely and boil it in white pepper. one of allspice. _Mrs. in the morning drain off all the liquor. drop in cold water and remove the shells. Slice each cucumber lengthwise into four pieces. Let them stand twenty-four hours covered with cold vinegar. One peck of green tomatoes. garlic. Pickled eggs are very easily prepared and most excellent as an accompaniment for cold meats. and pack them when entirely cold in a wide-mouthed jar. eight large onions chopped fine. They will be fit for use in eight or ten days. Let it stand over night. A most delicious accompaniment for any kind of meat or fish. a little root ginger. St. and half a teaspoonful of cayenne pepper. Put it back into the kettle again. PICCALILLI. and a very little allspice. Now take two quarts of water and one of vinegar. and a tablespoonful of salt. Cover them closely in a jar. Seal in glass jars. Boil all together fifteen minutes or until tender. Boil quite hard three dozen eggs. if liked. half a pound of white mustard seed. two of ginger.

two ounces of turmeric. hard white cabbage quartered. two of allspice. Repeat this two or three times as your taste may direct. snap beans. cracked fine. small onions. gherkins.beets until tender. very small common white onions. take them out and put in jars or casks. half a teaspoonful of salt and two tablespoonfuls of mustard. Other spices may be added if liked. but add enough fresh to the spiced to cover the pickles. or whose edges have been broken so that the covers will not fit tightly. soak in two gallons of cider vinegar for two weeks. a quarter of a pound of white race ginger. pears. spiced. BLUEBERRY PICKLES. For five gallons of pickle. two of celery seed. If the turmeric vinegar be much diluted do not use it. When ready. half a pint of small red peppers. Boil in each pint of cider vinegar one tablespoonful of sugar. peel and cut in dice form. EAST INDIA PICKLE. nasturtiums and green beans. one layer of pickle and one of spice out of the vinegar. pour over the pickle. take two ounces of mace. drain thoroughly and lay them in vinegar in which is dissolved one ounce of turmeric to the gallon. After the pickles have lain in the turmeric vinegar for a week. if you like. MIXED PICKLES. peaches. old jars which have lost their covers. and cover with vinegar. stirring daily. till all is used. cucumbers cut in dice. put it on the fire with a pound of brown sugar to each gallon. take them out of the brine and simmer in pure water until tender enough to stick a straw through--if still too salt. half a pint of garlic. soak in clear water. two of cinnamon. pour over the pickle and seal carefully. quarter of a pound of grated horse-radish. or until convenient to use them. plums. shell the eggs and drop into the pickle jar. serve an excellent purpose as these pickles _must not_ be kept air-tight. green tomatoes and anything else you may wish. two of cloves. . half a pint of flour mustard. Lay in strong brine for two weeks. when boiling. then drain until dry and pack into wide-mouthed bottles. For blueberry pickles. lemons. peppers. half a pound of white mustard seed. add it and the spiced vinegar. If the turmeric vinegar is still good and strong. small cucumbers. Scald in salt water until tender cauliflower heads.

put them in a strong brine for six days. To every quart of fruit. changing the water every other day. SWEET PICKLE FOR FRUIT. adding two large spoonfuls of mustard seed. Cheap molasses is good enough. that we give that which is most successfully used. take of black pepper and ginger root each an ounce. Only lazy people will feel obliged to stand by and watch its progress." Wild grapes may be pickled in the same manner. drain the water off. strewing the powdered seasoning between every layer of nuts. damsons. plums..Pick over your berries. Then drain and wipe them (piercing each nut through in several places with a large needle) and prepare the pickle as follows: For a hundred large nuts. PICKLED BUTTERNUTS AND WALNUTS. Most of the recipes for making a sweet pickle for fruit. fill your jars or wide-mouthed bottles to within an inch of the top. are so similar. allow a cup of white sugar and a large pint . apricots. Pound all the spices to powder and mix them well together. mace and nutmeg. cherries. keeping them closely covered from the air. half an ounce of cloves. Then tie over the top a piece of cotton cloth to keep the flies and other insects out and set away in the preserve closet. These nuts are in the best state for pickling when the outside shell can be penetrated by the head of a pin. such as cling-stone peaches. one quart of vinegar. one ounce of cinnamon. pour in more until the berries are covered. each a half ounce. and make a syrup of two pounds of white sugar. Secure the jars closely with corks. and of cloves. etc. as molasses does not _run_ very freely. Put the nuts into jars (having first stuck each of them through in several places with a large needle). this cannot be done in a moment. Boil for five minutes a gallon of the very best cider vinegar and pour it boiling hot upon the nuts. You may begin to eat the nuts in a fortnight. using only sound ones. and your pickles will soon be "sharp. The syrup to be poured over the rind boiling hot three days in succession. Scald them and rub off the outside skin. then pour in molasses enough to settle down into _all_ the spaces. Ten pounds of watermelon rind boiled in pure water until tender. WATERMELON PICKLE. As it settles.

and pour it hot over the fruit. and then rubbed with a coarse cloth to remove the fur. and bring to a boil. four pounds of sugar. sound ones. adding half an ounce of _stick_ cinnamon. then seal it hot in glass jars. cinnamon and cloves to boil with the vinegar. one pint of _cider_ vinegar. so as to heat it all through. is to be eaten. then skim out the fruit. Any tart fruit may be put up in this way. then add the pears and boil. Damsons and plums should be pricked with a needle. Let it come to a boil. repeat this two or three days in succession. Select small. then seal hot in glass jars if you wish to keep it for a long time. dark place. stick them with a fork. four pounds of sugar. half as much of whole cloves and the same of broken nutmeg." which is not treated the same. remove the blossom end. one tablespoonful of ground cinnamon. the same of whole allspice. putting it on dishes until the syrup is boiled down thick. one tablespoonful of _whole_ cloves. and is considered a very good embellishment for cold meats. SPICED PLUMS. place these in a muslin bag and simmer them in a little vinegar and water for half an hour. and peaches washed with a weak lye. SPICED CURRANTS. Put into a kettle and boil until the fruit is soft. the other a spiced preserve boiled down thick. and seal in jars. add the plums and boil carefully until they are cooked tender. allow to each quart of pears one pint of cider vinegar and one cup of sugar. Seven pounds of fruit. Before cooking . not the liquor. then add it all to the vinegar and sugar. one teaspoonful of cloves. Seven pounds of plums. Some confound this with "Spiced Fruit. one being a pickle. and used the same as any pickle. one pint of good cider vinegar. The _fruit_. and set it in a cool. Turn the fruit back into the syrup again. two tablespoonfuls of broken cinnamon bark. PEAR PICKLE.of good cider vinegar. put in a teaspoonful allspice.

to every quart of cherries allow a large cupful of vinegar. large cherries. Take the pulp from the grapes. throwing out all decayed or unripe parts. Boil the pulp and rub through a colander to get out the seeds. pack the cherries into jars. cork tightly and set away. turn out into a covered stoneware vessel. not allowed to stop boiling or simmering until they are thoroughly done. they are fit for use almost immediately. Vegetables of all kinds should be thoroughly picked over. PICKLED CHERRIES. Spice quite highly with ground cloves and allspice. carrots and turnips should be cooked in a great deal of water. To every seven pounds of grapes use four and one-half pounds of sugar. Longer boiling makes them insipid in taste. When partly cooked a little salt should be thrown into the water in which they are boiled. Select sound. SPICED GRAPES. one pint of good vinegar. and half a dozen blades of mace. thoroughly drained. . then well washed in several waters.the plums they should be pierced with a darning needle several times. and pour the vinegar over them when cold. put the vinegar and sugar on to heat with the spices. this will prevent the skins bursting while cooking. and immediately drained. preserving the skins. then add the skins to the strained pulp and boil with the sugar. two tablespoonfuls of sugar. a dozen whole cloves. when peeled. as large as you can get them. vinegar and spices. VEGETABLES. when done. and they should cook steadily after they are put on. Every sort of culinary vegetable is much better when freshly gathered and cooked as soon as possible. Onions. and served immediately while hot. are better when laid in cold water a short time before cooking. cover and let it get perfectly cold. Most vegetables. boil five minutes. and with _too little_ water they turn a dark color. with a little cinnamon. boiled only long enough to sufficiently cook them. and. cabbage.

If the potatoes are too old to have the skins rubbed off. with a piece of butter the size of a walnut. they should be made so by cutting after they are peeled. and boiled until soft enough for a fork to pierce through easily. taking care that they are not too wet. Put them into a vegetable dish. put a small piece of butter on the top in the centre. a bad one will flavor a whole dish. If they are not uniform in size. MASHED POTATOES. as they are never good when they have been out of the ground for some time. with a piece of butter placed in the midst of them. . Drain off the water and mash them fine with a potato masher. mix it well with the mashed potatoes until they are a smooth paste. Do not have the potatoes dug long before they are dressed. and replace the kettle on the fire with the cover partly removed. and when done pour the water away from them. and when the potatoes are thoroughly dry. They require about twenty minutes to boil. pare off the skins and lay them in cold water half an hour. all defective or green ones should be cast out. the cores should be cut out. TO BOIL NEW POTATOES. then put them into a saucepan with a little salt. They should be prepared just in time for cooking by scraping off the thin outside skin. peel and serve them as above. until they are completely dried. if old. try them with a fork. and when partly done salted a little.Potatoes rank first in importance in the vegetable line. In the first place. if at all. or the most nutritious. Take the quantity needed. heaping them up and smooth over the top. Let them boil until tender. boil them in their jackets. The best part of a potato. put them in a hot vegetable dish. then. melted in half a cup of boiling hot milk and a good pinch of salt. let them stand by the side of the fire with the lid of the saucepan partly removed. rub off the skins with a coarse cloth. They require twenty to thirty minutes to cook. is next to the skin. and put them in _boiling_ water salted. cover with water and boil them until done. pile the potatoes over this and serve. Well wash them. therefore they should be pared very thinly. or with melted butter over them. and consequently should be properly served. and have dots of pepper here and there on the surface as large as a half dime. thrown into _cold_ water salted a little. drain immediately. Serve them hot and plain. drain. Have ready a piece of butter the size of an egg. New potatoes should be put into boiling water. It requires some little intelligence to cook even so simple and common a dish as boiled potatoes.

(Warmed Over. spread a little butter over the top and bake a golden brown. and a little very finely chopped parsley. beating the potatoes quite light and heaping them up in the dish without smoothing over the top. Prepare the potatoes as directed for mashed potato. pepper and salt. slip a knife under them and slide them upon a hot platter. then put into a pudding or vegetable dish. shape in balls about the size of an egg. smooth over the top and brush over with the yolk of an egg. and place the balls on it. a tablespoonful of butter. BROWNED POTATOES. While _hot_. POTATO PUFFS. and pour into a deep dish.) To two cupfuls of cold mashed potatoes add a half cupful of milk. As soon as all are done. Stir until smooth and thick. POTATOES A LA CREME. The quality depends upon very thoroughly beating the eggs before adding them. so that the potato will remain light and porous after baking. sliced. instead of a potato masher. Mash them the same as the above. a pinch of salt. put them into a dish that they are to be served in. Mix the whole until thoroughly light. two tablespoonfuls of flour and two eggs beaten to a froth. Have a tin sheet well buttered. brush over with beaten egg. Set in the oven to brown. MASHED POTATOES. When done. similar to sponge cake. NEW POTATOES AND CREAM. Brown in the oven. . Heat a cupful of milk. and add two cupfuls of cold boiled potatoes. stir in a heaping tablespoonful of butter cut up in as much flour. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Shake over the fire until the potatoes are hot all through. or spread on a bountiful supply of butter and dust well with flour.Some prefer using a heavy fork or wire beater. it will brown in fifteen minutes with a quick fire.

Just before putting into . as for cakes. if liked. add the mixture. drop into boiling water and boil briskly until done. not the length. shaking and turning them carefully. Cover them with a tight-fitting lid. drain the potatoes. have a kettle of very hot lard. so as to brown equally. sprinkling over them salt and pepper to season them. cold cooked potatoes may be fried by the same recipe. SCALLOPED POTATOES. hot. and then drop them into the boiling lard. and season with salt. and slice them as evenly as possible. but not boiling. in a saucepan have ready some butter and cream. if done.) Peel and slice raw potatoes thin. and let the steam partly cook them. Serve very hot. of the potato. and they will be crisp and not greasy. put in a layer of potatoes.Wash and rub new potatoes with a coarse cloth or scrubbing-brush. Put a tablespoonful each of butter and sweet lard into the frying pan. Drop them into ice-water. pepper and salt. and as soon as it boils add the sliced potatoes. and serve. a bit of onion chopped fine. pepper. put a few at a time into a towel and shake. and no more. butter. a little green parsley. Butter an earthen dish. Stir them occasionally. Sprinkle salt over them while hot. press a potato against the side of the kettle with a fork. and be sure to cut them from the _breadth_. and let them fry a bright gold color. the same as for frying. Now put another layer of potatoes and the seasoning. SARATOGA CHIPS. (Kentucky Style. Peel good-sized potatoes. FRIED RAW POTATOES. sprinkle a little flour.--Boiled or steamed potatoes chopped up or sliced while they are yet warm never fry so successfully as when cold. cut them in slices as thin as an egg-shell. Fried. then remove it. only slice them a little thicker. Continue in this way till the dish is filled. and when of a light brown take them out with a skimmer. _Remark_. to dry the moisture out of them. put over hot water for a minute or two. Peel half a dozen medium-sized potatoes very evenly. it will yield to a gentle pressure.

so as to keep them as hot as possible. It requires less time to bake them. it being so very convenient. Put in the saucepan in which they were dressed. pare them and cook them well. chop them slightly. The potatoes should be boiled _whole with the skins on_ in plenty of water. and a few small pieces of fresh butter. throw them into _boiling_ salted water.the oven. drain them. When the fork goes easily through them. but not so as to be watery. Pare the potatoes. well _salted_. if of good quality. If the onion is disliked it can be omitted. they are delicious either way. STEAMED POTATOES. then press them through a wire sieve into the dish in which they are to be served. POTATO SNOW. and. strew a little fine salt upon them previous to sending them to table. cut them into slices of about a quarter of an inch in thickness. Choose some mealy potatoes that will boil exceedingly white. HASTY COOKED POTATOES. Bake three-quarters of an hour. and mash and season them well. then put them in a steamer. This mode of cooking potatoes is now much in vogue. Wash and peel some potatoes. throw them into cold water as they are peeled. FAVORITE WARMED POTATOES. and serve without loss of time. and are much better for being boiled the day . salt. Strain off the water. they are done. and steam the potatoes from twenty to forty minutes. dish and serve very quickly. they will be done in about ten minutes. according to the size and sort. pour a quart of hot milk over. French cooks also add a small quantity of pounded loaf sugar while they are being mashed. then take them up. Cold boiled potatoes may be cooked the same. put the potatoes into a hot dish. particularly where they are wanted on a large scale. Place the steamer over a saucepan of boiling water. add pepper.

sprinkle well with salt and pepper. Cut cold raw potatoes into shavings. Fat is never hot enough while bubbling--when it is ready it is still and smoking. then turn the chopping-bowl half way around and chop across them.before needed. LYONNAISE POTATOES. _They must not brown. CRISP POTATOES. Baked potatoes are very good warmed in this manner. a few at a time. put in a cup of rich sweet milk. When this boils up put in the chopped potatoes. fry in it one small onion (chopped fine) until it begins to change color and look yellow. Take eight or ten good-sized cold boiled potatoes. stir them a little so that they become moistened through with the milk. Pare and slice the potatoes thin. Now put in your potatoes. stir carefully from the bottom with a spoon and cover tightly again. slice them end-wise. but should never burn. Keep hot until ready to serve. cubes. Place them in a chopping-bowl and sprinkle over them sufficient salt and pepper to season them well. cutting them into little square pieces the shape of dice. or any small shape. _Delmonico_ POTATO FILLETS. throw them. then crosswise. there should be about a quart of them. Drain dry by shaking in a heated colander. cut them if you like in small fillets about a quarter of an inch square. and as long as the potato . making them like dice in small squares. taking care that you do not break them. Serve _very hot_. drain and season with salt and pepper. Care should be taken that they are not over cooked._ Just before taking up stir in a tablespoonful of minced parsley. When you are ready to cook them. heat some butter or good drippings in a frying pan. where they will heat through gradually. place on the stove a saucepan (or any suitable dish) containing a piece of butter the size of an egg. Strip off the skins (not pare them with a knife) and slice them nearly a quarter of an inch thick. stir well and cook about five minutes. into boiling fat and toss them about with a knife until they are a uniform light brown. chop them all one way. then cover and place them on the back of the stove. About twenty-five minutes before serving time. when it begins to melt and run over the bottom of the dish. or in a moderate oven. When heated through.

then roll either in flour or cracker crumbs. when thoroughly mixed. dip it in a well-beaten egg. and work all together thoroughly. fry the same as fish-balls._ POTATOES A LA DELMONICO. with a pinch of salt. Cut the potatoes with a vegetable cutter into small balls about the size of a marble. lay them on brown paper or a hair sieve. then serve on a napkin. When they are done. Beat up the whites of two eggs. _Delmonico's. which will be in about an hour. then drop them into boiling lard. pour the potatoes into it. 1. POTATO CROQUETTES. four potatoes making six croquettes. turning them gently as may be necessary. and shake occasionally until they are quite done. 2. keep the saucepan covered. Take a tablespoonful and roll it in a clean towel. take them out with a skimmer and drain them. No. and stir them very fast with a wooden spoon. . as soon as the milk comes to a boil. put them into a stewpan with plenty of butter and a good sprinkling of salt. to drain off all fat. making it oval in shape. No. and drop it in hot drippings or lard. pepper and a tablespoonful of butter. this operation causes the fillets to swell up and puff. and put in it ten tablespoonfuls of milk and a lump of butter half the size of an egg. and set them over a brisk fire. Fry them a light brown all over. POTATO CROQUETTES. when nearly done. season with a pinch of salt. keep them in cold water until wanted. put it over a brisk fire. dip them in the beaten yolks of the eggs.will admit. when they are done pour off all the water and mash them. drop the potatoes back and fry till done. and then in bread crumbs. Take two cups of cold mashed potatoes. Proceed in this manner till all the potato is used. FRIED POTATOES WITH EGGS. boil up the lard again. peel and put four large potatoes in cold water. Wash. take them from the fire and put them on a dish. Take another saucepan. make it into small balls slightly flattened.

cook and mash the required quantity. Many cooks partly boil the potatoes before putting around the roast. inasmuch as thereby a great deal of vegetable is scorched and rendered uneatable. which is wasteful. 2. Potatoes are either baked in their jackets or peeled. one egg is enough for three or four persons. They should be frequently turned while being baked and kept from touching each other in the oven or dish. They should be served promptly when done and require about three-quarters of an hour to one hour to bake them. . have plenty and put in two. New potatoes are very good cooked around a roast. Cover with a folded napkin that allows the steam to escape. for if they harden they are not half so nice. beat up one or two eggs. boiled or baked whole.Slice cold boiled potatoes and fry in good butter until brown. browning them evenly. When done in their skins. do not leave them a moment on the fire after the eggs are in. or in a Dutch oven in front of the fire. Peel. 1. Serve hot with the meat. They become sodden and clammy. then place around the meat about twenty minutes before it is taken from the oven. pepper and salt. then arrange them in the roasting-pan around the roast. adding while hot a little chopped onion. and stir into them just as you dish them for the table. in a closely covered dish. BROWNED POTATOES WITH A ROAST. be particular to wash and brush them before baking them. basting them with the drippings at the same time you do the meat. they may be baked in wood-ashes. they are ordinarily baked thus as an accessory to baked meat. No. form it into small oval balls and dredge them with flour. About three-quarters of an hour before taking up your roasts. Never serve potatoes. When pared they should be baked in a dish and fat of some kind added to prevent their outsides from becoming burnt. BROWNED POTATOES WITH A ROAST. unless they are very fond of potatoes. BAKED POTATOES. When nicely browned. boil them until partly done. if they are. No. or absorbs the moisture. if of a good size. drain dry and serve hot with the meat. peel middling-sized potatoes. If convenient. in either case they should not be exposed to a fierce heat.

cut off the ends. split them lengthwise. They should be a nice brown. then turn off that water. The white silver-skins are the best species. put them into cold water. Boil until partly done. sprinkle them with pepper and salt and serve hot. Wash and scrape them. basting them with butter or beef drippings several times. pour a little melted butter over them. peel them and bake brown. ONIONS STEWED. Drain. when done drain them quite dry.SWEET POTATOES. generally cooked with their jackets on. and into a stewpan and let them scald two minutes. a tablespoonful of flour stirred to a cream. and fried as common potatoes. placing over them lumps of butter. add a teacupful of milk. An excellent way to peel onions so as not to affect the eyes is to take a pan _full_ of water and hold and peel them under the water. BAKED SWEET POTATOES. pour on cold water salted a little. Steam or boil them until nearly done. let all boil up once and serve in a vegetable dish hot. which will be in thirty or forty minutes. and boil slowly till tender. To boil them peel off the outside. or may be cut in half and served cold. sprinkle thickly with sugar. pepper and salt to taste. pepper and salt. . Cook the same as boiled onions. and put them in a baking dish. and bake in the oven to a nice brown. Boiled. when quite done. Cold sweet potatoes may be cut in slices across or lengthwise. Hubbard squash is nice cooked in the same manner. steamed and baked the same as Irish potatoes. Boiled sweet potatoes are very nice. and. turn off all the water. Served hot. according to their size. a piece of butter the size of an egg. ONIONS BOILED.

remove the cover and brown them. as many believe. drain and dish them. Lay them in a baking-dish. basting well with butter for fifteen minutes. When carefully concealed by manipulation in food. as best for this purpose. turn off the water and lay the onions on a cloth to dry them well. cover until partly soft. SCALLOPED ONIONS. Bake twenty minutes or half an hour. When cleaned and washed. but do not peel. into which you have put salt and a teaspoonful of flour. between each layer until the dish is full. A great many successful compounds derive their excellence from the partly concealed flavor of the onion. . wash them clean. place in a deep dish and brown slightly. which imparts a delicate appetizing aroma highly prized by epicures. replacing the water with more boiling hot as it evaporates. and put into a saucepan with slightly salted water. or a slice of bread. pepper. pepper and salt. add milk or cream until full. CAULIFLOWER. chopped parsley and vinegar. peel them. or until tender all through. putting bread crumbs last. Take eight or ten onions of good size. A little onion is not an injurious article of food. it affords zest and enjoyment to many who could not otherwise taste of it were its presence known. drop them into boiling water. A judicious use of plants of the onion family is quite as important a factor in successful cookery as salt and pepper. serve with a sauce spread over and made with melted butter. Use the large Spanish onion. FRIED ONIONS. twisting it at the top to keep it on. salt. and bake in a slow oven about an hour. Peel. take off. season with salt and pepper and pour some melted butter over them. slice and fry them brown in equal quantities of butter and lard or nice drippings. grated nutmeg. roll each one in a piece of buttered tissue paper. put in bread crumbs. slice them and boil until tender. butter in small bits. boil an hour. boil till tender.ONIONS BAKED. salt and pepper.

Another way is to make a white sauce (see SAUCES) and when the cauliflowers are dished as above. Dip each branch of the cauliflower into the mixture. Drain off the water and add half a pint of new milk. as it frequently harbors numerous insects. or with brown butter. the green savory cabbage will boil in twenty minutes. or part milk and cream. add . For directions to prepare these varieties. Asparagus. when it boils. oyster plant are all fine when fried in this manner. stir in a large teaspoonful of either wheat or rice flour moistened with milk. the top downward. pouring over it right away a pint of boiling water. Have on the fire a spider or deep skillet. FRIED CAULIFLOWER. and when it is hot put in the cut cabbage. celery. Mix two tablespoonfuls of flour with two yolks of eggs. see articles SLAW and SOURCROUT. Cover closely and allow it to cook rapidly for ten minutes. in a pan of cold salt water. to remove any insects that might be hidden between them. turn into a colander. Remove it from the water into a colander to drain and serve with drawn butter. dust salt all over and serve warm. as is also the white winter cabbage. Do not let a cabbage boil too long--by a long boiling it becomes watery. turn the white sauce over. or tomato sauce. and then mixed with the yolks. and fry them in hot fat. CABBAGE BOILED. Remove the outer leaves from a solid. Great care is requisite in cleaning a cabbage for boiling. then add water enough to make a rather thin paste. add salt to taste. cream. Boil the cauliflower till about half done. The large drumhead cabbage requires an hour to boil. Red cabbage is used for slaw. egg-plant. It is a very good plan to loosen the leaves of a head of cauliflower and let lie. flour and water. and cut the remainder as fine as for slaw. the two whites are beaten till stiff. take them off with a skimmer. They may also be served in the same way with a milk. Add considerable salt to the water when boiling. small-sized head of cabbage. and serve warm. CABBAGE WITH CREAM. or butter poured over it. When done.

until it begins to be tender. pepper. just before taking from the fire add a third of a cup of good vinegar. This dish resembles cauliflower and is very digestible and palatable. solid cabbage. salt and pepper to taste. Then take cold boiled cabbage chopped fine. salt. pour in half a teacupful of water. Take a sound. salt and four tablespoonfuls of cream. Place in a frying pan an ounce of butter and heat it boiling hot. stirring until it is very hot and becomes a delicate brown on the under side. adding two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. and as soon as it comes to a boil. drain and set aside until perfectly cold. so as to confine the steam. Place a hot dish over the pan. Chop fine and add two beaten eggs. Stir all well together. watch it closely. and with a large sharp knife shave it _very fine_. cooked the same as steamed cabbage. . STEAMED CABBAGE. Those who find slaw and other dishes prepared from cabbage indigestible will not complain of this. When tender. cover it very tightly. then put into it a large tablespoonful of butter. which must be reversed when turned out to be served. Put it in a saucepan. Very good. Boil a firm white cabbage fifteen minutes. If you prefer to give it a tart taste. pepper. FRENCH WAY OF COOKING CABBAGE. put it into the hot butter and fry a light brown. then turn the mixture into a buttered frying pan. serve. add a little water now and then. Chop cold boiled white cabbage and let it drain till perfectly dry: stir in some melted butter to taste. a tablespoonful of butter. or just enough to keep it from burning. changing the water then for more from the boiling tea-kettle. and bake in a buttered pudding-dish until brown. or cabbage hot. three tablespoonfuls of rich milk or cream. FRIED CABBAGE.salt and pepper. Serve very hot. dish it hot. LADIES' CABBAGE. after it is heated through add two well-beaten eggs.

Have a saucepan of water slightly salted. juniper berries. Care must be taken to let the least possible air enter the sourcrout and to have the cover perfectly clean. Place the saucepan with the lid partly off. It is better. Boil it steadily for twenty minutes. wash it in warm water. and sprinkle it in the boiling water by degrees. The cabbage must be seasoned with a few grains of coriander. being careful to have one of salt on the top. to allow the rice to dry. At the bottom of a small barrel they place a layer of coarse salt and alternately layers of cabbage and salt. then take it off from the fire and drain off all the water. etc. . has a well-acquired fame for preparing the cabbages. excepting it is first boiled until soft in just water enough to cook it. then fry and add vinegar. Each time the barrel has to be opened it must be properly closed again. At the end of a few days it will begin to ferment. This is often fried in the same manner as fried cabbage. This should be done every day. under a plank. so that if shaken the grains will fall apart. so as to keep the particles separated. Pick over the rice carefully. Renew the cloth and wash the cover. during which time the pickle must be drawn off and replaced by fresh. Barrels having held wine or vinegar are used to prepare sourcrout in. This is the true way of serving rice as a vegetable and is the mode of cooking it in the Southern States where it is raised. when it is boiling hard. As each layer of cabbage is added. pour off the cold water from the rice. TO BOIL RICE. They slice very white and firm cabbages in fine shreds with a machine made for the purpose. rubbing it between the hands. covered with a cloth. When the barrel is full it must be put in a dry cellar. as well as all Alsace. The moisture will pass off and each grain of rice will be separated.SOURCROUT. then let it remain in cold water until ready to be cooked. By that time the sourcrout will be ready for use. on the back part of the stove. where it is only moderately warm. Strasburg. until the liquor becomes clear. to have a special barrel for the purpose. and on this heavy weights are placed. it must be pressed down by a large and heavy pestle and fresh layers are added as soon as the juice floats on the surface. however. put the weights back and let stand for a month. These precautions must not be neglected. rinsing it in several waters.

season with salt and pepper. cut into long slices. watching carefully and stirring often to prevent burning. put a tablespoonful of lard or beef drippings in a frying pan over the fire. Boil four or five parsnips. Drain off fat and serve.PARSNIPS. . BOILED. Put them into a pot of boiling water. These resemble very nearly the taste of the salsify or oyster plant. when tender take off the skin and mash them fine. When they are done they will be of a creamy light straw color and deliciously sweet. add a little salt. Parsnips may be boiled and mashed the same as potatoes. After washing and scraping the parsnips slice them about half of an inch thick. when boiling hot put in the parsnips. and will generally be preferred. dredge with flour. make it in small cakes with a spoon. put a very little of the fat in which they were fried over and serve hot. fry in hot lard or dripping. which will be in from two to three hours. when both are done take them on a dish. scrape. Boil tender in a little hot water salted. or in butter and lard mixed. FRIED PARSNIPS. retaining all the goodness of the vegetable. STEWED PARSNIPS. and boil them till quite tender. according to their size. Wash. until they are soft. then cover closely. Serve them up with any sort of boiled meat or with salt cod. PARSNIP FRITTERS. Put them in a saucepan of boiling water containing just enough to barely cook them. add a tablespoonful of butter. Stew them until the water has cooked away. when one side is a delicate brown turn the other. Dry them in a cloth when done and pour melted butter or white sauce (see SAUCES) over them in the dish. add to it a saltspoonful of salt. fry quite brown. scrape and split them. Parsnips are very good baked or stewed with meat. add to them a teaspoonful of wheat flour and a beaten egg.

salt and pepper to taste. Then repeat with another layer of crumbs. and others who like the flavor of onion chop up one and add while stewing. Drain and peel. some add as much green corn as there are tomatoes. Some prefer to thicken tomatoes with a little grated bread. and a very _little_ white sugar. sprinkle with salt. adding a teaspoonful of sugar. Boil once and pour over the parsnips. Put the tomatoes into a frying basket and plunge them into hot water for three or four minutes. STEWED TOMATOES. then again. this loosens the skins so that they readily slip off. TO PEEL TOMATOES. SCALLOPED TOMATOES. remove the cover and brown quickly. Stew them about twenty minutes. Butter the sides and bottom of a pudding-dish. From the blossom end of a dozen tomatoes--smooth. pepper and salt and a little minced parsley. Boil tender. ripe and solid--cut a thin slice and with a small spoon scoop out the pulp without breaking the rind surrounding it. Put over the fire with two tablespoonfuls of butter. Put a layer of bread crumbs in the bottom. let them remain for a few moments. then peel off the skins. then add a tablespoonful of butter. STUFFED BAKED TOMATOES. pepper and some bits of butter. chop a small head of cabbage and a . Pour boiling water over a dozen sound ripe tomatoes. let them stew fifteen minutes longer and serve hot.CREAMED PARSNIPS. Another way is to place them in a flat baking-tin and set them in a hot oven about five minutes. on them put a layer of sliced tomatoes. having the top layer of slices of tomato. Dish the parsnips. add to the sauce three tablespoonfuls of cream or milk in which has been stirred a quarter of a spoonful of flour. with bits of butter on each. another of tomato and seasoning until full. Shake until the mixture boils. scrape and slice lengthwise. Bake covered until well cooked through. slice them and put them over the fire in a well-lined tin or granite-ware saucepan.

butter and a very little white sugar. add a small piece of butter to the top of each and bake until slightly browned on top. add a gill of hot water. Remove the lid and brown for fifteen minutes. more sparingly with black pepper. drop a small lump of butter on each tomato and bake half an hour or so. (Raw. simmer slowly and season with salt and pepper. (Plain. Slice them and sprinkle generously with salt. Another stuffing which is considered quite fine. BAKED TOMATOES. seasoning each layer with salt. Cover with a lid or large plate and bake half an hour. till well done.) Peel and slice quarter of an inch thick. sprinkle dry crumbs over the top. cut ends up and put in the pan just enough water to keep from burning. Only perfectly ripe tomatoes should ever be eaten raw and if ripe the skins easily peel off. FRIED AND BROILED TOMATOES. Cut a slice from the stem of each and scoop out the soft pulp. rather more than a quarter of an inch thick. ripe tomatoes into thick slices. replace the slices and place the tomatoes in a buttered baking-dish. if you would have a dish yet better suited to please an epicurean palate. although. place another bit of butter on each and serve in same dish. dredge well . Very fine. large. salt and sugar and add a cup of sweet cream. Stir into the pan cracker dust or bread crumbs enough to absorb the moisture. Cut firm. Mince one small onion and fry it slightly. take off from the fire and let it cool.good-sized onion fine and mix with them fine bread crumbs and the pulp. place in layers in a pudding-dish. add a light tablespoonful of sugar to give a piquant zest to the whole. Lastly. Season with salt and pepper. add a gill of best cider vinegar.) Carefully remove the peelings. and to a dish holding one quart. you may add a teaspoonful of made mustard and two tablespoonfuls of rich sweet cream. season with pepper. stuff the tomatoes with this mass. the tomato pulp and two ounces of cold veal or chicken chopped fine. Just before taking from the oven pour over the top three or four tablespoonfuls of whipped cream with melted butter. when all is well mixed. Scalding injures the flavor. pepper. fill the tomato shells. TO PREPARE TOMATOES.

but requires longer time to boil. and serve. CUCUMBER A LA CREME. Brown both sides and serve warm. Strip off the husks. wipe them dry with a cloth. when sufficiently boiled.with flour. Boil them until soft. The corn is much sweeter when cooked with the husks on. add a little butter. Remove the skins from a dozen tomatoes. Or. in hot butter and lard mixed. put in plenty of butter and a little salt. if not entirely fresh. Pare them and cut lengthwise in very thick slices. or you may cut it from the cob. and fry them brown on both sides evenly. dredge with flour. GREEN CORN. cream an ounce of butter. Or. prepare them the same as for frying. salt. For Tomato Salad. see SALADS. broiling on a well-greased gridiron. it loses its sweetness in a few hours and must be artificially supplied. A good accompaniment to steak. allowing them time to be done thoroughly. but _no salt_. a tablespoonful of flour and one beaten egg. This should be cooked on the same day it is gathered. cut them up in a saucepan. FRIED CUCUMBERS. seasoning afterward the same as beefsteak. salt to taste. whisk into it the milk and let it simmer until it thickens. . a pint of milk. fast. BOILED. and fry in lard and butter. beat up five or six eggs and just before you serve turn them into the saucepan with the tomatoes. pepper and salt. Will generally boil in twenty minutes. Peel and cut into slices (lengthwise) some fine cucumbers. pepper and a very little mace. also for Raw Cucumbers. and serve in a covered vegetable dish. a tablespoonful of each mixed. add a tablespoonful of sugar to the water. and serve with delicate cream sauce. pour the sauce on a hot side-dish and arrange the tomatoes in the centre. boil twenty minutes. and stir one way for two minutes. having prepared the following sauce. pick out all the silk and put it in boiling water. SCRAMBLED TOMATOES. sprinkle with salt and pepper. or roll in egg and crumbs.

and one pint of milk. [Illustration: THE FAMOUS EAST ROOM. cut off the kernels. and put into a bowl with a cup of milk to every cup of corn. Boil ten minutes longer and dish up hot in a vegetable dish. boil about twenty minutes.] [Illustration: THE RED ROOM. Many like corn cooked in this manner. Cut the corn off the cob. Bake about half or three-quarters of an hour. and a little butter. The corn would be much sweeter if the scraped cobs were boiled first in the water that the corn is cooked in. putting half corn and half tomatoes. prepared as follows: Cut the corn from the cob. and fry in small cakes in very hot butter. taking care not to bring off any of the husk with it and to have the grains as separate as possible. add yolks and whites.] [Illustration: THE BLUE ROOM. Put the corn in a saucepan over the fire with just enough water to make it cook without burning. the same of flour mixed in a tablespoonful of butter. either way is very good. and season with pepper and salt. a small quantity of salt and pepper. This is a Virginia dish. a tablespoonful of cold butter. beaten separately. then add a teacupful of milk or cream. cutting with a large sharp knife from the top of the cob down. of four eggs. a half cup of flour. a pinch of salt. Scrape the substance out of twelve ears of tender. then scrape the cob. Serve with plenty of butter and powdered sugar. as you do not get those husky particles which you cannot avoid with a grater). Mix well into a thick batter. Fry in a . STEWED CORN. Take a dozen ears of green sweet corn. uncooked corn (it is better scraped than grated. one egg.Green corn left over from dinner makes a nice breakfast dish. FRIED CORN. green. very tender and juicy.] CORN PUDDING. a teaspoonful of sugar.

put another coat of crumbs on them and fry them in butter to a light brown. Cut the egg-plant in two. The frying pan must be hot before the slices are put in--they will fry in ten minutes. lay them on a napkin. Take fresh. serve with salt and butter. cut them in slices a quarter of an inch thick. ROASTED GREEN CORN. lay the corn down. When nicely browned. drain off the water from the slices. a piece of butter the size of an egg and half a cup of cream. Or. SUCCOTASH. Do not set it near the stove after the cream is added. rather more than will cover them. You may pare them before you put them into the frying pan. put them in a pot with cold water. as the air will turn them black. STUFFED EGG-PLANT. as it will be apt to turn. or any large fresh beans. if a wood fire is used. and soak them for half an hour in cold water. boiling from half to three-quarters of an hour. scrape out all the inside and put it in a saucepan with a little minced ham. You must not remove them from the water until you are ready to cook them. turn it when one side is done. turning it as one side is done. Take a pint of fresh shelled Lima beans.little butter--just enough to keep it from sticking to the pan. dip them in the crumbs and then in the egg. then season with salt and pepper to taste. Strip off all the husk from green corn and roast it on a gridiron over a bright fire of coals. put the cobs in with the beans. or you may pull off the skins when you take them up. boil again fifteen minutes. FRIED EGG-PLANT. with a teaspoonful of salt in it. Serve hot. stir very often. cover with water and boil until . make a place clean in front of the fire. Scrape the kernels from twelve ears of young sweet corn. add salt and pepper and a little rich cream. Now take out the cobs and put in the scraped corn. purple egg-plants of a middling size. This makes a nice dinner or breakfast dish. Have ready some cracker or bread crumbs and one beaten egg.

half a minced onion. if you have not the cream add more butter. These beans should be put into boiling water. This is stewed the same as green corn. . butter. and boil them in _just enough_ water to _cover_ them. as you do so. cut them with a sharp knife into pieces half an inch long. STEWED SALSIFY OR OYSTER-PLANT. add a small lump of butter to each and bake fifteen minutes. repeat the same process from the other end.soft. a tablespoonful of butter. which are cooked as above. add two tablespoonfuls of grated crumbs. For Baked Beans. Wash the roots and scrape off their skins. in that case they lose the real goodness of the vegetable. see PORK AND BEANS. STRING BEANS. into cold water. but this depends upon their age and freshness. Minced veal or chicken in the place of ham. These beans are in season from the last of July to the last of September. serve with butter and salt upon them. salt and pepper. throwing them. They usually require one hour's boiling. a tablespoonful of butter and a half a cup of cream. for exposure to the air causes them to immediately turn dark. and boiled till tender--from half an hour to two hours. salt and pepper. drawing off at the same time the string upon the edge. There are several other varieties of beans used as summer vegetables. LIMA AND KIDNEY BEANS. CELERY. After they have boiled until tender and the water _boiled nearly out_. a little more than enough to cover them. Break off the end that grew to the vine. adding cream. Many prefer to drain them before adding the seasoning. drain off the water. add pepper and salt. by boiling. Then cut crosswise into little thin slices. stuff each half of the hull with the mixture. is equally as good and many prefer it.

Stew the salsify as usual till very tender. and while hot season with butter. Turn them frequently while in the oven. using a knife. add a teacupful of milk. smooth roots. Salsify may be simply boiled and melted butter turned over them. add a little salt and stew in a covered vessel until tender. and serve with butter. delicate flavor to perfection if they are baked instead of boiled. as the juice will escape and the sweetness of the vegetable be impaired. some boiled onion and parsley chopped fine. When done remove the skin. a little pepper.throw into fresh water. take them up. add a small lump of butter. and fry a light brown in boiling lard. as the fork allows the juice to run out. a little flour. Boil up and serve hot. Beets retain their sugary. Put them into a stewpan with a piece of butter rolled in flour. Pour off a little of the water. Make into little cakes. Boil them first and then scrape and slice them. and boil them until tender. leaving it white and hard. but press them with the finger to ascertain if they are sufficiently done. Put them into boiling water. or about one hour. STEWED BEETS. BEETS BOILED. Beat up an egg. salt. Do not probe them. and put them into a pan of cold water. Cut them into thin slices. salt and pepper on the slices. FRIED SALSIFY. . and slip off the outside. salt and pepper. Select small-sized. which requires often from one to two hours. then with the back of a spoon or a potato jammer mash it very fine. and let the beets stew for a quarter of an hour. When satisfied of this. They should be carefully washed. a little pepper and very sharp vinegar. butter and seasoning of pepper and salt. Set the pan on the fire. but not cut before boiling. BAKED BEETS. and a little vinegar. enough to cover. and a gill of sweet cream and a teaspoonful of flour stirred to a paste.

Beat up four eggs. pare off the crust and toast it a delicate brown on both sides. and is of a gelatinous character. Bake eight minutes or until the eggs are set. throw them into cold water and when they are all scraped and very clean. Boil a bunch of asparagus twenty minutes. GREEN PEAS. remove the stems. or melted butter. ASPARAGUS. well salted. that the stems may be all of the same length. . a tablespoonful of warm butter. cut several slices of bread half an inch thick.OKRA. boil fifteen minutes. Put in boiling water just enough to cover them well and keep them from burning. pepper. season with pepper and salt and a good allowance of butter. salt and vinegar if preferred. the yolks and whites separately to a stiff froth. salting and peppering well. Pour evenly over the asparagus mixture. but very clean. or it will lose both its color and flavor and will also be liable to break. ASPARAGUS WITH EGGS. This is a very much better way than cooking in a larger quantity of water and draining off the liquor. it may be boiled as follows: Put the young and tender pods of long white okra in salted boiling water in granite. and serve with butter. serve very hot. buttering. as that diminishes the sweetness. Scrape the stems of the asparagus lightly. much used for soup. cut off the tender tops and lay them in a deep-pie plate. and put the asparagus into plenty of boiling water. when the liquor should be nearly boiled out. Shell the peas and wash in cold water. dip the toast quickly into the liquor in which it was boiled and dish the vegetable upon it. Very good. While it is boiling. cut the large ends evenly. the heads all lying one way. Pour over white sauce. boil from twenty minutes to half an hour. When the stalks of the asparagus are tender (it will usually cook in twenty to forty minutes) lift it out directly. pepper and salt to taste. add two tablespoonfuls of milk or cream. porcelain or a tin-lined saucepan--as contact with Iron will discolor it. and is also pickled. tie them in bunches of equal size. This grows in the shape of pods.

place in a moderately hot oven and bake about an hour. then prepared the same as boiled. can be kept well all winter. then melt two ounces of butter in two of flour. It is fit to eat in August. as it tends to harden them. Wash them. set it on hot coals and stir it very frequently till it becomes dry. then mash it with a very little butter. should the pods be quite clean and fresh boil them first in the water. Then put the squash thus prepared into a stewpan. They will boil in from twenty to forty minutes. When done. The green or summer squash is best when the outside is beginning to turn yellow. When done. Into a saucepan of boiling water put two or three pints of young green peas and when nearly done and tender drain in a colander dry. The salt should never be put in the peas before they are tender. take out the seeds and without paring cut it up into large pieces. unless very young. in a dry warm place. squeeze and press it well. BOILED WINTER SQUASH. Cut open the squash. Pare it. pepper and salt. cut them into pieces and take out the seeds. pepper and salt. put the pieces on tins or in a dripping-pan. or till quite tender. and. cut it in pieces. drain and squeeze them well till you have pressed out all the water. peel and . Summer squash is very nice steamed. Take care not to let it burn. and stew it slowly till quite soft in a very little water. Afterwards drain. stir well and boil five minutes longer. BAKED WINTER SQUASH. mash them with a little butter. take out the seeds. The Germans prepare a very palatable dish of sweet young pods alone by simply stirring in a little butter with some savory herbs. SQUASHES. Boil them about three-quarters of an hour.and much of the fine flavor of the peas is lost. This is much finer than the summer squash. OR CYMBLINGS. as it is then less watery and insipid than when younger. remove and put in the peas. STEWED GREEN PEAS. The color is a very bright yellow.

to retain its fresh appearance. take it up. Chop it fine. etc. VEGETABLE HASH. Chop rather coarsely the remains of vegetables left from a boiled dinner. until quite dry. SPINACH. About a peck of greens are enough for a mess for a family of six. It retains its sweetness much better baked this way than when boiled. or serve the pieces hot on a dish. Turn it into a vegetable dish. When heated thoroughly take off the cover and stir occasionally until well cooked. tip the dish so as to oil the bottom and around the sides. Set it on the fire and let it stew five minutes. as it so often is. slice some hard-boiled eggs and lay around the top. put in a piece of butter the size of a hickory nut. sprinkle over them a little pepper. such as cabbage. place in a saucepan or frying pan over the fire. GREENS. to be eaten warm with butter like sweet potatoes. The addition of a handful of salt to each pan of water used in washing the greens will free them from insects and worms. . burdock. such as dandelions. then be thoroughly washed through several waters until they are entirely free from sand. Be careful to remove the scum. and drain and squeeze it well. when it begins to melt. All greens should be carefully examined. Fifteen to twenty minutes is generally sufficient time to boil spinach. Serve hot.mash like mashed potatoes. chicory and other greens. and put it into a saucepan with a piece of butter and a little pepper and salt. stirring it all the time. pour in a spoonful or two of hot water from the tea-kettle. When it is quite tender. Spinach requires dose examination and picking. the tough ones thrown out. parsnips. of a dull brown or olive color. cover quickly so as to keep in the steam. Persons fond of vegetables will relish this dish very much. as insects are frequently found among it and it is often gritty. then put in the chopped vegetables. Then drain it and put it in boiling water. potatoes. do not cover the vessel while it is cooking. cowslips.. Wash it through three or four waters. It should be cooked so as to retain its bright green color and not sent to table. shape it into a mound.

also mashed like potatoes and stewed like parsnips. for this reason it is best to cut away any tough stalks before beginning to cook the greens. chop them a little and return them to the fire long enough to season them with salt. As soon as they are tender drain them in a colander.especially if after the last watering they are allowed to stand in salted water for a half hour or longer. TURNIPS. add a spoonful of salt and let them boil slowly until tender. They should always be served hot. STEWED CARROTS. then add enough cream or milk to moisten the whole. let it come to a boil and serve hot. Wash and scrape the carrots and divide them into strips. All kinds of greens can be cooked in this manner. and boil them steadily until the stalks are tender. pepper and butter. Scrape and wash them. . Drain well and mash them. They require from forty minutes to an hour to cook. put them into a stewpan with water enough to cover them. cook them tender in boiling water salted slightly. Work in a good piece of butter and season with pepper and salt. according to the maturity of the greens. Carrots are also good simply boiled in salted water and dished up hot with melted butter over them. with two tablespoons of butter rolled in flour. Heap up on a vegetable dish and serve hot. vinegar may be added if it is liked. but remember that long-continued boiling wastes the tender substances of the leaves. CARROTS MASHED. and so diminishes both the bulk and the nourishment of the dish. STEWED PUMPKINS. then drain and replace them in the pan. When ready to boil the greens. with a handful of salt. Turnips are boiled plain with or without meat. this will be in from five to twenty minutes. shake over a little pepper and salt. the greens should be served as soon as they are hot. put them into a large pot half full of boiling water.

baste with butter. _Time. lemon juice and chopped parsley. then after stewing season the same as mashed potatoes. which may be ascertained by squeezing a piece between the thumb and finger. one pint of broth. Pumpkin is good baked in the same manner as baked winter squash. add a thickening of butter and flour and the lemon juice. Wipe them clean and white with a wet flannel. Let it remain for ten minutes. STEWED MUSHROOMS. Put in a saucepan and set on the fire. a tablespoonful of chopped parsley. Choose buttons of uniform size. two ounces of butter. drain it till there is no water remaining and chop it very fine. pepper._--Ten minutes to boil. twenty-one minutes. Cook in the oven fifteen minutes. a little cayenne pepper. Put it into a stewpan with the broth. Season with salt. Add salt to taste. and put it into boiling water. put them in a stewpan with a little water and let them stew very gently for a quarter of an hour. thickening of butter and flour. and boil until the endive is perfectly tender._--Six heads of endive. _Mode. Button mushrooms. Time. a little butter rolled in flour. remove the green part of the leaves. salt to taste. let the sauce boil up and serve. then take it out. Prepare them the same as for stewing. STEWED ENDIVE. salt. salt and water. Place them in a baking-pan in a moderate oven.See stewed pumpkin for pie. one tablespoonful of lemon juice. Cook the same. Arrange on a dish and pour the gravy over them. a small lump of sugar. slightly salted._--Wash and free the endive thoroughly from insects. Serve with sauce made by heating a cup of cream. Mushrooms are very nice placed on slices of well-buttered toast when set into the oven to bake. _Ingredients. BAKED MUSHROOMS. Stir until thick. work in . a tablespoonful of white sauce and two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice. When done. five minutes to simmer in the broth. They cook in about fifteen minutes. add a little salt and a lump of sugar. but do not let boil. two tablespoonfuls of cream or the yolk of one egg.

toss them about in the butter for a moment only. either stewed. Wash and wipe free from grit the small fresh button mushrooms. stir in two tablespoonfuls of cream or the yolk of an egg. mace and salt and thicken the gravy with cream or the yolks of eggs. add to them a little veal gravy. they are used principally in this country as a condiment for boned turkey and . Put into a frying pan a quarter of a pound of the very best butter. and serve. Canned mushrooms may be served with good effect with game and even with beefsteak if prepared in this way: Open the can and pour off every drop of the liquid found there. then put them in a saucepan with a little cream and butter. then put them in jars. stir it over the fire for a minute. The truffle belongs to the family of the mushrooms. CANNED MUSHROOMS. When you are ready to dish it up. or as a soup. where the air is pure. fried. Add to it two whole cloves. broiled. MUSHROOMS FOR WINTER USE. When hot add a quart of the small mushrooms. never in any case fried.a little flour and butter. They are also used to flavor sauces. TRUFFLES. either in fish stews or ragouts. to make the liquor about as thick as cream. Stewed button mushrooms are very nice. and let it boil for five minutes. catsups. and when the butter is quite firm add a top layer of salt. If served with steak. fill the top of each jar with an inch or two of the butter and let it cool. Cover to keep out dust. The best mushrooms grow on uplands or in high open fields. or served apart to eat with fish. pepper and salt. a saltspoonful of salt and a tablespoonful of lemon juice. that should be very tender and be broiled. Mushrooms can be cooked in the same manner as the recipes for oysters. game and soups. meat gravies. Keep the jars in a cool place. Another way of doing them is to stew them in milk and water (after they are rubbed white). let the mushrooms drain. but do not let it boil. let them simmer gently for from five to ten minutes. and when the meat is on the platter pour the mushrooms over it.

Select some fine truffles. wrap each truffle in buttered paper and bake in a hot oven for quite an hour. Ten truffles. Drain. they add a peculiar zest and flavor to sauces that cannot be found in any other plant in the vegetable kingdom. game and fish. cut them into thin slices and put them in a baking-dish. one tablespoonful of lemon juice. a quarter of a pint of salad oil. After cleansing and brushing the truffles. wipe the truffles and serve them in a hot napkin. then turn over the soup stock and bake half an hour. Bake them for nearly an hour. MACARONI A LA ITALIENNE. when the cheese is melted. Strew over it an ounce of grated cheese. parsley. Simmer fifteen minutes in plenty of boiling water. ITALIAN STYLE OF DRESSING TRUFFLES. take off the paper. TRUFFLES AU NATUREL. cleanse them by washing them in several waters with a brush until not a particle of sand or grit remains on them. garlic and mace in the above proportion. and just before serving add the lemon juice and send them to the table very hot. Break half a pound of macaroni into pieces an inch or two long. enough to prevent burning. Put alternate layers of macaroni and cheese. salt. a very little finely minced garlic. pepper. one tablespoonful of minced parsley. dish. pepper and salt to taste. salted. MACARONI. MACARONI AND CHEESE. cook . When mixed in due proportion. fillets of beef. on a seasoning of oil or butter. Divide a quarter of a pound of macaroni into four-inch pieces. two blades of pounded mace. scrambled eggs. Put the macaroni into a saucepan and turn over it a strong soup stock.chicken.

Pour over the whole a teacupful of cream or milk. dress it with butter and grated cheese. and when it boils stir into it a mixture of two tablespoonfuls of butter and one of flour.it in boiling water. filling the dish. and when the macaroni is nearly cold fill the mold with it. turn out and serve. [Illustration] . See SAUCES for tomato sauce. MACARONI A LA CREME. salted. boil from fifteen to twenty minutes then drain. according to taste. Break in very short lengths small macaroni (vermicelli. arrange it neatly on a hot dish and pour tomato sauce over it. a bit of salt. sprinkle the top layer with a thick layer of cracker crumbs. TIMBALE OF MACARONI. until tender. put it into boiling salted water enough to cover it. Divide half a pound of macaroni into four-inch pieces. Butter and bread crumb a plain mold. then work into it one or two eggs. and from one-quarter to one-half a pound of grated cheese. spaghetti. tagliarini). then more macaroni. into which place a well-flavored mince of meat. Let it be rather overdone. according to quantity. put in a good teaspoonful of salt. Set it in the oven and bake half an hour. let it boil about twenty minutes. It should be nicely browned on top. pour the boiling sauce over it and serve immediately. poultry or game. put half a pint of milk in a double boiler. enough to cover it well. Add two tablespoonfuls of cream. then fill up the mold with more macaroni. upon this some grated cheese and small pieces of butter. MACARONI AND TOMATO SAUCE. a little white and cayenne pepper. Boil one-quarter of a pound of macaroni in plenty of hot water. Drain it well and then put a layer in the bottom of a well-buttered pudding-dish. Bake in a moderately heated oven. pressed well down. Drain and dish the macaroni. and serve immediately while hot. pressing it well down and leaving a hollow in the centre. and so on. Serve in the same dish in which it was baked with a clean napkin pinned around it. salt to taste.

so that the butter will not stick to them. little balls. if the cream is too cold. not at all. tray and ladle should be well scalded before using. have ready some very cold water in a deep wooden tray. as the butter forms. leaving the dasher free. then. stamped pats. more slowly. pour a little cold water into the churn. Now pour in the thick cream. used in moderation. TO MAKE BUTTER QUICKLY. always with perfect regularity. and into this plunge the dasher when you draw it from the churn. is easily digested. should the butter form slowly. When you have collected all the butter. add a little warm water to bring it to the proper temperature. and close in texture and polish. so that it may all sour alike.BUTTER AND CHEESE TO MAKE BUTTER. stir it well into what is already there. The churn. and then cooled with very cold water. and the butter is perfectly smooth. and no _fresh cream should be put with it_ within twelve hours before churning. Butter is indispensable in almost all culinary preparations. nutritious and fattening. rinse the sides of the churn down with cold water and take the butter up with a perforated dasher or a wooden ladle. it is softening. dasher. in the winter. then cool well with ice or spring water. Good fresh butter. . churn fast at first. drain off the water. or the butter will not come quickly. turning it dexterously just below the surface of the buttermilk to catch every stray bit. squeezing and pressing the butter with the ladle. then with the ladle make up into rolls. sprinkle salt over the butter--a tablespoonful to a pound. Thoroughly scald the churn. and perhaps. etc. work it in a little and set in a cool place for an hour to harden. When you skim cream into your cream jar. When the butter has "come". the butter will float off. and is far more easily digested than any other of the oleaginous substances sometimes used in its place. then pour on more cold water and work the butter with the ladle to get the milk out. in warm weather. then work and knead it until not another drop of water exudes. gather behind a wooden butter ladle and drain off the water.

N. tying them up with a string. having it strong enough of salt to bear up an egg. A BRINE TO PRESERVE BUTTER. First work your butter into small rolls. then thoroughly work in an ounce of this mixture to every pound of butter. PUTTING UP BUTTER TO KEEP. one ounce of white sugar and one of saltpetre. beat it with a wooden spoon until the butter is made. when drained. then set it aside. when you have enough cream put it into a clean earthen basin. strain the milk into clean pans. then drain off the water.. The butter is to be made into half-pound rolls. which will not be long. Take of the best pure common salt two quarts. which must be frequently changed (a refrigerator saves this trouble). _Orange Co. One gallon of milk will make a moderate dish. put a small tablespoonful of fine salt to each pound of butter and work it in. if there is whey . when it is cold. pulverize them together completely. worked in with the salt. add half a teacupful of pure. and put into the following brine--to three gallons of brine strong enough to bear an egg. and set it over a moderate fire until it is scalding hot. A reliable recipe. cover it with a bit of muslin and keep it in a cool place. Style_ CURDS AND CREAM. white sugar. Work the butter well. then take it from the milk and work it with a little cold water. add a quarter of a pound of white sugar. put the curd into a mug and set in cool water. Make the butter in a roll.Immediately after the cow is milked. until it is free from milk. as this excludes the air. Put one spoonful of prepared rennet to each quart of milk. do not let it boil. Place a weight over all to keep the rolls under the surface. do not wring or press the cloth. and when you find that it has become curd. tie it loosely in a thin cloth and hang it to drain. skim off the cream. and when cold strain it carefully. wrapping each one carefully in a clean muslin cloth. When you dish it. boil the brine. Make a brine. and one tablespoonful of saltpetre. will be found an improvement--sugar is a great preservative. the milk will still be fit for any ordinary use. Pour it over the rolls so as to more than cover them. say three gallons. Y. A small teaspoonful of fine white sugar.

lay it on a thin cloth held by two persons. then stir into it one large spoonful of the preparation called rennet. let them lie to drain. and wash them in cold water. lay it on a deep dish. take them out. It should be made only a . and pour fresh cream over it. dash a ladleful of water over each ladleful of curd. a tablespoonful of butter and enough sweet cream to make the cheese the consistency of putty. and when cool again it will be as stiff as jelly. hang it up to drain the water off. Put a pan of sour or loppered milk on the stove or range where it is not too hot. Keep it in a cool place. You may make this cheese of sweet milk by forming the curd with prepared rennet. With your hands make it into little balls flattened. also hand the nutmeg grater. and at a reasonable price. Prepared rennet can be had at almost any druggist's. and press for an hour." When the curd is formed.in the mug. have powdered loaf-sugar to eat with it. let it scald until the whey rises to the top (be careful that it does not boil. and in a day or two the skin will look dry. then add the rennet. NEW JERSEY CREAM CHEESE. Place a clean doth or towel over a sieve and pour this whey and curd into it. living it covered to drain two or three hours. rub them with fine salt. let it cool a little. COTTAGE CHEESE. serving it in a deep dish. cut the curd with a thread into small pieces. lay a cloth between each two. and they will soon ripen. put some sweet grass under and over them. Many like it made rather thin with cream. the directions for quantity are given on the packages of "Prepared Rennet. take it out on a ladle without breaking it. First scald the quantity of milk desired. set it by. then put it into a dish and chop it fine with a spoon. to separate the curd. lie it gently out without pressing the curd. It is prepared thus:--Make a quart of milk moderately warm. Slip is bonny-clabber without its acidity. or the curd will become hard and tough). adding a teaspoonful of salt. and then put it under a light press for one hour. and so delicate is its flavor that many persons like it just as well as ice cream. let them lie on a board for an hour. SLIP.

It should be only half filled. Pin a napkin around the dish in which it is baked. Dissolve two tablespoonfuls of flour in a gill of cold milk. Grate fine a quarter of a pound of any kind of good cheese. Sufficient for six persons. CHEESE FONDU. mix smoothly with it one ounce of flour. It must be served with powdered sugar. lay the bread in layers in a buttered baking-dish. Take three slices of bread well-buttered.few hours before it is to be used. . Melt an ounce of butter in a saucepan. Any person who is fond of cheese could not fail to favor this recipe. or any good cheese. Whisk three whites to a solid froth. Whip the whites of the eggs and add them. first cutting off the brown outside crust. and allow for the rising. Mix four well-beaten eggs with three cups of milk. Bake twenty minutes and serve the moment it leaves the oven. as the fondu will rise very high. and pour the mixture into a small round tin. stir into it about three ounces of finely-grated parmesan. It would be well to have a metal cover strongly heated. sprinkle over it the grated cheese. pour the mixture into a deep tin lined with buttered paper. till it is as thick as melted butter. or it will be tough and watery. SCALLOPED CHEESE. in summer set the dish on ice after it has jellied. Time twenty minutes. Beat the yolks of four eggs with a heaping teaspoonful of salt. say four inches. This makes an ample dish for four people. add it to the boiled milk and let it cool. half a teaspoonful of pepper and five ounces of grated cheese. nutmeg and cream. pour it over the bread and cheese. a pinch of salt and cayenne and a quarter of a pint of milk. some salt and pepper to taste. Melt an ounce of butter and whisk into it a pint of boiled milk. CHEESE SOUFFLE. stirring it all the time. Bake it in a hot oven as you would cook a bread pudding. simmer the mixture gently over the fire. Turn it into a basin and mix with it the yolks of two well-beaten eggs. and just before the souffle is baked put them into it. and serve the moment it is baked.

piled tastefully on a glass dish. Fold the paste in three. parmesan is the best kind of cheese to use for making this dish. a pinch of salt and a few grains of cayenne pepper. roll it out. and with a paste-cutter shape it in any way that may be desired. When the cream is nicely cooked. roll it out again. cut into strips about a third of an inch wide. and the flour mixed in a little cold water before stirring in. set the toast and cheese in the oven for three or four minutes and then pour the cream over them. two ounces grated parmesan cheese. twist them as you would a paper spill and lay them on a baking-sheet slightly floured. Roll out to the thickness of a silver quarter. Mix into a paste with the yolk of an egg. rolling in the grated cheese. Grate three ounces of dry cheese and mix it with the yolks of two eggs. CAYENNE CHEESE STRAWS. If put away in a tin these straws will keep a long time. CHEESE CREAM TOAST. Bake the ramakins in a brisk oven from ten to fifteen minutes. The milk should be boiling. season with salt and butter. two ounces butter. The appearance of this dish may be very much improved by brushing the ramakins over with yolk of egg before they are placed in the oven. roll it out evenly. You can make the straws of remnants of puff pastry.PASTRY RAMAKINS. about four or five inches long. beat the . but they must not be the least brown. WELSH RAREBIT. fold the paste. and sprinkle it with grated cheese of a nice flavor. and sprinkle more cheese over. dish them on a hot napkin and serve quickly. Where expense is not objected to. make a cream for ten slices out of a pint of milk and two tablespoonfuls of plain flour. Bake in a moderate oven until crisp. put four ounces of grated bread and three of butter. Very nice with a cup of coffee for a lunch. Serve cold. gather up the pieces of paste. A quarter of a pound of flour. Take the remains or odd pieces of any light puff paste left from pies or tarts. Stale bread may be served as follows: Toast the slices and cover them slightly with grated cheese.

while the upper side will exhibit a dark or cloudy appearance. which will be perfectly clear. with a strong light in front of you. that it seems unnecessary for the ordinary family to use those that are not the most practical. cover tightly and set in a cool place. if the large end turns up in the water. serve hot as possible. The best time for preserving eggs is from July to September. There are so many ways of cooking and dressing eggs. The fresh egg will have a clear appearance. pour off the top. It will boil and bubble until thick as cream.whole together in a mortar with a dessertspoonful of made mustard. and put them in the oven. let them become hot and slightly browned. when it is cold. toast some slices of bread. hold it between your thumb and forefinger in a horizontal position. To ascertain the freshness of an egg. Another test is to put them in a pan of cold water. and pour it over your eggs. cut off the outside crust. with a thick layer of salt at the top. Drain off this liquor. they are not fresh. the large end of the egg downward. the stale will rise and float on top. those that are the first to sink are the freshest. A stone jar is the most convenient--one that holds about six quarts. EGGS AND OMELETS. The stale egg will have a clear appearance at the lower side. see that the liquor more than covers them. cut it in shapes and spread the paste thick upon them. a little salt and some pepper. Another manner of preserving eggs is to pack them in a jar with layers of salt between. keeping them fresh from August until Spring. Take a piece of quick-lime as large as a good-sized lemon and two teacupfuls of salt. There are several recipes for preserving eggs and we give first one which we know to be effectual. TO PRESERVE EGGS. or. both upper and lower sides being the same. put it into a large vessel and slack it with a gallon of boiling water. Some put them in a wire basket or a piece of mosquito net and dip them .

as those of black Spanish fowls sometimes are. Eggs can be kept for some time by smearing the shells with butter or lard. SOFT BOILED EGGS. and then pouring upon them _boiling_ water--two quarts or more to a dozen of eggs--and cover and set them away where they will keep _hot_ and _not_ boil for ten to twelve minutes. . SCALLOPED EGGS. like any other food. and if liked hard. then pack in powdered charcoal. BOILED EGGS. or boiled too soon after they are laid. Eggs for boiling cannot be too fresh. leaving the centre or yolk harder than the white. Hard-boil twelve eggs. letting the spoon touch the bottom of the saucepan before it is withdrawn. and the egg tastes as much richer and nicer as a fresh egg is nicer than a stale egg. Have ready a saucepan of boiling water. about as thin as muscilage. set in a cool. the eggs not allowed to touch one another. When properly cooked eggs are done evenly through. or a tin pail.in boiling water half a minute. put the eggs into it gently with a spoon. that the egg may not fall and consequently crack. but rather a longer time should be allowed for boiling a new-laid egg than for one that is three or four days old. three and three-quarters to four minutes will be ample time to set the white nicely. evenly and sufficiently. or coat the eggs with melted paraffine. they should then be rolled on the table with the hand and the shell will peel off easily. For those who like eggs lightly boiled. six or seven minutes will not be found too long. in the bottom of a large well-buttered baking-dish place a layer of grated bread crumbs. then packed in plenty of bran or sawdust. slice them thin in rings. dark place. allow an extra half minute for them. and brush over each egg with it. Eggs for salad should be boiled for ten or fifteen minutes. Should the eggs be unusually large. This result may be obtained by putting the eggs into a dish with a cover. three minutes will be found sufficient. and should be placed in a basin of cold water for a few minutes to shrink the meat from the shell. then pack in sawdust. The heat of the water cooks the eggs slowly. Still another manner is to dissolve a cheap article of gum arabic.

tip around so that it will touch all sides of the pan. though. Break the eggs. one at a time. into a saucer. The beauty of a poached egg is for the yolk to be seen blushing through the white. Over the whole pour a large teacupful of sweet cream or milk and brown nicely in a moderately heated oven. Have one quart of _boiling_ water and one tablespoonful of salt in a frying pan. slip them into the hot dish. Set into the oven until quite hot a common white dish large enough to hold the number of eggs to be cooked. and in the same dish they were baked in. salted and peppered. stir them one way briskly for five or six minutes or until they are mixed. and breaking the eggs carefully in a saucer. cover with bits of butter and sprinkle with pepper and salt.then one of eggs. SHIRRED EGGS. Be careful that they do not get too hard. turn them (without beating) into the hot butter. be sure. which should only be just sufficiently hardened to . SCRAMBLED EGGS. Or prepare the eggs the same and set them in a steamer over boiling water. They are usually served in hotels baked in individual dishes. that the crumbs cover the eggs upon top. and slide carefully into the salted water. This is far more delicate than fried eggs. Put a tablespoonful of butter into a hot frying pan. about two in a dish. Adding a tablespoonful of cream for every two eggs. allowing plenty of room for each. Continue thus to blend these ingredients until the dish is full. is a great improvement. Melt in it a small piece of butter. POACHED OR DROPPED EGGS. Dash with a spoon a little water over the egg. sprinkle over them a small quantity of pepper and salt and allow them to cook four or five minutes. Having ready half a dozen eggs broken in a dish. Turn over toast or dish up without. one by one. when the eggs are first slipped in. to keep the top white.

POACHED EGGS A LA CREME. first stirring the hot lard with a stick until it runs round like a whirlpool. this will make the eggs look like balls. Serve immediately. then with a skimmer lift them out into a hot dish. simmer three or four minutes until the white is set. and then slide them carefully off into a frying pan of lard and butter mixed. and lift out with a griddle cake turner and place on toasted bread. Open gem rings are nice placed in the water and an egg dropped into each ring. add a teacupful of thick cream. A tablespoonful of vinegar put into the water keeps the eggs from spreading. the same as for fried cakes. They require about three minutes' cooking. a tablespoonful of vinegar and a teaspoonful of salt into a frying pan.form a transparent veil for the egg. Cook until the white is firm. dipping over the eggs the hot grease in spoonfuls. and break each egg separately into a saucer. together with two teaspoonfuls of chopped parsley. slip the egg carefully into the hot water. Put a quart of hot water. Eggs can be fried round like balls. Eggs can be poached the same in boiling water. put in half a cup of cream. by dropping one at a time into a quantity of hot lard. put it into a coffeecupful of fresh milk. EGGS AUX FINES HERBES. a large spoonful of butter. and decorate with little heaps of fried bread crumbs round the margin of the dish. salt and nutmeg. pour the sauce over them. into a saucer. Roll an ounce of butter in a good teaspoonful of flour. stir and simmer it for fifteen minutes. Hard-boil five eggs and halve them. FRIED EGGS. frying both sides without breaking them. Empty the pan of its contents. or rich milk. Break the eggs. if milk. arrange them in a dish with the ends upwards. or turn them over. season with pepper. one at a time. Take out with a skimmer. pepper and .

When it cooks thick like cream put in the minced eggs. or some shred anchovy may be added to the mince. garnished with sippets of toast. truffles. really it is nothing more than an omelet which is stirred about in the pan while it is being dressed. do not mince them too fine. Decorate with hot pickles. fry it quickly until nicely browned. salt and pepper. and when nearly done. Strew in upon them a few seasoned bread crumbs. Much the same method is followed in mixed eggs generally. MIXED EGGS GENERALLY--SAVORY OR SWEET. essence of shrimps. Stir it gently around and around for a few moments and serve. and some savory chopped small. a tablespoonful of butter. break a fresh egg into each case. and turn it over the dish of poached eggs. shrimps. MIXED EGGS AND BACON.. and when the butter melts. Make little paper cases of buttered writing paper. It is a better plan to warm the cream in butter in a separate dish. When this comes to a boil stir into it a tablespoonful of flour. Any particular flavor may be given to this dish. stir the whole about and. such as that of mushrooms. but on no account burn it. . Put over the fire in a suitable dish a cupful of milk. add them to the bacon. thicken with a very little cornstarch. Take a nice rasher of mild bacon. Serve in the paper cases. pepper and salt.salt to taste. oysters. let it boil up once. whatever may be added to them. Place the cases upon a gridiron over a moderate fire of bright coals. dissolved in a little cold milk. etc. turn it out into a dish. glaze the tops with a hot shovel. It can be served on toast or without. cut it into squares no larger than dice. put a small piece of butter in each. instead of being allowed to set as a pancake. catsup. that the eggs may not have to stand. when sufficiently firm. and a little chopped parsley or onion. strain and season them with pepper. MINCED EGGS. EGGS IN CASES. Chop up four or five hard-boiled eggs. Break half a dozen eggs into a basin. Chopped tongue.

a small omelet can be made more successfully than a large one. Fill the cavity in the egg with either of these mixtures. place in the centre of the omelet.. as parsley.sardines. and dip into boiling lard. celery. In making an omelet. or any cooked ingredients. seasoned and hot. roll twice in beaten egg and bread crumbs. spinach. beaten up in the eggs in due quantity. halve them lengthwise. flavored. salmon. Allow one egg to a person in making an omelet and one tablespoonful of milk. remove the yolks and chop them fine with cold chicken. just before turning. than to try double the number of eggs in one omelet and fail. then remove it. as the least particle of roughness will cause the omelet to stick. To insure this. a little olive oil. Sweet omelets are generally used for breakfast or plain desserts. and then put in a tablespoonful of butter. drain them and they are ready for use. wipe the pan dry with a towel. roasted meat. The smoothness of the pan is most essential. or with bread soaked in milk and any salad. drawn butter. Press the halves together. lamb. As a general rule. endive. COLD EGGS FOR A PICNIC. this makes an omelet more puffy and tender than one made without milk. If vegetables are to be added. They are also served over many kinds of thick sauces or purees. Boil hard several eggs. or with grated cheese. so with mushroom. it being much better to make two small ones of four eggs each. oysters. shrimps. anchovies. as they harden by standing. Many prefer them without milk. they should be already cooked. put a small quantity of lard or suet into a clean frying pan. or any similar preparation. OMELETS. care should be taken that the omelet pan is hot and dry. veal or any tender. lettuce. . This novel way of preparing cold egg for the lunch-basket fully repays one for the extra time required. onion. which gives as many different kind of omelets. herbs. onions. such as tomato. celery. etc. let it simmer a few minutes. as minced ham. dried salmon. Omelets are called by the name of what is added to give them flavor. may be used. the bread being half of the whole. All omelets should be served the moment they are done. When the color rises delicately. etc. and care taken that they do not _cook too much_.

potatoes. Pour them into a nice hot frying pan. pour in the eggs. tomatoes.. fish. pepper and salt. spread the . the whites to a stiff froth and the yolks to a thick batter. with or without a sauce. or white wine. etc. The right proportion is one tablespoonful of meat to four eggs. VEGETABLE OMELET. and either cut it small or pound it to a paste in a mortar. and. truffles or turnips.PLAIN OMELET. asparagus tops. Add to the yolks four tablespoonfuls of milk. gravy. meanwhile. water. with a spoon. beat four eggs very light. letting the raw part run out on the pan. artichokes. the omelet will be firm around the edge. green peas. Hold the frying pan handle in your left hand. lastly. draw up lightly from the bottom. lentils. let it remain a moment. Put a piece of butter nearly half the size of an egg into the heated pan. lest it adhere. together with a proper proportion of spices and salt. may be advantageously added to the eggs while they are being beaten. broad shovel. mushrooms. clean. MEAT OR FISH OMELETS. pickles. then turn with a spoon one half of the omelet over the other. cream or gravy and some seasoning. iron frying pan on the fire to heat. Put a smooth. till the omelet be free from the pan. but creamy and light inside. The most suitable vegetables are cucumbers. sorrel. carefully. till all be equally cooked. containing a spoonful of butter. A little milk. and. Take cold meat. or sliced lemon. Potted meats make admirable omelets in the above manner. game or poultry of any kind. or lift with a flat. as the eggs whiten. remove all skin. Make a puree by mashing up ready-dressed vegetables. or beat it up with the eggs. Just as it begins to boil. In any case serve hot. shake with your left hand. Prepare some eggs by beating them very light. but garnish with crisp herbs in branches. toss to a warm platter held in the right hand. then either toss it in a buttered frying pan over a clear fire till it begins to brown and pour beaten eggs upon it. sinew. turn it so that it will moisten the entire bottom. or spread it upon them after they have begun to set in the pan. taking care that it does not scorch. onions. but continue shaking. stir in the whites lightly. together with a little milk.

thyme and sweet marjoram mixed gives the famous _omelette aux fines herbes_ so popular at every wayside inn in the most remote corner of sunny France. turn it out on a hot dish. Make the omelet as above directed. and add to them a tablespoonful of milk and a tablespoonful of grated cheese. Parsley. OMELET OF HERBS. TOMATO OMELET. add a . Beat the eggs and mix the tomatoes with them. TOMATO OMELET.puree upon the upper side. onion. and when perfectly hot. Or stew a few tomatoes in the usual way and spread over before folding. It will take a little more butter to fry it than a plain one. No. add a little more cheese before folding. then fry them with a little butter until nearly done. ASPARAGUS OMELET. then tossed in a little butter. eight or ten stalks of asparagus. turn or fold the omelet together and serve. remove the seeds and cut them into small dice. grate a little cheese over it before serving. Or cold vegetables may be merely chopped small. and until about half cooked. adding salt and pepper. Peel a couple of tomatoes. which split into four pieces. Beat up three eggs. and cut the eatable part into rather small pieces. beat the egg and mix the asparagus with them. Omelet with parsley is made by adding a little chopped parsley. CHEESE OMELET. 2. No. Boil with a little salt. and some beaten and seasoned eggs poured over. An omelet "jardiniere" is two tablespoonfuls of mixed parsley. Cut in slices and place in a stewpan six peeled tomatoes. shallots and a few leaves each of sorrel and chevril. and make the omelet as usual. minced fine and stirred into the beaten eggs before cooking. 1. chives.

. Tongue is equally good. turn the beaten egg over it and cook as a plain omelet. a little pepper and salt. Boil ten minutes. half a teaspoonful of pepper and half a cupful of cream or milk. Mince rather fine one cupful of cooked chicken. If boiled ham is used. a teaspoonful of salt. mix well. Take a cup of cold boiled rice. then add three well-beaten eggs. CHICKEN OMELET. canned ones may be used. and serve at once. cut them into bits. if needed. and set aside until the omelet is ready. then add this mixture just before turning it over. and when it begins to boil pour in the omelet and set the pan in a hot oven.tablespoonful of cold water. stir well. break in six eggs. turn over it a cupful of warm milk. thicken with a large tablespoonful of flour. fold it double. a level teaspoonful of salt. add a tablespoonful of butter melted. Bacon may be used instead of raw ham. This is much better than the dry minced chicken. and just before doubling it. Make a plain omelet the usual way. Cut raw ham into dice. salt and pepper. add the mushrooms. RICE OMELET. Serve warm. until the eggs are cooked. warm in a teacupful of cream or rich milk a tablespoonful of butter. HAM OMELET. Clean a cupful of large button mushrooms. turn it out on a hot dish. fry with butter and when cooked enough. Put a tablespoonful of butter in a hot frying pan. Stir in a teaspoonful of flour. a dash of pepper. Put into a stewpan an ounce of butter and let it melt. When they begin to simmer. As soon as it is cooked through. dissolved in a little milk or water to thicken. mince it and mix with the egg after they are beaten. Make a plain omelet. MUSHROOM OMELET. turn the mushrooms over the centre and serve hot. Very good. but not too hard. stirring one way.

1. mix the minces into the eggs before cooking. and when ready to fold. cream. buttered and made thoroughly hot. if preferred. soak it in either milk. Break four eggs into a basin and carefully remove the treadles. No. lemon juice. have ready a tablespoonful of grated and sifted bread. season with salt. Make a plain omelet. cream enough to moisten it. JELLY OMELET. Cook the same as a plain omelet. Thicken the liquid with butter rolled in flour. add the bread. white wine. gravy. or. Chop up the oysters and add to the sauce. ONION OMELET.OYSTER OMELET. do it on one side only. water. Turn out on a warm platter. then fold. FISH OMELET. then pepper and salt to taste. either whole or minced. pour the remainder of the sauce around it. spread over it fish prepared as follows: Add to a cupful of any kind of cold fish. beating constantly (or the omelet will be crumbly). Dust it with powdered sugar. Make a plain omelet. skim them out and let them cool. when dished. broken fine. Parboil a dozen oysters in their own liquor. put in the omelet. Well beat the eggs together with a little nutmeg. brandy or rum. spread with some kind of jelly. cayenne pepper and a teaspoonful of chopped parsley. and when ready to turn spread over it a teaspoonful each of chopped onion and minced parsley. BREAD OMELET. turn it upon a dish. add them to the beaten eggs. seasoned with a tablespoonful of butter. and just before folding together. and. get ready a frying pan. pepper and salt. Warm together. Put a few spoonfuls in the centre of the omelet before folding. Make a plain omelet. according as the omelet is intended to be sweet or savory. and fold it .

and send to table. BAKED OMELET. OMELET SOUFFLE. Cracker omelet may be made by substituting three or four rolled crackers in place of bread. roll out in warm dish. and put in a little . Let one teacupful of milk come to a boil. mix with them one teaspoonful of flour. add to the yolks a small cup of milk. and when brown on the bottom cut in squares and turn again. Whisk the whites of six eggs to a firm froth. Break six eggs into separate cups. BREAD OMELET. sift pulverized sugar over. pour it over one teacupful of bread crumbs and let it stand a few minutes. This makes a nice dessert. No. one-half teaspoonful of salt. as it is liable to fall. mix them lightly with the yolks. mix all well together and turn into a hot frying pan. season with pepper and salt. 2. containing a large spoonful of butter boiling hot. Beat the whites and yolks of four or six eggs separately. lastly. it is done. or pound cake. RUM OMELET. Flavor with extract lemon or any other of the flavors that may be preferred. Put a small quantity of lard into the pan. wipe the pan dry with a towel. beat four of the yolks. fry to a delicate brown and serve hot. bake in a quick oven. let it simmer a few minutes and remove it. three tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. the stiff-beaten whites. may replace the bread for a sweet omelet. very little salt. a teaspoonful of baking powder. pour the mixture into a greased pan or dish. when pounded loaf sugar should be sifted over it. a tablespoonful of flour or cornstarch. Stale sponge-cake. When well-risen and lightly browned on the top. and the dish decorated with lumps of currant jelly. Bake in a well-buttered pie-tin or plate about half an hour in a steady oven. Fry the omelet slowly. grated biscuit. It should be served the moment it is taken from the oven.double to prevent the steam from condensing. then add the milk and bread. stir (not beat) till well mixed. and. Break six eggs into a bowl.

Dust a liberal quantity of powdered sugar over it. put them into a bowl and whisk them thoroughly with a fork. As soon as the omelet sets. Trim the crusts from thin slices of bread. butter them and lay between every two some thin slices of cold boiled ham. slant the pan. Slip a knife under it to prevent sticking to the pan. put out the fire and serve. HAM SANDWICHES. . Add a little salt to it just before folding it and turning out on the dish. pour a glass of warm Jamaica rum around it. The longer they are beaten. which would spoil the color of the omelet. a pinch of salt and the yolk of an egg. Salt _mixed_ with the eggs prevents them from rising.fresh lard in which the omelet may be fried. Make a dressing of half a cup of butter. Omit salad oil and substitute melted butter if preferred. PLAIN. When the centre is almost firm. Care should be taken that the lard does not burn. rub the butter to a cream. one of salad oil."_ SANDWICHES. Beat up a teaspoonful of milk with the eggs and continue to beat until the last moment before pouring into the pan. and when slightly browned. and when it is so used the omelet will look flabby. then stir in as much chopped ham as will make it consistent and spread between thin slices of bread. With a tablespoon dash the burning rum over the omelet. hold a platter against the edge of the pan and deftly turn it out on to the hot dish. a little red or white pepper. Break three eggs separately. and when it is placed on the table set fire to the rum. which should be over a hot fire. add the other ingredients and mix thoroughly. one tablespoonful of mixed mustard. and singe the sugar into neat stripes with a hot iron rod. yet without salt it will taste insipid. heated in the coals. _"The Cook. HAM SANDWICHES. the lighter will the omelet be. Spread the meat with a little mustard if liked. remove the pan from the hottest part of the fire. work the omelet in shape to fold easily find neatly.

WATER CRESS SANDWICHES. removing the stems. put it into a saucepan with gravy. Hard boil some very fresh eggs and when cold cut them into moderately thin slices and lay them between some bread and butter cut as thin as possible. work it very smooth while it is heating until it looks almost like a paste. SARDINE SANDWICHES. and cut them sharply on a board into small squares. Then spread it on a plate to cool. add pepper. pressing out every atom of moisture as far as possible. with a slight sprinkling of lemon juice. add a good piece of butter. For picnic parties. and seasoned with salt and pepper. place it between each slice of bread and butter. and spread between buttered bread or cold biscuits. having first drained away all the oil. these sandwiches are far preferable . then scrape away the skins and pound the sardines in a mortar till reduced to paste. A few minutes will free the sardines from grease. Take two boxes of sardines and throw the contents into hot water. Spread it between slices of buttered bread. a pinch of pepper. leaving no crust._ EGG SANDWICHES. The lettuce adds very much to the flavor of the sardines. Wash well some water cress and then dry them in a cloth. season them with pepper. _Nantasket Beach.CHICKEN SANDWICHES. then mix with the cress hard-boiled eggs chopped fine. salt and nutmeg. then cut the cress into small pieces. and with a sharp knife cut as many thin slices as will be required for two dozen sandwiches. press down the slices hard. Mince up fine any cold boiled or roasted chicken. and spread on the sandwiches. Or chop the sardines up fine and squeeze a few drops of lemon juice into them. salt and some tiny pieces of lettuce. or when one is traveling. Pour away the water and dry the fish in a cloth. Have a stale loaf and some fresh butter. which have been previously cut as above. water or cream enough to soften it.

one tablespoonful of melted butter. If vinegar is not relished. half a teaspoonful of mustard. and you could not require a better sandwich.to hard-boiled eggs _au naturel_. These are extremely nice and are very easily made. Spread this between two biscuits or pieces of oat-cake. Among all civilized people bread has become an article of food of the first necessity. for it constitutes of itself a complete life sustainer. Mince beef tongue and boiled mushrooms together. MUSHROOM SANDWICHES. half a teaspoonful of salt. palatable and nutritious bread. half a teaspoonful of pepper. and combining the sustaining powers of the animal and vegetable kingdoms in one product. then add the salt. add French mustard and spread between buttered bread. BREAD. mixing each well. A little earnest attention to the subject will enable any one to comprehend the theory. Some people will prefer the sandwiches less highly seasoned. season to taste. pepper. put into it the butter and mix it smooth with a spoon. In that case. a quarter of a pound of common cheese grated. mustard and the cheese. starch and sugar which it contains representing ozotized and hydro-carbonated nutrients. which will make it the proper thickness. As there is no one article of food that enters so largely into our daily fare as bread. Take one hard-boiled egg. Take the yolk of the egg and put it into a small bowl and crumble it down. and then ordinary care in practice will make one familiar with the process. . and properly so. GENERAL DIRECTIONS. the gluten. so no degree of skill in preparing other articles can compensate for lack of knowledge in the art of making good. Then put in the tablespoonful of vinegar. and one tablespoonful of vinegar or cold water. CHEESE SANDWICHES. then use cold water instead.

while boiling will act as a preventative. particularly in winter. unwholesome loaf. or has had hot liquid poured over it. If either the sponge or the dough be permitted to overwork itself--that is to say. as the cool air admitted will have an unfavorable effect upon it. Heavy bread will also most likely be the result of making the dough very hard and letting it become quite cold. As a general rule. Salt is always used in bread-making. the next is the soundness and sweetness of all the ingredients used for it. there must be attention and care through the whole process. but heated to boiling over hot water--then set aside to cool before mixing. not only on account of its flavor. and. if the mixing and kneading be neglected when it has reached the proper point for either--sour bread will probably be the consequence in warm weather. which destroys the insipid raw state of the flour. but because it makes the dough rise better. The yeast must be good and fresh if the bread is to be digestible and nice. instead of maintaining the gentle and equal degree of heat required for its due fermentation. thin yeast produces an imperfect fermentation. . A poor. and should be used when it is just blood warm. an acetous fermentation. Too small a proportion of yeast. The other most common causes of failure are using yeast which is no longer sweet. or which has been frozen. the oven for baking bread should be rather quick and the heat so regulated as to penetrate the dough without hardening the outside. or insufficient time allowed for the dough to rise. So the milk should be thoroughly scalded. which flavors the bread and makes it disagreeable. and to allow it to become cold before it is finished. The goodness will also be endangered by placing it so near a fire as to make any part of it hot. in addition to these. The oven door should not be opened after the bread is put in until the dough is set or has become firm. Stale yeast produces. will cause the bread to be heavy. In mixing with milk. instead of vinous fermentation. Simple heating will not prevent bread from turning sour in the rising.The first thing required for making wholesome bread is the utmost cleanliness. and bad bread in any. the milk should be boiled--not simply scalded. An almost certain way of spoiling dough is to leave it half made. the result being a heavy.

Some people use scalding water in making wheat bread.The dough should rise and the bread begin to brown after about fifteen minutes. In the morning add a teaspoonful of salt and mix all the flour in the pan with the sponge. in winter. and thus carry off the gas which has been formed. Keep the jar well covered and carefully cleansed from crumbs and stale pieces. Bread made in this manner keeps moist in summer much longer than when made in the usual mode. Never leave the bread in the pan or on a pin table to absorb the odor of the wood." In summer the bread should not be wet over night. Scald and dry it thoroughly every two or three days. stir in the "wetting" very lightly. When the bread is baked.--which use warm in winter and cold in summer. but is no longer needed." either milk or water. as now sold in most grocery stores. in that case the flour must be scalded and allowed to cool before the yeast is added--then proceed as above. but only slightly. if you use water as "wetting. Sift the flour into a large bread-pan or bowl. kneading it well. removing the cloth. but brown all over when well baked. make a hole in the middle of it. but to give the soft. use them for no other purpose.--this is called "_putting the bread in sponge_. Bake from fifty to sixty minutes and have it brown. makes fine light. wafer-like consistency which many prefer. sweet bread. then cover the pan with a thick blanket or towel. Keep in good supply. When cold put them in a stone jar. stir the yeast lightly. wrap them while still hot in several thicknesses of bread-cloth. A yard and a half square of coarse table linen makes the best bread-cloth. then pour in your "wetting. and is a much quicker process. and can always be had fresh. in a warm place to rise. remove the loaves immediately from the pans and place them where the air will circulate freely around them. then let it stand . Compressed yeast. If you like crusts that are crisp do not cover the loaves. as that absorbs the moisture and gives the bread an unpleasant taste and odor. WHEAT BREAD." dissolve in it a bit of butter of the size of an egg. and set it. not black or whitey brown. Home-made yeast is generally preferred to any other. and pour in the yeast in the ratio of half a teacupful of yeast to two quarts of flour. as you choose. tender. no butter is necessary.--if you use milk. but do not mix all the flour into it. being made fresh every day.

COMPRESSED YEAST BREAD. Use for two loaves of bread three quarts of sifted flour. prick them three or four times with a fork. . if the temperature of heat is properly attended to the sponge will be foamy and light in half an hour.two hours or more until it has risen quite light. Dissolve the yeast in a pint of lukewarm water. Keep well covered in a tin box or large stone crock. then knead it from five to ten minutes. The loaves should come half way up the pan. cover them with a double thick cloth and set again in a warm place to rise twice their height. nearly a quart of warm water. The heat should be greater at the bottom than at the top of the oven. It should be hot enough to brown a teaspoonful of flour in five minutes. Cover the bowl containing the batter or sponge with a thick folded cloth and set it in a warm place to rise. divide it into loaves. bake in a quick oven from forty-five to sixty minutes. put the loaves into baking-tins. and scalded and dried thoroughly in the sun once a week. if you desire good health. Let them stand ten or fifteen minutes. then stir into it enough flour to make a thick batter. then remove the dough to the molding-board and mold it for a long time. This bread has the advantage of that made of home-made yeast as it is made inside of three hours. cutting it in pieces and molding them together again and again. When the loaves are ready to put into the oven. you will obtain sweet. All bread is better. a level tablespoonful of salt and an ounce of compressed yeast. the oven should be ready to receive them. without the soda. but _sour bread_ you should never eat. and the fire so arranged as to give sufficient strength of heat through the baking without being replenished. using as little flour as possible. molding the dough a long time to distribute the soda equally throughout the mass. whereas the other requires from twelve to fourteen hours. knead again each loaf and put them into buttered baking tins. tender and wholesome bread. If by any mistake the dough becomes sour before you are ready to bake it. which should be wiped out every day or two. add the rest of the flour and sufficient warm water to make the dough stiff enough to knead. you can rectify it by adding a little dry super-carbonate of soda. If these directions are followed. then make it into loaves. and they should be allowed to rise until the bulk is doubled. then bake the same as any bread. Now stir into this sponge the salt dissolved in a little warm water. until the dough is elastic under the pressure of your hand. if naturally sweet.

Use about the same quantity as of other yeast. if care be taken to let it ferment well in the bowl. it may immediately be corked tightly. strain it. UNRIVALED YEAST. a saving of time and trouble. requiring the help of no old yeast.HOME-MADE YEAST. two of salt and a teacupful of yeast. beat up one quart of flour with some of the liquor. The jug should be scalded before putting in the yeast. Make a pan of yeast the same as "Home-Made Yeast. keep in a dry place. DRIED YEAST OR YEAST CAKES. when thoroughly cooked drain the water on enough flour to make a thin batter. When it is convenient to get compressed yeast. Two-thirds of a coffeecupful of this yeast will make four loaves. Be careful to keep it in a cool place. let it stand a day. it is much better and cheaper than to make your own. and kept near a fire. remove it from the fire and when cool enough. half a tablespoonful of ginger. then put it in a large mouthed jug and cork tightly. Let it stand in a warm place. It will keep in a cool place two months. and let the liquor cool to the consistency of new milk. kneading it well until it is thick enough to roll out. set this on the stove or range and scald it enough to cook the flour (this makes the yeast keep longer). On one morning boil two ounces of the best hops in four quarts of water half an hour. then strain and bottle and it is fit for use. and is best the latter part of the time. Tie a handful of hops in a small muslin bag and boil with the potatoes. then add six medium-sized potatoes. It must be stirred frequently while it is making." mix in with it corn meal that has been sifted and dried. boiled and mashed through a colander. then put it in an earthen bowl and add half a cupful of salt and half a cupful of brown sugar. Spread out and dry thoroughly in the shade. Almost . and let it stand till the third day after. Before using it shake the bottle up well. set away in a cool place. when it can be cut into cakes or crumble up. also half a cup of sugar. then mix all well together. One advantage of this yeast is its spontaneous fermentation. Boil six large potatoes in three pints of water. until it has thoroughly risen. add the potatoes mashed.

This. as soon as the tea-kettle has boiled. At noon the day before baking. Place in warm. in a closed vessel half-filled with water moderately hot. then add the cup of meal set the day before. or milk and water (not too hot. and flour enough to knead into loaves. with the spoon in it. Set the cup. salted. cover the top with a folded towel and put it where it will keep warm. or you will scald the yeast germs). add one teaspoonful of soda and one of salt. Wrap closely in damp towels and keep in closed earthen jars until it is wanted. Knead but little harder than for biscuit and bake as soon . Then place the pitcher in a kettle of warm water. take half a cup of corn meal and pour over it enough sweet milk boiling hot to make it the thickness of batter-cakes. Cover this sponge closely and keep warm for an hour. Keep the temperature as nearly even as possible and add a teaspoonful of flour once or twice during the process of fermentation. While getting breakfast in the morning. as the yeast can be procured at almost any grocery. on account of its being sweet and wholesome and required no prepared yeast to make it. add enough to make a stiff batter. or half water and half milk. then fill one-third full of water about as warm as the finger could be held in. and stir rapidly into a pulpy mass with a spoon. Nowadays yeast-bread is made with very little trouble. Sift your flour into a pan. well-greased pans. adding flour to make the proper consistency. Then pour the yeast into a bread-pan. When cool enough so that it will not scald the flour.all groceries keep it. Bake in a steady oven. and when done let all the hot steam escape. add a pint and a half of warm water. and you will be surprised to find how soon the yeast will be at the top of the pitcher. SALT-RAISING BREAD. then to this add a teaspoonful of salt. delivered to them fresh made daily. take a quart tin cup or an earthen quart milk pitcher. scald it. The next morning before breakfast pour into a pitcher a pint of boiling water. used to be considered the prize bread. Have ready a pitcher of warm milk. make an opening in the centre and pour in your yeast. In the winter place it where it will keep warm. BREAD FROM MILK YEAST. but not scalding. a pinch of brown sugar and coarse flour enough to make a batter of about the right consistency for griddle-cakes. cover closely and leave till it is light. then knead into loaves. The yeast ought to reach to the top of the bowl in about five hours. This will be full of little bubbles. in our grandmothers' time.

This recipe makes five large loaves. and let it rise again. as it has been tried for years and never failed. Mix into as stiff a dough as can be stirred with a spoon. mix well. GRAHAM BREAD. dissolved in a little water. one-half cupful of good yeast. one quart of corn meal. deep bread-pans. then bake one hour in a pretty hot oven. one-half teacupful of Porto Rico molasses. and two-thirds of a teacupful of home-made yeast. then add a large teaspoonful of salt and half a cup of sugar. beat it well and turn it into well-greased. add a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a spoonful of warm water. and pour into two medium-sized pans. BOSTON BROWN BREAD. One teacupful of wheat flour. or when light. Bake in a _moderate_ oven from three to four hours. a lump of butter as large as a walnut may be melted and stirred into it. This should be covered about twenty minutes when first put into the oven with a thick brown paper. this is to be mixed at night. add one teaspoonful of soda. in the morning. one pint of warm water. let it stand in a warm place until it rises to the top of the pans. for it will make the bread dry and crumbling.) Stir together three heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder. it prevents the upper crust hardening before the loaf is well-risen. If these directions are correctly followed the bread will not be heavy or sodden. in the morning. a teaspoonful of salt. GRAHAM BREAD. three cups of Graham flour and one cup of white flour. . they will be about half full. Let it rise several hours. If water is used. A cup of this milk yeast is excellent to raise buckwheat cakes. half a teacupful of molasses or brown sugar. Mix all thoroughly with milk or water into as stiff a batter as can be stirred with a spoon. one teacupful of Graham flour. or over night. One pint of rye flour. Do not allow it to get too light before baking. or an old tin cover. using warm water for wetting.as it rises to the top of the tin. Bake immediately in well-greased pans. all fresh. add sufficient Graham flour to make the dough as stiff as can be stirred with a strong spoon. one teaspoonful of salt. (Unfermented.

three and a half cups of milk. One cup of white flour. (Unfermented. white bread sponge. RHODE ISLAND BROWN BREAD. pour over enough boiling water to thoroughly scald it. This is for sour milk. then add a level teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a tablespoonful of water. VIRGINIA BROWN BREAD. Stir all together _thoroughly_. two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. STEAMED BROWN BREAD. Beat well and steam for four hours. Chicago_. Most excellent. when cool add one pint of light. half a teacupful of molasses or sugar. bake in a moderate oven one and a half hours. Two and one-half cupfuls of corn meal.) One cupful of rye flour. This is improved by setting it into the oven fifteen minutes after it is slipped from the mold. . one teaspoonful of soda. two of Graham flour. One pint of corn meal. add one cupful of molasses. one cup of molasses. one and one-half cupfuls of rye meal. and Graham flour enough to mold. mix well together. Bake in a covered dish. The batter to be stirred as thick as can be with a spoon. when light. one cupful of white flour. this will make two loaves. a teaspoonful of salt. when sweet milk is used. RYE BREAD. one cup of molasses. To be eaten warm with butter._Palmer House. The same can be made of sweet milk by substituting baking powder for soda. BOSTON BROWN BREAD. either earthen or iron. one teaspoonful of soda. use baking powder in place of soda. in a moderately hot oven three hours. one egg. a little salt and one quart of milk. a little salt. and wet up with sour milk. two of Indian meal. two cupfuls of corn meal. and turned into well-greased pans.

If put in the oven late in the day. mixing with warm water and let rise all night. in the morning. make it as stiff as can be stirred with a spoon. Graham may be used instead of rye. one-half cup of molasses. make a hollow in the centre. half a cupful of yeast. FRENCH BREAD. Cut across the top diagonal gashes just before putting into the oven. add a dessertspoonful of salt. if made in two loaves. two quarts of Indian meal. make the whole into a smooth dough. stirring constantly with a spoon). then knead it again. knead it well. cover it. scalded (by placing in a pan and pouring over it just enough _boiling_ water to merely wet it. then put it in a large pan. with coals heaped upon the lid.To a quart of warm water stir as much wheat flour as will make a smooth batter. one teaspoonful of salt and two eggs. One quart of rye meal or rye flour. and set it in a warm place to rise. When this dough is risen. let it stand a short time and bake five or six hours. and baked as above. but not enough to make it into a batter. . to bake all night. or half butter and half lard. bake in a quick oven one hour. with as much warm water as may be necessary. pour in the sponge. or less if the loaves are smaller. RYE AND CORN BREAD. stir into it half a gill of home-made yeast. TWIST BREAD. one teacup yeast. but that was placed in a kettle. This is similar to the "Rye and Injun" of our grandmothers' days. allowed to rise. Stir into this two quarts of flour. and let it set in a warm place for three hours. and make it into two or three loaves. Beat together one pint of milk. and half a small teaspoonful of soda. two teaspoonfuls salt. four tablespoonfuls of melted butter. this is called setting a sponge. make into two large rolls and bake as any bread. put three pounds and a half of rye flour into a bowl or tray. dissolved in a little water. let it remain all night. then placed in a covered iron pan upon the hearth before the fire. In the morning add a level teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little water. smooth the top with the hand dipped in cold water. let it be mixed in some vessel which will contain twice the quantity.

Flour the paste-board well. lay one part on it. a teaspoonful of salt. bake in a quick oven fifteen or twenty minutes. two-thirds of a teacupful of baker's yeast. when cool add the butter and salt. with flour enough to make as soft a dough as can be handled. Make a rising with the milk and yeast. half a cup of molasses or sugar. when perfectly light. dip a brush in milk and pass it over the top of the loaf. make about a dozen indentures with the finger on the top. two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. two cups of sour milk. and sift over the whole one tablespoonful of sugar mixed with one teaspoonful of cinnamon. Two cups of sifted meal. then bake from twenty to thirty minutes. set it in a quick oven and bake for nearly an hour. Scald the milk and gradually pour it on the meal. One quart of milk. when light. NEW ENGLAND CORN CAKE. and lastly dissolve a level teaspoonful of . GERMAN BREAD. joint one end of each of the other two to it. CORN BREAD. Mix the meal and flour smoothly and gradually with the milk. strew a little flour over the paste-board or table. two well-beaten eggs.Let the bread be made as directed for wheat bread. put a small piece of butter in each. two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. one teacupful of sugar. let it stand fifteen minutes to rise again. then the butter. Let this stand for a second rising. in the morning beat thoroughly and add two well-beaten eggs. Pour the mixture into buttered deep earthen plates. roll each piece under your hands to twelve inches length. and braid them together the length of the rolls and join the ends by pressing them together. put this quantity into two large pans. having rolled the three in this way. take a baking-tin. then the beaten eggs. then take three pieces as large as a pint bowl each. and a half teaspoonful of soda. molasses and salt. dissolved in a spoonful of water. roll out about one-half inch thick. making it smaller in circumference at the ends than in the middle. after ten minutes or so. mix in the sugar and shortening. a teaspoonful of salt. half a cup of flour. one pint of corn meal. two tablespoonfuls of nice lard or butter. Do this at night. One pint of milk well boiled. also a half cup of yeast. one teacupful of wheat flour.

The pan must be very well-buttered as Indian meal is apt to stick. three cups of milk and three eggs. Mix into a moderately stiff batter. Mix a teacupful of powdered white sugar with a quart of rich milk. one cup of flour. and set it on the fire till it is scalding hot. _St. one teaspoonful of salt. While it is cooling. Beat the whole very hard for a quarter of an hour. add the eggs well beaten and then the milk. for much of the goodness of this cake depends on its being long and well beaten. corn meal. When done. Add a teacupful of good strong yeast and beat the whole another quarter of an hour. Put in the mixture. Bake from thirty to forty minutes. This recipe can be made with sweet milk by using baking powder in place of soda. New Orleans. sugar. Three cups of white corn meal. shallow baking pans (pie-tins are suitable). One cup of sweet milk. beat three eggs very light. adding a saltspoonful of salt. one tablespoonful of lard. Put this mixture into a covered pan or skillet. one tablespoonful of sugar. and scald with it as much yellow Indian meal (previously sifted) as will make it of the consistency of thick boiled mush. Charles Hotel. pour it into well-greased. INDIAN LOAF CAKE._ VIRGINIA CORN BREAD.baking soda in a little milk and beat thoroughly altogether. two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder. BOSTON CORN BREAD. one of wheat flour. salt and baking powder. four of corn meal and one teaspoonful of soda. not very shallow. turn it out with the broad surface . Then take it off. Then have ready a tin mold or earthen pan with a pipe in the centre (to diffuse the heat through the middle of the cake). and then set it away to cool. Then bake it two hours in a moderate oven. and stir them gradually into the mixture when it is about as warm as new milk. Sift together the flour. It should be light in about four hours. rub in the lard cold. The same made of sweet milk and baking powder is equally as good. and cut up in the milk two ounces of butter. two of sour milk. cover it and set it in a warm place to rise. steam for three hours. two-thirds of a cup of molasses. and brown a few minutes in the oven. Bake nearly an hour in well-buttered tins.

If properly made. _St. Like all Indian cakes (of which this is one of the best). mix it and set it to rise the night before. flat board (a piece of the head of a flour-barrel will serve for this purpose). in well-greased pans. Cut it into slices and eat it with butter. If wanted for breakfast. Pour in the corn-cake mixture and add one more cup of sweet milk. Turn the spider so that the butter can run up on the sides of the pan. Mold into oval cakes with the hands and bake in a very hot oven. standing all night will not injure it. a teaspoonful of salt. there should be a streak of custard through it. SPIDER CORN-CAKE. bake it well. cut it in squares. Put a spider or skillet on the range and when it is hot melt in two tablespoonfuls of butter. but do not stir afterwards. adding one teaspoonful of salt._ JOHNNIE CAKE. Charles Hotel. split and buttered. Put this in the oven and bake from twenty to thirty-five minutes. Then add one cup sweet milk and one cup of sour milk in which you have dissolved one teaspoonful soda. Beat two eggs and one-fourth cup sugar together. it should be eaten warm. To be eaten hot. stir it very briskly for a quarter of an hour or more. Sift one quart of Indian meal into a pan. when done. The crust should be . make a hole in the middle and pour in a pint of warm water. till it becomes light and spongy. send it hot to table. then spread the dough smoothly and evenly on a straight. Mix with cold water into a soft dough one quart of southern corn meal. with a spoon mix the meal and water gradually into a soft dough. Then mix one and two-thirds cups of granulated corn meal and one-third cup flour with this. SOUTHERN CORN MEAL PONE OR CORN DODGERS. _Old Plantation Style_. sifted. place the board nearly upright before an open fire and put an iron against the back to support it. When done. This will be found an excellent cake.downwards and send it to table hot and whole. Add a teaspoonful of salt. New Orleans. a tablespoonful of butter or lard melted.

GENERAL SUGGESTIONS. In making batter-cakes. When the recipe calls for sweet milk or cream. take them from the tins and drop in the gravy just before sending to the table. the butter melted and eggs well beaten. and not sour enough . the bread cut smooth and tender. dissolve a little soda and stir into it. say one quart of each. and you do not have it. bake in muffin tins. using a _level_ teaspoonful to a quart of sour milk. Water can be used in place of milk in all raised dough. If the batter appears sour in the least. RAISED POTATO-CAKE. and should be done well and for some length of time. MUFFINS. the milk is always best when just turned. Where any recipe calls for baking powder. then dissolve half a teaspoonful of soda in a spoonful of warm water and add to the batter. but baking-soda. let it rise till it is light and bubbles of air form. a little salt and milk enough to make a batter as for griddle-cakes. then when molding them use as little flour as possible. and the eggs and butter added in the morning. and. ETC. and the dough should be thoroughly light before making into loaves or biscuits. the ingredients should be put together over night to rise. two tablespoonfuls of butter. to be served with roast lamb or with game. are made of equal quantities of mashed potatoes and of flour. the kneading to be done when first made from the sponge. you may use in place of it sour milk or cream. and you do not have it. in that case. baking powder or cream of tartar _must not_ be used. ROLLS. as this makes the pores fine. These are good also with fricasseed chicken. so that it is solid. Care should be taken not to get the dough too stiff. BISCUITS. you can use cream of tartar and soda. to this allow half a teacupful of fresh yeast. this should be done early enough to rise some time before baking.brown. Potato-cakes. in the proportion of one level teaspoonful of soda to two of cream of tartar.

you will find it makes no difference with their lightness and goodness. then all you have to do in the morning (an hour before breakfast time. lay them a little apart on buttered tins. TO RENEW STALE ROLLS. As in beating cake. therefore. as that has a tendency to cause the crust to be hard and thick when baked. the oven should be prepared first. Prepare them ready for baking by molding them out late in the evening. The best place in summer is to place them in the ice-box. take off the cloth and warm it. can be made late the day before wanted for breakfast. cover the tins with a cloth. and over again. never _stir_ ingredients into batter. and place it over them again. but beat them in. This will give them time to rise and bake when needed. by beating down from the bottom. the dough handled quickly and put into the oven immediately. then set the tins in a warm place near the fire. and you can always be sure of warm raised biscuits for breakfast in one hour's time. and up. .to whey or to be watery. If the oven is _too slow_. then dry them off in a hot oven. Stale rolls may be made light and flakey by dipping for a moment in cold water. put them into a steamer for ten minutes. WARM BREAD FOR BREAKFAST. Dough after it has become once sufficiently raised and perfectly light. cannot afterwards be injured by setting aside in any cold place where it cannot _freeze_.. etc. and while the oven is heating) is to bring them from the ice-box. or dip each roll for an instant in cold water and heat them crisp in the oven. as soon as it becomes the proper lightness. then fold around that a newspaper. When making biscuits or bread with baking powder or soda and cream of tartar. and placing immediately in a very hot oven to be made crisp and hot.. to ensure good success. so as to exclude the air. If these directions are followed rightly. To freshen stale biscuits or rolls. biscuits. the article baked will be heavy and hard. This laps the air into the batter which produces little air-cells and causes the dough to puff and swell as it comes in contact with the heat while cooking. rolls.

roll this out about half an inch thick and cut out with a biscuit-cutter. one teaspoonful of soda. Rub a little warm butter or sweet lard on the sides of the biscuits when you place them on the tins. pour into this one pint of warm water or new milk. half a cup of melted lard or butter. One quart of sifted flour. or make it into little balls with your hands. make a soft dough of sweet milk or water. one teaspoonful of salt. let it rise until light again. then add half a cupful of yeast. and more flour as is needed to make a rather soft dough. cut out with the usual biscuit-cutter and bake in rather a quick oven. three heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder and one teaspoonful of salt. Sift two quarts of flour in a mixing-pan. one teaspoonful of salt. knead it up quickly. When light. then mold fifteen to twenty minutes. . bake a light brown in a moderate oven. Very nice biscuit may be made with sour cream without the butter by the same process. BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. stir in a little flour. in the morning add nearly a teaspoonful of soda. SOUR MILK BISCUIT. the longer the better. butter the size of an egg. Two pints of flour. knead as little as possible. cover and set in a warm place to rise. Bake in a quick oven. to prevent their sticking together when baked. two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. one teaspoonful of salt. let it rise over night. mix thoroughly. make a hole in the middle of the flour. stir into this a pint of sour milk. RAISED BISCUIT.SODA BISCUIT. roll it out nearly half an inch thick and cut out with a biscuit-cutter. bake immediately in a quick oven. dissolve one teaspoonful of soda and stir into the milk just as you add it to the flour. after which stir in as much flour as you can conveniently with your hand. Rub into a quart of sifted flour a piece of butter the size of an egg. and rub in two tablespoonfuls of butter and wet with one pint of sweet milk.

add two well-beaten eggs. mix this thoroughly with enough flour to keep it from sticking to the hands and board. or more if needed. let them rise twenty minutes. boiled and cooled. add the rest of the ingredients and as much Graham flour as can be stirred in with a spoon. These can be made in the form of rolls. and bake immediately in a quick oven from fifteen to twenty minutes. 2. PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. with one cup of milk. EGG BISCUIT. Sift together a quart of dry flour and three heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder. a piece of butter the size of an . place in a greased pan. Let rise until light. Rub into this thoroughly a piece of butter the size of an egg. and let them rise until about even with the top of the pan. WITH YEAST. making it the consistency of batter-cakes. 1. take a lump of dough the size of an egg. and when light bake. which some prefer. Knead it well for about fifteen or twenty minutes. LIGHT BISCUIT. one tablespoonful of sugar. take enough wheat flour to use up the water. break into it two eggs. a tablespoonful of sugar. flour your hands. One pint of milk. lay it out rather flat in a bowl. the white of one egg beaten to a foam. set it away till morning. Bake in a quick oven for about half an hour. GRAHAM BISCUITS. half a cup of butter. two tablespoonfuls of sugar. half a cup of sugar. mold into biscuits. Take one pint of water or milk. Take a piece of bread dough that will make about as many biscuits as you wish. in the morning grease a pan.LIGHT BISCUIT. roll it lightly between the palms of your hands. a teaspoonful of salt. one large tablespoonful of butter. a half cup of yeast and a pinch of salt. No. Roll out nearly half of an inch thick. No. Mix all together quickly into a soft dough. make into small biscuits. When you bake take a pint of sponge. Cut into biscuits. and bake in a tolerably hot oven. one tablespoonful of melted butter.

make it into balls as large as an egg." Stir into a quart of sifted flour three large teaspoonfuls of baking powder. in the morning. one egg. then roll between the hands to make _long rolls_ (about three inches). and are much sooner made. knead thoroughly and let it rise again. or if milk is . to give them a glaze. Place close together in even rows on well-buttered pans. make up with half a pint of milk. fold one-half over the other by doubling it. roll out not more than a quarter of an inch thick. and let it rise over night. one-half cup of good yeast. mix up quickly into a smooth dough. and two quarts of sifted flour. salt and flour. pour in a pint of cold milk. add two well-beaten eggs. Melt the butter in the warm milk. spread soft butter over the top of each. Place them apart a little so that there will be room to rise. although the preceding recipe is the old original one from the "Parker House. (Unfermented. then add the sugar. Mix rather soft. FRENCH ROLLS. rub all well into the flour. and a well-beaten egg. mixed in equal proportions. add to this half of a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a spoonful of water. Cover and let them rise again. one tablespoonful of sugar. one pinch of salt.) These rolls are made with baking powder. With the hands. and a teaspoonful of salt. one-half cupful of fresh yeast. BEATEN BISCUIT. Add flour enough to make a stiff dough. lay them a little apart on greased tins. Rub over the tops with sweet milk before putting in the oven. Set them immediately in a pretty hot oven. Cover and place them near the fire for fifteen or twenty minutes before baking.egg. Mix in enough flour to make the same stiffness as any biscuit dough. Bake in rather a quick oven. PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. a tablespoonful of cold butter. then bake in a quick oven to a delicate brown. Two quarts of sifted flour. In the morning. a teaspoonful of salt. Three cups of sweet milk. one cup of butter and lard. roll it out less than half an inch thick. or half a cake of compressed yeast. Cut with a large round cutter. a tablespoonful of sweet lard. spread soft butter over the tops and fold one-half over the other by doubling it. cut with a large biscuit-cutter. Let it rise over night. a teaspoonful of salt and one of sugar.

beat well until the dough blisters and cracks. When cool. one tablespoonful and a half of vinegar and one teaspoonful of soda. one large tablespoonful of lard or butter. a third of a teaspoonful of soda and flour enough to make stiff sponge. flatten. beat in half a cup of yeast. It is not beating hard that makes the biscuit nice. Bake in a _quick_ oven.not to be had. work it on the board. make into small cakes. plain water will answer. Let them rise the same as biscuit and bake a delicate brown. one egg and a pint of sweet milk. put it back in the tray to rise again. This dough is very fine dropped into meat soups for pot-pie. but the regularity of the motion. roll into cakes and let them stand half an hour. then remove the skin. When tepid. [Illustration:] GRAFTON MILK BISCUITS. _An old-fashioned Southern Recipe._ POTATO BISCUIT. make a dough with warm water stiff enough to roll out. take them out with a skimmer. When this rises. . roll it into a ball with the hand. and bake in a quick oven. stir in the flour. _kills_ the dough. drain and squeeze with a towel to ensure being dry. when risen. pull off a two-inch square of the dough. add a tablespoonful of butter. Take two quarts of flour. These biscuits are fine. warm three ounces of butter in one pint of milk. a little salt. stick with a fork. and cut with a biscuit-cutter one inch thick and bake in a _quick_ oven. add two teaspoonfuls of brown sugar. the old cooks say. Boil six good-sized potatoes with their jackets on. when risen. Boil and mash two white potatoes. pour boiling water over these. enough to soften them. mash them perfectly free from lumps. put the soda in the vinegar and stir it well. VINEGAR BISCUITS. Put in just enough flour to make a stiff dough. when light. beat two eggs very light and add to it. Beating hard. add one small teacupful of yeast.

Bake a light brown and brush over with white of egg beaten stiff with powdered sugar. and seven cupfuls of _sifted_ flour. or until light. The cake should be torn apart. not cut. Bake a light brown. Bake about fifteen to twenty minutes. salt and sugar into the flour. add a teaspoonful of salt. RUSKS. Three cups of milk. add the eggs. cutting with a knife makes warm bread heavy. LONDON HOT-CROSS BUNS. Eat warm with butter. This cake is frequently seen on Southern tables. Stir all together and bake in well-greased round pans. three tablespoonfuls of baking powder and a teaspoonful of salt. shallow dish to rise again about fifteen or twenty minutes. beat thoroughly and when the mixture is blood warm. Warm one-half cupful of butter in a pint of milk. add a tumbler of milk. Roll the dough half an inch thick. half a nutmeg grated. one cup of yeast. set this as a sponge over night. In the morning. three tablespoonfuls of sugar.) Rub a piece of butter as large as an egg into a quart of flour. add four beaten eggs and last of all. SALLY LUNN. half a teaspoonful of soda. then put them in the oven. half a cup of good lively yeast. having first made a deep cross on each with a knife. Set it to rise over night. or one cake of compressed yeast dissolved in a cup of tepid water. In the morning add half a cup of melted butter. Scatter the baking powder. stir it into the batter and turn it into a well-buttered. and flour enough to make a thick batter. dissolve half a teaspoonful of soda. and let the cakes stand half an hour. and flour enough to roll out like biscuit. In one large coffeecup of warm milk dissolve half a cake of compressed . Knead well and set to rise for five hours. (Unfermented. one cup of sugar. two eggs. a tablespoonful of sugar.SALLY LUNN. melted. WITH YEAST. one saltspoonful of salt. the milk. Beat hard until the batter breaks in blisters. the butter. cut in round cakes and lay in rows in a buttered baking-pan.

one quart of sifted flour. Bake immediately in a quick oven from twenty to thirty minutes. Add sweet milk enough to make a _very_ soft paste. then rub into it a tablespoonful of cold butter and a teaspoonful of salt. light dough. Roll out the paste about a quarter of an inch thick. or three tablespoonfuls of home-made yeast. beat these together.) Three cups of flour sifted. and place the pieces on it. Glaze the top of each with sugar and milk. Two cups of raised dough. roll them under the hands into round balls. (Unfermented. before baking. then . add the milk. and cut them a round shape the size of a saucer. Be sure that the butter is well worked in. mix into a soft dough. flour enough to make a stiff dough. two small cups of milk. half a cup of butter. then knead it in the form of biscuits. flour. three teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Cut it into triangular pieces. sift together salt. rub damp sugar and cinnamon over the top and place in the oven. a small cup of sugar and a teaspoonful of salt.yeast. two tablespoonfuls of butter. let it stand until very light. break off pieces about as large as an egg. sugar and baking powder. using plenty of flour on the paste-board and rolling pin. Flour the sides and bottom of a biscuit tin. Some cooks prefer to bake them on a floured griddle. Bake about twenty minutes. one teaspoonful of salt. When half done. place them on buttered tins and let them rise until they are almost up to the edge of the tins. Use flour enough to make a smooth. RUSKS. rub in the butter cold. three eggs. RUSKS. Some add dried currants. three tablespoonfuls of sugar. rub the tops with sugar and water mixed. each side about four inches long. and then sprinkle dry sugar over them. while dry. well-washed and dried in the oven. and when light mold into high biscuit and let rise again. one of sugar. beaten eggs and spices. brush over with sweet milk. to this add three well-beaten eggs. SCOTCH SCONES. set to rise. Bake immediately. half a nutmeg grated and a teaspoonful of ground cinnamon. with two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder. pierce the top of each one and bake in a quick oven. or the white of an egg. two well-beaten eggs. loosely measured. Thoroughly mix.

then add the eggs well beaten. two heaping teaspoonfuls of white sugar. stir this gradually into the flour. place until it is quite light.scarred across to form four quarters. instead of cut with a knife.) One quart of flour. like soda crackers. prick well with a fork and bake in a slow oven. set them at ten o'clock at night. 1. 2. and half a teaspoonful of soda. Make a batter of one pint of sweet milk. keep it in a warm. stir in half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a teaspoonful of hot water. (Fine. warm the milk with the butter in it. one of salt. They are to be mixed rather hard and rolled very thin. stir in the sugar and add a little salt. then stir in one or two well-beaten eggs. RAISED MUFFINS. RAISED MUFFINS. add flour enough to make it moderately thick. one teaspoonful of sugar. mix warm. cool a little. when ready for baking. _not hot_. the whites and yolks beaten separately. three eggs. a tablespoonful of butter or sweet lard and a half cup of yeast. three eggs. add flour enough to make a light dough. a tablespoonful of sugar. CRACKNELS. a large tablespoonful of lard or butter and . and bake in a quick oven. No. dissolved in a little warm water. Two cups of rich milk. a piece of butter the size of an egg. sifted twice. a teaspoonful of salt. a teaspoonful of salt. if the muffins are wanted for luncheon. Let the batter stand twenty-five or thirty minutes longer to rise a little. butter the muffin-rings or gem-irons and bake in a quick oven. Three pints of flour. if for breakfast. roll thin and cut in long pieces three inches wide. EGG MUFFINS. turn into well-greased muffin-rings or gem-pans. No. three teacups of sweet milk. four tablespoonfuls of butter and a gill of yeast. To be served hot and torn open. dissolve the yeast in half a cup of lukewarm water and add to the other ingredients. one-half cake of compressed yeast and a quart of milk. mix them about eight o'clock in the morning. When light.

three of sifted flour and three teaspoonfuls of baking powder. rub in lard or butter cold. TENNESSEE MUFFINS. Bake in hot oven fifteen minutes. or two cups of corn meal and one of flour. and flour enough to make a stiff batter. One-half Graham and one-half rye meal may be used instead of wheat flour. . mix at night. add the beaten eggs and milk. One egg well beaten. One quart of buttermilk. a little firmer than for griddle-cakes. Sift together flour. one tablespoonful of lard or butter. two eggs and a pint of milk. with a teaspoonful of salt. One cup of milk. one tablespoonful of sugar. flour. bake in cake rounds.two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder. (Without Eggs. two tablespoonfuls of sugar. a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in the milk. Sift together corn meal. One pint of corn meal. omitting the butter. a little salt. one pint of flour.) One cup of flour. or bake on a griddle in muffin-rings. or sour milk is better. CORN MEAL MUFFINS. sugar. in the morning add two tablespoonfuls of melted butter and one teaspoonful of soda. then fill two-thirds full. water to make a thick batter. mix into batter of consistency of cup-cake. salt and powder. Drop on well-greased patty-pans and bake twenty minutes in a rather quick oven. all beaten until very light. salt and baking powder. mix quickly into a smooth batter. are excellent. Grease well some muffin-pans and fill them two-thirds full. muffin-rings to be cold and well greased. one teaspoonful of salt. rub in the lard cold. PLAIN MUFFINS. These made of cream. MUFFINS WITHOUT EGGS. a tablespoonful of butter and a tablespoonful of sugar. three of baking powder. Drop in hot gem-pans and bake in a quick oven. Bake in a hot oven fifteen or twenty minutes. Two or three tablespoonfuls of sour cream will make them a little richer. one cup of corn meal. sugar. and eggs beaten and milk.

Rice muffins may be made in the same manner. then the Graham flour (with the soda mixed in). and a little salt. two tablespoonfuls of sugar. to the egg add the milk. The same can be made of sweet milk. GRAHAM GEMS. then the sugar and salt. beat it well. one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water. two of water. one of melted lard or butter. Have the gem-pans very hot. one of salt. half a cup of melted butter. a tablespoonful of sugar. Two cupfuls of Graham flour. on the top of the stove while pouring in the batter. Will bake in from fifteen to twenty minutes. from the spoon. not pour. one or two beaten eggs. No. so that it will _drop_. Excellent. Bake quickly. have the irons well greased. and if you use sweet milk. Muffins of all kinds should only be cut just around the edge. one tablespoonful of brown sugar. using three teaspoonfuls of baking powder instead of soda. Two cups of boiled hominy. Have the gem-pan. No. Two cupfuls of the best Graham meal. Bake in gem-irons. two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. GRAHAM GEMS. beat it smooth. fill two-thirds full and bake in a hot oven. make a stiff batter. fresh and cold. hot and well greased. one of salt and one well-beaten egg. 1. Three cups of sour milk. fill and bake fifteen minutes in a hot oven. one teaspoonful of soda. together with the lard or butter. Mix with sweet milk to make a thin batter.HOMINY MUFFINS. one cupful of wheat flour. put in no shortening. or milk and water. stir in three cups of sour milk. Stir briskly for a minute or two. two teaspoonfuls of salt. 2. add three eggs well beaten. then pulled open with the fingers. PLAIN GRAHAM GEMS. two cups of flour. Then place in a very hot oven and bake forty .

one of sugar. Meanwhile. but with nicety. one pint of flour. Put into one quart of sifted flour three teaspoonfuls of baking powder. that they may be in the proper condition for baking as soon as the batter is ready. Add the eggs to the mush. Have a brisk fire. six well-beaten eggs and a pint of sweet milk. and bake quickly. and yeast to raise it. One pint of sour cream. Lastly. a teaspoonful of salt. in which has been dissolved half a teaspoonful of carbonate of soda. Take a quart of flour and wet it with a little sweet milk that has been boiled and cooled.minutes. NEWPORT WAFFLES. and when brown on both sides the cake is done. Waffle-irons should be put on to heat an hour in advance. WAFFLES. and cream in gradually one quart of wheaten flour. all thoroughly stirred and sifted together. one tablespoonful . put in a small lump of butter and a dessertspoonful of salt. CREAM WAFFLES. It is best to check the heat a little when they are nearly done. Two or three minutes will suffice to bake on one side. Set the mush aside to cool. two eggs. or sour cream. cook in waffle-irons heated and well greased. then turn the iron over. grease it well and fill it with the batter. then stir in enough of the milk to form a thick batter. Make one pint of Indian meal into mush in the usual way. as delicious bread. Serve hot. beat separately till very light the whites and yolks of four eggs. CONTINENTAL HOTEL WAFFLES. butter the irons thoroughly. When light add two well-beaten eggs. that the waffles may have room to rise. While hot. care and judgment must be used in order to secure this most healthful as well. Fill the irons only half full of batter. Serve immediately. one teaspoonful of salt. add a tablespoonful of melted butter. Add a tablespoonful of melted butter. bring to the consistency of thin batter by the addition of sweet milk. heat your waffle-iron. As the best prepared gems may be spoiled if the heat is not sufficient. Add half a pint of buttermilk.

In this batter stir a pint bowl of fruit--any fresh are nice--or canned berries with the juice . add to the yolks a cup and a half of milk. One quart of flour. the whites beaten to a stiff froth. sugar and baking powder well together. one and a half pints of milk. separately. two-thirds of a teaspoonful of salt. Boil a half pound of rice in milk until it becomes thoroughly soft Then remove it from the fire. one and a half cups of milk. half a teaspoonful of salt. corn meal and salt. No. stirring it constantly. lastly. add it to a tablespoonful of dry flour. two eggs. a little at a time. one large tablespoonful of butter. work it into the flour. half a teaspoonful of salt. one teaspoonful of soda. GERMAN RICE WAFFLES. Beat the eggs separately. one heaping teaspoonful of baking powder. pour the batter into the half of the iron over the range until nearly two-thirds full.of corn meal. and. and add the stiff whites last of all. a half pound of melted butter. two eggs. mix the cream with the beaten yolks. then add an ounce of melted butter. beat the whites of eggs thoroughly. a little salt and a teacupful of warm milk. and. two spoonfuls of yeast. Rub through a sieve one pint of boiled rice. beat the eggs well. five beaten eggs. when risen. Set the batter in a warm place. 1. add the soda dissolved in a little sweet milk. BERRY TEA-CAKES. 2. Sift the flour. two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. No. RICE WAFFLES. two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. one cupful of hot boiled rice. mix the whole together. Nice little tea-cakes to be baked in muffin-rings are made of one cup of sugar. RICE WAFFLES. and adding. salt. then turn and brown slightly on the other side. one quart of sifted flour. stir in the flour. allow to cook a moment. a piece of butter the size of an egg and flour sufficient to make a stiff batter. bake in the ordinary way. Heat the waffle-iron and grease it evenly. one teaspoonful of sugar. rub the butter into the flour. cover. Beat separately the yolks and whites of three eggs.

a level tablespoonful of melted butter. a teaspoonful of salt. a teaspoonful of salt. let it stand three hours or over night.) Heat a pint of sweet milk and into it put two heaping tablespoonfuls of butter. let it melt. and half a teacupful of yeast. Serve hot with a sweet sauce. One pint of warm milk. POP-OVERS. One pint of cream. RYE DROP-CAKES. with half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in it. (With Yeast. Be sure to make the batter stiff enough. are very nice. before baking add the beaten whites. Serve while warm and they are a dainty addition to the tea-table. bake in cups in a quick oven fifteen minutes. Eaten with butter. six eggs well beaten. bake in little cups buttered and in a hot oven fifteen minutes. four tablespoonfuls of home-made yeast and sufficient flour to make a stiff batter. in the morning. bake in small cups. a little salt. buttered. at night. one teaspoonful of butter. set it in a warm place to rise. then add a pint of cold milk and the well-beaten yolks of four eggs--placing the whites in a cool place. two eggs. a little salt. FEATHER GRIDDLE-CAKES. one teaspoonful of salt. and wheat flour enough to make a thin batter. sour milk.poured off. four eggs well beaten. unless it is allowed to rise again. bake like any other griddle-cakes. and in a hot oven. and rye flour enough to make a thin batter. WHEAT DROP-CAKES. add to it one teacupful of thick. for flour must not be added after it has risen. half corn meal and half wheat.) Make a batter. a level teaspoonful of soda and flour . FLANNEL CAKES. two eggs well beaten. (With Yeast. These. Two cups of flour. of a pint of water or milk. also. or in small cakes upon a hot griddle. two cups of sweet milk.

a teaspoonful of salt and three tablespoonfuls of home-made yeast. fasten it by winding a piece of thread around that and tying it firm. CORN MEAL GRIDDLE-CAKES. one teaspoonful of salt. Mix this over night. added last. Three cups of flour. In the morning add one tablespoonful of melted butter or lard. when making sponge for bread over night. add two beaten eggs. that it should have time to rise a little. hot griddle. let stand twenty minutes. or pour them carefully from a pitcher. a nice light brown. wipe the griddle off with a clean paper or cloth and grease afresh. Take a small stick like a good-sized skewer. The second lot always cooks better than the . Put the cakes on by spoonfuls. well greased. a teaspoonful of salt. Grease the griddle with this. Between each batch of cakes. as thick as will run in a stream from the lips of a pitcher. then bake. As soon as they begin to bubble all over turn them. after it cools add one cup of white flour. trying to get them as near the same size as possible. WHEAT GRIDDLE-CAKES. using some of the sponge. This batter should stand a few minutes. and cook on the other side till they stop puffing. SOUR MILK GRIDDLE-CAKES.enough to make the consistency of pancake batter. also a tablespoonful of melted butter. wind a bit of cloth around the end of it. after adding the butter and soda.) Stir into one quart of boiling milk three cups of corn meal. Melt together a tablespoonful of butter and lard. Make a batter of a quart of sour milk and as much sifted flour as is needed to thicken so that it will run from the dish. brown on both sides. Bake on a well-greased. three teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted together. beat three eggs and add to three cupfuls of sweet milk. two beaten eggs and a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little water. a tablespoonful of melted butter. This is a convenient way. (With Yeast. Very good. in the meantime the griddle could be heating. mix all into a smooth batter. and a level teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little milk or cold water. then bake on a hot griddle.

first. If you use sweet milk. Beat the whole till very light and add a teaspoonful of baking soda dissolved in a little water. add the yeast. and when light bake on griddle not too hot. a teaspoonful of salt. (Very Good. one tablespoonful of lard or butter melted and three cups of sweet milk. half a pint of Indian meal. thin the whole with sour milk enough to make it the right consistency. mix the flour and meal. one-half teaspoonful salt. mix with a cup of wheat flour and a teaspoonful of salt. add the yolks of the eggs well whipped. one-half teaspoonful soda dissolved in warm water. and let stand for ten minutes in a covered bowl. Then add three eggs well beaten. GRAHAM GRIDDLE-CAKES. soaking the bread in it over night and using a little more soda. BREAD GRIDDLE-CAKES. one pint of flour. Add three well-beaten eggs. salt. and add half of a cupful of flour. one tablespoonful melted butter. the butter. one cup wheat flour. then beat to a smooth paste. RICE GRIDDLE-CAKES. pour on enough warm water to make batter rather thicker than that for buckwheat cakes. Scald two cups of sifted meal. Cook immediately on a hot griddle. break the bread into the boiling milk. one teaspoonful . GRIDDLE-CAKES. as the griddle becomes evenly heated. soda. one gill of yeast. Two cupfuls of cold boiled rice. These can also be made of sour milk.) One quart of Graham flour. three eggs. two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder and one teaspoonful of salt. CORN MEAL GRIDDLE-CAKES. Mix together dry two cups of Graham flour. two cups fine bread crumbs. and finally the whites of the eggs previously whipped stiff. boiling hot. use two large teaspoonfuls of baking powder instead of soda. One quart of milk.

FRENCH GRIDDLE-CAKES. mixed with the baking powder. Twelve large potatoes. salt and powder. one or two eggs. one egg. with one ounce of sugar and a cup of milk. stir in eggs. HUCKLEBERRY GRIDDLE-CAKES. a little more than half a pint of milk. sugar. two teacupfuls of boiling milk. and serve with maple syrup. leaving out one cup of milk. make cakes large. two eggs. then strain off water and pour on boiling milk. diluted with beaten egg and milk. add rice free from lumps. dust with powdered sugar and serve hot. GREEN CORN GRIDDLE-CAKES. flour sufficient to make a batter to fry on the griddle. salt and flour. one-half teaspoonful salt. a little salt. put a tablespoonful at a time into a frying pan slightly greased. Have griddle well heated. washed and grated into a little cold water (which keeps them white). three heaping tablespoonfuls of flour. . bake nicely brown. mix into smooth batter. RAISED BUCKWHEAT CAKES. fry to a light brown. Serve with stewed or preserved fruit. a teaspoonful of baking powder.sugar. Beat together until smooth six eggs and a pint sifted flour. one-half teaspoonful salt. One pint of milk. Butter them hot and serve. Made the same as above. one and one-half teaspoonfuls baking powder. POTATO GRIDDLE-CAKES. Blackberries or raspberries can be used in the same manner. beat until smooth. if agreeable. roll up. The potatoes are peeled. spread with jelly. adding one tablespoonful of sugar and a pint of huckleberries rolled in flour. melt one ounce of butter and add to the batter. bake like any other pancakes. two cups grated green corn. spreading the batter evenly over the surface by tipping the pan about. especially with huckleberries. flavor with a little fine chopped onion. allowing a little more lard or butter. Sift together flour. one teaspoonful of baking powder.

milk to make a thin batter. put into it a quart of warm water or half water and milk. a little salt. If they do not brown well. If in the least sour. SWEDISH GRIDDLE-CAKES. two cupfuls of milk. A very nice. BUCKWHEAT CAKES WITHOUT YEAST. a quarter of a pint of corn meal. Not a few object to eating buckwheat. level teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little warm water. add a little molasses. a little salt. sifted. two large tablespoonfuls of yeast. as its tendency is to thicken the blood. cover it up warm to rise over night. if any. this will remove any sour taste.Take a small crock or large earthen pitcher. but more expensive. two eggs beaten very light. one tablespoonful of butter or sweet lard. which makes the cakes equally as good. . recipe. add the salt. and also to produce constipation. BUCKWHEAT CAKES. one quart of new milk (made a little warm and mixed with the eggs before the flour is put in). one heaping teaspoonful of salt. CORN MEAL FRITTERS. Beat the yolks light. a quarter of a pint of wheat flour. mix thoroughly and add about equal parts of milk and water until the batter is of the right consistency then stir until free from lumps. One pint of white flour. then the flour and beaten whites alternately. thin with more milk if necessary. stir in before baking just enough soda to correct the acidity. one saltspoonful of salt. Many prefer them in this way. Two cups of buckwheat flour. then stir in as much buckwheat flour as will thicken it to rather a stiff batter. one saltspoonful of soda dissolved in vinegar. whites and yolks beaten separately to the utmost. and increase the lightness. three teaspoonfuls baking powder. make it smooth. this can be remedied by making the batter one-third corn meal and two-thirds buckwheat. in the morning add a small. soda. one of wheat flour. Half a pint of buckwheat flour. Set it to rise at night for the morning. lastly. six eggs. add half a cup of yeast.

sweet lard. WHEAT FRITTERS. Eat with a mixture of wine and powdered sugar. one-half teaspoonful mixed cinnamon and nutmeg. one tablespoonful butter. salt. a pinch of salt. fine bread crumbs._--One cup of sugar. Or serve with maple syrup. lastly. Three eggs. one teaspoonful of flour beaten together. one teaspoonful of salt. two cups of milk. The batter should be rather thick. One cup of cream. and corn meal enough to make a stiff batter. not cut. thicker than batter cakes. one and a half cups of milk. Mix and put in the butter. five eggs whipped very light. three teaspoonfuls baking powder. Fry in plenty of hot. one-half pound currants. CURRANT FRITTERS. Drop in great spoonfuls into the hot lard and fry. half a cup boiling water. them open. Drain them and send hot to table. finally. clean napkin. Two cupfuls dry. Beat in next the yolks and sugar. one saltspoonful of nutmeg. the seasoning. Let it get cold. Eat with jelly sauce. This recipe is very nice made of rye flour. put in nutmeg and salt. Drop into hot lard and fry like doughnuts. The batter should be thick. flour and stiff whites.One pint of sour milk. flavor with extract lemon and boil until clear. a spoonful of batter for each fritter. one tablespoonful of molasses or sugar. Boil the milk and pour over the bread. CREAM FRITTERS. beat all up hard for two minutes. Pull. and flour enough to make quite stiff. stir in a small teaspoonful of soda. two tablespoonfuls of prepared flour. the currants dredged whitely with flour. one handful of flour. dissolved in a little warm water. two full cups prepared flour. Drain. Stir the whites into the cream in turn with the flour. one-half cup powdered sugar. two tablespoonfuls of butter. three eggs. Very nice. five eggs--the whites only. washed and well dried. . _A Good Sauce for the Above. and serve upon a hot.

add to them a gill of milk. creamy consistency. then add flour and whites of the eggs. a saltspoonful of salt. The batter is made as follows: Beat the yolks of three eggs. two eggs beaten separately. add to them a dash of nutmeg and a gill each of cold water and rum. a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder.APPLE FRITTERS. Remove from the fire. If old flour is used a little more milk may be found necessary. PINEAPPLE FRITTERS. dipping the batter up over them. sliced oranges and other fruits can be used in the same batter. split each in two and take out the stones. Make a batter as for apple fritters. mix. PEACH FRITTERS. Peel the peaches. stir this into the luke-warm batter and allow it to heat gradually. peaches. Bananas. a piece of butter as large as an egg and a tablespoonful of sugar. and serve them as above. GOLDEN-BALL FRITTERS. Beat the yolks of two eggs. then pare one large pineapple. drop into boiling hot lard in large spoonfuls with pieces of apple in each. A sauce to be served with them may be made as follows: Put an ounce of butter in a saucepan and whisk it to a cream. Eat with . cut it in slices a quarter of an inch thick. dust a little powdered sugar over them. Serve with maple syrup. dip them into the batter and fry them. stirring briskly and thoroughly. cut the slices in halves. dip each piece in the batter and fry in hot fat. and when nearly cooled beat into it six eggs. Put into a stewpan a pint of water. beating the batter between each. and fry to a light brown. each one beaten separately and added one at a time. and serve. Drop the stiff dough into boiling lard by teaspoonfuls. four ounces of flour. add four ounces of sugar gradually. or half of a cupful. When it boils stir into it one pint of sifted flour. or a nice syrup made with clarified sugar. heat the milk a little more than milk-warm. stir all together and throw in thin slices of good sour apples. Make a batter in the proportion of one cup sweet milk to two cups flour. one tablespoonful of sugar and a saltspoon of salt. Stir constantly until of a smooth. add it slowly to the beaten yolks and sugar.

two eggs. to remove the grease. that the paste may be thoroughly done. roll it out very thin. slightly press the edges together. OR FRIED PUFFS. and cut out in long. . wet the edges with the white of egg and fold the paste over _twice_. and when all are prepared. half a teaspoonful of salt and a tablespoonful of flour.syrup. raspberries or currants. GERMAN FRITTERS. dish on a d'oyley. like crullers. These cannelons are very delicious made with fresh instead of preserved fruit. Cannelons. apricot or any kind of preserve that may be preferred. CANNELONS. hot lard. to a _light_ brown. and cut it into pieces of an equal size. Take slices of stale bread cut in rounds or stale cake. Pile on a hot plate and serve. HOMINY FRITTERS. Half a pound of puff paste. Drain them before the fire. drain quickly. Take one pint of hot boiled hominy. make a very pretty and elegant dish. or melted sugar and butter flavored. they should be laid in the paste. when cold add a teaspoonful of baking powder. sprinkle over them sifted sugar and serve. such as strawberries. thin it a little with cold milk. letting them remain by the side of the fire after they are colored. so that it whirls when you drop in the fritters. Stirring the boiling lard around and around. narrow rolls or puffs. mix thoroughly. dust with powdered sugar or spread with preserves. with jam enclosed. fry them in hot lard. which are made of puff paste rolled very thin. place upon each piece a spoonful of jam. Dip each slice when fried in boiling milk. plenty of pounded sugar sprinkled over and folded and fried in the same manner as stated above. that the jam may not escape in the frying. Sweet wine sauce poured over them is very nice. about two inches wide and eight inches long. drop tablespoonfuls of it into hot fat and fry to a delicate brown. Make some good puff paste. causes them to assume a round shape like balls. fry them in boiling lard until of a nice brown.

roll lightly into two round sheets. mix all together. add the corn by degrees. When you have a sufficient number ready. This crust is delicious for fruit short-cake. CREAM SHORT-CAKE. the same as fried eggs. Add a beaten egg to a cup of sour cream. These are also very good fried in a frying pan with a small quantity of lard and butter mixed. Boil them until tender. one tablespoonful of melted butter. handling as little as possible. Beat the eggs well. Have ready a plate with some sifted flour on it. drop the corn from the spoon into the fat and fry a light brown. Take three or four good-sized parsnips. rub into it three tablespoonfuls of cold butter. a pinch of salt and a slight sprinkling of pepper. Do not put them in a covered dish. a tablespoonful of white sugar. green corn. place on pie-tins and bake from twenty to twenty-five minutes in a quick oven. Drop a tablespoonful of the parsnip in the flour and roll it about until well coated and formed into a ball. as you would a fritter. three eggs. Make a rule of baking powder biscuit. One pint of grated. thicken with just enough flour to hold them together. divide the dough in half. turning them over so as to fry both sides brown. also the milk and butter. for that would steam them and deprive them of their crispness. Mash and season with a little butter.PARSNIP FRITTERS. young and tender. a teaspoonful of salt. with the exception of a little more shortening. which is one of their great charms. if milk is used. lay one-half on the molding . dissolve a teaspoonful of soda in a spoonful of water. STRAWBERRY SHORT-CAKE. a teaspoonful of salt. drop them into boiling drippings or lard. fry a delicate brown and serve hot. They are also nice fried in butter and lard mixed. adding a teaspoonful of baking powder to the flour. Have ready a kettle of hot lard. Sift one quart of fine white flour. turn it into the other ingredients. two tablespoonfuls of milk or cream. GREEN CORN FRITTERS.

half a cupful of butter. This makes a delicious short-cake. separate each one by running a large knife through where the cold soft butter was spread. Make a rich biscuit dough. spread soft butter over the lower one and place the other on top of that. To be eaten warm. . Peaches. add a quart of the huckleberries. or a large sized pie-tin. when sufficiently baked take them out. HUCKLEBERRY SHORT-CAKE. boil this for some little time. split the short-cakes while hot. Peel two large oranges. and two lemons. and roll each piece large enough to cover a biscuit-tin. two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted into a quart of flour. Spread between the layers of short-cake while it is hot. peel. While baking. cover thickly with a quart of strawberries that have been previously prepared with sugar. juice and pulp. one pint of sweet milk. to be baked in a dripper. raspberries. one tablespoonful of salt. take a cup and a quarter of water. and putting on another tin. blackberries and huckleberries can be substituted for strawberries. by cutting it in halves. cut into squares for the table and served hot with butter. remove the seeds. a cup and a half of sugar. If there is any juice left pour it around the cake. or enough to form a thick batter. proceed with the other lump of dough the same. divide this half again.board (half the dough makes one short-cake). ORANGE SHORT-CAKE. lay the top crusts on the fruit. [Illustration: ICING THE CAKES. Set them in the oven. add half a peeled lemon and one cup of sugar. Blackberries may be used the same. spread with butter. lay the bottom of each on earthen platters or dining-plates. same as above recipe. then stir in three crackers rolled fine. Two cupfuls of sugar. Always send to the table with a pitcher of sweet cream. chop them fine.] LEMON SHORT-CAKE. throwing away the tough part of the rind. then with the mixture. Then butter plentifully each crust.

one teaspoonful of soda. lay as many of the rolls in as will fry nicely. Roll it out on the board. Nice accompaniment to a meat dinner as a side-dish--similar to plain macaroni. then set them by the fire where they will become light. mix them into the dough and gradually add two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. When making light raised bread. Cut it in strips three inches long and one inch wide. Lay them on buttered tins. one teaspoonful of soda. When it boils clear and is _hot_. Dissolve a quarter of a teaspoonful of soda in a tablespoonful of water and pour that also over it. break three eggs. To a piece of butter as large as an egg stirred until soft. Have the griddle hot and nicely greased. then turn them on the edges and brown the sides. Dish them hot with melted butter turned over them. Eat them warm in place of bread. beat it well and let it rise until breakfast time. one teaspoonful of . cover with a cloth and set away in a cool place until an hour before dinner time. save out a piece of dough nearly the size of a small loaf. then add enough flour to make a very thick batter. the same as any griddle cake. As soon as they brown on one side turn them over and brown the other. Add fresh grease as is needed. work it all well into the dough. add three well-beaten eggs. Take one quart of dough from the bread at an early hour in the morning. Cook until the puffs rise to the surface. PUFF BALLS. Nice with warm meat dinner. one of sugar. spread a tablespoonful of melted butter over it. both to be whipped to a light froth. BREAKFAST PUFFS. a pinch of salt and half a teacupful of sour cream. Drop a spoonful of this into boiling water. add to a frying-pan a tablespoonful of cold butter and one of lard. pour on the batter in small round cakes and bake a light brown. While they are rising. Stir well together. roll it out into a sheet not quite half an inch thick.FRIED DINNER-ROLLS. NEWPORT BREAKFAST-CAKES. Two cups of sour milk. separating yolks and whites. and enough warm milk with it until it is a batter the consistency of buckwheat cakes.

a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little water and a very little more flour. add half a cupful of melted butter. CRACKERS. Butted them while hot. Or fry in a spider with an ounce each of lard and butter. Cut into narrow strips an inch wide and three inches long. excellent with coffee. crushing them. ENGLISH CRUMPETS. four tablespoonfuls of melted butter. pounded and kneaded a long time. turning and browning all four of the sides. place them on a hot griddle and fill them half full of the batter. Sift into a pint of flour a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder. flour enough to make a stiff batter. One quart of warm milk. watching closely that they do not scorch. pancakes. Roll very thin like pie crust and cut out either round or square. half a teaspoonful salt and the white of an egg beaten and one cup of milk. Bake quickly in muffin-rings or patty-pans. Serve hot. then take them while hot and crisp and roll them. break them in small bits. mix it with more flour. croquettes. let it stand twenty minutes or until light. when light. Grease some muffin-rings. one teaspoonful of salt. .salt. pile one on another and serve immediately. Mix together thoroughly while dry one quart of sifted flour. half a cup of yeast. PLAIN CRUMPETS. using the fine crumbs for breading cutlets. fish. when done on one side turn and bake the other side. Bake a light brown. etc. then add two tablespoonfuls of melted butter and sweet milk enough to make a thin dough. enough to make a very stiff dough. two heaping teaspoonfuls baking powder and a little salt. Take pieces of stale bread. The coarse ones may be used for puddings. PREPARED BREAD CRUMBS. as stiff as can be rolled out. etc. put them on a baking pan and place them in a moderate oven. one egg and flour enough to roll out like biscuit dough. Sift them. fry brown in hot lard like doughnuts. loosely measured.

take a handful of the meal with the left hand and a pudding-stick in the right. have sweet. turning to brown well both sides. mold with flour. Put two quarts of water into a clean dinner-pot or stewpan. half a teaspoonful of soda. turn it into a deep basin. twelve tablespoonfuls of sweet milk. roll it thin. take off the light scum from the top. let the fire be gentle. with milk or with butter and syrup or sugar. or butter and syrup. it will bubble or puff up.Stale crackers are made crisp and better by placing them in the oven a few moments before they are needed for the table. then add a tablespoonful of salt. CORN MEAL MUSH OR HASTY PUDDING. This is eaten cold or hot. Six eggs. turn it into bread tins and when cold slice it. then with the stick. refill it. or with meat and gravy. and steaming three or four hours. Sift Graham meal slowly into boiling salted water. cover it and let it become boiling hot over the fire. continue to stir and add meal until it is as thick as you can stir easily. the same as potatoes or rice. when one handful is exhausted. stir the water around and by degrees let fall the meal. as soon as thoroughly mixed. Must be served hot. FRIED MUSH. stir it awhile longer. Make it like the above recipe. like corn meal mush. stirring briskly until thick as can be stirred with one hand. or until the stick will stand in it. pounding and working half an hour. . Bake with rather quick fire. dip each piece in flour and fry it in lard and butter mixed in the frying pan. fresh yellow or white corn meal. It may also be eaten cold. which will be in half an hour. FRENCH CRACKERS. or sliced and fried. It will be improved by removing from the kettle to a pan. when it is sufficiently cooked. GRAHAM MUSH. serve with milk or cream and sugar. six tablespoonfuls of butter.

The fine hominy takes two or three hours for proper cooking. light paste. roll into small balls and dip in beaten eggs. a pinch of salt. Or they may be fried in the frying pan. It must be boiled for at least eight hours to be properly cooked. two ounces of sugar. This form of cereal is very little known and consequently little appreciated in most Northern households. and fry in hot lard. made into croquettes or balls. add a teaspoonful of melted butter. HOMINY. To a cupful of cold boiled hominy. add a teaspoonful of white sugar. and when slightly cool add the yolks of two eggs well beaten. or fried in cakes. Boil for thirty minutes one cup of well-washed rice in a pint of milk. which is apt to be too heating for the climate. and kept steadily boiling until thoroughly soft. whip into the hot rice the following ingredients: Two ounces of butter. when cold. roll in fine cracker or bread crumbs. The hominy is best boiled the day or morning before using. and should be cooked in a dish set into another of boiling water.OATMEAL. turning and frying both sides brown. BOILED RICE." as they are called in the South. boil half an hour in the morning. dipped in beaten egg. It is better to cook it in a dish set into a dish of boiling water. . RICE CROQUETTES. with a tablespoonful each of butter and lard mixed. Roll it into oval balls with floured hands. adding by degrees a cupful of milk. Soak one cup of oatmeal in a quart of water over night. some salt. salted to taste. Serve very hot. and stir it well. The former is called "samp" here. "Big hominy" and "little hominy. then rolled in cracker crumbs. and fry same as doughnuts. till all is made into a soft. and one well-beaten egg. are staple dishes there and generally take the place of oatmeal. HOMINY CROQUETTES. and may then be kept on hand for two or three days and warmed over. if too stiff pour in a little more milk.

OR HULLED CORN. and put it in a saucepan. about a quart of water to a cup of wheat. close the lid on your saucepan carefully down. eaten with milk or cream. serve it up with fresh new milk. You can use sugar if you like. wash it in a strainer. cook it as directed for oatmeal. stir carefully from the bottom of the saucepan. dilute it. and set it on a cooler part of the fire. After soaking a while it was boiled until the skins or hulls came off easily. so that the upper grain may go under. stir in a piece of butter as large as the yolk of an egg. and with it a bag of hardwood ashes. add a saltspoonful of salt. as soon as it has absorbed the added milk. should be thoroughly done. This healthful oat preparation may be procured from the leading grocers and is prepared as follows: Put into a double saucepan or porcelain-lined pan a quart of boiling water. and then boiled until the kernels were soft. An old-fashioned way of preparing hulled corn was to put a peck of old.Take half or quarter of a pound of the best quality of rice. It makes a delicious dish. Another way was to take the lye from the leaches where potash was made. with a quart of clean water and a pinch of salt. CRACKED WHEAT. Another nice way to cook rice is to take one teacupful of rice and one quart of milk. say a quart. or rather stir in gradually. where it will not boil. the longer it takes to cook. adding fruit and sugar for those who like them. OAT FLAKES. but do not smash it. The corn was then washed in cold water to get rid of the taste of potash. when nearly done. place in a steamer. The difference in the time of cooking depends on your rice--the older the rice. and boil the corn in this until the skins or hulls came off. and steam from two to three hours. and a pinch of salt. ripe corn into a pot filled with water. SAMP. dry. Soak the wheat over night in cold water. Eaten with sugar and cream. three . and when it is boiling add. let it boil slowly till the water is all evaporated--see that it does not burn--then pour in a teacupful of new milk.

then cover it with twice its depth of cold water and let it come to a boil slowly. When the water evaporates add hot water. no matter what the directions on the package may be. using a little butter to prevent burning. should have the slices first dipped quickly in a dish of hot water turned from the boiling tea-kettle. a teaspoonful of salt. or at least of bread that has been baked a day. or allowed to become cold and warmed up in the frying pan. when done it may be eaten with cream. then browned evenly on both sides. simmer six hours. Toast that is to be served with anything turned over it. TOAST. if the small hominy. served with a family breakfast. broken or ground. Cut smoothly in slices. that should be scraped off. either large or small. Cold biscuits cut in halves. STEAMED OATMEAL. and is an excellent breakfast dish in winter or summer. MILK TOAST. Let it boil from fifteen to twenty minutes and serve with cream and sugar. put in a steamer over a kettle of cold water. not more than half an inch thick. The following preparations of toast are almost all of them very nice dishes. HOMINY. and the under crust sliced off. Toast should be made of stale bread. but if it happens to burn. trim the edges and brown very evenly. if the crust is baked very hard. If it be the large hominy. Keep stirring to prevent burning. Never be afraid of cooking cereals or preparations from cereals too long. simmer two hours. gradually heat and steam an hour and a half after it begins to cook. with a little salt thrown in. . Wash the hominy thoroughly in on 3 or two waters. To one teacupful oatmeal add a quart of cold water.ounces of flakes. Wheaten grits and hominy one hour. but a half hour longer cooking will not injure them and makes them easier of digestion. Hominy is a preparation of Indian corn. make equally as good toast. Ordinarily oatmeal requires two hours' steady cooking to make it palatable and digestible.

and dip in this slices of toasted bread. CHEESE TOAST. allowing one small slice to each person. Slice light bread and dip into the mixture. NUNS' TOAST. and add some of the boiling milk to this. crisp brown. let all boil up once. Cover and send to the table hot. . remove from the fire. Pour over neatly trimmed slices of hot buttered toast. allowing each slice to absorb some of the milk. AMERICAN TOAST. spread with butter and serve hot. put into it a tablespoonful of cold butter. Serve while warm. After taking from the fire stir in a beaten egg. stir a heaping teaspoonful of flour into half a gill of milk. To one egg thoroughly beaten. and pour on enough melted cheese to cover them. Put a piece of butter half the size of an egg into a saucepan and when it begins to bubble add a finely chopped onion. heat it gradually and prevent the flour from lumping. Heat a pint of milk to boiling and add a piece of butter the size of an egg. then stir into the boiling milk and let it cook a few moments. No. Rich new cheese is best. Cut four or five hard-boiled eggs into slices. stir a tablespoonful of flour smoothly into a cup of rich cream. strain the mixture on to toast lightly buttered. Toast thin slices of bread an even. as soon as the milk on the fire boils. 1. then stir in a teaspoonful of flour. CREAM TOAST. stir in the flour. salt to taste. then put in the slices of eggs and let them get hot. put one cup of sweet milk and a little salt. then brown on a hot buttered griddle or thick-bottomed frying pan. Add a cupful of milk and stir until it becomes smooth.Put over the fire a quart of milk. Place on a warm plate. The sauce must be seasoned to taste with pepper and salt. Let the onion cook a little without taking color. add a teaspoonful of salt. Many prefer a little prepared mustard spread over the toast before putting on the cheese. pour what is left of the scalded milk over the toast. When all are used up.

open the shells with an oyster-knife. then in either cracker or bread crumbs and cook upon a fine wire gridiron. Oysters steamed in the shell are equally as good. or bake them in a hot oven. Beat together half a pint of cream and two eggs. whisk into the cheese. TOMATO TOAST. taking care to lose none of the liquor. pour over the crisp toast. used for frying.CHEESE TOAST. No. tilt the pan and squeeze the meat with the back of the spoon until there is nothing left but dry meat. then remove it. After pouring on the sauce. Or wash oysters in the shell and put them on hot coals. add more butter. season with salt and pepper and a teaspoonful of melted butter over each." OYSTER TOAST. MUSHROOMS ON TOAST. . a pinch of cayenne and a gill of hot water. Peel a quart of mushrooms and cut off a little of the root end. Dip the toast into hot. salted water quickly and turn out the oyster and liquor over the toast. and first dip them in beaten egg. 2. over a quick fire. Melt an ounce of butter in the frying pan and fry in it half a pound of raw minced steak. Whisk it thoroughly until melted. The two above recipes are usually called "Welsh Rarebit. when hot add gradually four ounces of mild American cheese. Select the large ones. and serve. or upon the top of a hot stove. add two saltspoonfuls of salt. Put half an ounce of butter in a frying pan. Some add a little sherry to the dish before removing from the fire. add a little salt. toss them about a moment and pour out on hot toast. fry until the juices are extracted from the meat. Toast should be made ready in advance. add the mushrooms to the liquid and if there is not enough of it. and a rich cream sauce poured over the whole. finely cut celery strewn over the top adds to their delicacy.

remove at once. breaking one at a time and slip over the toast so that they do not break. Dip the toast for an instant in hot salted water. then turning over them scrambled. and arrange them nicely on slices of toast. Serve at once." turn this over the toast and eggs and bake in a hot oven until the eggs are set. spread over some melted butter. Serve hot. and place them on a double broiler. then lightly broil the other side. dip the birds in it. well beaten. a dash of pepper. brush a little melted butter over them and broil the inner side thoroughly first. REED BIRDS ON TOAST. chop it fine. season it nicely with salt and pepper. all found in the recipes among EGGS. Toast six slices of stale bread.Pare and stew a quart of ripe tomatoes until smooth. but not boil. dip them in hot salted water and butter them lightly. Various preparations of eggs can be served on toast. then turn over the ham mixture. HAM TOAST. poached or creamed eggs. EGGS ON TOAST. Pour over slices of dipped toast. Melt one quarter of a pound of butter. break enough eggs to cover them. a tablespoonful of butter. Take a quarter of a pound of either boiled or fried ham. pepper and a tablespoonful of butter. well buttered. cream or a cream sauce made the same as "White Sauce. Remove the feathers and legs of a dozen reed birds. split them down the back. Stir it over the fire until it thickens. remove the entrails. or about five minutes. BAKED EGGS ON TOAST. sprinkle over them salt and pepper and turn over all some kind of thickened gravy--either chicken or lamb. and enough cream or rich milk to make it soft. After arranging them on a platter or deep plate. first dipping slices of well-toasted bread quickly in hot salted water. Season with salt. When done. mix it with the yolks of two eggs. Let it scald. add one cup sweet cream and a little flour. .

Clean it from the skin. put in the fish with water enough to cover it. simmer for twenty minutes. Chop the veal fine and mix with it half as much stale bread crumbs. after covering it.MINCED FOWLS ON TOAST. Take a teacupful of boiling water in a saucepan. Boil the bones and skin with three-fourths of a pint of water until reduced quite half. (Cuban Style. In case water be used instead of soup-stock. having skimmed off the fat. put it into a clean saucepan with half a cup of cream. Then put in the fowl finely minced. toast half a dozen slices of bread nicely and at the end of the twenty minutes spread the meat upon them. and let it boil five minutes. Cook all nearly an hour. chopped. CODFISH ON TOAST. Fry a sliced onion in a tablespoonful of butter. add a tablespoonful of butter just before spreading the beef upon the toast. VEAL HASH ON TOAST.) Take a teacupful of freshened codfish picked up fine. Serve at once on a hot dish. Any kind of cold meat may be prepared in a similar manner. stir in an even teaspoonful of flour. Stir well and add a small teacupful of soup-stock or water. and keep covered from the air until ready for use. and let it keep hot. For each pint of meat add a level tablespoonful of flour. with three hard-boiled eggs. when it has turned a light brown. but not boil. Put the mixture into a small stewpan and. well mixed with a tablespoonful of flour. as much salt and two tablespoonfuls of butter. three tablespoonfuls of butter. Keep these stirred until they boil. Put it in a pan and pour the gravy over it. Shake the mince over the fire until just ready to serve. or half a dozen of fresh ones. Chop a quantity of cold roast beef rather fine and season it well with pepper and salt. . and sufficient salt and pepper to season. _Maria Parloa_. Meanwhile. Strain the gravy and let it cool. wet in a tablespoonful of cold water. then let it simmer ten minutes. Dish it over hot toast and serve. Next. Serve this on buttered toast. HASHED BEEF ON TOAST. Remove from the bones all the meat of either cold roast or boiled fowls. add half a can of tomatoes. add one-half teaspoonful of black pepper.

Next morning cut it in half inch slices. When tender cut two or three slices of bread half an inch thick. place them on a dish. rub over each slice a little warm butter and toast them on a broiler to a delicate brown. a little white sugar over. remove from the water and chop it fine. hot. which fry of a nice yellowish color. . put into the frying pan with butter and a little water to moisten it. chopped fine. adding pepper and salt. cook slowly for fifteen minutes. set it in the ice-box. narrow bread-pan. when nice and crisp take them out. CHICKEN HASH WITH RICE TOAST. put in the saucepan an ounce of butter. then add half a cup of melted butter and eight eggs well beaten. or stir with a spoon. the apples about an inch thick.seasoning with a little pepper. tip the pan so as to grease the sides. put in a frying pan two ounces of butter. put the saucepan on the fire. APPLE TOAST. put it into a square. Turn over toast dipped in hot salted water. Arrange the toast on a warm platter and turn over the whole a chicken hash made from the remains of cold fowl. the meat picked from the bones. Serve immediately. Heat hot all through. when it begins to melt. HALIBUT ON TOAST. toss them up. let it stew quickly. Place over the fire a thick-bottomed frying pan containing a tablespoonful of cold butter. a few minutes will do them. Serve hot. when the butter is melted put in your bread. peel and cut them in slices. Put into boiling salted water one pound of fresh halibut. Cut six apples into quarters. Boil a cup of rice the night before. put on the fire. Season with salt and pepper. then throw over the apples about two ounces of white powdered sugar and two tablespoonfuls of water. then put in the fish and eggs and stir one way until the eggs are cooked. or until done. Plain creamed codfish is very nice turned over dipped toast. but not _too_ hard. take the core out. Very fine. Serve on slices of dipped toast.

or the cake will be sodden and heavy. a small pinch of soda sometimes has the same effect. is to drop a few spoonfuls of the cake batter on a small piece of buttered letter paper. the flour. Pour all in well-buttered cake-pans. or assumes a dark brown color. picked. especially. butter be placed where it will become moderately soft. Use none but the best materials. if the little drop of cake . stir in gradually and thoroughly. much depends on this for success. Eggs beat up much lighter and sooner by being placed in a cold place sometime before using them. When the oven is of the proper temperature the flour will slightly brown and look slightly scorched. Cake is often spoiled by being looked at too often when first put into the oven. measure and dredge with a little sifted flour. cakes will be liable to be heavy. If fruit is to be used. currants. only when necessary to see that the cake is baking properly. dried in a cloth and then carefully examined. then the milk. then add the beaten yolks. Sugar should be rolled and sifted. spices ground or pounded. moderate heat. the temperature is too high and the oven must be allowed to cool. should be nicely washed. the yolks to a thick cream. Another good way to test the heat. If the flour takes fire. Always stir the butter and sugar to a cream. and. then the beaten whites. which can be done by throwing on the floor of the oven a tablespoonful of new flour. as. They should then be laid on a dish before the fire to become thoroughly dry. the whites until they are a stiff froth. Eggs should be well beaten. that no pieces of grit or stone may be left amongst them. the temperature is too low. so that the piece will be baked before putting in the whole cake. the oven should be an even. but _not_ melted in the least. lastly. SUGGESTIONS IN REGARD TO CAKE-MAKING. While the cake is baking care should be taken that no cold air enters the oven. the flavoring. The heat should be tested before the cake is put in. and all the ingredients should be properly prepared before commencing to mix any of them. the whites and yolks separately.CAKES. Flour should always be sifted before using it. raisins or any ether fruit looked over and prepared. and place it in the oven during the finishing of the cake. if added damp to the other ingredients. if the flour remains white after the lapse of a few seconds. Cream of tartar or baking powder should be thoroughly mixed with the flour. not too cold or too hot.

stirred very slowly and lightly. run a broom straw into the middle of it. etc. this laps air into the cake batter. the cake should then be quickly examined. two heaping teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. it will be safe to put the whole cake in the oven. again. in a cool. or earthen jars. break or fall. Never stir cake after the butter and sugar is creamed. and lay on the bottom of the oven. after the cake is put in. fold a thick brown paper double. so that it will not crack.. Cakes should be kept in tight tin cake-cans. put a brown paper loosely over the top of the pan. if the oven seems too hot. let it remain in the tin until it is _cold_. dry place. and you have none. Cakes made with molasses burn much more easily than those made with sugar. Where the recipe calls for baking powder. or the rush of cold air will cause it to fall. up and over. put again into the oven a few minutes.batter bakes evenly without burning around the edge. the flour should be added by degrees. require a quick oven. and the door shut carefully. ginger-snaps. use only soda. Then. which cause the dough to puff and swell when it comes in contact with the heat while cooking. jumbles. then set it in the oven a minute. then after the cake has risen. When the cake is baked. placing it smoothly on the bottom and sides of the tin. and produces little air cells. the cake will do to take out. To remove a cake from a tin after it is baked. will also prevent the cake from scorching. Cookies. first butter the tin well all around the sides and bottom. or just long enough to . then cut a piece of letter paper to exactly fit the tin. and do not open the door for five minutes at least. care being taken that it does not touch the cake. especially sponge cake. butter that on both sides. If. but beat it down from the bottom. When sour milk is called for in the recipe. or butter well a thick white paper and lay carefully over the top. for if stirred hard and fast it will make it porous and tough. When making most cakes. you can use cream of tartar and soda in proportion to one level teaspoonful of soda. To ascertain when the cake is done. if it comes out clean and smooth. Setting a _small dish_ of hot water in the oven. it seems to bake too fast. put a thick brown paper over the top. if they become moist or soft by keeping.

Remove it from the oven. it can be thinned sufficiently with a little water. Break the eggs and throw a small handful of the sugar on them as soon as you begin beating.warm the tin through. A little lemon juice. If a cake-pan is too shallow for holding the quantity of cake to be baked. or nearly so. If you wish to ornament with figures or flowers. or in a draught . vanilla. that can be remedied by thoroughly greasing a piece of thick glazed letter paper with soft butter. almond. FROSTING OR ICING. leaving it whole. with a clean glass syringe. The eggs must _not_ be beaten until the sugar has been added in this way. If the icing gets too dry or stiff before the last coat is needed. for fear of its being so light as to rise above the pan. yellow with saffron or the grated rind of an orange strained through a cloth. Spread with a broad knife evenly over the cake. apply it in such forms as you desire and dry as before. enough to make it work smoothly. green with spinach juice and brown with chocolate. keep about one-third out until that on the cake is dried. for the white of one egg. and the platter on which they are to be beaten also cold. the second after the first has become dry. In the first place. Set the cake in a cool oven with the door open to dry. allowing it to reach an inch or more above the top. added to the frosting while being beaten. the eggs should be cold. purple with cochineal and indigo. beat in a little more sugar. then. turn it upside down on your hand. tender frosting. make up rather more icing. what you keep out to ornament with may be tinted pink with cochineal. Strawberry. which gives a smooth. blue with indigo. chocolate and orange. tap the edge of the tin on the table and it will slip out with ease. Allow. or half a teaspoonful of tartaric acid. makes it white and more frothy. one small teacupful of powdered sugar. If the oven heat is moderate the butter will preserve the paper from burning. and if it seems too thin. Place or fit it around the sides of the buttered tin. Cover the cake with two coats. keep adding it at intervals until it is all used up. and one that will dry much sooner than the old way. rose. The flavors mostly used are lemon. or currant and cranberry juices color a delicate pink.

seedless raisins. sugar and vanilla extract. CHOCOLATE FROSTING. The whites of three eggs. will appreciate the above. beaten up with three cups of fine. stir in three tablespoonfuls of milk or cream and one of water. mix all well together. three cups of powdered sugar and nearly a cup of grated chocolate.in an open window. "Chocolate Eclairs. and place it where it will melt gradually. Pound a few minutes to thoroughly mix. beating to mix it well. SUGAR ICING. ALMOND FROSTING. Beat the whites a very little. In making those most palatable of cakes. Blanch a pound of sweet almonds. but not scorch. set in a cool oven to dry. boil about five minutes. All who have tried recipe after recipe. when melted. and while hot. put a second one on top. TUTTI FRUTTI ICING. then add the whites of eggs. and when the cakes are nearly cold. Put into a shallow pan four tablespoonfuls of scraped chocolate. vainly hoping to find one where the chocolate sticks to the cake and not to the fingers. and set in a warm oven to harden. To one pound of extra refined sugar add one ounce of fine white . stir in the chocolate. The whites of four eggs. until a fine paste. candied pineapple and blanched almonds." the recipe just given will be found very satisfactory. and add one scant teacupful of sugar. white sugar. candied cherries. then put in the sugar gradually. they must not become white. afterwards cover with a plain icing. spread some evenly over the surface of one of the cakes. then cover top and sides. Mix with boiled icing one ounce each of chopped citron. alternating the mixture and cakes. PLAIN CHOCOLATE ICING. pound them in a mortar with a little sugar. Cover the cake with a very thick coating of this.

and always one way. It requires nicety and care to do it with success. pound finely together and then sift them through gauze. or it will spoil the froth of the eggs. then beat the whites of three eggs to a froth. then boil it until it is perfectly clear and threads from the spoon. Beat well the whites of four eggs. For ornamenting the cake the icing may be tinged any color preferred. While the first coat is drying continue to beat the remainder. This is said to be a most excellent recipe for icing. make a cone of stiff writing paper and squeeze the colored icing through it. a pinch of saffron dissolved. for green. let the coloring be first mixed with a little colorless spirit and then stirred into the white icing until the tint is deep enough. For pink. Let it stand until it dissolves. Whichever is chosen. The first coating may be put on the cake as soon as it is well mixed. FROSTING WITHOUT EGGS. which will keep longer and cut more easily. causing no breakage or crumbling and withal is very economical. Rub the cake with a little flour before you apply the icing. so as to form leaves. but do not mix them until the syrup is luke-warm. BOILED FROSTING. use a few drops of cochineal. for yellow. Take one cup of granulated sugar. Pour the sugar into the dish with the eggs. the juice of some chopped spinach. or five tablespoonfuls. The secret of success is to beat the eggs long enough. When all the sugar is stirred in continue the whipping for half an hour longer. spread the sugar icing smoothly over it with a knife and dry it at once in a cool oven. or lemon juice. add the powdered sugar by degrees. To ornament the cake with it. beading or letters. rose-water. you will not have to wait long if the cake is set in a warm place near the fire. When the cake comes out of the oven. place it on the fire in a suitable dish and stir it until it boils. Take a little of the icing and lay it aside for ornamenting afterward.starch. as the case may be. To one pound of finest pulverized sugar add three wine-glassfuls of clear water. then let it boil for five minutes without stirring. adding more sugar if the ice is too thin. An excellent frosting may be made without eggs or gelatine. Season to your taste with vanilla. remove it from the fire and set the dish in another . dampen it with one-fourth of a cup of milk. then beat all well together for one-half hour.

Cream filling is made with one pint of new milk. add one-half cup chopped raisins. three tablespoonfuls of sifted flour (or half cup of cornstarch). Beat white of an egg and mix with the above. Proceed exactly as for ordinary frosting. add flavoring. ANOTHER CREAM FILLING. add one cup of powdered sugar and stir until smooth. GELATINE FROSTING. harmonizing with the color of the cake in a way to please those who love rich coloring. one tablespoonful of grated cocoanut. when cold. one cup of sugar. Soak one teaspoonful of gelatine in one tablespoonful of cold water half an hour. dissolve in two tablespoonfuls of hot water. flour and eggs in what is left. GOLDEN FROSTING. No. put into it the whole and cook it until it is as thick as custard. Spread between the layers of cake. one-fourth cup hot water. two eggs. No. A very delicious and handsome frosting can be made by using the yolks of eggs instead of the whites. CREAM FILLING. saving the whites for the cake part. when cool. This is particularly good for orange cake. It will harden just as nicely as that does. This custard is nice with a cup of hickory nuts. add vanilla extract. one-half cup chopped walnuts. creamy frosting. One cup powdered sugar. 2.of cold water. FILLINGS FOR LAYER CAKES. stir or beat it constantly and it will become a thick. stir the sugar. . When the milk boils. 1. kernels chopped fine and stirred into it. Let them simmer. While it is cooling. This custard can be made of the yolks of the eggs only. Put two-thirds of the milk on the stove to boil.

cover the cake with plenty of sugar. one egg. answers for "Ice-Cream Cake. A cup of sweet thick cream whipped. APPLE FILLING. To be cooled before putting on the cake. Make an icing as follows: Three cups of sugar. ANOTHER APPLE FILLING. Flavor with lemon or vanilla extract. 8. This. enough cream or milk to wet it. remove. one cupful of sugar. Five tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate. or chop them and prepare cream by whipping and sweetening. ICE-CREAM FILLING. this tastes like Charlotte Russe. CHOCOLATE CREAM FOR FILLING. over the _well-beaten_ whites of three eggs. pour this. Spread between layers of cake. beat it. One coffeecup of sugar. one of water. 7. PEACH-CREAM FILLING. Cut peaches into thin slices. beat together and cook till quite thick. boiling hot. spread between any white cake layers. 3. until cool. CREAM FROSTING. No. clear syrup. No. When cold. 5." No. 4. No. mashing strawberries and stewing thick with powdered sugar. spread the frosting between and on the top. one egg. use to spread between the layers. one lemon grated. Put a layer of peaches between the layers of cake and pour cream over each layer and over the top. sweetened and flavored with vanilla. three large apples grated. put them on the fire with sugar to suit. rub them through a fine sieve and add a small piece of butter. when tender. cut a loaf of cake in two. juice and outside of the rind. when all in. Bananas.No. and pour the sugar in slowly. . Peel and slice green tart apples. 6. boil to a thick. or until it begins to be brittle. stir the mixture very briskly. strawberries or other fruits may be used in the same way. one teaspoonful vanilla flavoring. No.

Cook all together until soft and smooth. FIG FILLING. chop fine. remove the seeds. then add a tablespoonful of melted butter. BANANA FILLING. cook until it thickens. The whites of three eggs beaten stiff. 12. add half a peeled lemon. pour over them a teacupful of water and add a half cup of sugar. No. Now pour on a cupful of boiling water. No. then add the vanilla flavoring after it is removed from the fire. Grate the yellow from the rind of two lemons and squeeze out the juice. No. having beaten the egg well before adding it. Make an icing of the whites of two eggs and one cup and a half of powdered sugar. This cake may be flavored with vanilla. one cup of sugar and one cup of grated chocolate. When cold. Take a pound of figs. stir into this two tablespoonfuls of sifted flour. No. 11. Peel two large oranges. and then cover thickly and entirely with bananas sliced thin or chopped fine. one cup of sugar and the well-beaten white of an egg. 9. then add the whites and then the lemons. The top should be simply frosted. spread between the layers of cake. Spread this on the layers. the yolks and whites of two eggs beaten separately. and put into a stewpan on the stove. rubbed smooth in half a cup of water.Stir the ingredients over the fire until thoroughly mixed. put between the layers and on top. When cold spread between layers of . two cupfuls of sugar. Another filling of lemon (without cooking) is made of the grated rind and juice of two lemons and the whites of two eggs beaten with one cup of sugar. No. Mix the sugar and yolks. Spread between the layers of "Silver Cake" recipe. ORANGE CAKE FILLING. 10. 13. Oranges can be used in place of lemons. ANOTHER CHOCOLATE FILLING. LEMON JELLY FILLING. chop them fine.

one tablespoonful allspice. Mix all well together. beat all hard for several minutes. put the fruit in last. Lay in some slices of citron. one tablespoonful of cinnamon. one pound citron. FRUIT CAKE. three-quarters of a pound sweet almonds blanched. etc. Four tablespoonfuls of _very finely_ chopped citron. so that it will cook the egg a little. one pound sweet butter. Two cupfuls of raised dough. one even teaspoonful of soda dissolved in two tablespoonfuls of milk. two tablespoonfuls cinnamon. put in the beaten whites of eggs and raisins last. 14. beat into it two-thirds of a cup of butter and two cups of sugar creamed together. if you have it convenient. well beaten. one coffeecupful molasses with the spices in it. Bake in a _moderate_ oven. FRUIT FILLING. then of citron again. also a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a tablespoonful of water. adding half of a cupful of sugar. steep this gently twenty or thirty minutes. if necessary add flour after the fruit is in. Beat the whites of three eggs to a stiff froth. the fruit should be well floured. three pounds stoned raisins. in a tolerably hot oven. one teaspoonful cloves. not boiling hot. put in buttered pans and let it stand half an hour to rise again before baking.cake. Put it between the layers of cake when the cake is _hot_. two pounds currants. one wine-glass of wine. beat the eggs very lightly. one pound sugar. This will be found delicious. BREAD OR RAISED CAKE.. till the pan is nearly full. two nutmegs. one cup of raisins. then a layer of the mixture. then mix thoroughly into this the whole of the chopped ingredients. one wine-glass of brandy. stirring it gradually. a teaspoonful of cloves. half a cupful of blanched almonds chopped fine. Bake three or four hours. No. half a nutmeg grated. twelve eggs. and with steady . four tablespoonfuls of finely chopped seeded raisins. (Superior. butter a sheet of paper and lay it in the pan.) Three pounds dry flour. according to the thickness of the loaves. Half a glass of brandy is an improvement. also a quarter of a pound of finely chopped figs. three eggs.

Bake slowly two hours and try with a splint to see when it is done. Let it cool in the oven gradually. seeded. two teacupfuls of cooking molasses. or let it remain in the pans and cover tightly. Best recipe of all. Sift a little flour over the fruit before stirring it in. and half a pound of citron cut in thin strips. It improves this cake very much to add three teaspoonfuls of baking powder to the flour. FRUIT CAKE BY MEASURE. two and one-half cups of flour. Mix the fruit together and stir into it two heaping tablespoonfuls of flour. next. One teacupful of butter. then stir it in the cake.) Two scant teacupfuls of butter. _Mrs. MOLASSES FRUIT CAKE. one pound of raisins. one pound each of seeded raisins. one cup of sweet milk. Camp. add the molasses and sour milk. ope tablespoonful of ground cinnamon. and one quarter of a pound of citron. Ice when cold. and then add four cupfuls of sifted flour alternately with the beaten whites of eggs. six eggs.heat. Stir the butter and sugar to a cream. add to that half a grated nutmeg. Mich. one of currants. two even teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Butter two common-sized baking tins carefully. stir again all thoroughly. (Excellent. Put baking powder in the flour and mix it well before adding it to the other ingredients. line them with letter paper well buttered. A. and bake in a moderate oven two hours. After it is baked. figs and blanched almonds. a wine-glass of brandy. one teacupful of brown sugar. all chopped fine. Afterward put it into a tight can. Grand Rapids. one teaspoonful of mace. A cup of grated cocoanut is a nice addition to this cake. Mix all thoroughly before adding the fruit. A fine wedding cake recipe._ WHITE FRUIT CAKE. the whites of seven eggs. Now dissolve a level teaspoonful of soda and stir in thoroughly. three cupfuls of dark brown sugar. washed and dried. Stir all well. also half a cupful of cooking molasses and half a cupful of sour milk. add a teaspoonful of lemon extract. then put in the beaten yolks of eggs. two cups of sugar. let it cool in the pan. One cup of butter. whites and yolks beaten separately. one cupful of milk . worked well together. S. one teaspoonful of cloves.

_sweet_ almonds have little or no taste. WHITE SPONGE CAKE. one tablespoonful of ginger. when the skins are all off wash the almonds in cold water (mixing the sweet and bitter) and wipe them dry. SPONGE CAKE. till very smooth and thick. to which add two teacupfuls of powdered sugar. If well covered will keep six months. adding. stirring slowly and lightly. one teaspoonful baking powder. Set them in a cool place. one cup sugar. Bake in a very _moderate_ oven one hour. lastly add the remainder of the whites of the eggs. Beat the yolks to a cream. one tablespoonful of cinnamon and one teaspoonful of cloves. add the flour. a pinch of salt and flavoring. the whites and yolks separately. beating again from five to ten minutes. when cool. Flour a cup of raisins and one of currants. add last. With sweet almonds always use a small portion of bitter. Now add four eggs well beaten and five cups of sifted flour. as you proceed. SEPARATE the whites and yolks of six eggs. and then beat into them gradually two cups powdered sugar in turn with the pounded almonds.with a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in it. stirring it round slowly and lightly on the surface of the mixture. blanch in scalding water two ounces of sweet and two ounces of bitter almonds. smooth paste (one at a time). ALMOND SPONGE CAKE. pound them to a fine. beat ten eggs. one cup of flour. cover it with plain white icing flavored with rose-water. put the mixture carefully into it. have ready buttered a _deep_ square pan. or with almond icing. flavor with vanilla. Line the tins with buttered paper and fill two-thirds full. or enough to make a stiff batter. Bake in a quick oven. . Sift one pint of fine flour. though they add to the richness of the cake. set into the oven and bake till thoroughly done and risen very high. without them. The addition of almonds makes this cake very superior to the usual sponge cake. water or white of egg to prevent their boiling. then add two tablespoonfuls of milk or water. only enough to mix them well. mix gradually into the above ingredients. a little grated nutmeg. lastly. renewing the hot water when expedient. Whites of five eggs. then two cups of flour in which you have sifted two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. as in common sponge cake. Now add part of the beaten whites.

using two large teaspoonfuls. Bake in shallow tins. Bake in a _moderate_ oven about forty-five minutes. BRIDE'S CAKE. then more flour and whites until all are used. lastly. Stir the yolks and sugar together until perfectly light. however thin the mixture may seem. after beating together lightly. being so light and porous. Two cups of sifted white sugar. but beating the batter makes the cake tough. Flavor. then a cup of sifted flour in which two teaspoonfuls of baking powder have been stirred. a scant teacupful of boiling water. Bake immediately until a straw run into it can be withdrawn clean. two cups of flour measured before sifting. LEMON SPONGE CAKE. and. now beat the whites to a stiff froth. add salt and. . Stir together until thick and creamy. Measure a scant cup of white granulated sugar and beat it to a cream with the yolks. The mode of mixing must be very light. Grate off the yellow rind of a lemon. beating the eggs makes them light. Baking powder is an improvement to this cake. Beat the yolks of four eggs together with two cups of fine powdered sugar. Stir in gradually one cup of sifted flour and the whites of four eggs beaten to a stiff froth. stirred in a little at a time. beat the whites of the eggs to a very stiff froth and add them with the flour. Into one level cup of flour put a level teaspoonful of baking powder and sift it.Use two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder in the flour. rather cutting down through the cake batter than to beating it. flavor with lemon. then quickly and lightly mix _without beating_ a third of the flour with the yolks. then add the grated rind and a tablespoonful of the juice of the lemon. ten eggs. PLAIN SPONGE CAKE. OLD-FASHIONED SPONGE CAKE. add a pinch of salt. Separate the whites from the yolks of four eggs. This recipe is especially nice for Charlotte Russe. then a third of the whites. do not add any more flour.

one-half ounce of sweet almonds. A beautiful white cake. if this is not the case. nine eggs. which should be blanched and chopped. A glass of wine is usually added to the mixture. one grated nutmeg. then the well-beaten yolks of eggs. then put in buttered tins lined with letter paper well buttered. One pound of butter. Then stir in one pound of sifted flour and the well-beaten whites of the eggs. Ice the top. a little pounded mace. . one pound of currants. Beat the cake well for twenty minutes and put it into a round tin. next the flour. and mix all these well together. Bake a nice light brown. flavor to taste. after mixing well with the beaten yolks of twelve eggs. add one cup of milk. whisk the whites of eggs and let them be thoroughly blended with the other ingredients.Cream together one scant cup of butter and three cups of sugar. and it can be kept for weeks in an earthen jar. as the cake will be found quite rich enough without it. Work the butter to a cream. ENGLISH POUND CAKE. and let the oven be well heated when the cake is first put in. Beat all thoroughly. one glass of wine. which should be cut into neat slices. Beat to a cream one pound of butter with one pound of sugar. currants. Bake it from two hours to two and a half. COCOANUT POUND CAKE. but this is scarcely necessary. one pound of pounded loaf sugar. then the beaten whites of twelve eggs. candied peel. bake slowly in a _moderate_ oven. the currants will all sink to the bottom of it. lined at the bottom and sides with strips of white buttered paper. add the sugar. sift three teaspoonfuls of baking powder into one cup of cornstarch mixed with three cups of sifted flour and beat in gradually with the rest. This is the old-fashioned recipe that our mothers used to make. one-half ounce of citron. two ounces of candied peel. as. PLAIN POUND CAKE. one glass of rose-water. Double the recipe if more is required. one and one-quarter pounds of flour. closely covered. and the almonds. first dipping letter paper in brandy and placing over the top of the cake before covering the jar. when liked.

Divide into two cakes and bake in tins lined with buttered letter paper. Line two cake pans with buttered paper and turn the cake batter in. LEMON CAKE. two cupfuls of sugar. Three cups of white sugar and one cup of butter creamed together. eight eggs. one cupful of milk. rub butter and sugar to a cream. one of sweet milk. sliced thin and dredged with flour. then last of all add a quarter of a pound of citron cut into thin slices and floured. two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder. CITRON POUND CAKE. sifted with four cups and a half of flour. then the flour by degrees. a teaspoonful of salt. one cup of sweet milk. DELICATE CAKE. mix one teaspoonful cream of tartar with the flour and . one quart of flour. a level teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a cup of sweet milk. Spread over the top a thin frosting. whites and yolks beaten separately. add a small cocoanut grated. One cup and a half of citron. One cup of cornstarch. the yolks and whites beaten separately. After beating all well together. When cold ice with lemon icing and cut into squares. one cupful of butter. Line the cake-pans with paper well buttered. four full cups of sifted flour and lastly the grated peel and juice of a lemon. six eggs. one teaspoonful of soda and two of cream of tartar. two of flour. and a wine-glass of brandy. fill rather more than half full and bake in a _moderate_ oven. five eggs. to which add the beaten yolks. the juice to be added the very last. Bake in a _moderate_ oven about three-quarters of an hour. stirred into four cups of sifted flour. then the milk.One-half cupful of butter. one of butter. sprinkled thickly with grated cocoanut. CITRON CAKE. two of sugar. Bake in two shallow tins. then beat in the following ingredients each one in succession: one pint of powdered sugar. beaten to a stiff froth. the beaten whites of eggs. Three teacupfuls of sugar. Stir two cups of butter to a cream. the whites of seven eggs. one teaspoonful of vanilla or lemon extract. and five eggs. Beat the butter and sugar until very light.

flavoring and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. half a pound of butter. one cupful of sweet milk. two cupfuls of sugar. four cupfuls of sifted flour. cream the butter and sugar. add the lemon or orange and bake. four cupfuls of sifted flour. one-half teaspoonful soda with the sweet milk. (Delicious. the grated rind and juice of a lemon or orange. frosting if liked. stir in the sugar and arrowroot gradually. Serve on toast or with chipped beef. then the whites of eggs. Never fails to be good. half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in half a cup of sweet milk. Line the bake-pans with buttered paper and bake in a moderate oven for one hour. at the same time beating . GOLD CAKE. keep them in a cool place and scramble them. SILVER. then add the milk and flavoring. stir in the well-whipped yolks of one dozen eggs. This makes a more suitable _lemon_ cake than if made with the white parts of eggs added. then add flour. the beaten whites of eggs. When using the whites of eggs for nice cakes. one teaspoonful of baking powder. or lemon. then the rest of the flour. Bake carefully in tins lined with buttered white paper. After beating to a cream one cup and a half of butter and two cups of white sugar. flavoring to taste of essence of almonds. the yolks need not be wasted. beat the butter to a cream. Lastly. sifted twice. Whites of six eggs. the whites of six eggs. quarter of a pound of pounded white sugar. Two cups of sugar. add the milk and soda to the sugar and butter. or vanilla. SNOW CAKE. half a cup of butter. GOLD OR LEMON CAKE.) One pound of arrowroot. four cups of sifted flour. flavor to taste. two-thirds of a cup of butter.cornstarch. Stir the sugar and butter to a cream. OR DELICATE CAKE. part of the flour. then add the beaten yolks and the flour. the yolks of six eggs and one whole one. Flavor with lemon. beating hard for several minutes.

MARBLE CAKE. stir in part of the flour and the yeast and let it rise. half a cup of sour milk. two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. one teaspoonful of soda and one teacupful of home-made yeast. the soda to be dissolved in a little milk and added after part of the flour is stirred in. one cup of white sugar. add them to the other ingredients and beat well for twenty minutes. alternately. one teacupful of sliced citron. half a cup of cooking molasses. one nutmeg grated. whisk the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth. two small cups of milk._--Yolks of four eggs. so that it has the appearance of marble. three cups of sugar. put in which-ever of the above flavorings may be preferred. The whites of seven eggs._--Whites of four eggs. then add the other ingredients with a wine-glass of wine or brandy. Two cups of butter. one teaspoonful of soda. Bake slowly in a _moderate_ oven for two hours. one cup of brown sugar. one teacupful of well-washed and dried currants. seven cups of sifted flour. pour the cake into a buttered mold or tin and bake it in a _moderate_ oven from one to one and a half hours. one teacupful of seeded raisins. one and a half cups of sifted flour. one teaspoonful of mace.the mixture. _White Part. then the dark. the whites and yolks separately beaten. SUPERIOR LOAF CAKE. Take part of the butter and warm it with the milk. Drop a spoonful of each kind in a well-buttered cake-dish. four eggs. _This is a genuine Scotch recipe_. two cups of sugar. one teaspoonful of cinnamon. first the light part. one teaspoonful of vanilla or lemon and two and a half cups of sifted flour. FRENCH CHOCOLATE CAKE. half a cup of sweet milk. Try to drop it so that the cake shall be well-streaked through. _Dark Part. one teaspoonful of mace. half a cup of butter. Turn all into well-buttered cake-tins and let rise again. one tablespoonful of powdered cinnamon. one teaspoonful of ground cloves. half a cup of butter. two-thirds of a cup of .

is the _premium_ cake of its kind. No. one cup butter. take it hot from the fire and pour it very slowly on the beaten whites of egg. put the cake together with the frosting. a teaspoonful of vanilla extract. _For the Frosting. now put in three cups and a half of sifted flour. One cup of butter and two cups of sugar stirred to a cream. CHOCOLATE CAKE. CHOCOLATE CAKE. One-half cup butter. when well made. 1. The chocolate part of the cake is made just the same. whites of eight eggs. then spread a custard between them. two and one-half cups flour. one-half teaspoonful soda. then spread between each cake and over the top and sides. one-half cup of sugar. with the yolks of five eggs added after they have been well beaten. Fine. one teaspoonful of cream of tartar. two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder having been stirred into it. when cool flavor with vanilla. one pint of milk. This. 2._--Take the remaining three whites of the eggs beaten _very_ stiff. three tablespoonfuls of sugar and one tablespoonful of grated chocolate (confectioners') to one egg. Two cups sugar. one tablespoonful of flour or cornstarch. add one-half cake of grated chocolate. No. beat the whites of two pf the eggs to a stiff froth and add that also. Bake in jelly-cake tins. yolks of five eggs and whites of two and one cup milk.butter. two cups sugar. Stir it all until cool. two teaspoonfuls. three-quarters of a cup sweet milk. only use the yolks of the eggs with a cup of grated chocolate stirred into it. then frost the top of the cake with the same. _Mixture for Filling. Then stir into that one cup of milk._--Take the whites of three eggs. two cupfuls of sugar boiled to almost candy or until it becomes stringy or almost brittle. CHOCOLATE CAKE. beating quite fast. which is made with two eggs. one cup of milk and three of flour and three teaspoonfuls of baking powder. then mix all together. Bake . Bake it in layers--the layers being light and dark. No. Thoroughly mix two teaspoonfuls baking powder with three and one-half cups flour while dry. 3. bake in shallow pans.

Cream together three-quarters of a cup of butter and two of white sugar. spread between the cooled cakes. one small cup of milk. Bake in four jelly-cake tins. four eggs. _Filling. _Mixture for Filling. stir in the grated cocoanut swiftly and lightly. When it has stiffened somewhat. but do not let it scorch. one grated cocoanut._--Whites of three eggs. three tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate. then the whites.in jelly tins. COCOANUT AND ALMOND CAKE. Two and one-half cups powdered sugar. Save about two dozen to shred for the top. COFFEE CAKE. flavor with lemon or vanilla. make that for the top a trifle thicker and lay it on heavily. . the yolks added first to the butter and sugar. Blanch the almonds. Lastly. one and one-half cups of sugar. and sprinkle very thickly with grated cocoanut. Beat together and spread between the layers and on top of the cake. add the milk and whites and flour alternately. mix well. cream butter and sugar. one heaping cup powdered sugar. two teaspoonfuls rose-water. Let them get cold and dry._--One pound sweet almonds._--Make an icing by beating the whites of three eggs and a cup of powdered sugar to a stiff froth. stir in lemon and nutmeg. adding rose-water as you go. four full cups prepared flour. stick the shred almonds closely over it. COCOANUT CAKE. the juice and half the grated peel of one lemon. whites of seven eggs whisked stiff. one teaspoonful of vanilla. Stir the paste into the icing after it is made. spread a thick layer of this frosting over each cake. one-half teaspoonful nutmeg. one cup butter. with a mere pinch of soda. Set in the oven to harden. whites of four eggs whisked stiff. then pound in a Wedgewood mortar. then add one cup of sweet milk. bake in jelly pans. whites and yolks separately beaten. When the cake is cooled. _For Filling. mix three heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder in three cups of sifted flour and add last.

one-half cup of molasses. one tablespoonful of cold butter. a gill of brandy. one and one-half cups of flour. Make an icing of the whites of three eggs and one pound of sugar. two eggs. one cup of raisins or currants and five cups of sifted flour. Spread it between the . whites and yolks beaten separately. half a nutmeg. Brown sugar is much better than white for this kind of cake. one teaspoonful of cloves. Add the whites the last thing before the flour and stir that in gently without beating. one teaspoonful of cream of tartar. one cup of sweet cream. two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon. two cups sugar. Three cups milk. A spoonful of dried apple sauce or of peach sauce. one cup of butter. one cup of strong. rubbed in a little of the flour. cold coffee. the same of lemon extract. in the morning add two cups sugar. one teaspoonful of soda. half a cup of milk. three teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted well with flour. one cup yeast. a pinch of salt. one tablespoonful cinnamon. a spoonful of jelly. One egg. three eggs. half a teaspoonful of soda. one cup of sugar. two cups butter. stir to a batter and let stand over night. nutmeg. two cupfuls of sugar. mix two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar in the flour before sifting. GOLDEN CREAM CAKE. ELECTION CAKE. It should stand in the greased pans and rise some time until quite light before baking. Four eggs. one teaspoonful of soda. cinnamon. Bake in three jelly-cake pans. one pound raisins. FEATHER CAKE. Bake about one hour. and it is improved by dissolving a half-teaspoonful of soda in a tablespoonful of milk in the morning. A nice plain cake--to be eaten while it is fresh. two teacups of sugar.One cup of brown sugar. CREAM CAKE. two heaping cupfuls of flour. Add the fruit last. Yolks of eight eggs beaten to the lightest possible cream. cloves and spice--ground--or half a cupful of raisins might be added for a change.

Soak three cupfuls of dried apples over night in cold water enough to swell them. if possible) and stew a few moments. making it very light. Beat the whites of eight eggs very stiff. two-thirds cup of sweet milk. two teaspoonfuls baking powder. then mixed with a cup of sifted flour one-teaspoonful of nutmeg. two cups of flour. when cold. This is not a dear but a delicious cake. then add a cupful of milk. the apples will cook like citron and taste deliciously. also spices to taste may be added. add half of those to the other ingredients. WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE No. the whites of seven eggs well beaten. one cup of cornstarch. bake in a steady oven. Cream three cupfuls of sugar and one of butter. Two cups of sugar. one cupful of butter. add a cupful of nice raisins (seedless. two-thirds cup of butter. CAKE WITHOUT EGGS. add some grated cocoanut._--Whites of three eggs and some sugar beaten together not quite as stiff as usual for frosting. three eggs and a teaspoonful of soda.cakes and sprinkle grated cocoanut thickly over each layer. 2. chop them in the morning and put them on the fire with three cups of molasses. Raisins may be omitted. DRIED APPLE FRUIT CAKE. Add to this one pound of raisins seeded and chopped. one teaspoonful of powdered cinnamon and lastly one pint of thick sour cream or milk in which a teaspoonful of soda is dissolved. _Frosting. Bake in jelly-cake tins. Beat together one teacupful of butter and three teacupfuls of sugar. Mix well into four cups of . spread over the cake. 1. It is delicious when properly made. then put your cakes together. stew until almost soft. and when quite light stir in one pint of sifted flour. No. This will make two good-sized panfuls of splendid cake. Bake immediately in buttered tins one hour in a _moderate_ oven. put cocoanut and frosting on top. WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. add three cupfuls of flour.

Stir in gently the whites of six eggs beaten to a stiff foam. two scant cups of butter. Put into one tumbler of flour one teaspoonful of cream of tartar. then sift it five times. add flavoring. To four cupfuls of flour add two heaping teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar and sift gently over the cake stirring all the time. Three cups of sugar. When done let it remain in the cake-tin. Beat well together one cupful of butter and three cupfuls of white sugar. ANGEL CAKE. It should be put in the oven as soon as possible after putting in the soda and whites of eggs. stir this into the cake. which should _not_ be buttered or lined. bright tin cake-dish. then the remaining beaten whites of egg. place one on another. adding three teaspoonfuls of vanilla extract. This is the same recipe as the one for "Citron Cake. Beat to a stiff froth the whites of eleven eggs. To this add one even teaspoonful of soda dissolved in one tablespoonful of warm water. stirring quickly and lightly. Make an icing for the filling. Bake slowly." only omitting the citron. Mix it well. turning it upside down. add the yolks of six eggs and one cupful of milk. testing it with a broom splint. very lightly and carefully. stir the sugar into the eggs by degrees. The yolks left from this cake may be used to make a spice cake from the recipe of "Golden Spice Cake. then ice all over the top and sides. WASHINGTON LOAF CAKE. Bake at once in a moderate oven about forty minutes. one cup of sour milk. Spread each layer of the cake thickly with this icing. Pour it into a clean. Bake in layers like jelly cake." QUEEN'S CAKE. A perfection cake. two teaspoonfuls of vanilla or lemon extract.sifted flour one tablespoonful of baking powder. with the sides resting on the tops of two saucers so that a current of air will pass under and over it. After this add the flour. Sift also one glass and a half of white powdered sugar. Mix all thoroughly. . with two cups of fine white sugar and the juice of half a lemon. This is the best recipe found after trying several. using the whites of four eggs beaten to a very stiff froth.

beating three or four minutes between each. add to the . one pint flour. It makes quite a fancy cake. flour and milk. Frost the top when cool. It will be a delicate pink. put into it a very little cochineal. one nutmeg and a small pinch of cayenne pepper. one teaspoonful of ground cloves. one at a time.] RIBBON CAKE. one cupful of molasses. ALMOND CAKE. two teaspoonfuls of ginger. one-half cupful milk. after having used the whites in making white cake. four eggs. One-half cupful butter. one teaspoonful of soda (just even full) and five cupfuls of flour. the heat of the oven must be kept at an even temperature. take two cupfuls of raisins. and divide it in one-half. two cupfuls of brown sugar. one-half cupful almonds. beat eggs. one glass brandy. two cupfuls sugar. This cake can be made to advantage when you have the yolks of eggs left. [Illustration: MAKING THE PIES. half a nutmeg grated and two cups of raisins. then the dark. Take the yolks of seven eggs and one whole egg. This cake will take longer to bake than plain. one large coffeecupful of sour milk. if fruit is used. one of currants and four cups of sifted flour. GOLDEN SPICE CAKE.five eggs and one teaspoonful of soda. Sift flour and powder together. two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon. one cupful of butter. one and one-half teaspoonful baking powder. beat it well together and bake in a _moderate_ oven. Bake in jelly-cake tins and lay first the white. flour them well and put them in last. then add the molasses. This cake is made from the same recipe as marble cake. then the pink one on top of the others. Line the cake-pans with paper well buttered. put together with frosting between. blanched--by pouring water on them until skins easily slip off--and cut in fine shreds. one-half teaspoonful extract bitter almonds. dredged in flour. Rub butter and sugar to a smooth white cream. add eggs. sugar and butter to a light batter before putting in the molasses. only make double the quantity of the white part. three tablespoonfuls of cinnamon. Mix as usual and stir the fruit in at the last.

also flavored. Bake this in same kind of tins. medium batter. dissolved in the milk. one teacup of fine sugar. bake carefully in a rather hot oven twenty minutes. Put the sheets of cake together.. add the yolks of two eggs well beaten. one-half cup raisins (chopped) or currants. When the cake is cool. Three eggs. beat the yolks until light. brandy and milk. one teacup of flour. one-half teaspoonful cinnamon. half a cup of butter. lastly stir in the flour. Mix a teaspoonful of cream of tartar and half a teaspoon of soda in a cup of flour. with almonds. One cup of sugar and two tablespoonfuls of soft butter stirred together. one-half cup butter. etc. bake it in three layers and put frosting between--the frosting to be made of the whites of two eggs with enough powdered sugar to make it thick. half a cup of wine. a little nutmeg and one tablespoonful flour. extract of bitter almonds. ROLLED JELLY CAKE. One and one-half cups sugar. then add two tablespoonfuls of water. mix into a smooth. and to the remainder add one teaspoonful molasses. one cup of raisins. in which there . one-half teaspoonful of soda.butter. WHIPPED CREAM CAKE. allspice. sift it into the cake batter and stir lightly. with jelly between. three-fourths cup milk. two eggs and half a teaspoonful of soda. Take one cup of sugar. while warm. one cup and a half of flour. then the beaten whites of the eggs. cloves. Put half the above mixture in a small shallow tin. have ready half of a pint of sweet cream sweetened and whipped to a stiff froth. a pinch of salt. To whip the cream easily. Spread it over the cake while fresh. then add four tablespoonfuls of milk. put these ingredients together with care. two heaping cups flour with one teaspoonful cream of tartar. The top of the cake may be frosted if you choose. FRUIT LAYER CAKE. two eggs. Bake in a small whipping-pan. This is a delicious novelty in cake-making. ROCHESTER JELLY CAKE. just as if it were a very rich cake. set it on ice before whipping. some flavoring. then add the sugar.

This prevents the edge of the cake from crumbling when cutting it. and. care should be taken. half a cup of butter. three eggs. it is better to first make a round hole in the cake with a knife or tin tube about an inch and a quarter in diameter. The flour added gradually. Bake in a moderate oven in layers like jelly cake. Turn out on a damp towel on a bread-board. LAYER JELLY CAKE. and roll up while warm. this prevents its burning. when done. When making custard filling for Layer Cake always set the dish containing the custard in another dish of boiling water over the fire. shallow biscuit-tins. well greased. as it browns very easily. When the milk comes to a boil add two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch or flour stirred into half a cup of sugar. Almost any soft cake recipe can be used for jelly cake. put it into a clean suitable dish. delicate cake the rule for "Silver Cake" is fine. When cutting Layer Cakes. spread custard between. CUSTARD OR CREAM CAKE. that the oven is just right for this cake. Cream together two cups of sugar and half a cup of butter. set it in a dish of _boiling_ water on the range or stove. TO CUT LAYER CAKE. The following is excellent: One cup of sugar. which would destroy its flavor. add half a cup of sweet milk in which is dissolved half a teaspoonful of soda. half a cup of sweet milk. Beat the whites of six eggs to a stiff froth and add to the mixture. For white. cover the top with jelly. however._--Take two cups of sweet milk.should be a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder. two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder. adding the yolks of four eggs and a little cold milk. two cups of flour. Bake in long. Stir this into the boiling milk . flavoring. To be baked in jelly-cake tins in layers. with filling put between when done. _For the Custard. Have one heaping teaspoonful of cream of tartar stirred thoroughly into three cups of sifted flour and add quickly.

beat all thoroughly together. then add one-quarter cup flour. before making the cake part. One cup of sugar. two more cupfuls of sifted flour. a teaspoonful of ground cinnamon. Stir to a cream one cupful of butter and half a cupful of brown sugar. CHEAP CREAM CAKE. one tablespoonful butter._--Beat one egg and one-half cup sugar together. but not quick. Divide into three parts and bake in round shallow pans. one egg. a tablespoonful (level) of powdered mace. then strew over these a handful of nuts. until thick. flavor to taste. Bake in a moderate oven. SOFT GINGER CAKE. Two cups of fine white sugar creamed with half a cup of butter. three eggs. oven. from forty to sixty minutes. This cake requires long and slow baking. Spread the cream when cool between the cakes. one heaping teaspoonful of baking powder sifted through the flour. the whites and yolks beaten separately. and so on until the pan is two-thirds full. afterwards add the flavoring. flavor to taste. two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder. divide the mixture and pour half into each. Fill the cake-pans with a layer of the cake. . I find that if sour milk is used the cakes are much lighter. a tablespoonful of ginger. It is best to make the custard first. but either sweet or sour is most excellent. three cups of sifted flour. then a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a spoonful of water and last. Line the tins with well-buttered paper and bake in a steady. one cup sweet milk. Butter and paper two common square bread-pans.and when cooked thick enough set aside to cool. _Cream. a coffeecup of hickory nut or walnut meats chopped a little. HICKORY NUT OR WALNUT CAKE. two-thirds of a cup of sweet milk. a cupful of sweet milk. either vanilla or lemon. two cups flour. then add three eggs. wet with a very little milk and stir this mixture into one-half pint of boiling milk. then a layer of raisins upon that. beat into this two cups of sifted flour. This is most excellent. add to this two cupfuls of cooking molasses.

then another." omitting the eggs and mixing hard enough to roll out like biscuit. This can be put together like marble cake. To be eaten warm.HARD GINGERBREAD. These two recipes are the best I have ever found among a large variety that I have tried. or sprinkle with sugar while hot. . BOSTON CREAM CAKES. a teaspoonful of salt and one heaping teaspoonful of ginger. one tablespoonful of ginger. This cake is baked in layers like jelly cake. three eggs. cut slits a quarter of an inch deep across the top of the tin from side to side. rub over the top with molasses and let it dry on. one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little warm water. this gives you pink. One cup of butter. PLAIN GINGERBREAD. WHITE GINGER BISCUIT. or it can be baked in a sheet or on a biscuit-tin. Frost the top. When baked and while hot. rolled nearly half an inch thick and cut out like small biscuits. one cup of sour cream. Divide the silver cake batter and color it pink with a little cochineal. Cut out rather thick like biscuits. with the white of an egg. one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a tablespoonful of warm water. One cup of _dark_ cooking molasses. first a spoonful of one kind. Made the same as "Soft Gingerbread. The grated rind and the juice of an orange add much to the flavor of ginger cake. while hot. the ingredients giving the best proportion for flavor and excellence. one cup of sour cream or milk. make about as thick as cup cake. GOLD AND SILVER CAKE. until the dish is full. brush over the tops. or enough to roll out _soft_. two cups of sugar. one teaspoonful of ground cinnamon and five cups of sifted flour. white and yellow layers. Put together with frosting.

Make the mixture exactly like the recipe for "Boston Cream Cakes. to be laid about two inches apart. but do not mash them. flavor with vanilla or lemon and fill your cakes._--Made of two eggs. SWEET STRAWBERRY CAKE. then remove from the fire and add a teaspoonful of butter. about an inch thick. until it thickens. stir the sugar. open them on the side with a knife or scissors and put in as much of the custard as possible. when the mixture begins to boil. the same of cinnamon and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. As soon as baked ice with chocolate icing. Pour into buttered pans. The baking powder to be rubbed into the flour. the yolks to a cream and the whites to a stiff froth. flour and beaten eggs. and when this is cold split them on one side and fill with the same cream as "Boston Cream Cakes. four eggs beaten separately.Put into a large-sized saucepan half a cup of butter and one cup of hot water. Put two-thirds of a pint of milk over the fire in a double boiler. they must be baked in a rather quick oven about twenty-five minutes. Beat a cup of butter and two cups of sugar together until light. one teaspoonful of grated nutmeg. then add a half cup of milk. beat and work it well with a vegetable masher until it is very smooth. As soon as the milk looks like boiling. and when cool enough add five eggs that have been well beaten. It is better the day after baking. also half a teaspoonful of soda and a teaspoonful of salt. pour in the mixture and stir briskly for three minutes." Spread it on buttered pans in oblong pieces about four inches long and one and a half wide. when cool. . turn in a pint of sifted flour at once. set it on the fire. Remove from the fire. _Cream for Filling." HUCKLEBERRY CAKE. Bake in a quick oven about fifteen minutes. three tablespoonfuls of sifted flour (or half cup of cornstarch) and one cup of sugar. first the yolks and then the whites. in a third of a pint of milk. CHOCOLATE ECLAIRS. dust the tops with sugar and bake. Drop on buttered tins in large spoonfuls about two inches apart. When done and quite cold. Bub one quart of huckleberries well with some flour and add them last.

sift four cups of flour and stir part of it into the above mixture. two tablespoonfuls of ginger. six eggs. Place them on well-buttered tins. one tablespoonful of ground cinnamon. Let them cool before taking out of the tins. beat the whole _well_ before adding the soda and but little afterwards. giving plenty of room to spread. MOLASSES CUP CAKES. Beat the butter and sugar together and add the eggs well beaten. remove from the fire and let it cool. one tablespoonful of cinnamon. In the meantime. the yolks and whites separately. one teaspoonful of cloves. which should be part butter. stirring the mixture all the time. one cupful of sugar. one of sugar. three teacupfuls of cooking molasses and one heaping teaspoonful of soda. Put into well-buttered patty-pan tins and bake in a _very moderate_ oven. then the molasses and flour in rotation. stir in the remainder of the flour and make stiff enough to roll into long rolls about an inch in diameter. . one cup of shortening. one tablespoonful of butter. Boil all together the following ingredients: Two cups of brown sugar. a teaspoonful. GINGER COOKIES. Bake in deep tin plate. Makes a very fancy dish. beat the eggs very light. five cupfuls of sifted flour. and cut off from the end into half-inch pieces. Bake in a moderate oven.Three eggs. and add to it. heaped. A baker's recipe. This quantity will fill four plates. two of flour. two cups of cooking molasses. as well as a most delicious cake. Stir in the flour and baking powder well sifted together. The top layer of strawberries may be covered with a meringue made with the white of an egg and a tablespoonful of powdered sugar. after which put in the spices. Now dissolve a teaspoonful of soda in a tablespoonful of warm water and beat into this mixture. Save out the largest berries and arrange them around in circles on the top in the white frosting. BAKERS' GINGER SNAPS. one _large_ tablespoonful of ginger. of baking powder. With three pints of strawberries mix a cupful of sugar and mash them a little. One cup of butter. Spread the fruit between the layers of cake. Stir the butter and sugar to a cream.

the better and more brittle they will be. draw the black lines and make the dots with a small brush dipped in melted chocolate. eight ounces of sifted flour and the yolk . and bake in a quick oven. When done.One cup sugar. or any other available fruit. and lay in the centre of your cakes. DOMINOES. two teaspoonfuls ginger. and bake a few at a time The more flour that can be worked in and the smoother they can be rolled. These are very nice for children's parties. WAFERS. strawberries. so as to form a deep. When the frosting is hard. mix like cooky dough. cut some paste in thick. rub shortening and sugar together into the flour. a trifle larger. FANCY CAKES. fill with iced fruit prepared as follows: Take rich. stir together four ounces of white sugar. ripe peaches (canned ones will do if fine and well drained from all juice) cut in halves. very thin. pineapples cut in squares or small triangles. two cups molasses. Have a plain cake baked in rather thin sheets and cut into small oblong pieces the size and shape of a domino. plums. Frost the top and sides. narrow strips and lay around your cakes. Should be rolled out to wafer-like thinness. add enough more flour to roll very smooth. They should become perfectly cold before putting aside. The dough can be kept for days by putting it in the flour barrel under the flour. One cup brown sugar. rather soft. one cup molasses. Bake quickly without burning. two teaspoonfuls soda. cup-like edge. Dissolve four ounces of butter in half a teacup of milk. one tablespoonful vinegar. three pints flour to commence with. These delicious little fancy cakes may be made by making a rich jumble-paste--rolling out in any desired shape. one egg. one large cup butter. place on a well-buttered tin and bake. one cup butter. one teaspoonful soda dissolved in boiling water. GINGER SNAPS. and dip in the white of an egg that has been very slightly beaten and then in pulverized sugar. one tablespoonful ginger.

then the milk. in rows on flat buttered tins. Then take them out. with a little cochineal water. drop the batter upon a baking tin. mix it well. one cup of milk. a teaspoonful at a time. when the wafers are all cooked roll them on a small round stick. Now add half a pound of fine flour. beating the whole together for four or five minutes. put the irons over the fire. which when dry can be brushed over on one side of the cake. serve with ices. Put cream of tartar in flour and add last. being careful to have the cakes as nearly the same size as possible and resembling in shape the half of a peach. To this recipe may be added a cup of English currants or chopped raisins. stir butter and sugar together and add the beaten yolks of the eggs. and beat the two together thoroughly. then flavoring and the whites. a half cupful of chopped almonds and lemon extract. watching them closely so that they may only come to a light brown color. dredging it in a little at a time. Have a quick oven ready and bake the cakes about ten minutes. which has been buttered and floured. and also another variety of cake may be made by adding a half cup citron sliced and floured. CUP CAKES. Then with a large spoon. . Fifteen minutes will be none too long for the latter operation if you would have excellence with your cakes. half a teaspoonful of soda. or drop the batter. covering the outside with a thin coat of icing. and stick them together in pairs. stand them upon a sieve and dry them. Bake in buttered gem-pans. three cups and a half of flour and four eggs. until the wafer is cooked. and then put in the whites of the eggs. Two cups of sugar. put in a tablespoonful of the batter and close the irons immediately. one cup of butter. PEACH CAKES. butter their inner surfaces. and turn them occasionally. Heat the wafer-irons. a tablespoonful of orange-flour water and a pinch of salt. spread the flat side of each with peach jam. large spoon cream of tartar.of one egg.) Then mix the beaten yolks with half a pound of pulverized and sifted loaf or crushed sugar. Take the yolks and whites of five eggs and beat them separately (the whites to a stiff froth. adding gradually the butter and milk.

now stir in lightly nine tablespoonfuls of sifted flour. one-half cup of milk. If you can get pistachio nuts to pound up for the green. in which one teaspoonful of cream of tartar and half a teaspoonful of saleratus are thoroughly mixed. lay this mixture out upon papers. Put the white between the pink and green. Beat to a froth three eggs and one teacup of sugar. Put nine tablespoonfuls of fine white sugar into a bowl and put the bowl into hot water to heat the sugar. Serve with ice cream. color another with cochineal. One cup powdered sugar. one-half cup of butter creamed with the sugar. Bake in gem-tins or patty-pans. or something of the kind. CORNSTARCH CAKES. Put a little of each into small. Butter tin sheets with washed butter and drop in teaspoonfuls about three inches apart. Ice on sides and top. Bruise and pound a few leaves of spinach in a thin muslin bag until you can express the juice. round pans or cups. the whites only. two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar and one of soda. in biscuits three inches long and half an inch thick. flavoring. two cupfuls each of sugar and flour. Bake instantly in a very quick oven. stir into this one heaping coffeecup of flour. then with a paper funnel. two and one-half cups prepared flour. Divide the batter into three parts. then take the bowl from the water and continue beating until it is nearly or quite cold. One cupful each of butter and sweet milk and half a cup of cornstarch. Bitter almond flavoring. four eggs. SAVORY BISCUITS OR LADY FINGERS. This will vein the cakes prettily. leaving the third white. break nine eggs into the bowl and beat them quickly until they become a little warm and rather thick. Cream the butter and sugar. flavor to taste. when the sugar is thoroughly heated. sift sugar over the biscuits and bake them upon tins to a . giving a light stir to each color as you add the next. the cakes will be much nicer. SPONGE DROPS. whipped light. Flavor with lemon.VARIEGATED CAKES. that the tints may show better. spinach juice and cochineal. in the form of fingers. Watch closely as they will burn easily. Put a few drops of this into one portion of the batter. the whites and flour. add the milk. the whites of five eggs beaten to a stiff froth.

after baking. greengage. If it is too stiff to roll out. and. if you find it so moist as to be unmanageable. Roll it a quarter of an inch thick and cut it out with any tin cutter. remove them from the papers. the white of an egg. Puff paste. a short time before being done. take the pastry out of the oven. sifted sugar. cut it into strips. Bake from twenty minutes to half an hour. jam of any kind. sift over pounded sugar and put it back in the oven to color. BRUNSWICK JELLY CAKES. either way is good. beat the yolks of three eggs till very thick and smooth. Place the cakes in a pan slightly greased and color the tops with beaten egg and milk. which must first be sprinkled with flour. when they are done and cold. PASTRY SANDWICHES. stir the whole well and lay it on your paste-board. spread the dough into a . as well as fanciful. Bake in a rather quick oven.light brown. One cup of powdered sugar. mace and cinnamon) and half a glass of rose-water or wine. till perfectly light. with some chopped almonds over them. add just enough more milk. by wetting them on the back. three whole eggs and three yolks. and spread equally over it apricot. half a cup of butter. dry them and they are ready for use. beaten separately. pile these on a dish pyramidically and serve. and mark the paste in lines with a knife on the surface. add a teaspoonful of mixed spice (nutmeg. This may be made of jelly-cake dough. allowed to cool before spreading with the preserve. Lay over this preserve another thin paste. throw in a little more flour. put half of it on a baking sheet or tin. to show where to cut it when baked. Stir one cup of powdered white sugar and one-half cup of butter together. Put this all together with half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a tablespoonful of milk. brush it over with the white of an egg. two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice. three cups of sifted flour. They are often used in making Charlotte Russe. sift three cups of flour and stir it into the beaten eggs with the butter and sugar. or any preserve that may be preferred. press the edges together all round. and. NEAPOLITAINES. When cold. Roll the paste out thin.

Bake on tin-sheets in a quick oven until a dark brown. two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. flavor to taste. and milk enough to make a stiff batter. half of a teaspoonful of baking soda dissolved in a little water. spread over the surface of each cake a liquor of fruit jelly or marmalade. one spoonful of vanilla and flour enough to roll out. and as soon as the tops are colored a pale brown. an inch apart. These will keep a year if kept in a tin box and in a dry place. WINE JUMBLES. beat into the froth. flour enough to make into a soft dough. two of sugar. one cup of raisins and one of currants. lay them on tins to bake. a sufficiency of powdered loaf sugar to make it as thick as icing. as it rises and spreads. LITTLE PLUM CAKES. flavor with a few drops of strong essence of lemon. three eggs. by degrees. and joining the ends. when cold. JUMBLES. but break off pieces of dough the size of a walnut and make into rings by rolling out rolls as large as your finger. One cup of sugar and half a cup of butter beaten to a smooth cream. lay them in buttered pans and bake about five or six minutes. then beat the whites of three or four eggs till they stand alone. One cup of butter. bake in a _moderate_ oven. These jumbles are very delicate and will keep a long time.sheet about half an inch thick and cut it out in round cakes with a biscuit-cutter. put the cakes into a cool oven. do not roll it on the paste-board. add three well-beaten eggs and six tablespoonfuls of sweet milk. Roll as thin as the blade of a knife and cut with an oval cutter. COCOANUT JUMBLES. and with a spoon heap it up on each cake. add three well-beaten eggs. a teaspoonful of vanilla extract. take them out. four cups of sifted flour. making it high in the centre. Cream together two cups of sugar and one of butter. rub one cupful of butter with one . one wine-glass of wine. drop this batter in drops on well-buttered tins and bake in a _quick_ oven. Grate one large cupful of cocoanut.

add the sugar. in which . the flavoring and flour. the beaten whites very lightly and quickly. mix well together. FRUIT JUMBLES. in which dissolve half a teaspoonful of soda. Bake in a quick oven from five to ten minutes. one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in boiling water. PHILADELPHIA JUMBLES. drop in rings on buttered paper and bake at once. so as to make a stiff dough. Three cupfuls of soft sugar. a little cinnamon. two cups of sugar. half a cupful of butter. rose-water. COOKIES. cream the butter. then add the well-whipped eggs. rolled thin and cut with a round cutter. beaten whites and flour. five eggs. cut into rings with a jagging-iron and bake in a quick oven on buttered tins. two cupfuls of flour. one cup of butter. add three beaten eggs. half a grated nutmeg and five cups of sifted flour. ALMOND JUMBLES. eight eggs beaten light. then add yolks of eggs. Two cups of sugar. five eggs well beaten. One cup of butter.and a half cupfuls of sugar. a _small_ teacupful of sweet milk. blanched and chopped _very_ fine. five cupfuls of flour. Two cups of sugar. whites and yolks separately. one small teacupful of milk. allspice and ground cloves and one-quarter of a pound of currants. two tablespoonfuls of rose-water. two tablespoonfuls of milk and five cupfuls of sifted flour. rolled in flour. flour. one teacupful of loppered milk. one cup of butter. essence of bitter almond or rose to taste. roll out in powdered sugar in a sheet a quarter of an inch thick. enough flour to enable you to roll them out. cream again. then add by degrees the grated nut. the milk. Cream butter and sugar. Stir the sugar and butter to a light cream. stir in the beaten yolks the milk. lastly. almonds and. three-quarters of a pound of almonds. nutmeg. having a hole in the middle.

Mix soft and roll out. wet the tops with milk and sprinkle sugar over them. one-half cup of sweet milk. make quite soft. adding. a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg. using just enough flour to stiffen sufficiently. LEMON COOKIES. Flour enough to make a soft dough just stiff enough to roll out. Water cookies keep longer than milk cookies. or sour or sweet cream can be used in place of butter. FAVORITE COOKIES. working it in gradually. roll the dough as thin as pie crust. Try a pint of sifted flour to begin with. two cups of sugar. FRUIT COOKIES. a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg Flour enough to roll.) One cup of butter. one teacupful of butter. one and a half cups of sugar. mix into a soft dough and cut into round cakes. two cups of sugar. a teaspoonful of soda and two of cream of tartar. using water in place of milk. after all is in. Cut out with a large cutter. one-half cup of sour milk one level teaspoonful of soda. three eggs well beaten. or enough for a stiff dough. Water cookies made the same as above. one teaspoonful of nutmeg and one of cinnamon. (Very Nice. two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Beat thoroughly each ingredient. three eggs whipped very light. Bake on buttered tins in a quick oven. One cup of butter. Bake in a quick oven a light brown. Roll out as any cookies and bake . Put a tablespoonful of fine sugar on a plate and dip the tops of each as you cut them out. spoonful of milk. Spread a little sweet milk over each and sprinkle with sugar. one cupful of butter. Place on buttered tins and bake in a quick oven a light brown.there has been sifted with it two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Bake in a quick oven a light brown. one egg. CRISP COOKIES. a half teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a tablespoonful of milk. the juice of one lemon and the grated peel from the outside. One cupful and a half of sugar. Four cups of sifted flour. These can be made of sour milk and a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in it. three tablespoonfuls of English currants or chopped raisins.

COCOANUT COOKIES. one-half teaspoonful extract of vanilla and flour enough to roll out. one large teaspoonful baking powder. one and one-half cups sugar. RAISED DOUGHNUTS. . two eggs. They should be turned over almost constantly. a teaspoonful of salt and one of soda. and cut with a fried-cake cutter. Make a sponge as for bread. Five or six minutes will cook a cruller. two scant tablespoonfuls of melted butter. if it is. three-fourths cup butter. the doughnuts will in about ten minutes be of a delicate brown outside and nicely cooked inside. roll out a quarter of an inch thick. Fry in hot lard. but are easily made. One and a half cupfuls of sugar. In the first place. using two heaping teaspoonfuls of the baking powder in place of soda. a large teaspoonful of cinnamon. using a pint of warm water or milk. when the sponge is very light. Try the fat by dropping a bit of the dough in first. which causes them to rise and brown evenly. one-half cup milk. they soak grease and are spoiled. Old-fashioned "raised doughnuts" are seldom seen nowadays. DOUGHNUTS OR FRIED CAKES. and the lard should never be so hot as to smoke or so cool as not to be at the boiling point. so that they swim on the top. make a little stiffer than biscuit dough. with a hole in the centre. there should be boiling lard enough to free them from the bottom of the kettle. raise them from the hot fat and drain them until every drop ceases dripping. If it is at the right heat. the fat will boil up when it is dropped in. When they are sufficiently cooked. half a nutmeg grated.a light brown. two eggs. Success in making good fried cakes depends as much on the _cooking_ as the mixing. One cup grated cocoanut. one cupful of sour milk. These can be made with sweet milk and baking powder. if it is right. CRULLERS OR FRIED CAKES. Use no other wetting. and a large half cupful of yeast.

Our grandmothers put allspice into these cakes. . and to be rolled very thin like pie crust. These are very dainty when fried. when they are a light._ CRULLERS OR WONDERS. Raised cakes require longer time than cakes made with baking powder. however. cut in squares three inches long and two wide. Three eggs. one teaspoonful of salt. have plenty of lard in the pot and when it boils drop in the cakes. Sift powdered sugar over them as fast as they are fried. three tablespoonfuls of melted lard or butter. when nearly cool add enough flour to make a thick batter and add a small cupful of yeast. a teaspoonful of ground cinnamon and half of a nutmeg grated. Drop them in very hot lard. New York City. a little grated nutmeg. BAKERS' RAISED DOUGHNUTS. then cut several slits or lines lengthwise to within a quarter of an inch of the edges of the ends. put into the centre of each round a large Sultana raisin. drain on soft white paper and roll. cut into rounds. the whipped whites of six eggs. let it rise again and when very light roll it out in a sheet an inch thick. let them stand a few minutes before boiling them. run your two forefingers through every other slit. that. Fry in hot lard a light brown. then work in gradually enough flour to make it stiff enough to roll out. one tablespoonful of cinnamon. when light work in gradually and carefully three cupfuls of sugar. a coffeecupful of sugar. and mold into perfectly round balls. a teaspoonful of salt and one small teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little water. lay them down on the board edgewise and dent them. half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a spoonful of milk. seeded. knead it well.add half a cupful of butter or sweet lard. as hard as can be rolled. cover and let rise. in fine powdered sugar. cover them well and let them rise before frying them. add sifted flour until it is the consistency of biscuit dough. _Purcell's Bakery. beat it well and set it to rise. flatten a little. or in strips half an inch wide and three inches long. Warm a teacupful of lard in a pint of milk. mix very hard with sifted flour. cut out with a very small biscuit-cutter. place them on greased tins. stir in now two well-beaten eggs. then roll the dough out into a sheet half an inch thick. brown take them out with a perforated skimmer. is a matter of taste. while warm. while warm. three tablespoonfuls of sugar.

These doughnuts. add to them one ounce of sifted sugar. One pint of milk. lastly. cut from the light dough little pieces the size of a walnut. Whip all well together. beaten well into it. Work one egg and a tablespoonful of sugar to as much flour as will make a stiff paste. salt to taste. and. beat it very smooth and when it is cool have ready the yolks of the eggs well beaten. Beat it until it falls from the spoon. TRIFLES. Three eggs. while hot.) Beat two eggs well. one cupful of sugar. [Illustration: CUTTING PUMPKIN FOR PIES. two tablespoonfuls of yeast. without molding or kneading. roll it as thin as a dollar piece and cut it into small round or square cakes. then add the well-beaten whites. roll it in pieces as thick as your finger and turn them in the form of a ring. nutmeg and flour enough to permit the spoon to stand upright in the mixture. eaten fresh and warm. When it has risen make butter or lard hot in a frying pan. PUFF-BALL DOUGHNUTS. When served for dessert or supper put a spoonful of jelly on each. add the salt and as much more flour as will make the whole into a soft dough. four eggs. first boil the milk and pour it. (Fried. a pint of sweet milk. are a delicious breakfast dish and are quickly made. and. more milk. add them to the milk and flour. flour your board. A nice breakfast cake with coffee. flavoring. drop two or three at a time into the boiling lard.] NUT CAKES. turn your dough upon it. fry them pale brown. if requisite. then set it to rise. over a pint of flour. salt.GERMAN DOUGHNUTS. then. two ounces of warmed butter. then stir in by degrees one pound of flour. As they are done lay them on a napkin to absorb any of the fat. when they rise to the surface and turn over they are done. take them out with a skimmer and lay them on an inverted sieve to drain. cook in plenty of boiling lard. making thin dough. a teacupful of luke-warm milk and a little salt. add two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder . one small tablespoonful of melted butter.

If currants are to be used in pies. Use the very best materials in making pastry. they should be carefully picked over and washed in several waters. In pounding them. A great improvement is made in pie crust by the addition of about a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder to a quart of flour. it could be placed in the ice box. to prevent their becoming oily. Great care is requisite in heating an oven for baking pastry. in summer. dried in a towel and dredged with flour before they are suitable for use. with the white of an egg. sweet and hard. Almonds should be blanched by pouring boiling water upon them and then slipping the skin off with the fingers. If you can hold your hand in the heated oven while you count twenty. the oven has just the proper temperature and it should be kept at this temperature as long as the pastry is in. the water cold (ice-water is best). this heat will bake to a light brown and will give the pastry a fresh and flaky appearance. When the crust is made. should be seeded stoned and dredged with flour before using. PASTRY.to the flour. Drop by the dessertspoonful into boiling lard. Raisins. or even an hour. and the pieces of butter placed thereon. the shortening should be fresh. GENERAL REMARKS. the under crust will become heavy and . PIES AND TARTS. the paste rolled on a cold board and all handled as little as possible. always add a little rose or orange-water. These will not absorb a bit of fat and are not at all rich and consequently are the least injurious of this kind of cakes. As this is the great beauty of puff paste. If you suffer the heat to abate. assists it to rise in _leaves_ or _flakes_. beat all until very light. it is as well to try this method. also brushing the paste as often as rolled out. it makes it much more flaky and puff much more to put it in a dish covered with a cloth and set in a very cold place for half an hour. with fine sugar. and all dried fruits for pies and cakes.

and until the filling boils up through the slits in the upper crust. or it will make the bottom crust sodden. wet the top edge of the rim. take a portion of it. gather up the scraps left from cutting and make into another sheet for the top crust. and the last be better than the if put in a tightly covered dish and set in the ice chest in summer and in a cool place in winter. then notch evenly and regularly with a three-tined fork. Pie crust can be kept a week. just before you put in the pie mixture. Now fill your pie-plate with your prepared filling. it gives it a beautiful glaze. To ice pastry. lap one-half over the other and cut three or four slits about a quarter of an inch from the folded edge (this prevents the steam from escaping through the rim of the pie. and thus you can make a fresh pie every day with little trouble. To prevent the juice soaking through into the crust. which is the usual method adopted for fruit tarts and sweet dishes of pastry.clammy and the upper crust will fall in. After making the crust. Bake in a rather quick oven a light brown. lay the upper crust across the centre of the pie. seal the two edges together by slightly pressing down with your thumb. pumpkin or squash pies. FOR ICING PASTRY. If the top of the pie is brushed over with the egg. to first partly bake the paste before adding it. and when stewed fruit is used the filling should be perfectly cool when put in. roll it out and fit it to a buttered pie-plate by cutting it off evenly around the edge. put the white of an egg on a plate and with the blade of a knife beat it to a stiff froth. it is well. Another good way to ascertain when the oven is heated to the proper degree for puff paste: put a small piece of the paste in previous to baking the whole. HOW TO MAKE A PIE. In baking custard. and causing the juices to run out from the edges). in order that the mixture may not be absorbed by the paste. and then the heat can thus be judged of. dipping occasionally in flour to prevent sticking. When the pastry is . roll it a little thinner than the under crust. turn back the half that is lapped over. making it soggy wet the under crust with the white of an egg.

an hour or more before making out the crust. spread with one-fourth of the butter. put it back into the oven to set the glaze and in a few minutes it will be done. but you must have nice flour. working . Take the lard and rub into the flour until a very fine smooth paste. then roll up closely in a long roll. Into one quart of sifted flour mix two teaspoonfuls of baking powder and a teaspoonful of salt. which is very liable to do after the icing is laid on. Wash the butter in this. toward you. double the ends towards the centre. Spread over the top and slightly brown in the oven. PUFF PASTE FOR PIES. sideways. Repeat this operation until the butter is used up. containing a beaten white of egg. let it remain until _cold_. the finest puff paste I have ever seen. and it is. One quart of pastry flour. Tarts made with this paste cannot be cut with a knife when fresh. Rinse a large bowl or pan with boiling water and then with cold. You may roll this pastry in any direction. one pint of butter. Great care should be taken that the paste does not catch or burn in the oven. This recipe I purchased from a colored cook on one of the Lake Michigan steamers many years ago. hard and cold. cover it with a cloth and set it in a cold place. Boll it out into a thin sheet. one and a quarter cupfuls of ice-water. from you. like a scroll. Measure out one teacupful of butter and one of lard. one tablespoonful of salt. then spread again with another quarter of the butter. Then put in just enough _ice-water_. without exception. Put it on an earthen dish. it matters not. flatten and re-roll. _then sift again_. Wash the hands with soap and water and dip them first in very hot and then in cold water. Or make a meringue by adding a tablespoonful of white sugar to the beaten white of one egg. to mix a very stiff dough. FINE PUFF PASTE. any way. if you would succeed. _ice-water_ and very _little_ of it.nearly baked. say half a cupful. they go into flakes at the touch. sprinkle over with a little flour. in the ice box in summer. one of sugar. Half fill it with cold water. brush it over with this and sift over some pounded sugar. and strength to roll it.

Now fold from the ends. Mix the salt and sugar with the flour. top and bottom before you. over which again pass the rolling-pin. Sprinkle the board _lightly_ with flour. mix the whole with cold water (this should be iced in summer if convenient) into a soft. so as to hide it. In hot weather. tarts. Turn the paste on this and pound quickly and lightly with the rolling-pin. Add the water. Repeat this three times if for pies and six times if for _vol-au-vents_. patties. To every pound of flour allow the yolk of one egg. stirring with a knife. thus forming a square. the paste will not be good if much flour is used. This frees it from the salt and buttermilk and lightens it. then fold over the other third. etc. _Maria Parloa_. the tenderer it will be. rub one-third of the butter into the flour. half a saltspoonful of salt. the lemon juice and salt. and repeat the rolls and turns twice again as before. the juice of one lemon. roll it out again to the thickness of a quarter of an inch. Flour a baking-sheet. place it with the ends. Shape the butter into two thin cakes and put in a pan of ice-water to harden. Roll from you and to one side. fold over one-third. Fold as before and roll down again. when it has been rolled the last time. if the paste sticks when being rolled down. shaking a little flour both under and over. put the paste on . Do not break the paste. it will roll easily. put it on a tin sheet and place on ice. With the hands. wring it in a cloth and roll out the paste. flexible paste with the right hand. Fold the paste. so that the pastry is more delicate. It should be in the ice chest at least an hour before being used. break it in bits and spread these on the paste. Put the flour onto the paste-board. but do not have these meet. Stir quickly and vigorously until the paste is a smooth ball. No matter how carefully every part of the work may be done. Double the paste. and handle it as little as possible. then squeeze all the buttermilk from the butter. SOYER'S RECIPE FOR PUFF PASTE. turn the paste around. Place on the ice to harden. The less flour you use in rolling out the paste. one pound of fresh butter. cold water. pound lightly and roll down to about one-third of an inch in thickness. or if easier to roll from you all the time. As soon as it is chilled. one-third from each side. make a hole in the centre. Sprinkle lightly with flour. into which put the yolk of the egg. wipe the remaining butter. place the butter on this and fold the edges of the paste over. so that the edges meet.it with the hands until it is light and waxy. When it is about one-fourth of an inch thick.

Place the flour. All the ingredients should be very cold when mixing. cut in small squares and bake. RULE FOR UNDER CRUST. rather firm dough. then roll twice more. just enough to get it into shape to roll out. or part butter and part lard. a pinch of salt. it must be handled very lightly. add suet and water. sifted with the powder in a bowl. stiff paste. one-half teaspoonful of salt. freed of skin. if it is well made. This rule is for two pies. turning it as before. it will be light and flaky and the suet impreceptible. mix into smooth. and chopped very fine. baked or boiled. give it two more rolls. This paste is excellent for fruit puddings and dumplings that are boiled. rubbing into it a _large_ tablespoonful of cold butter. PUFF PASTE OF SUET. one cupful of shortening. PLAIN PIE CRUST. and rolled quite thin. making seven in all. one cup of chopped suet. When you have a little pie crust left do not throw it away. as a custard or pumpkin pie.this and let it remain on ice or in some cool place for half an hour. roll it thin. Two and a half cupfuls of sifted flour. and it is ready for use when required. one cupful of water. A good rule for pie crust for a pie requiring only an under crust. and a pinch of salt. is: Three _large_ tablespoonfuls of flour sifted. mixing with _cold_ water enough to form a smooth. to prevent the particles from adhering to each other. Mix together with half a teacupful of _cold_ water. Two cupfuls of flour. one teaspoonful of baking powder. Rub thoroughly the shortening into the flour. . place it again upon the ice for a quarter of an hour. or enough to form a rather stiff dough. mix as little as possible. a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder sifted through the flour. and the suet dredged with flour after it is chopped. Just before tea put a spoonful of raspberry jelly on each square. It is also excellent for meat pies. half butter and half lard cold.

flaky look. cut it about the right size. two tablespoonfuls of cold butter and half a cupful of milk or cream. TARTLETS. 1. and. enough to cover it well. Nice for the tops of meat pies. brush them over with the egg. both the flavor and color of the jam are preserved. 2. Bake from ten to fifteen minutes. Tarts of strawberry or any other kind of preserves are generally made of the trimmings of puff paste rolled a little thicker than the ordinary pies. spread it over with butter. after you have rolled out your top crust. No. Tartlets are nice made in this manner: Roll some good puff paste out thin. to give it a fine. Cut a slit in the middle place it over the top of your pie. Boil and mash a dozen medium-sized potatoes. so much jam is not required. blistered. so that they all meet in the middle of each piece of paste. and placed in small tart-pans. add one good teaspoonful of salt. and fasten the edges as any pie. pour over the water sufficiently to rinse off the flour. Now take the pie on your left hand and a dipper of cold water in your right hand. TARTLETS. then shake sifted flour over the butter. then cut out with a round cutter. first dipped in hot water. marmalade. first pricking a few holes at the bottom with a fork before placing them in the oven. which would be lost were it baked in the oven on the paste. Stiffen with flour sufficient to roll out. Pile them high in the centre of a dish on a napkin and garnish with the same preserves . tip the pie slanting a little. Let the paste cool a little.POTATO CRUST. then fill it with preserve. By this manner. TO MAKE PIE CRUST FLAKY. or red currant jelly. In making a pie. When they are done. then fold down the corners. brush each square over with the white of an egg. to make the edges smooth. make a little hole in the middle of the paste and fill it up with apricot jam. sift over sugar and bake in a nice quick oven for about a quarter of an hour. and cut it into two and a half inch squares. No. slightly press the two pieces together. besides. which many cooks think is much better than rolling the butter into the crust. Enough flour will stick to the butter to fry into the crust.

TARTS. If the paste is light. a teaspoonful of cinnamon. put it into a pie-tin lined with pie paste. If the cutters are dipped in _hot water_. criss-crossed on the top. two cupfuls of thick stewed apples. juicy pie. also cranberries stewed and well sweetened. a small level tablespoonful of sifted flour. OR SHELLS FOR TARTS. they are very nice to serve for tea. Beat the whites . May be used for veal or oyster patties. or strips of paste. Three cupfuls of milk. PATTIES. Roll out a nice puff paste thin. a few bits of butter. lay the rings thus made on the third. Peel. stewed until thick. the edges of the tartlets will rise much higher and smoother when baking. strained through a colander. the shells will be fine. The result will be a delicious. cover with a top crust and bake about forty minutes. APPLE CUSTARD PIE. and bake at once. stir all together with a spoon. 1. Larger pans are required for tarts proper. all of which have been previously baked on a tin by themselves. Dried fruit. or filled with jelly. sprinkle over about three tablespoonfuls of sugar. jam or preserves. two tablespoonfuls of water. GREEN APPLE PIE. cut out with a glass or cookie-cutter and with a wine-glass or smaller cutter. four eggs and one cupful of sugar. core and slice tart apples enough for a pie. makes fine tart pies. a few stars or leaves are placed on the top. cut out the centre of two out of three.the tartlets are filled with. Filled with jelly and covered with meringue (tablespoonful of sugar to the white of one egg) and browned in oven. then after the paste is baked and cooled and filled with the jam or preserve. Or shells may be made by lining patty-pans with paste. as tarts. the size of small. No. shallow pie-tins.

Bake for an hour. pare and grate them.and yolks of the eggs lightly and mix the yolks well with the apples. No. the grated rind and half the juice of one lemon. 2. mix all well and pour into a deep plate lined with paste. half a lemon . cutting each apple into four or eight pieces. APPLE CUSTARD PIE. then rub through a colander. A little quince marmalade gives a fine flavor to the pie. put it into a bowl and pour upon it one teacupful of cold water. one large Boston cracker. APPLE CUSTARD PIE. Crush finely with a rolling pin. slice apples thin and half fill your plates. or grated lemon peel. one of melted butter. Lay them neatly in a baking dish. To be baked with only the one crust. Select fair sweet apples. put a strip of the paste around the edge of the dish and bake thirty minutes. Then beat into this the milk and. 3. flavoring with nutmeg. like all custard pies. and to every teacupful of the apple add two eggs well beaten. No. seasoning them with brown sugar and any spice. beat three eggs for each pie to be baked and put in at the rate of one cupful of butter and one of sugar for three pies. Lay a crust in your plates. Let the crust partly bake before turning in this filling. season with nutmeg. according to their size. MOCK APPLE PIE. and not much water left in them. lastly. Peel sour apples and stew until soft. two tablespoonfuls of fine sugar. Add a little water and cover with puff paste. such as pounded cloves and cinnamon. add one teacupful of fine white sugar. IRISH APPLE PIE. Pare and take out the cores of the apples. No. sweetened and seasoned to your taste. pour over them a custard made of four eggs and one quart of milk. 4. APPLE CUSTARD PIE. the juice and pulp of one lemon. half a wine-glass of brandy and one teacupful of milk. the whites.

rind grated and a little nutmeg." Eat cold. Take the whites of three eggs for each pie and whip to a stiff froth. Cut off the brown part of the cocoanut. four tablespoonfuls of sifted white sugar. Nice with a meringue on top. stir into the boiling water and boil three minutes. 1. pounded fine. line the pie-plate with half puff paste. This is for one small-sized pie. APPLE AND PEACH MERINGUE PIE. COCOANUT PIE. grate the white part. The eggs and sugar should be beaten together to a froth. No. No. Bake them as soon as turned into the plates. When nearly cold beat up with this the yolks of all the eggs and the whites of . six eggs. one small cupful of sugar. cover with the paste and bake half an hour. Stew the apples or peaches and sweeten to taste. CHOCOLATE CUSTARD PIE. COCOANUT PIE. mix it with milk and set it on the fire and let it boil slowly eight or ten minutes. One-half cup desiccated cocoanut soaked in one cupful of milk. with a lining and rim of puff paste. then spread it on the pie one-half to one inch thick. beat until it will stand alone. Dissolve the chocolate in a very little milk. two spoonfuls of melted butter and half a nutmeg. Put them into the milk and cocoanut. one-half cupful of white sugar. 2. set it back into the oven until the meringue is well "set. turn the whole into deep pie plates. and sweeten with three tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. Put on no top crust. pour in the mixture. These are proportions for one pie. which should be first allowed to get quite cool. one pint of boiling water. a glass of wine. Fill the crusts and bake until just done. eight eggs. one quart of milk. 1. add the cracker and nutmeg. a small cracker. No. Flavor with rose-water or vanilla. allow a quart of milk. Mash smooth and season with nutmeg. two eggs. grated. butter the size of an egg. To a pound of the grated cocoanut. two teaspoonfuls of vanilla. then the wine stirred in. One-quarter cake of Baker's chocolate.

lined with pastry. LEMON PIE. beat this thoroughly. two cups of water and a piece of butter the size of a walnut. Set this on the fire in another dish containing boiling water and cook it until it thickens. Bake from thirty-five to forty minutes. one cupful of water. and very superior. beat one egg and some sugar in it. two heaping tablespoonfuls of unsifted flour. No. One coffee cupful of sugar. one tablespoonful of melted butter. . Washington.three. CHOCOLATE PIE. three eggs. pour it into a deep pie-tin. one heaping tablespoonful of flour. and when cooled. have ready the whites. and return to the oven until it is a light brown. to set and brown slightly. and after the pie is baked. This may be cooked before it is put into the crust or not. when melted. Stir this mixture into the milk. It makes a medium-sized pie. and when done. or one of cornstarch. _Ebbitt House. grate into it the outside of the rind of two lemons. add to that a cup and a half of white sugar. large sized pie. 2._ LEMON PIE. (Superior. in a pudding dish or cups set in boiling water. No. spread them over the top beaten lightly-with a spoonful of sugar. 1. then add the yolks of three well-beaten eggs. season and pour into shells of good paste. bake. 2. No. Lovers of chocolate will like this. with three small tablespoonfuls of sugar. and will dip up on the spoon like cold honey. This makes a deep. the juice and a little of the rind of one lemon. When the custard is "set"--but not more than half done--spread over it the whites whipped to a froth. Spread this over the top and return to the oven. spread this on the top of a custard pie. You may bake these custards without paste. Reserve the whites of the eggs. beaten stiff. but it is rather better to cook it first in a double boiler or dish. then add the juice of the lemons. with two tablespoonfuls of sugar. Put some grated chocolate into a basin and place on the back of the stove and let it melt (do not add any water to it).) Take a deep dish. Remove from the fire. stir it well together.

which must be sweetened with two tablespoonfuls of sugar. then one of the grated rind and. two cupfuls of sugar. This makes one small pie. Two large. if not bitter reserve it for the filling of the pie. No. then one of sugar. say two or three minutes. Be sure to have the under crust lap over the upper. 3. and pinch it well. Beat up the yolks of three eggs to a cream. as the syrup will cook all out if care is not taken when finishing the edge of crust. take off the fire and. and so on till the ingredients are used. Grate the rind of one and use the juice of two large oranges. sprinkle the water over all. When done so as to resemble a finely baked custard. Reserve the whites for frosting. Bake with a crust. BAKERS' CUSTARD PIE. ORANGE PIE. spread on the top of it the beaten whites. grate off the rind. Moisten a heaping tablespoonful of cornstarch with a little cold water. fresh lemons. lastly. Stir together a large cupful of sugar and a heaping tablespoonful of flour. three tablespoonfuls of water and two of sifted flour. Stir thoroughly a tablespoonful of sifted flour into three tablespoonfuls of sugar. pare off every bit of the white skin of the lemon (as it toughens while cooking). then add a cupful of boiling water. if convenient to have it. add teaspoonful of butter and a cupful of sugar. of flour. this . stir over the fire till it boils and cook the cornstarch. add to this the well-beaten yolks of three eggs. This quantity makes one medium-sized pie. Turn this into a pie-pan lined with pie paste and bake in a quick oven. No. and cover with upper crust. The addition of the juice of half a lemon improves it. add an egg well beaten and the juice and grated rind of a fresh lemon.LEMON PIE. two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. when slightly cooled. 4. Put into the pie a layer of lemon. LEMON PIE. then cut the lemon into very thin slices with a sharp knife and take out the seeds. spread evenly and return to the oven and brown slightly.

"The secret is the addition of this _bit of flour_--not that it thickens the custard any to speak of. When done. lastly." He replied. set the cream where it will get very cold before whipping. grate a little nutmeg over the mixture and bake without an upper crust. flavor with nutmeg or vanilla. then add the four beaten whites. Line a pie plate with a rich crust and bake quickly in a hot oven." CREAM PIE. then add it to the beaten yolks. If a tablespoonful of sifted flour is added to it. next the well-beaten whites of the eggs. and. mix this in by degrees and turn all into a deep pie-pan lined with puff paste. add this to the cream and beat up thoroughly. let it stand until the whites of three eggs have been beaten to a stiff froth. spread over the jelly or jam._--Put on a pint of milk to boil. CUSTARD PIE. I received this recipe from a celebrated cook in one of our best New York bakeries. _Cream Part. sweeten with powdered sugar and flavor with vanilla. a quart of sweet milk. I inquired of him "why it was that their custard pies had that look of solidity and smoothness that our home-made pies have not. a pint of scalded milk (not boiled) which has been cooled. lastly. BOSTON CREAM PIE. as the above Custard Pie recipe. Beat together until very light the yolks of four eggs and four tablespoonfuls of sugar. Bake until firm. and bake from twenty-five to thirty minutes. mix well and pour into tins lined with paste. put in a pinch of salt. Break two eggs into a . a teaspoonful of vanilla and a little grated nutmeg. then whip one cupful of thick sweet cream until it is as light as possible.separates the particles of flour so that there will be no lumps. WHIPPED CREAM PIE. spread with a thin layer of jelly or jam. a pinch of salt and. but prevents the custard from breaking or wheying and gives that smooth appearance when cut. Pour a pint of cream upon one and a half cupfuls of sugar. it would improve it.

one cup of granulated sugar. flavor with vanilla or lemon. Divide the batter in half and bake on two medium-sized pie-tins. When done and cool._--Three eggs beaten separately. Take the whites of the eggs and beat to a stiff froth with two tablespoonfuls of sugar. Take three eggs. spread over the top and brown in a quick oven. then fill with the custard. and the cherries in any case should be stoned. dot a few bits of butter over that. split each one in half with a sharp broad-bladed knife. The cake part should be flavored the same as the custard. and spread half the cream between each. banana. Bake in a rather quick oven to a straw color. beat the sugar. Now fill the crust full to the top. Any fruit custard. Line your pie plate with good crust. . stir it into the milk just as the milk commences to boil. stir in the mixture and add a pinch of salt and about a teaspoonful of butter. CHERRY PIE.dish and add one cup of sugar and half a cup of flour previously mixed after beating well. one large teaspoonful of baking powder and two tablespoonfuls of milk or water. Cover with the upper crust and bake. if made correctly. This is one of the best of pies. CURRANT PIE. a teaspoonful of sifted flour. _Crust Part. cornstarch and yolks of the eggs together. bake. Serve cold. such as pineapple. one pint of milk. after the milk has come to a boil. Make crust the same as any pie. sprinkle over them about a cupful of sugar. FRUIT CUSTARD PIE. a cupful of sugar. fill half full with ripe cherries. one and a half cups of sifted flour. two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch or three of flour. add an ounce of butter and keep on stirring one way until it thickens. grate over a little nutmeg and bake again. MOCK CREAM PIE. can be readily made after the recipe of APPLE CUSTARD PIE.

one of flour. then grate over it a nutmeg. Sprinkle a small handful of flour over all. filling the pan somewhat heaping. RIPE CURRANT PIE. put in half a cup of butter and a medium cup of sugar. try it. slice the tomatoes _very thin_. take off. if the pan is rather deep." unless they are somewhat green. Having your pie-pan lined with paste made as biscuit dough. cover with a meringue made of the beaten white of an egg and one tablespoonful of sugar. serving hot. HUCKLEBERRY PIE. fill the crust and bake. let it stand for two or three minutes. . Take from the oven. Bake half an hour in a moderately hot oven. Bake. or to the exclusion of the latter. pare and cut out the stem end. beaten with the yolks of two eggs. Take medium-sized tomatoes. two tablespoonfuls of water. A canned apricot meringue pie is made by cutting the apricots fine and mixing them with half a cup of sugar and the beaten yolk of an egg. APRICOT MERINGUE PIE. Is good. One cupful of mashed ripe currants. Put a quart of picked huckleberries into a basin of water. pouring in half a cup of vinegar before adding the top crust. Set back in a slow oven until it turns a golden brown. Stewed dried apricots are a delicious addition to mince meat. then they should be stewed a little. GREEN TOMATO PIE. All of the above are good if made from the dried and stewed apricots instead of the canned and are much cheaper. frost the top with the beaten whites of the eggs and two tablespoonfuls powdered sugar and brown in oven. The above pie can be made into a tart without the addition of the meringue by adding criss-cross strips of pastry when the pie is first put into the oven. They may be used in connection with minced apples. one of sugar.Make in just the same way as the "Cherry Pie.

cover the pie. three eggs. one tablespoonful of melted butter. MOLASSES PIE. to a quart bowl of cut rhubarb put a large teacupful of sugar. line a buttered pie. One cup of chopped raisins.whatever floats. put half of a teacupful of brown sugar. . Cut the large stalks off where the leaves commence. put in the berries half an inch deep. dish with a pie paste. dredge a teaspoonful of flour over. two tablespoonfuls of butter. one lemon. Stir lightly together and bake with upper and under crust. one tablespoonful of flour. nutmeg. one cupful of cold water. and to a quart of berries. strew a saltspoonful of salt and a little nutmeg grated over. Pick the berries clean. Two teacupfuls of molasses. one cupful of sugar. and the juice and grated rind of one lemon. beat and bake in pastry. BLACKBERRY PIE. RHUBARB PIE. press the two crusts together around the edge. strip off the outside skin. rinse them in cold water and finish as directed for huckleberries. seeded. LEMON RAISIN PIE. cover with a rich pie crust. trim off the edge with a sharp knife and bake in a quick oven until the pie loosens from the dish. or make several small incisions on either side of it. one of sugar. trim it off neatly with a sharp knife and bake in a quick oven for three-quarters of an hour. strew it over with a saltspoonful of salt and a little nutmeg grated. put a layer of the rhubarb nearly an inch deep. cut a slit in the centre. Rhubarb pies made in this way are altogether superior to those made of the fruit stewed. shake over a little flour. take up the berries by the handful. pick out all the stems and unripe berries and put them into a dish. cut a slit in the centre. line a pie dish with paste rolled rather thicker than a dollar piece. then cut the stalks in pieces half an inch long.

cinnamon or nutmeg. stone and slice the peaches. cut a slit in the centre of the cover through which the vapor may escape and bake twenty minutes. when tender and while hot. when cool. sweeten them with sugar and let them stand until they become cold. its weight in sugar. Peel. beat the batter to a creamy froth. put in the filling. half its weight in butter. Line a pie plate with crust and lay in your fruit. remove it and rub it through a colander to separate it from the seeds. five eggs. Pop the pulps out of the skins into one dish and put the skins into another. wet and pinch together the edges of the paste. add a little lemon-peel. cover with crust and bake in a _quick_ oven. GRAPE PIE. DAMSON OR PLUM PIE. the pineapple grated and the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. wash and put them in a stewpan with no more water than what adheres to them. dredge flour upon them. then pour them into pie dishes lined with paste. if liked. . Then simmer the pulp a little over the fire to soften it. cover them with the same paste. continue beating till very light. Allow three peach kernels chopped fine to each pie. add the sugar and yolks of the eggs. Eat cold.] PEACH PIE. Bake with an under crust. when cooked. (Cooked.) Skin the stalks. one cupful of cream. [Illustration: CHOPPING THE MINCEMEAT. sweeten to taste.RHUBARB PIE. A grated pineapple. mash them fine and put in a small piece of butter. Then put the skins and pulp together and they are ready for pies or for canning or putting in jugs for other use. sift sugar over it when served. add the cream. Stew the damsons whole in water only sufficient to prevent their burning. Fine for pies. sprinkling sugar liberally over them in proportion to their sweetness. PINEAPPLE PIE. cut them into small pieces. line your plate with thin crust.

_ CRANBERRY TART PIE. making quite full. put over them one cupful of white sugar. should be rolled thin. Cover with crust and bake about forty minutes. DRIED FRUIT PIES. or bake a top crust shell. In the morning stew slowly until nearly done in the same water. stir it all together and put into your crust. hence.pour in a very little water and bake with an upper crust. shake over a tablespoonful of sifted flour (if very juicy) and as much sugar as is necessary to sweeten sufficiently. sound. ripe cranberries and with a sharp knife split each one until you have a heaping coffeecupful." Line your pie-tin with crust. always bake the shell and put in the sweetmeats afterwards. soak over night in water enough to cover. You will find this the true way of making a cranberry pie. you can cover with whipped cream. Sweeten to taste. put them in a vegetable dish or basin. Now fill up the crust to the top. CRANBERRY PIE. Preserved fruit requires no baking. _Newport Style. Wash the fruit thoroughly. half a cup of water. or with cross-bars of paste across the top. both upper and under. Take fine. Huckleberry and blackberry pies are improved by putting into them a little ginger and cinnamon. The crust. RIPE BERRY PIES. . a thick crust to a fruit pie is undesirable. Cover with an upper crust and bake slowly in a moderate oven. the former is preferable for delicacy. All made the same as "Cherry Pie. JELLY AND PRESERVED FRUIT PIES. fill half full of berries. a tablespoon _full_ of sifted flour.

the yolks and whites of four eggs beaten separately. and cook slowly. then take them out. just enough to cover them. stirring often until the moisture is dried out and the pumpkin looks dark and red. sweeten them with plenty of sugar.After having washed and picked over the berries. let it cook slowly until tender. Can be made the same as "Cranberry Tart Pie. three cupfuls of boiled and strained pumpkin. Cut up in several pieces. STEWED PUMPKIN OR SQUASH FOR PIES. 1. It requires cooking a long time. Bake in a moderate oven. a little salt. GOOSEBERRY PIE. pare the outside and cut again in small pieces. PUMPKIN PIE. then cut it up in thick slices. When cool press through a colander. where it will not burn. No." or an upper crust can be put on before baking. line your pie-plates with thin puff paste. mash them smooth (some prefer them not mashed). place them on baking tins and set them in the oven. For three pies: One quart of milk. rub it through a colander. when they burst open and become soft. stew them well in a little water. scrape all the pumpkin from the shell. Now set the pot on the back of the stove. fill them and lay strips of paste across the top. Put it into a large pot or saucepan with a very little water. at least half a day. BAKED PUMPKIN OR SQUASH FOR PIES. to have it dry and rich. Deep-colored pumpkins are generally the best. one tablespoonful each of ginger and cinnamon. one-half cupful of molasses. take out the seeds. one and one-half cupfuls of sugar. It will be fine and light and free from lumps. Or you may rub them through a colander to free them from the skins. Serve with boiled custard or a pitcher of good sweet cream. Boston marrow or Hubbard squash may be substituted for pumpkin and are . do not pare it. bake slowly until soft. Cut a pumpkin or squash in half. Beat all together and bake with an under crust.

A tablespoonful of brandy is a great improvement to pumpkin. Beat all well together and bake in crust without cover. one teaspoonful of cinnamon or nutmeg. In order to succeed in having good mince pie. two tablespoonfuls of molasses. it is quite essential to cook the meat properly. one teaspoonful of cinnamon. so as to retain its juices and strength of flavor. . This makes two pies. flavor with lemon or nutmeg and bake in pastry shell. one teaspoonful of mace.much preferred by many. one teaspoonful of cinnamon and the same of nutmeg. a pinch of salt and one pint of milk. to this add enough good. whites and yolks beaten separately. as possessing a less strong flavor. SQUASH PIE. One quart of properly stewed pumpkin pressed through a colander. PUMPKIN PIE. COOKED MEAT FOR MINCE PIES. 2. one tablespoonful of melted butter one tablespoonful of ginger. PUMPKIN PIE WITHOUT EGGS. One quart of stewed pumpkin pressed through a sieve. half a cupful of molasses or brown sugar. one cupful of brown sugar. or very light brown. one cup cream. three well-beaten eggs. nine eggs. or one large deep one.-two cups sugar. One pound of steamed sweet potatoes finely mashed. three eggs. Bake in a moderately slow oven three-quarters of an hour. One pint of boiled dry squash. No. rich milk. Fine. two scant quarts of milk. SWEET POTATO PIE. a tablespoonful of ginger. sufficient to moisten it enough to fill two good-sized earthen pie-plates. or squash pies. a teaspoonful of salt. one and one-half cupfuls of white sugar. one-half cup butter.

one pound of Sultana raisins. wash it and put it into a kettle with just water enough to cover it._ MINCE PIES. until it is tender. Four pounds of lean boiled beef chopped fine. mix thoroughly and warm it on the range until heated through. half a pound of citron. add hot water from time to time. The "Astor House. one pound of brown sugar. One pound of beef suet. two of mace. washed and dried. seeded. one tablespoonful of salt. three pounds of raisins. one tablespoonful of pepper.Select four pounds of lean beef. but keep perfectly cold. one quart of cooking molasses. pared and chopped. Five pounds of apples. one of allspice. one pint of boiled cider. 2. boiled and. gristle and stringy bits should be well picked out before chopping. Two pounds of lean fresh beef. which should be done the day before needed. washed and picked over. two pounds of currants washed and _carefully_ picked over." The chief pastry cook at that time. one of powdered nutmeg. one tablespoonful of cloves. the neck piece is as good as any. one tablespoonful of allspice and four tablespoonfuls of cinnamon. I find that those who partake of it never fail to speak in laudable terms of the superior excellence of this recipe when strictly followed. No. stir in a pint of good brandy and one pint of Madeira wine. take off the scum as it reaches the boiling point. published the recipe. one pound of chopped suet. it is time to take up and set aside to get cold. chopped fine. take off the cover and let it boil until almost dry. two pounds of raisins. was _famous_ for its "mince pies. 1. seeded and chopped. cut up fine. _Chef de Cuisine. Next day. Y. Astor House. by request. three-quarters of a pound of citron cut up fine. cover it tightly and set it in a cold place where it will not freeze. one of . two quarts of sweet cider. one tablespoonful of mace. Put into a crock. when making the mince meat. then season with salt and pepper. two tablespoonfuls cinnamon. two grated nutmegs. Remove from the fire and when nearly cool. Will keep good all winter. MINCE PIES. When it looks as though it was beginning to fry in its own juice. N." some years ago. when cold. or until the juice has boiled back into the meat. the bones. No. two pounds of currants picked over. cleared of strings and minced to powder. one of cloves. twice as much of chopped green tart apples.

half a cupful of molasses. after being rubbed through a sieve. Mince-meat made by this recipe will keep all winter. two-thirds of a cupful of melted butter. beat the two whites until stiff. Whisk all together until light and foamy. a teaspoonful each of cloves. one pint best brandy. then bake in small patty-pans shells of puff paste a light brown. One pint of greengage plums. in a brisk oven. a teaspoonful of cinnamon. salt and black pepper. wet the edges and turn the paste over. add two tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. allspice. nutmeg. Instead of putting the fruit in raw. or jam of any kind may be substituted for fresh fruit. one large cup of sugar. (Suitable for Picnics. two and a quarter pounds of brown sugar. . then add the sugar and molasses. FRUIT TURNOVERS. sprinkle over sifted sugar and bake on tins. half a cupful of cider vinegar. one egg beaten light. look for CANNED MINCE MEAT. Press the edges together. MOCK MINCE MEAT WITHOUT MEAT. sprinkle over some sugar. then the other ingredients. half a cupful of rolled cracker crumbs.) Make a nice puff paste. the yolks of two eggs well beaten. then cut it out into circular pieces about the size of a small tea saucer. half a cupful of brown sugar. ornament them and brush the turnovers over with the white of an egg. lastly. Cover closely in a jar and set in a cool place. One cupful of cold water. pile the fruit on half of the paste._ For preserving mince meat. one quart brown sherry. Put the saucepan on the fire with the water and raisins. then the vinegar. let them cook a few minutes. as for pies. PLUM CUSTARD TARTLETS. roll it out the usual thickness. it may be boiled down with a little sugar first and then enclosed in the crust. for about twenty minutes. _Common Sense in the Household.fine salt. add a wine-glassful of brandy. Then fill with the plum paste. one cupful of raisins seeded and chopped. Very fine.

put into twelve patty-pans lined with puff paste and bake until the crust is done.spread over the plum paste and set the shells into a moderate oven for a few moments. Put into the oven and bake a light straw color. Take the juice of two large oranges and the grated peel of one. Beat all well together and bake in tart shells without cover. LEMON TARTLETS. but they should be about six inches in diameter and from two to three inches deep. When it comes to the boiling point put into it the following mixture: Into a bowl put a heaping tablespoonful of flour. then fill it with a custard made as follows: Stir gradually into the beaten yolks of six eggs two tablespoonfuls of . 1. No. Stir this all together thoroughly. MERINGUE CUSTARD TARTLETS. then add the beaten yolks of six eggs. beat it all together until smooth. Have ready baked and hot some puff paste tart shells. three-fourths of a cup of sugar. half a cupful of sugar and a pinch of salt. a tablespoonful of butter. stir this one way into the boiling milk until cooked to a thick cream. fluted tartlet pans are suitable for custard tarts. remove from the fire and stir into it the grated rind and juice of one large lemon. two cupfuls of sugar. These are much more easily handled than pieces of pie or even pies whole. stir in a good teaspoonful of cornstarch into the juice of half a lemon and add to the mixture. ORANGE TARTLETS. No. Mix well together the juice and grated rind of two lemons. two eggs and the crumbs of sponge cake. Fill them with the custard and cover each with a meringue made of the whites of the eggs. LEMON TARTLETS. Butter the pan and line it with ordinary puff paste. Put a quart of milk into a saucepan over the fire. 2. sweetened with four tablespoonfuls of sugar. and can be packed nicely for carrying. Select deep individual pie-tins.

using a baker's wire egg-beater for this purpose. a saltspoonful of salt and half a pint of cream. then stir into it the whites of two eggs beaten light. heat it until it comes to a boil. spread a thin layer of it over the tart and decorate the top with the remainder by squeezing it through a paper funnel. Pour it in a bowl. add a few drops of vanilla flavoring and stir until the custard becomes cold. fill the lined mold with this and bake in a moderate oven. Serve it cold with powdered sugar sifted over it. blackberry and whortleberry may be made the same. Raspberry. Stir until free from lumps and add two tablespoonfuls of sugar. Just before ready to use fill the tarts with strawberries. also a tablespoonful of white sugar and a teaspoonful of cornstarch wet in cold milk. BERRY TARTS. with a slit in the top and bake.flour. Top and tail the gooseberries. While beating. After picking over the berries carefully. pour into the slit in the top of the pie the following cream mixture: Take a small cupful of the cream from the top of the morning's milk. after adding berries add also to each tart a tablespoonful of sweet cream. sprinkle in lightly half a pound of sugar and a dash of salt. Strew a little powdered sugar over the top. In the meantime. or whatever berries are in season. sprinkling sugar thickly between each layer: fill the pie-tin pretty full. arrange them in layers in a deep pie-tin lined with puff paste. return to the oven. Put into a porcelain kettle with enough water to prevent burning and stew slowly until they break. When the paste is quite firm. GREEN GOOSEBERRY TART. blackberries. Line small pie-tins with pie crust and bake. pouring in a quantity of the juice: cover with a thick crust. put the whites of the eggs in a bright copper vessel and beat thoroughly. Do not let it boil or it will curdle. set it aside and when cool pour it into the pie through the slit in the crust. CREAM STRAWBERRY TARTS. Sprinkle over each tart a little sugar. Boil all together a few moments until quite smooth. and when a delicate yellow tinge remove from the oven and when cold serve. When the pie is baked. put the saucepan on the range and stir until the custard coats the spoon. They form a delicious addition to the breakfast table. Take them . raspberries.

Stir five minutes until well thickened. sweeten _well_ and set aside to cool. These are nice for tea. then stir in the cornstarch. Eat cold. When cold pour into pastry shells and bake with a top crust of puff paste._ COCOANUT TARTS. Bake in open shells of pastry. baked in patty-pans. remove from the fire and pour into a bowl. four of white sugar. Take one cupful of sour milk. well-beaten eggs and lemon. one-half cake of Baker's chocolate. the meats grated. one-half teaspoonful of cinnamon. dissolved in water. Put both kinds of milk together in a vessel. put the butter in cold and bake in a nice puff paste. Four eggs. two teaspoonfuls of vanilla. CHOCOLATE TARTS. one of sweet milk. a tablespoonful of melted butter. add butter to the curd. one teaspoonful of butter. put all together with the flavoring and stir until light. rub the chocolate smooth in the milk and heat to boiling over the fire. Take three cocoanuts. _Common Sense in the Household. juice and rind of one lemon and a small cupful of white pounded sugar. which is set in another and let it become sufficiently heated to set the curd._ MAIDS OF HONOR. half a cupful of white sugar. _Common Sense in the Household. Line the little pans with the richest of puff paste and fill . melted. When done. and when the chocolate mixture is almost cold. one tablespoonful of cornstarch. season. Brush all over with beaten egg while hot.off. the sugar. the yolks of four eggs. three tablespoonfuls of milk. then strain off the milk. rub the curd through a strainer. set back in the oven to glaze for three minutes. Beat all the yolks and the whites of two eggs well with the sugar. whites and yolks. one saltspoonful of salt. the yolks of five eggs. a wine-glass of milk. grated. Eat cold. cover with a meringue made of the whites of two eggs and two tablespoonfuls of sugar flavored with a teaspoonful of lemon juice.

and with your egg-beater whip it to a thick. tart apples. GERMAN FRUIT PIE. Ripe peaches are fine used in the same manner. one and a half of sugar (or more. until quite soft. add a piece of butter as large as a walnut. cover them when removed from the oven with the meringue made of the whites of three eggs remaining. mixed with three tablespoonfuls of sugar. line patty-pans with a puff paste and fill.with the mixture. ten large. take one teacupful (more or less according to the number of tarts you want) of perfectly sweet and fresh cream. sprinkle with a little cinnamon and molasses. the juice and grated outside rind of two lemons. Fill the cold shells with this and set in a cool place till tea is ready. with a teaspoonful (a small one) of lemon or vanilla. Make a rich. Bake in rather quick oven until the crust and apples are cooked a light brown. half a cap of butter. Pare. Roll it out half an inch thick. Sprinkle a little sugar over the top five minutes before removing from the oven. While these "shells" are cooling. beat all thoroughly. core and boil in half a cupful of water. stiff froth. quarter. brittle crust. smoothing off the edges nicely and bake well. or three whole ones. bake five minutes in a hot oven. Sift together a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder and a pint of flour._--If desired very nice. put this into a large bowl or other deep dish. APPLE TARTS. if not sufficiently sweet). bake until firm in the centre. skimmed free of milk. add a heaping tablespoonful of fine white sugar. from ten to fifteen minutes. a pinch of salt. one beaten egg and sweet milk enough to make a soft dough. . beat until very smooth and add the yolks of six eggs. _Meringue. butter a square biscuit tin and cover the bottom and sides with the dough. fill the pan with quartered juicy apples. with which cover your patty-pans. CREAM TARTS. return to the oven and delicately brown.

put in the jam. The usual rule for custards is. Peel and grate one cocoanut. then lay them across the tart. they add very much to the flavor and richness.OPEN JAM TARTS. and double the quantity of eggs used to those mentioned. stir in the grated cocoanut and boil fifteen minutes longer. cream should be substituted for the milk. stir in a quarter of a pound of butter. . Time to bake until paste loosens from the dish. While warm. lay another strip around the edge. especially with the addition of a level tablespoonful of sifted flour. partly filled with boiling water. or even less. CHESS CAKES. roll out some of the paste. placed over the fire. take one and a half coffeecupfuls. A very small lump of butter may also be added. it must _not_ boil or it will curdle. either in cups or one large dish. then stir it briskly one way every moment until smooth and well cooked. and a tablespoonful of powdered sugar. When making boiled custard. It improves custard to first boil the milk and then cool it before being used. eight eggs to a quart of milk. before adding the other ingredients. set the dish containing the custard into another and larger dish. thoroughly blended in the sugar first. boil one pound of sugar fifteen minutes in two-thirds of a pint of water. wet it lightly with the yolk of an egg beaten with a little milk. Cut it in narrow strips. but a very good custard can be made of six. If prepared cocoanut is used. Bake in patty-pans with rich paste. four duck's eggs to the pint of milk making a delicious custard. Let the cream or milk come almost to a boil before adding the eggs or thickening. When desired extremely rich and good. Line shallow tin dish with puff paste. if one wants something especially rich. duck's eggs should be used when obtainable. boiled or steamed. trim off outside. Fine. CREAMS AND DESSERTS. CUSTARDS. also a little salt adds to the flavor. To make custards look and taste better. and so many are not required as of ordinary eggs. add the yolks of seven eggs well beaten. and bake in a quick oven. omitting the whites. They may be baked.

the fire should be moderate and the dish well buttered. and they should always be strained. Serve in glasses. Drop them into boiling water. beat again. then stir them gradually into a quart of sweet rich milk previously boiled and . Eggs should always be broken into a cup. smoothed over with a broad-bladed knife dipped in cold water. Frozen eggs can be made quite as good as fresh ones if used as soon as thawed soft. then the cooled scalded milk. then the sugar added. Breaking the eggs thus. the thicker and richer the custard. or frosting for the top. then add the beaten eggs and cold milk and stir constantly until the mixture begins to thicken. Stir it into the boiling milk. Beat the eggs and add the cold milk to them. If made with nicety it is the most delicate of all sweets. Everything in baked custard depends upon the _regularly heated slow_ oven. Eggs should always be thoroughly well beaten separately. if cooked till it wheys it is hardly eatable. the whites and yolks separated. six eggs.To bake a custard. Stir the sugar in a small frying pan until it becomes liquid and just begins to smoke. to be placed on the top after the custard or pudding is baked. half a cupful of sugar. the yolks first. Set away to cool. the bad ones may be easily rejected without spoiling the others and so cause no waste. requires about a tablespoonful of fine sugar to the beaten white of one egg. the yolks with half a cup of sugar. the whites and yolks separately. the whites to a stiff froth. The lighter the eggs are beaten. One quart of milk. reserving a cupful. SOFT CARAMEL CUSTARD. A meringue. Put the milk on to boil. then add the beaten whites with the flavoring. BAKED CUSTARD. and replaced in the oven to brown slightly. half a teaspoonful of salt. letting them remain until the water is cold. They will be soft all through and beat up equal to those that have not been touched with the frost. Beat five fresh eggs.

Fill your custard cups. peaches or raspberries.cooled. When the custard is cold heap this on top. if it comes out clean it is baked sufficiently. half a teaspoonful of salt and a small piece of butter. three eggs. set them in a moderate oven in a shallow pan half filled with hot water. Six eggs half a cupful of sugar. Whip the whites of the two eggs that remain. add flavoring. the milk will certainly whey. _Common Sense in the Household. In about twenty minutes try them with the handle of a teaspoon to see if they are firm. pour in the custard. Beat seven eggs very light. CUP CUSTARD. Judgment and great care are needed to attain skill in baking custard. OR MOCK CREAM. if in cups. then add the eggs well beaten with four tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. put on a strawberry or a bit of red jelly on each. As soon as it comes to the boiling point remove it. grate a little nutmeg over and bake in a quick oven. one quart of milk. adding two heaping tablespoonfuls of sugar. boil in a dish set in another of boiling water. and any extract or flavoring you like. three-quarters of an hour is generally enough. Serve cold with fresh fruit sugared and placed on top of each. BOILED CUSTARD. Set in a cold place till wanted. Strawberries. mix them gradually with a quart of milk and half a cupful of sugar. Rub butter over the bottom and sides of a baking-dish or tin basin. Take two even tablespoonfuls of cornstarch. heat the milk to nearly boiling and add the starch. one quart of new milk. Run a teaspoon handle into the middle of it. omitting the whites of two. for if left in the oven a minute too long. let it boil up once or twice. sift a little nutmeg or cinnamon over the tops. Beat the eggs and the sugar and milk. or if the fire is too hot. It is better to set the dish in a shallow pan of hot water reaching nearly to the top. the water to be kept boiling until the custard is baked. previously dissolved in a little cold milk._ BOILED CUSTARD. or it will be liable to curdle and become lumpy. as preferred. . flavor with extract of lemon or vanilla and half a teaspoonful of salt.

or vanilla. whisk the whites until stiff and dry. Beat six eggs very light and stir them gradually into a quart of rich milk alternately with the stewed apple. Flavor with lemon. rich. Pare. also a small quantity of candied citron cut into the thinnest possible slips. . cover and place them where the water will keep sufficiently hot to cause a steam to pass through and cook them. over which grate nutmeg. 1. and sweeten to taste. roasted and pounded. beat the yolks until thick. and stew them till tender in a very small portion of water. APPLE CUSTARD. with nutmeg grated over the top. reserve a layer of white for the cover. or to suit your taste. Put the mixture into cups. mash them smooth with the back of a spoon (you must have a pint and a half of the stewed apple). eight eggs. core and quarter a dozen large juicy pippins. Stew among them the yellow peel of a large lemon grated very fine. No. A good substitute for ice cream. then pour it into a pudding-dish to get cold. cook the custard as usual and set it on the ice for some hours before using. and it is done. or into a deep dish and bake it about twenty minutes. mix a half cupful of sugar with them and set them away till cold. on each layer of custard grate a little nutmeg with a teaspoonful of wine. ALMOND CUSTARD. roasted and pounded to a paste. When done. and half an ounce of pine-nuts or peanuts. a little vanilla. to which add the milk. then send to table and eat cold. sugar and cinnamon to taste. blanched. GERMAN CUSTARD.stirring it briskly. Add to a pint of good. boiled custard an ounce of sweet almonds. place in a dish (suitable for the table) a layer of custard and white alternately. Send it to table cold. put it into a pan or farina kettle. FRENCH CUSTARD. blanched. have ready a pan of boiling water on the top of which place the whites. or raspberry. separate the eggs. One quart of milk. place it over a slow fire and stir it all the time until it becomes custard. served _very_ cold.

until wanted. Soak half a package of Cox's gelatine in a teacupful of cold water one hour. turn them out of the molds. as in No. put two teacupfuls of sugar in the gelatine water first. throwing them. to which add a pint of boiling water. place them in a glass dish and pour this custard around the base. adding a few drops of wine or rose-water to them. In the meantime. Beat eight eggs very light with two-thirds of a cup of sugar. stir the whole over the fire until it thickens and is smooth. Serve cold. or the grated rind and the juice of a lemon. with six ounces of fine white sugar and mix them well with the yolks of four eggs. make a boiled custard of the yolks of three of the eggs. No. rub it with a cloth and turn out the cream carefully upon your dish. spread over the top of the custard. Dip some teacups or wine-glasses in cold water and fill them. then mix together with a quart of rich milk. stir it until the gelatine is thoroughly dissolved. as you do them. then pour it into your mold and keep it upon ice. Then pound them one at a time into a paste. put the mixture into a saucepan and set it over the fire. Blanch a quarter of a pound of sweet almonds. 1 on preceding page. pound them.Scald and blanch half a pound of shelled sweet almonds and three ounces of bitter almonds. into a large bowl of cold water. then the beaten white of egg and one teaspoonful of vanilla extract. Stir it one way until it begins to thicken. Whip it some time until it is all quite stiff and cold. when ready to serve dip the mold into warm water. Now after the meringue in the cups has stood four or five hours. or part milk and part cream. flavor with vanilla extract. then dissolve one ounce of patent gelatine in one quart of boiling milk. set in a cold place. Having reserved part of the whites of the eggs. or in a cool place. strain it through a sieve and pour into it the other mixture. ALMOND CUSTARD. beat them to a stiff froth. 2. with half a cupful of sugar and a pint of milk. remove from the fire and when it is cooled put in a glass dish. season with three tablespoonfuls of sugar and a teaspoonful of lemon extract. but not till it curdles. . SNOWBALL CUSTARD. Then beat the whites of four eggs to a stiff froth.

1. WHIPPED CREAM. No. take it off lightly with a spoon and lay it on an inverted sieve with a dish under it to catch what will drain through. whip it to a stiff froth. alternately with the grated cocoanut. WHIPPED CREAM. Beat to a stiff froth the whites of eight eggs and stir them into the milk and sugar. When finished pour in molds and set on ice or in any very cold place. Then stir in gradually a pint of rich milk. No. beaten to a stiff froth. grate loaf sugar over them. Take one quart of milk and soak half a box of gelatine in it for an hour. Three coffeecupfuls of good thick sweet cream. The dish which contains the cream should be set in another dish containing ice-water. a little at a time. add a pint of thick sweet cream (previously set where it is very cold) and four tablespoonfuls of sweet wine. add a teaspoonful of powdered nutmeg and cinnamon. adding two tablespoonfuls of rose-water. or with a pint of cream. cutting the cream into it. SPANISH CREAM. Then put the mixture into cups and bake them twenty minutes in a moderate oven. or cracked ice. To the whites of three eggs. with three of fine white sugar and a teaspoonful of the extract of lemon or vanilla. This should be whipped in a cool place and set in the ice box. set in a pan half filled with boiling water. half a cup of powdered sugar. Grate as much cocoanut as will weigh a pound. or it will . Dissolve three-fourths of an ounce of best gelatine in a teacup of hot water and when cool pour it in the cream and stir it gently from the bottom upward. place it on the fire and stir often. three teaspoonfuls of vanilla. as the froth rises. Mix all the ingredients together on a board platter or pan and whip it to a standing froth. stir into the scalding milk and heat until it begins to thicken (it should not boil. 2.BAKED COCOANUT CUSTARD. until it thickens. Mix half a pound of powdered white sugar with the milk of the cocoanut. Beat the yolks of three eggs very light with a cupful of sugar. and what drains through can be beaten over again. Serve in a glass dish with jelly or jam and sliced sponge cake. When cold.

then wet a dish or mold in cold water and set aside to stiffen. Raspberries or currants may be substituted for strawberries. pounded. one and one-half pints of cream. Dissolve half an ounce of gelatine or isinglass in half a teacupful of warm water. CHOCOLATE CREAM. GOLDEN CREAM. and when nearly cold flavor with vanilla or lemon. the yolks of four eggs beaten together with a cupful of sugar. and pour over it the whites beaten to a stiff froth. cook all together until it begins to thicken. bruise them in a basin with a cup of powered sugar. BAVARIAN CREAM. add the beaten yolks and sugar. 1. add six tablespoonfuls of sugar and one tablespoonful of sifted flour. grated chocolate. set it in a cold place. Boil a quart of milk. Serve cold. one and one-half ounces of clarified . STRAWBERRY BAVARIAN CREAM. pour the cream into a mold previously oiled. raspberries. when it is dissolved stir in a pint of boiling hot cream. when boiling stir into it the well-beaten yolks of six eggs. adding a little at a time and beating hard. To this could be added almonds. One quart of sweet cream. when boiled. of powdered sugar. Whip the whites of the eggs for the top. turn it into a dish. or any seasonable fruit. pineapples. peaches. rub this through a sieve and mix with it a pint of whipped cream and one ounce and a half of clarified isinglass or gelatine. Set all in the oven and brown slightly. mixing with them six tablespoonfuls.curdle). Dip the mold in cold water before filling. strawberries. No. remove from the fire and strain through thin muslin or tarlatan. Let it in rough ice and when it has become firm turn out on a dish. which have been well beaten together. one-quarter pound of sugar. Three ounces of grated chocolate. Season with vanilla or lemon. then remove from the fire and add the other pint of cold cream whipped to a stiff froth. Flavor the top with vanilla and the bottom with lemon. Pick off the hulls of a box of strawberries.

if at hand. one ounce isinglass or gelatine. let it warm on the fire for a few moments. 1. stirring them all the time. the sugar and one pint of the cream. Beat the yolks of the eggs well. LUCY WEBB HAYES. stir the mixture one way until it thickens. put a dish on the top of the mold. put them into a basin with the grated chocolate. [Illustration: MRS ULYSSES S. lemon peel and isinglass. . When required for table. Take one quart of milk. which should-be well whipped. one large lemon. MRS ANDREW JOHNSON] CHOCOLATE CREAM OR CUSTARD. turn it over quickly. the yolks of six eggs. _but do not allow it to boil_. 2. Strain the cream through a sieve into a basin. GRANT. and then remove and cool. mix all well together. and let it remain until perfectly set. either in cups or a large dish. loosen the edges with a small blunt knife. take it off the fire and keep stirring it until nearly cold. stir in the isinglass and the other one-half pint of cream. pour them into a basin and set this basin in a saucepan of boiling water. add the yolks of eggs. the yolks of two eggs. Strain the cream into a basin. Put the cream into a _lined_ saucepan with the sugar. 2. or it will curdle. LEMON CREAM. and simmer these over a gentle fire for about ten minutes. Strain the lemon juice into a basin. No.isinglass. and the cream should easily slip away. but _do not allow it to boil_. one quarter of a pound of white sugar. One pint of cream. gradually pour on it the cream. pour the cream into it. Have ready a well-oiled mold. and put the basin into a saucepan of boiling water. then pour the milk over them. flavor and bake as any custard. and _stir it well_ until the juice is well mixed with it. and. which should be well beaten. Make a meringue of the remaining whites. beat the yolks of eight eggs and two whites with eight tablespoonfuls of sugar. stir it one way until the mixture thickens. LEMON CREAM. and pour it into a mold which has been previously oiled with the purest salad oil. stir these ingredients well together. set it in ice until wanted for table. or gelatine. No. No. and when nearly boiling stir in two ounces of grated chocolate.

Strain and simmer over a gentle fire till it thickens. when cool. strain it through a piece of lawn or lace into a porcelain lined stewpan._ Serve very cold. _do not let it boil. now put the half pint of unwhipped cream into a double boiler. No.Pare into one quart of boiling water the peels of four large lemons. and one pint of water. the juice of one large lemon. To be served with sweetened cream. two tablespoonfuls of brandy. Add the peel. _but do not let it boil_. LEMON CREAM. 3. Mix well and turn into molds to harden. cut in pieces and cover the mixture for a few hours. one quart of cream. put the mixture into a pitcher and continue pouring from one pitcher to another. . let it stand for two minutes and add the orange juice and sugar. Four tablespoonfuls of pounded sugar. Whip a pint of cream so long that there will be but one-half the quantity left when skimmed off. set it over a slow fire. or it may be whisked until the desired consistency is obtained. well beaten. until it is quite thick. Soak in half a cupful of cold water a half package of gelatine and then grate over it the rind of two oranges. Strain the juice of six oranges and add to it a cupful of sugar. ORANGE CREAM. serve in custard cups. and. SOLID CREAM. Peel three lemons and squeeze out the juice into one quart of milk. then add six eggs. let it stand for four hours. Remove from the fire. It should be served in jelly glasses. then add the gelatine. then take them out and add to the water the juice of the four lemons and one cupful of fine white sugar. pour into it the well-beaten yolks of six eggs. Strain the lemon juice over the sugar and add the brandy. well sweetened. Fine. Beat the yolks of ten eggs and mix all together. stir it one way until it is as thick as good cream. stirring until it begins to thicken. beat all together until about the consistency of soft custard and add the whipped cream. then take it from the fire. then stir in the cream. the yellow outside only.

No. and bake a light brown. Mash very smooth two cupfuls of canned peaches. No. run them through a sieve and cook for three minutes in a syrup made by boiling together one cupful of sugar and stirring all the time. Beat them all together until the cream is light. stir until it thickens. then add a cupful of sugar and the beaten yolks of three eggs. It should be placed on the ice to cool for two or three hours before serving. A quart of fine peaches. pare and stone the fruit and cut in quarters. Soak three heaping tablespoonfuls of tapioca in a teacupful of water over night.BANANA CREAM. Put the peaches into the mixture. then take it from the fire. Take the yolks and mix with half a cupful of granulated sugar and a pint of milk. Then pour into a mold. Beat the whites of three eggs with a half cupful of powdered sugar until it is stiff enough to cut with a knife. mash them with an iron or wooden spoon. a good pinch of salt. PEACH CREAM. or in an ice chest. place in a pudding-dish and bake until almost firm. Eat ice cold. set away to cool and serve with cream and sugar. mixing all thoroughly again. 2. Beat this whole mixture until it commences to harden. beat until nearly cool and then add the well-frothed whites of six eggs. . allow one-quarter of a pound of sugar. allow equal quantities of bananas and sweet cream. to one quart of the mixture. Place the pan containing the syrup and peaches into another of boiling water and add one-half packet of gelatine prepared the same as in previous recipes. TAPIOCA CREAM CUSTARD. place in a pan of ice-water. Stir it quickly and pour it into a dish and stir gently into the mixture the whites beaten stiff. and stir for five minutes to thoroughly dissolve the gelatine. let it come to a boil. 1. then put in the whites. Place over the fire a quart of milk. the flavoring and set it on ice. After peeling the bananas. PEACH CREAM. then stir in the tapioca.

MOCK ICE. and boil same in a custard kettle. being careful to keep . SNOW CREAM. add quickly the whites of six eggs. rub it through a sieve with as much cream as will fill a quart mold. If the recipe is closely followed. blended with some cold cream. then remove. and it is really worthy the table of an epicure. lay the snow thus formed quickly in rocky heaps on silver or glass dishes. stirring for two or three minutes. set in a cool place and turn out next day. and cover them well with the beaten whites of three eggs. stir into it quickly three tablespoonfuls of cornstarch flour. Iced. Take about three tablespoonfuls of some good preserve. Heat a quart of thick. it will turn out well. put it into a mold. when ready to boil. It can be made the day before it is to be eaten. add to them a pint of milk. put them in a glass dish to congeal. mix it well with the cream. beaten to a stiff froth. boil two ounces of isinglass or gelatine with four small teacupfuls of water till reduced to one-half. set the dish on ice. Stand the dish in the oven until the eggs have become a delicate brown. place them all in a dish that it will not injure to set in the oven and yet be suitable to place on the table. or in shapes. the juice of two large lemons and two glassfuls of white wine. with one bowl mix six ounces of powdered loaf sugar. Sprinkle the peaches with sugar. sweeten and flavor. any family may enjoy it at a trifling expense. when almost cold. Put two pints of cream into two bowls. flavor with lemon. do not allow it to boil up more than once after adding the eggs. and when cool enough. ripe peaches. sweet cream. then stir the mixture luke-warm into the other ingredients. bitter almond or grated lemon peel. Pare and quarter (removing stones) a quart of sound. sweeten to taste and allow it to boil gently. vanilla. PEACH MERINGUE.ITALIAN CREAM. kept cold. dissolve three-quarters of an ounce of isinglass or gelatine in half a pint of water. Take the yolks of the eggs. or in a very cool place. then add the other pint of cream and stir the whole very hard.

STRAWBERRY SPONGE. spread it over the apples. holding it high. One cupful of sweet milk. It is to be eaten cold with cream. put in the apples and let them stew until done through and clear. When the sugar is dissolved in the wine. Whip the whites of the egg. SYLLABUB. then take them out. Serve in a creamer. pour it back and forth until it is frothy. Grate nutmeg over it. It should be of the consistency of real fresh cream. one pound and a half of sugar. then add it to the boiling milk. put the sugar and wine into a bowl and the milk lukewarm in a separate vessel. heat it until boiling. APPLE FLOAT. then pour upon the apples. The syrup will congeal. flavor with lemon and place on the custard. CREAM FOR FRUIT. Or you may change the dish by making a soft custard with the yolks of four eggs. This recipe is an excellent substitute for pure cream. half a cupful of sugar. then take them out and put the sugar in the same water. Put the apples on with water enough to cover them and let them stew until they look as if they would break. pour the milk in. cook it until it thickens. When cool pour into a glass pitcher and serve with the meringue when ready to use. Let the whole mix well and come to a boil. to be eaten on fresh berries and fruit. stir well together until very light and smooth.the eggs from curdling. Set it aside to cool. One dozen apples. a tablespoonful of white sugar and a piece of butter the size of a nutmeg. Now add half a cupful of cold milk and a teaspoonful of cornstarch. let the syrup come to a boil. Color in the oven. it must not boil. slice into the syrup one large lemon and add an ounce of gelatine dissolved in a pint of cold water. When cold. a cupful of wine. Beat together the whites of two eggs. pared and cored. . One quart of rich milk or cream. three tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar and a scant quart of milk.

Serve with powdered sugar and cream. Then with an egg-whisk beat all to a stiff froth and pile with a spoon upon a glass . Remember the sponge hardens very rapidly when it commences to cool. then peel them and push them through a coarse sieve. Boil the remainder of the sugar and the water gently twenty minutes. sweeten to taste. More eggs may be used if liked. QUINCE SNOW. Serve with sugar and cream. Add the gelatine to the boiling syrup and take from the fire immediately. so have your molds all ready. now add the whites of the eggs until it begins to thicken. Rub the strawberries through a sieve. whisk the apple and egg very briskly till quite stiff and it will be as white as snow. beat the yolks of the eggs and mix with the remainder of the water. Add the sugar and lemon to this and cook until it begins to thicken. having used a half cupful of the pint in which to soak the gelatine. then add the strawberries. strain them through a fine wire sieve and break into one pint of strained apples the white of an egg. turn in a mold and set to harden. Place in a pan of ice-water and beat five minutes. Mash the strawberries and add half the sugar to them. Strain this into a basin. the juice of a lemon. Sweeten to the taste and add the whites of three or four eggs. four eggs.One quart of strawberries. Stew some fine-flavored sour apples tender. half a package of gelatine and one pint of water. one cupful of sugar. then add the gelatine. Raspberry and blackberry sponges are made in the same way. Lemon sponge is made from the juice of four lemons. half a package of gelatine. LEMON SPONGE. APPLE SNOW. Add the whites of eggs and beat until the mixture begins to thicken. which place in a pan of water to cool. Soak the gelatine for two hours in half a cupful of the water. Pour in the molds and set away to harden. Beat with a whisk until it has cooled but not hardened. Strain lemon juice on the sugar. eaten with a nice boiled custard it makes a very desirable dessert. the whites of four eggs. a cupful of sugar. one cupful and a half of water. Quarter five fair-looking quinces and boil them till they are tender in water.

one cupful of sherry. it is a delicious dessert. cover it with good cognac and let it stand twenty-four hours. Whites of four eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Take the thin parings from the outside of a dozen oranges and put to steep in a wide-mouthed bottle. LEMON TRIFLE. arrange in a dish and heap with whipped cream flavored with the orange brandy. a little nutmeg.dish and set away in the ice box. Serve very cold. core and quarter some good tart apples of nice flavor. when cooked. dish and cover with one pint of whipped cream flavored with lemon peel. . and stew them with a strip of orange and a strip of quince peel. add sugar to taste. Nice with cake. one pint of cream. Peel. when cold. unless it is to be served immediately. lemon juice and peel lie together two hours before you add wine and nutmeg. The juice of two lemons and grated peel of one. skin and seed the oranges and reduce to a pulp. Strain through double tarlatan and whip gradually into the frothed cream. currant jelly and raspberry jam. GRAPE TRIFLE. enough to keep back the stones. Eaten with sponge cakes. Serve very soon heaped in small glasses. well sweetened and whipped stiff. FRUIT TRIFLE. two tablespoonfuls each of sugar. and sugar in the proportion of half a pound to one pound of fruit. and. ORANGE TRIFLE. Put into a trifle dish and cover with whipped cream. nicely flavored. Pulp through a sieve two pounds of ripe grapes. sufficient water to cover the bottom of the stewpan. press this through a sieve. press the pulp through a sieve. sugar to taste. Let sugar. APPLE TRIFLE. ice two hours before serving.

this trifle should be set on the ice for at least an hour before serving. This dish may be garnished as fancy dictates. GOOSEBERRY TRIFLE. a tablespoonful of butter. Select perfect. peel and core and cut in quarters. fresh peaches.Quinces prepared in the same manner are equally as good. a plateful of whipped cream. FLOATING ISLANDS. beat up the eggs. stir them into a quart of scalded milk and cook it until it thickens. LEMON HONEY. This will keep for some days. When cool pour . One quart of gooseberries. sugar to taste. etc. and. then add this to the sugar and butter. when cold. The cream should be whipped the day before it is wanted for table. they should be _well sugared_. home-made sponge cakes should be served with it. Beat the yolks of five eggs and the whites of two very light. One coffeecupful of white sugar. then heaped with whipped cream as above. cover with whipped cream. while this is melting. the yolks of three eggs and the white of one. the grated rind and juice of one large lemon. sweeten with five tablespoonfuls of sugar and flavor to taste. and add to them the grated rind from the outside of the lemon. arranged in a trifle dish with a few of their own blanched kernels among them. Put into a basin the sugar and butter. as it will then be so much firmer and more solid. Put this pulp at the bottom of a trifle dish. cooking and stirring it until it is thick and clear like honey. pour over it a pint of custard. PEACH TRIFLE. Put the gooseberries into a jar. with sufficient moist sugar to sweeten them. and is nice for flavoring pies. one pint of custard. and boil them until reduced to a pulp. set it in a dish of boiling water over the fire. put into a tight preserve jar. the cream should not be flavored.

1. add a pinch of salt. adding three tablespoonfuls of sugar and a little flavoring. then serve with sugar and cream or custard sauce. flavor. when cold turn it out and serve with strawberry or raspberry jam around it and a little cream. pour it into molds previously wet with cold water. and. when sufficiently cooked. By dropping a teaspoonful of bright jelly on the top or centre of each island. is produced a pleasing effect. stir the sugar into a quart of rich cream and half a pint of Madeira or sherry wine. also by filling wine-glasses and arranging them around a standard adds much to the appearance of the table. when it is well mixed. FLOATING ISLAND. Now whip the whites of the three remaining eggs to a _stiff_ froth. stir all well together. the steam passing through it cooks it. First stir into them a little of the scalded milk to prevent curdling. BLANC MANGE. white sugar. Cook it the proper thickness. In one teacupful of water boil until dissolved one ounce of clarified isinglass.it into a glass dish. far enough apart so that the "little white islands" will not touch each other. set the molds upon ice. when cool. Before it is served beat up the remaining four whites of the eggs to a _stiff_ froth and beat into them three tablespoonfuls of sugar and two tablespoonfuls of currant jelly. sweeten to taste and put into a mold. Dip this over the top of the custard. then add the beaten yolks and one of the whites together with the sugar. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. five eggs and five tablespoonfuls of sugar. Pour this froth over a shallow dish of boiling water. TAPIOCA BLANC MANGE. . then all of the milk. let them stand until their contents are hard and cold. Half a pound of tapioca soaked an hour in one pint of milk and boiled till tender. Scald the milk. No. while boiling. take a tablespoon and drop spoonfuls of this over the top of the custard. or of patent gelatine (which is better). stir it continually. Then squeeze the juice of a lemon upon a cupful of fine. add the dissolved isinglass or gelatine. then pour it into a glass dish and let it become very cold. One quart of milk. remove from the fire.

let it stand on ice._--One pint of milk boiled with a little salt in it. place it over the fire in a double kettle until it boils. fresh fruit (cherries. peaches in halves. or vanilla. strain off the juice and sweeten to taste. let it boil five minutes. turn it out carefully upon dishes and serve. when the milk is hot. and add the remainder. rubbed smooth in a little milk. Boil two cupfuls of milk. _A Custard for the above. Dissolve two ounces of patent gelatine in cold water. or peach water. or in any cool place until it becomes hard and cold. or canned ones will do. place it over the fire and boil it. or sugar and cream. Should be served cold with custard made of the yolks. take from the stove and add the whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth. season it to your taste with lemon. then strain it through a cloth. while . half fill your mold. FRUIT BLANC MANGE. beat the yolks of three eggs with half a cupful of sugar and add to the boiling milk. when it is dissolved stir it into two quarts of rich milk. flavor with lemon. but do not let it boil until the eggs are put in. pour in the cold milk with the cornstarch and sugar thoroughly mixed in it and stir altogether until there are no lumps and it is thick.BLANC MANGE. boil all together eight or ten minutes. with a teacupful of fine white sugar. cover with cherries. and when nearly cold beat into this the whipped whites of three eggs. or. raspberries and strawberries being the best). strawberries or sliced bananas. in the other pint mix four heaping tablespoonfuls of cornstarch and half a cupful of sugar. Set the molds in a cold place. flavor to taste. CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE. flavored with vanilla. half a cupful of grated chocolate. Stew nice. stir well. pour it into molds previously wet with cold water and salt. 2. Take one quart of sweet milk and put one pint upon the stove to heat. then add the gelatine and chocolate and one cupful of sugar. stirring it continually. No. Half a box of gelatine soaked in a cupful of water for an hour. Remove from the fire. when this has set. CORNSTARCH BLANC MANGE.

Cook over hot water till it is a thick custard. dip the mold for a moment in hot water.) Whip one quart of rich cream to a stiff froth and drain well on a nice sieve. To one scant pint of milk add six eggs beaten very light. then pour into molds wet in cold water and set away to cool. . in summer. When the custard is very cold beat in lightly the gelatine and the whipped cream. To turn out. STRAWBERRY CHARLOTTE. (Fine. When the custard is cold pour over the whole. put in a cold place. one of orange juice and pulp and the juice of one lemon. Make a boiled custard of one quart of milk. beaten to a stiff froth. Line a glass fruit-dish with slices of sponge cake dipped in sweet cream. the side with sponge cake or lady-fingers fastened together with the white of an egg. Decorate the top with the largest berries saved out at the commencement. Now beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth. on ice. soak half a box of gelatine in half a cupful of water for two hours. then a layer of cake and strawberries as before. or about five minutes. Served with cream and sugar. Then add two cupfuls of sugar. or. Stir until the mixture begins to cool. stir in cornstarch wet with a little cold water. the yolks of six eggs and three-quarters of a cupful of sugar. flavor high with vanilla. allowing two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch to each pint of juice. add a tablespoonful of sugar to each egg and put over the top. For two molds of medium size. CHARLOTTE RUSSE. Add one and a half cupfuls of boiling water and strain. flavor to taste. lay upon this ripe strawberries sweetened to taste. then add the whites of six eggs. Beat the whole until so stiff that it will only just pour into molds lined with sections of orange. continue stirring until sufficiently cooked. ORANGE CHARLOTTE. In draining the whipped cream.boiling. make very sweet. Raspberry charlotte may be made the same way. Set away to cool. Soak one full ounce of Cox's gelatine in a very little water and warm over hot water. Fill with the cream. all that drips through can be re-whipped. Line the bottom of your mold with buttered paper.

whip it to a froth and when the bowl is full. Have the cream ice cold when you begin to whip it. add the whipped cream. Cut stale sponge cake into slices about half an inch thick and line three molds with them. PLAIN CHARLOTTE RUSSE. stir into it two-thirds of a cup of powdered sugar. stir from the bottom of the pan until it begins to grow stiff. two coffeecupfuls of rich cream. loosen lightly at the sides and turn out on a flat dish. then strain. skim the froth into the pan which is standing on the ice and repeat this until the cream is all froth. Parloa's. Boil the milk and pour gradually over the gelatine until dissolved. a spoonful at a time. set on ice. which has been soaked in cold water enough to cover it for one hour and then put in boiling water enough to dissolve it (about half a cup). then with a spoon draw the froth to one side and you will find that some of the cream has gone back to milk. when the cream is all whipped. Whip the cream stiff in a large bowl or dish. flavor with extract of vanilla. Take a deep tin pan and fill about one-third full of either snow or pounded ice and into this set another pan that will hold at least four quarts. Wet a saucepan with cold water to prevent the milk that will be scalded in it from . set the molds where they will not be disturbed until the filling is ready. and it is a good plan to put a lump of ice into the cream while whipping it. when nearly cold. _Maria Parloa. 1. Then make a custard of the yolks after this recipe. but is not as explicit in detail. pour in cream and set in a cool place to harden. or until they are sent to the table. This is about the same recipe as M. turn this into the bowl again and whip as before. fill the molds and set them on ice in the pan for one hour. Make a rule of white sponge cake. Line a dish with lady-fingers or sponge cake. bake in narrow shallow pans. Into a deep bowl or pail (a whip churn is better) put one and a half pints of cream (if the cream is very thick take one pint of cream and a half pint of milk).CHARLOTTE RUSSE. No. leaving a space of half an inch between each slice. Two tablespoonfuls of gelatine soaked in a little cold milk two hours. one teacupful of milk. one teaspoonful of vanilla and half of a box of gelatine._ ANOTHER CHARLOTTE RUSSE. When ready to dish them. Sweeten with powdered sugar.

flavor with lemon or vanilla. Now. Make a quart of nicely flavored mock custard. put it into a large glass fruit dish. Pour out the water and put in a quart of milk. stir it a little. take a pint and a half of milk. PLAIN CHARLOTTE RUSSE. If you wish a meringue on the top. flavor it a little. No. 2. bake it in round deep patty-pans. Replace the inside with a custard made of the yolks of four eggs beaten with a pint of boiling milk. beat it well and pour over the cake. Beat up the yolks of six eggs and add three ounces of sugar and a saltspoonful of salt.burning. NAPLE BISCUITS. beat up the whites of four eggs with four tablespoonfuls of sugar. pour in wine enough to soak it. boil and partly cool. sweetened and flavored. lay on the top of this some jelly or jam. pour over the custard. one moderately . do not allow it to boil. Stir and pour the custard into a porcelain or double saucepan and stir while on the range until of the consistency of cream. strain. Or. then beat the whites of two or more eggs stiff. ECONOMICAL CHARLOTTE RUSSE. when cold cut out the inside about one-quarter of an inch from the edge and bottom. beat up the whites of three eggs until very light. spread over the top and brown slightly in the oven. spread over the top. place this on the jelly. Set it in a cold place until served. mix thoroughly and add the lukewarm milk. sweetened with white sugar. Put some thin slices of sponge cake in the bottom of a glass sauce dish. a glass of sweet wine and one pint of thick sweet cream. set in a refrigerator to become cold. having arranged your cake (cut into inch slices) around the sides and on the bottom of a glass dish. as that would curdle it. set it on the stove to boil. OR CHARLOTTE RUSSE. and when almost cold add two teaspoonfuls of vanilla. beat the whites of three eggs with three heaping tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar until it will stand in a heap. Make a double rule of sponge cake. Set them aside in a cold place until time to serve. add to it three tablespoonfuls of finely powdered sugar. to be still more economical: To make the cream. leaving the shell. which is partly filled with stale cake (of any kind) cut up into small pieces about an inch square. mix together in a bowl the following named articles: large half cup of sugar.

stir in the gelatine and when it is thoroughly dissolved. Pour into the boiling milk. turn into the mold and set in a cold place to stiffen. To be dished with a spoon. TIPSY CHARLOTTE. In the meantime. Have ready a pint of good boiled custard. first placing pieces of sponge cake all around the mold. about two heaping teaspoonfuls. a small half cup of milk and a pinch of salt. If you do not have plenty of eggs you can use all cornstarch. take from the fire. remove to top of the stove and let simmer a minute or two. One cupful of sweet almonds. When cool enough. This is equally as good as any charlotte.heaped teaspoonful of cornstarch. blanch. half a box of gelatine soaked two hours in half a cupful of cold water. so as to make it stand even in a glass fruit dish. but be careful and not get the cream too thick. When the cream is cold pour over the cake just before setting it on the table. ORANGE CHARLOTTE. one-third of a cupful of cold water. when the gelatine is sufficiently soaked. let it stand and soak into the cake. then add the sugar. let it come to a boil on the fire. The cream should be flavored either with vanilla or lemon extract. the juice of one lemon and one cupful of orange juice and pulp. put three tablespoonfuls of sugar into a saucepan over the fire and stir until it becomes liquid and . and have it free from lumps. well flavored. Take a stale sponge cake. beat into it the four beaten whites of eggs. Pour the boiling water over the lemon and orange juice. Nutmeg might answer. a little grated orange peel and the whites of four eggs. One-third of a box of gelatine. make a few deep gashes through it with a sharp knife. Soak the gelatine in the cold water one hour. one-third of a cupful of boiling water and one cup of sugar. cut the bottom and sides of it. peel and slice lengthwise half a pound of sweet almonds. cover it and let stand half an hour. and pour over the whole. BURNT ALMOND CHARLOTTE. Serve in saucers. blanched and chopped fine. stick them all over the top of the cake. two tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate one egg. pour over it a pint of good wine.

looks dark. After they become cool enough break them up in a mortar. Heat a quart of milk until it boils. or prepared in any other way you prefer. add also the gelatine. Stir over the fire until the sugar is thoroughly dissolved. COUNTRY PLUM CHARLOTTE. Cut slices of bread and butter and lay them in the bottom and around the sides of a large bowl or deep dish. and half a teacupful of water. grated lemon peel and the juice of one lemon and five ounces of sugar. and place on ice until wanted. CHARLOTTE RUSSE. place it upon ice. and stir it well. mix it well and pour it into a mold lined with sponge cake. turn it out on a platter and set aside to get cool. add to it half a pint of light sherry. send it to the table and eat it with cream. put the slices into a stewpan with half a pound of fine white sugar. or of patent gelatine (which is better). first stew and then sweeten them. cover the bowl and set it away to cool gradually. then add the chopped almonds to it and stir two minutes more. when it is upon the point of setting. Now beat together the yolks of two eggs with a cupful of sugar. and turn the whole carefully into molds. and add to the cooking mixture. pour the mixture on top. stir until smooth and well dissolved. WITH PINEAPPLE. set away on the ice to become firm. take from the fire and set in a basin of ice-water and beat it until it begins to thicken. Before it sets beat into it a pint of cream. CORNSTARCH MERINGUE. half an ounce of isinglass. Half fill the small molds with fine strawberries. add four heaping teaspoonfuls of . Sponge cake can be placed around the mold or not. WITH STRAWBERRIES. Peel and cut a pineapple in slices. then add to that two quarts of whipped cream. Stone a quart of ripe plums. then rub it through a sieve. add a pint of cream well whipped. When quite cool. Then strain and cool. and cook again for ten minutes. put them in a cup and a half of milk. stew it until it is quite tender. Pour in the plums boiling hot. pour into molds and keep on ice until wanted. VELVET CREAM. Dissolve half an ounce of gelatine in a gill of water. as desired.

Remove from the fire. Puffs for dessert are delicate and nice. Stir constantly while boiling for fifteen minutes. without removing the same farther than the edge of the oven. A delicious dessert. sift pulverized sugar over them and eat with sauce flavored with lemon. which may be found under the head of PASTRY. whipped stiff with a half cupful of jelly. the whites of four eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Use currant jelly if vanilla is used in the custard. and spread evenly over the custard. PIES AND TARTS. Beat with egg-beater or fork till it is stiff enough to put on without running off and flavor with vanilla. In summer time. bake in gem-pans. after which take off the lid and brown the meringue a very little. Make two cakes as for Washington pie." Make a meringue of the whites of five eggs. . beaten together with three-fourths of a cupful of sugar. one scant cupful of powdered sugar. CREAM PIE. and gradually add while hot the yolks of five eggs. then serve it with a dish of fresh strawberries or raspberries. vanilla or bitter almond. Sift powdered sugar thickly over the top. To be eaten cold. Cover and bake for five minutes. beat these all together till very light. take one pint of milk and cream each. wrap around it a paper and place it in the ice box so to have it get _very cold_. one heaping cupful of sifted flour. and flavored with lemon. crab apple for bitter almond and strawberry for lemon. WASHINGTON PIE. add a little grated lemon peel and a little salt. then take one cup of sweet cream and three tablespoonfuls of white sugar. Bake this mixture for fifteen minutes in a well-buttered pudding-dish or until it begins to "set. it is a good plan to bake the pie the day before wanted. If you beat it after it is stiff it will come to butter. then when cool. DESSERT PUFFS.cornstarch which has previously been dissolved in a little cold milk. Put between the cakes and on top. This recipe is the same as "Boston Cream Pie" (adding half an ounce of butter).

Cut sandwich bread into slices one-quarter of an inch thick. Serve them after the cheese. or some fine pickles may take their place. Stir them till well mixed. cut nice ripe peaches in thin slices. peach and other fruit short-cakes. and are used by some in place of olives. Put with them a tablespoonful of melted butter and one of salt. SALTED OR ROASTED ALMONDS.PEACH CAKE FOR DESSERT. sweetening and adding flavor of vanilla. stirring often. ROAST CHESTNUTS. when obtainable. They must be bright yellow-brown when done. Peel the raw chestnuts and scald them to remove the inner skin. then spread them over a baking-pan and bake fifteen minutes. They all make a very delicious dessert when served with a pitcher of fresh sweet cream. Bake three sheets of sponge cake. if desired. as for jelly cake. pour cream over each layer and over the top. Blanch half a pound of almonds. look under the head of BISCUITS. Peanuts may be blanched and roasted the same. These crispy _croutons_ answer as a substitute for hard-water crackers and are also relished by most people. put them in a frying pan with a little butter and toss them about a few moments. however. ROLLS AND MUFFINS. or till crisp. AFTER-DINNER CROUTONS. cut each slice into four small triangles. For the recipes of strawberry. add a sprinkle of salt and a suspicion of cayenne. To be eaten soon after it is prepared. dry them in the oven slowly until . put layers of peaches between the sheets of cake. They are a fashionable appetizer and should be placed in ornamental dishes at the beginning of dinner. or chop them. which. should also be on the table. FRUIT SHORT-CAKES. prepare cream by whipping.

beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and add to the mixture. four eggs. A nice dessert. This dessert can be made very conveniently without much preparation. When boiling hot. a pinch of salt. hot. two tablespoonfuls of sugar. the juice and pulp of two lemons. One tablespoonful of butter. Let it boil fifteen minutes. 2. to which may be added a very little minced parsley. two of sugar. take baker's bread. one coffeecupful of sugar. No. Take the whites of the six eggs and beat them to a froth. one cupful of milk. beat them well and add three cupfuls of sweet milk. Four eggs. sweetened and flavored with vanilla. No. stirring all the time. SWEET OMELET. add the juice of two lemons. not too stale. 1. Let the milk come to a boil. take one quart of water. To make orange float. and cut into slices. ORANGE FLOAT. SWEET OMELET. Take the yolks of six eggs. adding a large cupful of white sugar. LEMON TOAST. add to the cooked mixture and set away to cool. heating well and adding two cupfuls of boiling water. to fry a delicate brown. A nice way to serve them is to spread a paste of part butter and part rich creamy cheese. beat the sugar and the yolks of the eggs together. pour it over four or five oranges that have been sliced into a glass dish and over the top spread the beaten whites of three eggs. Serve _immediately_ with creamy sauce. dip them into the milk and eggs and lay the slices into a spider. When cool. with sufficient melted butter. Bake in a buttered pudding-dish for twenty minutes in a moderate oven. half a . Serve over the toast as a sauce and you will find it a very delicious dish. Beat the flour and butter together. then serve either hot or cold.they assume a delicate brownish tint. add to them gradually the boiling milk and cook eight minutes. stirring often. add four tablespoonfuls of cornstarch. When cold.

Put in the centre of a dish a pineapple properly pared. and tuck the point in next to the orange. When oranges are served whole. arrange these zigzag-fence fashion around the border of the dish. leave on their stalks. the whipped cream. When complete. cover a pan with a sheet of fine paper. one cupful of whipped cream. one by one and dip them into a cup of finely powdered sugar. In the V-shaped spaces around the dish put tiny mounds of grapes of mixed colors. they should be peeled and prettily arranged in a fruit dish. lastly. ORANGE COCOANUT SALAD. peel and cut into slices lengthwise. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and gradually beat the flavoring and sugar into them. Break the skin from the stem into six or eight even parts. Put alternate layers of each until the dish is full. Served with small cakes. yet retaining as near as practicable its original shape. quarter and remove the seeds from four sweet oranges. arrange them in a border around the pineapple. Select four fine bananas. Serve the moment it is taken from the oven. Then pour over them sweetened wine. select them out. SALAD OF MIXED FRUITS. A small knife is best for this purpose. When well beaten add the yolks and. For this purpose. drain them and beat the part that drips off again. and all the white inner skin removed that is possible. place the fruit inside of it. when the icing on the fruit becomes firm. or in quarters if oranges. oranges or lemons should be carefully pared. the dish should look very appetizing. to prevent bitterness. Pick out the finest of any kind of fruit.teaspoonful of vanilla extract. Peel and slice a dozen oranges. cored and sliced. Have a dish holding about one quart slightly buttered. CRYSTALLIZED FRUIT. peel each section down half way. For cherries. pour over the fruit and serve. and put it in an oven that is cooling. Peel. grate a cocoanut and slice a pineapple. beat the whites of three eggs to a stiff froth. then cut either in thin horizontal slices if lemons. Pour the mixture into this and bake just twelve minutes. To half a pint of clear sugar syrup add half an ounce of good brandy. . lay the fruit in the beaten egg with the stalks upward. pile them on a dish and set them in a cool place.

cover the saucepan closely. turn the other. put in the batter by the large spoonful. making it boiling hot. adding to the syrup a pinch of mace and a dozen whole cloves just ten minutes before taking from the fire. then take them out. leaving stems out. core and slice them. add a saltspoonful of salt. put into a saucepan with just enough water to cover them. not fresh fruit. pour scalding hot over the apples and set them in a cold place. STEWED APPLES. and boil it half an hour. A very nice dessert.. take them on to a dish with a d'oyley over it. not too close. Pass the powdered sugar and cream with them. a pint of milk and a pint bowl of wheat flour or more. when done. Take a dozen green tart apples. put them into a deep dish and cover them. Fill half full of cream as many saucers as you have guests. dropping in the centre of each saucer a tablespoonful of the beaten eggs and jelly in the shape of a pyramid. put a dessertspoonful of firm jelly or jam on each and serve. choose the largest and finest. Pineapples should be cut in thin slices and these again divided into quarters. when one side is a delicate brown. 1. Make a batter of three eggs. and stew the apples until they are tender and clear. Beat to a stiff foam the whites of half a dozen eggs. add to the juice in the saucepan a cupful of loaf sugar for every twelve apples. or look nicely when pared. SNOW PYRAMID.strawberries. No. currants. Peaches should be pared and cut in halves and sweet juicy pears may be treated in the same way. beat it light. Do not sugar them in the dish--they then become preserves. leaving on the stems and iced. Pare and slice the peaches just before sending to table. add a small teacupful of currant jelly and whip all together again. Cover the glass dish containing them to exclude the air as much as possible. eat ice . PEACHES AND CREAM. etc. put a tablespoonful of lard or beef fat in a frying or omelet pan. as they soon change color. JELLY FRITTERS.

add a little water and let them bake until perfectly tender. strain it and allow it to cool enough to set it. BAKED PEARS. Then take out the fruit carefully and arrange it on a dish for serving. Boil down the syrup until quite thick. Put them into a saucepan. with the stems uppermost. Pare and core the pears without dividing. Cover the stewpan closely. pare and quarter them. Stewed pears with a thick syrup make a fine dessert dish accompanied with cake. then pour it over the fruit. The juice could be colored by a few drops of liquid cochineal. STEWED PEARS. to stew gently till the fruit is done. a cup of sugar.cold with cream or boiled custard. a few whole cloves and some sticks of cinnamon. Serve with cream or boiled custard. place them in a pan and fill up the orifice with brown sugar. pour it over the apples and eat cold. placing them close together. pare neatly and cut in halves. 2. place in a shallow stewpan with sufficient boiling water to cover them and a cup of sugar to every six apples. No. A teaspoonful of brandy adds much to the flavor. BAKED QUINCES. Select firm round greenings. Apples cooked in the following way look very pretty on a tea-table and are appreciated by the palate. Peel and cut them in halves. Nice with sweet cream or boiled custard. STEWED APPLES. A few pieces of lemon boiled in the syrup add to the flavor. or a few slices of beets. remove to a glass dish carefully. cut out the seeds. boil the syrup a half hour longer. while boiling. Each half should cook on the bottom of the pan and be removed from the others so as not to injure its shape. Stew slowly until the pieces are very tender. which will depend on the quality of the fruit. a tablespoonful of lemon juice. Pour over sufficient water. leaving the stems on and scoop out the cores. then stew . Take ripe quinces.

To vary their appearance. Cut some strips of paper about two inches wide. Fill a large glass fruit dish and spread on the top the beaten whites mixed with three tablespoonfuls of sugar. In dropping it from the spoon. when soft. The sweeter the meringues are made the crisper will they . taking care to let all the meringues be the same size. if the meringues are not put into the oven as soon as the sugar and eggs are mixed. rub them through a colander to remove the skins and seeds. return the syrup to the saucepan and boil twenty minutes. while hot stir into them a tablespoonful of melted butter and a cupful of sugar. remove them from the oven. take each slip of paper by the two ends and turn it gently on the table and with a small spoon take out the soft part of each meringue. cover closely and bake in the oven one hour. as. put into a baking dish with half a cupful of loaf sugar to every eight quinces. the whites of six eggs. Spread some clean paper on the board. Stew a quart of ripe gooseberries in just enough water to cover them. the former melts and the mixture would run on the paper instead of keeping its egg-shape. finely chopped almonds or currants may be strewn over them before the sugar is sprinkled over. flavored with liquor or vanilla and sweeten with pounded sugar. When required for table. and they may be garnished with any bright-colored preserve. GOOSEBERRY FOOL. pour over them the liquor in which they were boiled. As soon as they begin to color.them in clear water until a straw will pierce them. Great expedition is necessary in making this sweet dish. then pour over the quinces and set them away to cool. turn the meringues upside down and put them into the oven to harden and brown on the other side. and have some boards put in the oven thick enough to prevent the bottom of the meringues from acquiring too much color. Strew over them some sifted sugar and bake in a moderate oven for half an hour. Apples or any tart fruit is nice made in this manner. whip all together until light. give the mixture the form of an egg and keep the meringues about two inches apart from each other on the paper. MERINGUES OR KISSES. A coffeecupful of fine white sugar. Join two of the meringues together and pile them high in the dish. then take out the quinces and put them into a covered dish. fill them with whipped cream. whisk the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and with a wooden spoon stir in _quickly_ the pounded sugar. Beat the yolks of three eggs and add that. place this paper on the board and drop a tablespoonful at a time of the mixture on the paper.

to make more. cementing them with some of the mixture. and put it back with the mixture. then take one off carefully. Half a pound of sweet almonds. Put three ounces of plain chocolate in a pan and melt on a slow fire. they will most likely be tough. CHOCOLATE MACAROONS. COCOANUT MACAROONS. take out the soft inside with the handle of a spoon. then roll the mixture in your hands in balls about the size of a nutmeg. add to it the white meat. Serve on a high glass dish. Take another and prepare it likewise. join two together. They are sometimes colored with cochineal. blanch the almonds and pound them to a paste. grated. then work it to a thick paste with one pound of powdered sugar and the . and finish as directed for KISSES. Make kisses. with other suitable confectionery. Kisses. then unite white and pink. Make a "kiss" mixture. placed upon stiff letter paper lining the bottom of a thick baking pan. will remain good for a month or six weeks. add to them the sugar and the beaten whites of eggs. a coffeecupful of white sugar. to be served for dessert at a large dinner. the whites of two eggs. and such like. then lay the shell down. It adds much to their beauty when served up to tint half of them pale pink. but if there is not sufficient sugar mixed with them. fill the shells with currant jelly or jam. so continue until you have enough. dust sugar over the top. and if kept well-covered in a dry place. Bake in a cool oven a light brown. JELLY KISSES. cocoanut drops. This recipe will make a fair-sized cake basket full.be. put them in a moderate oven until the outside is a little hardened. work the whole together with the back of a spoon. heap them in the shape of half an egg. may be varied in this way: Having made the kisses. the day before they are wanted. lay them on a sheet of paper at least an inch apart. ALMOND MACAROONS.

WINE JELLY. add to this three cupfuls of sugar. then add one pint of boiling water. one cupful of cold water soaked together two hours. the juice of three lemons and the grated rind of one. LEMON JELLY. place in it the pieces of paste or mixture. LEMON JELLY. the rind and juice of two lemons. there should be nearly a quart.whites of three eggs. place them in four quarts of water. then another of berries. after they have set. replace the jelly into the preserving-kettle. and bake in a hot but not too quick oven. Nice poured over sliced bananas and oranges. let it all come to a boil. . which pour into the kettle and boil five minutes. when the sugar has dissolved. another layer of jelly. beat two eggs with their shells in one gill of water. One package of gelatine. No. harden it a little. roll the mixture down to the thickness of about one-quarter of an inch. pour in jelly to set them. Now pour over this a quart of boiling water and stir until dissolved. 2. put in a layer of strawberries or raspberries. either plain or scalloped. or any fresh fruit in season. let it stand one hour. alternating with jelly and berries. and dust it with flour and sugar in equal quantities. set away to get cold. Wash and prepare four calf's feet. At the expiration of this time take them out and pour the liquid into a vessel to cool. three cups of sugar. then add a pint of sherry wine. 1. cut it in small. the juice of four lemons and the rind of one. One good way to mold this jelly is to pour some of it into the mold. or until perfectly clear. round pieces with a paste-cutter. and so fill each mold. strain through a napkin into molds. turn into molds dipped in cold water and place in the ice box for several hours. When cold. butter a pan slightly. a pinch of cinnamon. and add one pound of loaf sugar. No. then add one gill of Madeira wine and strain through a flannel bag into any form you like. remove every particle of fat. and let them simmer gently five hours. To a package of gelatine add a pint of cold water. Strain through a napkin.

pour into the molds the mixture of eggs. two lemons. squeeze the orange juice into a bowl. . add a pint of boiling water. stir the new mixture into a pint and a third of boiling milk. by substituting clear. Orange jelly is a great delicacy and not expensive. in equal parts. Cover the bowls to keep out the dust and set them away for two hours. and flavor with a teaspoonful of vanilla extract. sugar and gelatine. strain through a napkin into molds or bowls wet with cold water. after adding this mixture to the third portion of gelatine. half a pint of wine. Beat together the yolks of four eggs and half a cupful of sugar. At serving time. Set the molds in an ice chest for three or four hours. To make a large dish. stirring constantly. and. a cupful of sugar. then stir in the orange juice. This can be made the same. strain the liquid through a napkin. then strain through a fine sieve. after stirring till the gelatine is dissolved. Put about two cupfuls of sugar with the gelatine. the wine jelly which was made with the clear gelatine. When it has become set. Treat one of the other portions of the gelatine in the same way. ORANGE JELLY. When the gelatine is entirely dissolved. and set it away to harden. dip them into tepid water to loosen the contents. which should be in a liquid state. which should have been set away in a place not cold enough to make it harden. and pour over all three pints of boiling water. VARIEGATED JELLY. put each half into a bowl with half a cupful of cold water. sweet cider in place of the wine. In three or four hours it will be ready for use and will last several days. After dividing a box of Cox's gelatine into halves. Put three-quarters of an ounce or six sheets of pink gelatine into a third bowl containing three-fourths of a cupful of cold water. After it has been transferred and has become hard. contained in a double boiler. pour in the pink gelatine. also the lemon juice. and gently turn the jelly out upon flat dishes. each holding about three pints. and set aside to harden. Stir on the fire for three minutes. and grate one of the lemon skins in with it. Place in a deep pan two molds. and the juice of lemon to the pink gelatine. Put the gelatine to soak in a pint of water. At the end of that time. get six oranges. a two-ounce package of gelatine. and surround them with ice and water.CIDER JELLY. and. Pour into these molds.

Strain the strawberry juice and water through a napkin. Pick the strawberries. RECIPE FOR CHEESE CUSTARD. flavor and freeze. . Mix the milk and cream. or it will make the jelly muddy. For three persons. so long as the relative proportions of the different ingredients are observed. The quantity. of course. Scald but do not boil. a little milk or cream to mix. the whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth. two ounces of grated parmesan cheese. put the jelly into a mold and set the mold on ice. to every pint of juice allow half a package of Cox's gelatine. measure it and to every pint allow half a package of Cox's gelatine dissolved in a teacupful of water. and let them remain for one hour that the juice may be extracted. but it must be well strained before it is put with the other ingredients. six ounces of sugar and one tablespoonful of cornstarch. salt and cayenne. One teaspoonful of vanilla or lemon is generally sufficient. bake for a quarter of an hour. the yolks of two eggs. pounded sugar. if the fruit is very ripe. can be increased to any amount desired. whip it. add sufficient pounded sugar to sweeten them nicely. Mix this with the juice. then add half a pint of water to every pint of juice. Delicious and beautiful. squeeze them well with a wooden spoon. then the pink jelly and finally the egg jelly. STRAWBERRY JELLY. One pint of milk. Strawberries. Then put the whites of the two eggs into a pint of cream. ICE CREAM AND ICES ICE-CREAM. put them into a pan. a little pepper. A little lemon juice added to the strawberry juice improves the flavor of the jelly.The clear jelly may be made first and poured into molds.

. with the back of the spoon. currant. For family use. FRUIT ICE-CREAM. mixed with _cold_ cream. Stir it about with a wooden spoon. one pound of sugar. _Ingredients. Raspberry. breaking it until it is well mashed. whip the cream for a few minutes. beat again and freeze. the milk should never be heated. (Very fine. no flavoring is required but vanilla. and all fruit ice-creams are made in the same manner._--To every pint of fruit juice allow one pint of cream. A little powdered sugar sprinkled over the fruit before it is mashed assists to extract the juice. Put the mixture into the freezer and freeze. a little jam may be substituted for it. In making berry flavoring for ice-cream. then mix it thoroughly to a quart of thick sweet cream. those with crank and revolving dashers effect freezing in eight to fifteen minutes. Genuine ice-cream is made of the pure sweet cream in this proportion: Two quarts of cream. when fresh fruit is not obtainable. the juice put in just before freezing. and if the color should not be good. pick it off the stalks and put it into a large earthen pan. the juice of the berries added to _cold_ cream. All conditions being perfect. then. 1. In winter. sugar to taste. Sweeten it nicely with pounded sugar. a little prepared cochineal may be put in to improve its appearance. rub it through a hair-sieve. CHOCOLATE ICE-CREAM. select one of the new patent freezers. add it to the fruit. as being more rapid and less laborious for small quantities than the old style turned entirely by hand.) Add four ounces of grated chocolate to a cupful of sweet milk. or fresh rich milk. No. strawberry. flavor and freeze. Let the fruit be well ripened.PURE ICE-CREAM. and whisk the whole again for another five minutes. beat up. or when partly frozen. it should be melted and worked through a sieve before being added to the whipped cream. Sweeten with a cupful of sugar.

Mix well and freeze again. add pounded almonds. return to the fire and heat until it thickens. pineapple and other fruits made the same. stirring briskly. When half frozen. Beat two eggs very light and cream them with two cupfuls of sugar. Scald a pint of milk and turn on by degrees. freeze. three eggs. then add to the juice a full cupful of sugar and when dissolved. then mash and strain them through a coarse towel. Have the freezer half full of custard and fill up with the fruit. 2. Stir until the mixture begins to thicken. Beat together the eggs and grated lemon rind and put with the milk in the double boiler. one cupful and a half of sugar and one of prepared cocoanut. Mix a cupful of sugar with a quart of ripe strawberries. When cool add the sugar. One quart of cream. Raspberries. take it off the fire and stir in very gradually six eggs which have been beaten until thick. freeze it as ice-cream. STRAWBERRY ICE-CREAM. Almost any kind of fruits that are preferred may be substituted for the . the rind and juice of a lemon. Freeze. one pint of milk. lemon juice and cream. chopped citron and brandy. No. FRUIT CREAM. Stir in this half a cupful of grated chocolate. put it over the fire in a farina-kettle. flavor with wine and vanilla. Sweeten one quart of cream or rich milk with half a pound of sugar and flavor to taste. When thoroughly cold. COCOANUT ICE-CREAM. Add the cocoanut and put away to cool. stir into it a tablespoonful of cornstarch or rice flour which has been previously mixed smooth with a little milk. boiled custard. pour it into a freezer. Make a rich. when quite cold. let them stand half a day.CHOCOLATE ICE-CREAM. after it has boiled a few minutes. mixing well with the sugar and eggs. beat in a quart of fresh thick cream. take off and set aside to cool. as soon as it begins to boil. CUSTARD ICE-CREAM. peaches or chopped raisins.

Take two quarts of the richest cream and add to it one pound of pulverized sugar and four whole eggs. Do this thoroughly. and beat again very hard.--_rock salt_. If you desire to _mold_ this ice sprinkle it with a little carmine. gages. cherries. Pour into a bowl to cool. until the custard is a smooth. and just bring to boiling point. so that it will be streaky or in veins like marble. Boil about fifteen minutes or until it is as thick as a boiled custard. _Common Sense in the Household. stirring constantly. ICE-CREAM WITHOUT A FREEZER. beating all the while. all of these fruits are to be cut up into small pieces and mixed well with frozen cream. flavor with a tablespoonful of extract of vanilla. place in freezer and. Put it into a pail having a close-fitting cover and pack in pounded ice and salt. Then carefully uncover and scrape from the bottom and sides of the pail the thick coating of frozen custard. Beat the yolks of eight eggs very light. with two drops of spirits of ammonia.._ . When quite cold. beat into it three pints of rich sweet cream and five teaspoonfuls of vanilla. little by little. apricots.--about three-fourths ice and one-forth salt. stirring steadily meanwhile. and cover the whole with a thick mat. in equal parts of peaches. mix thoroughly into it one pound of preserved fruits. mix well together. then put on the cover and put the ice and salt over it. when half frozen. and leave it for five or six hours. Put on the cover. one quart of rich milk that has been heated almost to boiling. not the common kind. for five minutes steady. beat the custard as you would batter. and add thereto four cupfuls of sugar. half-congealed paste. making every particle clear. then put in the whites of eight eggs beaten to a stiff froth. blanket or carpet and let it stand for an hour. mix in this color. TUTTI FRUTTI ICE-CREAM. pineapples. etc. or such other flavoring as you prefer. and stir well. salt and blanket. ice. place on the fire. replenishing the ice and salt if necessary. Add to this. before putting the ice on top of the cover. When packed. now remove immediately and continue to stir until nearly cold. Then boil the mixture in a pail set inside another containing hot water. dissolved in a teaspoonful of water.above.

add a pint of water and two cupfuls of sugar. FROZEN FRUITS. then squeeze and strain through a towel. the fruit should be mashed to a smooth pulp. break the peaches rather fine and stir all the ingredients together. one pint and a half of water. one pint of water and the whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth. The juice of six lemons and the grated rind of three. RASPBERRY SHERBET. you must be especially careful to prevent its getting lumpy. then proceed as for ice-cream. the juice of a large lemon. Other flavors may be made in this manner. Stir until dissolved. one cupful of sugar. two coffeecupfuls of sugar. one tablespoonful of gelatine. freeze the whole into form. and adding a small amount of rich cream. PINEAPPLE SHERBET. Frozen fruit of any kind can be made the same way. Mash the berries and sugar together and let them stand two hours. Soak the . Two quarts of raspberries. juice and rind. The above recipe. care should be taken to prevent its getting lumpy.FROZEN PEACHES. letting it stand longer. LEMON ICE. When fruit jellies are used. add the juice of two lemons and the beaten whites of four eggs. gently heat the water sufficiently to melt them. raspberries or whatever fruit you may use. make fine frozen fruits. varying the flavoring to taste. One can or twelve large peaches. In freezing. Grate two pineapples and mix with two quarts of water and a pint of sugar. squeeze out all the juice and steep it in the rind of orange and lemons a couple of hours. Place in a freezer and freeze. but not thinned too much. turn into a freezer. increasing the quantity of peaches. In freezing. a large sweet orange. two or three hours. then cool and freeze.

eight ounces of sweet almonds. let it stand twenty minutes and add half a pint of boiling water. take it off and let it cool in a bowl or pitcher before pouring it into the mold for freezing. (See LEMON ICE. pour into the freezing can and freeze. When cool.) ALMOND ICE. tightly squeezed. beaten to a stiff froth. the strained juice of six oranges and cold water enough to make a full quart in all. four ounces of bitter almonds. CURRANT ICE. onto whites of three eggs. add a pint each of the water and sugar. pouring in from time to time a few drops of water. boil the rest of the milk with the cream and keep stirring it with a wooden spoon. Part red raspberry juice is a much finer flavor. stir until dissolved and add four ounces of powdered sugar. freeze in the usual manner. A refreshing ice is made of currants or raspberries. DUMPLINGS AND PUDDINGS It depends as much upon the judgment of the cook as on the materials . Add one pint of the water to the berries and strain. Squeeze enough fruit in a jelly-bag to make a pint of juice. add this to the strained mixture and freeze. pass this. give it one boiling. ORANGE-WATER ICE. through a cloth. Stir until the sugar is dissolved. boiling hot. Add a tablespoonful of gelatine to one gill of water. or equal portions of each. pour in the almond milk. eight ounces of cream. Dissolve the gelatine in half a pint of boiling water.gelatine in cold water to cover. as soon as it is thick enough. pour the whole. when thoroughly pounded add the orange-flower water and half of the milk. pound all in a marble mortar. two ounces of orange-flower water. Two pints of milk. and whip the mixture thoroughly. Any juicy fruit may be prepared in this manner.

Everything should be the best in the way of materials. When done. first dredging it in flour. Dumplings boiled the same way. and the pot must be tightly covered. and the cover not removed except when necessary to add water from the _boiling_ tea-kettle when the water is getting low. then the seasoning. if boiled. put into a thick cloth bag. if the eggs are put into the milk before they are mixed with the flour. Or butter a tin pudding-mold or an earthen bowl. with a small plate or saucer in the bottom to keep it from sticking to the kettle. To ensure this. steaming or boiling should be well buttered before the mixture is put into them. Much success in making this kind of pudding depends upon a strict observance of this rule. allow a little longer time than you do for boiling. drop it into a kettle of _boiling_ water. put into little separate cloths. and tied over the bowl. although the materials may be good. allowing room for it to swell. To steam a pudding. close it tight so that water cannot penetrate. baked or steamed. If a bowl is used it should be well buttered and not quite filled with the pudding. tie it firmly. wringing it slightly and dredging the inside _thickly_ with flour. Cover the steamer closely. and set it in a steamer. dip immediately in cold water and turn out. then a cloth wet in hot water. allowing room for it to swell. previously dipped in hot water. and a proper attention to the rules. will ensure success. the yolks of the eggs and the sugar thoroughly beaten together. first mix the flour with a very small portion of milk. then the beaten whites of eggs last. slightly wringing it. Batter puddings should be smoothly mixed and free from lumps. This should be done just before placing on the table. then add the remainder of the milk by degrees. tie a cloth over the top. with some practice. drop it into boiling water and boil steadily the required time. All sweet puddings require a _little_ salt to prevent insipidity and . then floured on the inner side. Allow a little longer time for steaming than for boiling.used to make a good pudding. It should not cease boiling one moment from the time it is put in until taken out. and added to this. Puddings are either boiled. there will be a custard at the top and a soft dough at the bottom of your dish. meeting under the bottom. for. Molds or basins for baking. put it into a tin pan or earthen dish. the materials should be well worked together.

to draw out the flavor of the several ingredients, but a grain too much will spoil any pudding. In puddings where wine, brandy, cider, lemon juice or any acid is used, it should be stirred in last and gradually, or it is apt to curdle the milk or eggs. In making _custard puddings_ (puddings made with eggs and milk), the yolks of the eggs and sugar should be thoroughly beaten together before any of the milk or seasoning is added, and the beaten whites of eggs last. In making puddings of bread, rice, sago, tapioca, etc., the eggs should be beaten very light, and mixed with a portion of the milk, before adding them to the other ingredients. If the eggs are mixed with the milk, without having been thus beaten, the milk will be absorbed by the bread, rice, sago, tapioca, etc., without rendering them light. The freshness of all pudding ingredients is of much importance, as one bad article will taint the whole mixture. When the _freshness_ of eggs is _doubtful_, break each one separately in a cup before mixing them all together. Should there be a bad one amongst them, it can be thrown away; whereas, if mixed with the good ones, the entire quantity would be spoiled. The yolks and whites beaten separately make the articles they are put into much lighter. Raisins and dried fruit for puddings should be carefully picked and, in many cases, stoned. Currants should be well washed, pressed in a cloth and placed on a dish before the fire to get thoroughly dry; they should be then picked carefully over, and _every piece of grit or stone_ removed from amongst them. To plump them, some cooks pour boiling water over them and then dry them before the fire. [Illustration: STATE DINING ROOM.] [Illustration: THE BLUE ROOM.] Many baked pudding recipes are quite as good boiled. As a safe rule boil the pudding _twice as long_ as you would bake it; and remember that a boiling pudding should never be touched after it is once put on the stove; a jar of the kettle destroys the lightness of the pudding. If the water boils down and more must be added, it must be done so carefully that the mold will not hit the side of the kettle, and it must not be allowed to stop boiling for an instant.

Batter should never-stick to the knife when it is sent to the table; it will do this both when less than sufficient number of eggs is mixed with it and when it is not cooked enough; about four eggs to the half pound of flour will make it firm enough to cut smoothly. When baked or boiled puddings are sufficiently solid, turn them out of the dish they were baked in, bottom uppermost and strew over them finely sifted sugar. When pastry or baked puddings are not done through, and yet the outside is sufficiently brown, cover them over with a piece of white paper until thoroughly cooked; this prevents them from getting burnt. TO CLEAN CURRANTS. Put them in a sieve or colander and sprinkle them thickly with flour; rub them well until they are separated, and the flour, grit and fine stems have passed through the strainer. Place the strainer and currants in a pan of water and wash thoroughly; then lift the strainer and currants together, and change the water until it is clear. Dry the currants between clean towels. It hardens them to dry in an oven. TO CHOP SUET. Break or cut in small pieces, sprinkle with sifted flour, and chop in a cold place to keep it from becoming sticky and soft. TO STONE RAISINS. Put them in a dish and pour _boiling_ water over them; cover and let them remain in it ten minutes; it will soften so that by rubbing each raisin between the thumb and finger, the seeds will come out clean; then they are ready for cutting or chopping if required. APPLE DUMPLINGS. Make a rich biscuit dough, the same as soda or baking-powder biscuit, only adding a little more shortening. Take a piece of dough out on the molding-board, roll out almost as thin as pie crust; then cut into square pieces large enough to cover an apple. Put into the middle of each piece two apple halves that have been pared and cored; sprinkle

on a spoonful of sugar and a pinch of ground cinnamon, turn the ends of the dough over the apple and lap them tight. Lay the dumplings in a dripping-pan buttered, the smooth side upward. When the pans are filled, put a small piece of butter on top of each, sprinkle over a large handful of sugar, turn in a cupful of boiling water, then place in a moderate oven for three-quarters of an hour. Baste with the liquor once while baking. Serve with pudding-sauce or cream and sugar. BOILED APPLE DUMPLINGS. The same recipe as the above, with the exception that they are put into a small coarse cloth well floured after being dipped in hot water. Each cloth to be tied securely, but leaving room enough for the dumpling to swell. Put them in a pot of boiling water and boil three-quarters of an hour. Serve with sweet sauce. Peaches and other fruits used in the same manner. BOILED RICE DUMPLINGS, CUSTARD SAUCE. Boil half a pound of rice, drain and mash it moderately fine. Add to it two ounces of butter, three ounces of sugar, half a saltspoonful of mixed ground spice, salt and the yolks of two eggs. Moisten a trifle with a tablespoonful or two of cream. With floured hands shape the mixture into balls, and tie them in floured pudding cloths. Steam or boil forty minutes and send to table with a custard sauce made as follows:-Mix together four ounces of sugar and two ounces of butter (slightly warmed). Beat together the yolks of two eggs and a gill of cream; mix and pour the sauce in a double saucepan; set this in a pan of hot water and whisk thoroughly three minutes. Set the saucepan in cold water and whisk until the sauce is cooled. SUET DUMPLINGS. No. 1. One pint bowl of fine bread crumbs, one-half cupful of beef suet chopped fine, the whites and yolks of four eggs beaten separately and very light, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar sifted into half a cupful of flour, half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little water, and a teaspoonful of salt. Wet it all together with milk enough to make a stiff paste. Flour your hands and make into balls. Tie up in separate cloths that have been wrung out in hot water and floured inside; leave room, when tying, for them to swell. Drop them into

_boiling_ water and boil about three-quarters of an hour. Serve _hot_, with wine sauce, or syrup and butter. SUET DUMPLINGS. No. 2. One cupful of suet chopped fine, one cupful of grated English muffins or bread, one cupful of flour, half a teaspoonful of baking powder, half a cupful of sugar, two eggs, one pint of milk, a large pinch of salt. Sift together powder and flour, add the beaten eggs, grated muffins, sugar, suet and milk; form into smooth batter, which drop by tablespoonfuls into a pint of boiling milk, three or four at a time; when done, dish and pour over the milk they were boiled in. A Danish dish; very good. PRESERVE DUMPLINGS. Preserved peaches, plums, quinces, cherries or any other sweetmeat; make a light crust, and roll a small piece of moderate thickness and fill with the fruit in quantity to make the size of a peach dumpling; tie each one in a dumpling cloth, well floured inside, drop them into hot water and boil half an hour; when done, remove the cloth, send to table hot and eat with cream. OXFORD DUMPLINGS. Beat until quite light one tablespoonful of sugar and the yolks of three eggs, add half a cupful of finely chopped suet, half a cupful of English currants, one cupful of sifted flour, in which there has been sifted a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder, a little nutmeg, one teaspoonful of salt and, lastly, the beaten whites of the eggs; flour your hands and make it into balls the size of an egg; boil in separate cloth one hour or more. Serve with wine sauce. LEMON DUMPLINGS. Mix together a pint of grated bread crumbs, half a cupful of chopped suet, half a cupful of moist sugar, a little salt and a small tablespoonful of flour, adding the grated rind of a lemon. Moisten it all with the whites and yolks of two eggs _well_ beaten and the juice of the lemon, strained. Stir it all well together and put the mixture into small cups well buttered; tie them down with a cloth dipped in flour and boil three-quarters of an hour. Turn them out on a dish,

strew sifted sugar over them and serve with wine sauce. BOILED APPLE PUFFETS. Three eggs, one pint of milk, a little salt, sufficient flour to thicken as waffle batter, one and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Fill teacups alternately with a layer of batter and then of apples chopped fine. Steam one hour. Serve hot with flavored cream and sugar. You can substitute any fresh fruit or jams your taste prefers. COMMON BATTER. For boiled puddings, fritters, etc., is made with one cupful of milk, a pinch of salt, two eggs, one tablespoonful of melted butter, one cupful of flour and a small teaspoonful of baking powder. Sift the flour, powder and salt together, add the melted butter, the eggs well beaten and the milk; mix into a very smooth batter, a little thicker than for griddle-cakes. ALMOND PUDDING. Turn boiling water on to three-fourths of a pound of sweet almonds, let it remain until the skin comes off easily; rub with a dry cloth; when dry, pound fine with one large spoonful of rose-water; beat six eggs to a stiff froth with three spoonfuls of fine white sugar; mix with one quart of milk, three spoonfuls of pounded crackers, four ounces of melted butter, and the same of citron cut into bits; add almonds, stir altogether and bake in a small pudding-dish with a lining and rim of pastry. This pudding is best when cold. It will bake in half an hour in a quick oven. APPLE PUDDING, BAKED. Stir two tablespoonfuls of butter and half a cupful of sugar to a cream; stir into this the yolks of four eggs, well beaten, the juice and grated rind of one lemon and half a dozen sound, green tart grated. Now stir in the four beaten whites of the eggs, season with cinnamon or nutmeg; bake. To be served cold with cream. BOILED APPLE PUDDING.

Take three eggs, three apples, a quarter of a pound of bread crumbs, one lemon, three ounces of sugar, three ounces of currants, half a wine-glassful of wine, nutmeg, butter and sugar for sauce. Pare, core and mince the apples and mix with the bread crumbs, nutmeg, grated sugar, currants; the juice of the lemon and half the rind grated. Beat the eggs well, moisten the mixture with these and beat all together, adding the wine last; put the pudding in a buttered mold, tie it down with a cloth; boil one hour and a half and serve with sweet sauce. BIRDS' NEST PUDDING. Core and peel eight apples, put in a dish, fill the places from which the cores have been taken with sugar and a little grated nutmeg; cover and bake. Beat the yolks of four eggs light, add two teacupfuls of flour, with three even teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted with it, one pint of milk with a teaspoonful of salt; then add the whites of the eggs well beaten, pour over the apples and bake one hour in a moderate oven. Serve with sauce. BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING. No. 1. Butter the sides and bottom of a deep pudding-dish, then butter thin slices of bread, sprinkle thickly with sugar, a little cinnamon, chopped apple, or any fruit you prefer between each slice, until your dish is full. Beat up two eggs, add a tablespoonful of sifted flour; stir with the three cupfuls of milk and a little salt; pour over this the bread, let it stand one hour and then bake slowly, with a cover on, three-quarters of an hour; then take the cover off and brown. Serve with wine and lemon sauce. Pie-plant, cut up in small pieces with plenty of sugar, is fine made in this manner. BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING. No. 2. Place a layer of stale bread, rolled fine, in the bottom of a pudding-dish, then a layer of any kind of fruit; sprinkle on a little sugar, then another layer of bread crumbs and of fruit; and so on until the dish is full, the top layer being crumbs. Make a custard as for pies, add a pint of milk and mix. Pour it over the top of the pudding and bake until the fruit is cooked. Stale cake, crumbed fine, in place of bread, is an improvement.

COLD BERRY PUDDING. Take rather stale bread--baker's bread or light home-made--cut in thin slices and spread with butter. Add a very little water and a little sugar to one quart or more of huckleberries and blackberries, or the former alone. Stew a few minutes until juicy; put a layer of buttered bread in your buttered pudding-dish, then a layer of stewed berries while hot and so on until full; lastly, a covering of stewed berries. It may be improved with a rather soft frosting over the top. To be eaten cold with thick cream and sugar. APPLE TAPIOCA PUDDING. Put one teacupful of tapioca and one teaspoonful of salt into one pint and a half of water, and let it stand several hours where it will be quite warm, but not cook; peel six tart apples, take out the cores, fill them with sugar, in which is grated a little nutmeg and lemon peel, and put them in a pudding-dish; over these pour the tapioca, first mixing with it one teaspoonful of melted butter and a cupful of cold milk, and half a cupful of sugar; bake one hour; eat with sauce. When fresh fruits are in season, this pudding is exceedingly nice, with damsons, plums, red currants, gooseberries or apples; when made with these, the pudding must be thickly sprinkled over with sifted sugar. Canned or fresh peaches may be used in place of apples in the same manner, moistening the tapioca with the juice of the canned peaches in place of the cold milk. Very nice when quite cool to serve with sugar and cream. APPLE AND BROWN-BREAD PUDDING. Take a pint of brown bread crumbs, a pint bowl of chopped apples, mix; add two-thirds of a cupful of finely-chopped suet, a cupful of raisins, one egg, a tablespoonful of flour, half a teaspoonful of salt. Mix with half a pint of milk, and boil in buttered molds about two hours. Serve with sauce flavored with lemon. APPLE-PUFF PUDDING.

Put half a pound of flour into a basin, sprinkle in a little salt, stir in gradually a pint of milk; when quite smooth add three eggs; butter a pie-dish, pour in the batter; take three-quarters of a pound of apples, seed and cut in slices, and put in the batter; place bits of butter over the top; bake three-quarters of an hour; when done, sprinkle sugar over the top and serve hot. PLAIN BREAD PUDDING, BAKED. Break up about a pint of stale bread after cutting off the crust, pour over it a quart of boiling milk; add to this a piece of butter the size of a small egg; cover the dish tight and let it stand until cool; then with a spoon mash it until fine, adding a teaspoonful of cinnamon and one of nutmeg grated, half a cupful of sugar and one-quarter of a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little hot water. Beat up four eggs very light and add last. Turn all into a well-buttered pudding-dish and bake three-quarters of an hour. Serve it warm with hard sauce. This recipe may be steamed or boiled; very nice either way. SUPERIOR BREAD PUDDINGS. One and one-half cupfuls of white sugar, two cupfuls of fine, dry bread crumbs, five eggs, one tablespoonful of butter, vanilla, rose-water or lemon flavoring, one quart of fresh rich milk and half a cupful of jelly or jam. Rub the butter into a cupful of sugar; beat the yolks very light, and stir these together to a cream. The bread crumbs soaked in milk come next, then the flavoring. Bake in a buttered pudding-dish--a large one and but two-thirds full--until the custard is "set." Draw to the mouth of the oven, spread over with jam or other nice fruit conserve. Cover this with a meringue made of the whipped whites and half a cupful of sugar. Shut the oven and bake until the meringue begins to color. Eat cold with cream. In strawberry season, substitute a pint of fresh fruit for preserves. It is then delicious. Serve with any warm sauce. BOILED BREAD PUDDING. To one quart of bread crumbs soaked soft in a cup of hot milk, add one cupful of molasses, one cupful of fruit or chopped raisins, one teaspoonful each of spices, one tablespoonful of butter, a teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of soda, about a cupful of flour sifted; boil or steam three hours. Serve with sweet sauce.

ALMOND PUDDING. No. 1. Put two quarts of milk into a double boiler; stir into it two heaping tablespoonfuls of sifted flour that has been stirred to a cream, with a little of the milk. When it boils, care should be taken that it does not burn; when cooked, take from the fire and let it cool. Take the skins off from two pounds of sweet almonds, pound them fine, stir them into the milk; add a teaspoonful of salt, a cupful of sugar, flavoring and six well-beaten eggs, the yolks and whites beaten separately. Put bits of butter over the top. Bake one hour. A gill of brandy or wine improves it. ALMOND PUDDING. No. 2. Steep four ounces of crumbs of bread, sliced, in one and one-half pints of cream, or grate the bread; then beat half a pound of blanched almonds very fine till they become a paste, with two teaspoonfuls of orange-flower water; beat up the yolks of eight eggs and the whites of four; mix all well together; put in a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar and stir in three or four ounces of melted butter; put it over the fire, stirring it until it is thick; lay a sheet of paper at the bottom of a dish and pour in the ingredients; bake half an hour. Use the remaining four whites of eggs for a meringue for the top. BATTER PUDDING, BAKED. Four eggs, the yolks and whites beaten separately, one pint of milk, one teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of baking powder, two cupfuls of sifted flour. Put the whites of the eggs in last. Bake in an earthen dish that can be set on the table. Bake forty-five minutes; serve with rich sauce. BOILED BATTER PUDDING. Sift together a pint of flour and a teaspoonful of baking powder into a deep dish, sprinkle in a little salt, adding also a tablespoonful of melted butter. Stir into this gradually a pint of milk; when quite smooth, add four eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately. Now add enough more flour to make a _very stiff_ batter. If liked, any kind of fruit may be stirred into this; a pint of berries or sliced fruit. Boil two hours. Serve with cream and sugar, wine sauce, or any sweet

sauce. CUSTARD PUDDING. No. 1. Take five tablespoonfuls out of a quart of cream or rich milk and mix them with two large spoonfuls of fine flour. Set the rest of the milk to boil, flavoring it with bitter almonds broken up. When it has boiled hard, take it off, strain it and stir it in the cold milk and flour. Set it away to cool and beat well eight yolks and four whites of eggs; add them to the milk and stir in, at the last, a glass of brandy or white wine, a teaspoonful of powdered nutmeg and half a cupful of sugar. Butter a large bowl or mold; pour in the mixture; tie a cloth tightly over it; put it into a pot of boiling water and boil it two hours, replenishing the pot with hot water from a tea-kettle. When the pudding is done, let it get cool before you turn it out. Eat it with butter and sugar stirred together to a cream and flavored with lemon juice or orange. CUSTARD PUDDING. No. 2. Pour one quart of milk in a deep pan and let the pan stand in a kettle of boiling water, while you beat to a cream eight eggs and six tablespoonfuls of fine sugar and a teaspoon of flour; then stir the eggs and sugar into the milk and continue stirring until it begins to thicken; then remove the pan from the boiling water, scrape down the sides, stir to the bottom until it begins to cool, add a tablespoonful of peach-water, or any other flavor you may prefer, pour into little cups and, when cold, serve. CUSTARD PUDDINGS. The recipe for COMMON CUSTARD, with the addition of chocolate grated, banana, or pineapple or cocoanut, makes successfully those different kinds of puddings. APPLE CUSTARD PUDDINGS. Put a quart of pared and quartered apples into a stewpan, with half a cupful of water and cook them until they are soft. Remove from the fire and add half a cupful of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of butter and the grated rind and the juice of a lemon. Have ready mixed two cupfuls of grated bread crumbs and two tablespoonfuls of flour; add this also

to the apple mixture, after which stir in two well-beaten eggs. Turn all into a well-buttered pudding-dish and bake forty-five minutes in a moderate oven. Serve with sugar and cream or hard sweet sauce. CREAM PUDDING. Beat the yolks and whites of six eggs well and stir them into one pint of flour, one pint of milk, a little salt and a bit of soda dissolved in a little water, the grated rind of a lemon and three spoonfuls of sugar; just before baking stir in one pint of cream and bake in a buttered dish. Eat with cream. CREAM MERINGUE PUDDING. Stir to a cream half a cupful of sugar with the white of one egg and the yolks of four. Add one quart of milk and mix thoroughly. Put four tablespoonfuls of flour and a teaspoonful of salt into another dish, and pour half a cupful of the milk and egg mixture upon them, and beat very smooth, gradually adding the rest of the milk and egg mixture. Turn this all into a double boiler surrounded by boiling water; stir this until smooth and thick like cream, or about fifteen minutes; then add vanilla or other extract. Rub all through a strainer into a well-buttered pudding-dish. Now beat the remaining three whites of eggs to a stiff froth, and gradually add three tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, and spread roughly over the pudding. Cook for twenty minutes in a _moderate_ oven. Serve cold. CORNSTARCH PUDDING. Reserve half a cupful of milk from a quart and put the remainder on the stove in a double boiler. Mix four large tablespoonfuls of cornstarch and a teaspoonful of salt with the half cupful of milk; then stir the mixture into the boiling milk and beat well for two minutes. Cover the boiler and cook the pudding for twelve minutes; then pour it into a pudding-dish and set in a cool place for half an hour. When the time for serving comes, make a sauce in this manner: Beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff, dry froth, and beat into this two tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. As soon as the sugar has been well mixed with the whites, add half of a large tumbler of currant jelly, or any other bright jelly, or any kind of preserved fruit may be used. If you prefer, serve sugar and cream with the pudding instead of a sauce.

COLD FRUIT PUDDING. Throw into a pint of new milk the thin rind of a lemon, heat it slowly by the side of the fire and keep at the boiling point until strongly flavored. Sprinkle in a small pinch of salt and three-quarters of an ounce of the finest isinglass or gelatine. When dissolved, strain through muslin into a clean saucepan with five ounces of powdered sugar and half a pint of rich cream. Give the whole one boil, stir it briskly and add by degrees the well-beaten yolks of five eggs. Next thicken the mixture as a custard over a slow fire, taking care not to keep it over the fire a moment longer than necessary; pour it into a basin and flavor with orange-flower water or vanilla. Stir until nearly cold, then add two ounces of citron cut in thin strips and two ounces of candied cherries. Pour into a buttered mold. For sauce use any kind of fruit syrup. CUBAN PUDDING. Crumble a pound of sponge cakes, an equal quantity, or less if preferred, of cocoanut, grated in a basin. Pour over two pints of rich cream previously sweetened with a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar and brought to the boiling point. Cover the basin and when the cream is soaked up stir in it eight well-beaten eggs. Butter a mold, arrange four or five ounces of preserved ginger around it, pour in the pudding carefully and tie it down with a cloth. Steam or boil slowly for an hour and a half; serve with the syrup from the ginger, which should be warmed and poured over the pudding. CRACKER PUDDING. Of raspberries, may be made of one large teacupful of cracker crumbs, one quart of milk, one spoonful of flour, a pinch of salt, the yolks of three eggs, one whole egg and half a cupful of sugar. Flavor with vanilla, adding a little pinch of salt. Bake in a moderate oven. When done, spread over the top, while hot, a pint of well-sugared raspberries. Then beat the whites of the three eggs very stiff, with two tablespoonfuls of sugar, a little lemon extract, or whatever one prefers. Spread this over the berries and bake a light brown. Serve with fruit sauce made of raspberries. BAKED CORN MEAL PUDDING, WITHOUT EGGS.

Take a large cupful of yellow meal and a teacupful of cooking molasses and beat them well together; then add to them a quart of boiling milk, some salt and a large tablespoonful of powdered ginger, add a cupful of finely-chopped suet or a piece of butter the size of an egg. Butter a brown earthen pan and turn the pudding in, let it stand until it thickens; then as you put it into the oven, turn over it a pint of cold milk, but do not stir it, as this makes the jelly. Bake three hours. Serve warm with hard sauce. This recipe has been handed down from mother to daughter for many years back in a New England family. BAKED CORN MEAL PUDDING, WITH EGGS. One small cupful of Indian meal, one-half cupful of wheat flour Stirred together with cold milk. Scald one pint of milk and stir the mixture in it and cook until thick; then thin with cold milk to the consistency of batter, not very thick; add half a cupful of sugar, half a cupful of molasses, two eggs, two tablespoonfuls of butter, a little salt, a tablespoonful of mixed cinnamon and nutmeg, two-thirds of a teaspoonful of soda added just before putting it into the oven. Bake two hours. After baking it half an hour, stir it up thoroughly, then finish baking. Serve it up hot, eat it with wine sauce, or with butter and syrup. BOILED CORN MEAL PUDDING. Warm a pint of molasses and a pint of milk, stir well together; beat four eggs and stir gradually into molasses and milk; add a cupful of beef suet chopped fine, or half a cupful of butter, and corn meal sufficient to make a thick batter; add a teaspoonful of pulverized cinnamon, the same of nutmeg, a teaspoonful of soda, one of salt, and stir all together thoroughly; dip a cloth into boiling water, shake, flour a little, turn in the mixture, tie up, leaving room for the pudding to swell, and boil three hours; serve hot with sauce made of drawn butter, wine and nutmeg. BOILED CORN MEAL PUDDING, WITHOUT EGGS. To one quart of boiling milk, stir in a pint and a half of Indian meal, well sifted, a teaspoonful of salt, a cupful of molasses, half a cupful of chopped suet and a teaspoonful of dissolved soda; tie it up

Into one quart of boiling milk stir eight tablespoonfuls of Indian meal. Flavor with vanilla. one cupful of milk. Serve with sweet sauce. mix well. and boil four hours. Boil milk in double boiler. bake in a _moderate_ oven. cut in slices and serve warm with wine or brandy sauce. three tablespoonfuls of cornstarch. three eggs. stirring all the while. CORN MEAL PUFFS. FRENCH COCOANUT PUDDING. salt. two heaping tablespoonfuls of Indian meal. One quart milk. stir into the milk and while boiling add the yolks and a cupful of grated cocoanut. four tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar and a teaspoonful of nutmeg._ COTTAGE PUDDING. cook twelve minutes. stirring often. DELICATE INDIAN PUDDING. four of sugar. flavor with nutmeg. salt and sugar on the stove and let it boil. let the whole boil five minutes. beaten as light as possible. One quart of milk. the yolks of four eggs. two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar rubbed dry in the flour. No. one of butter. or sweet sugar sauce. 1. _Maria Parloa. Pour this gradually over the egg mixture. dissolve the cornstarch in the rest of the milk. sprinkle the meal into it. one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in the milk. . allowing room for it to swell.tight in a cloth. serve with lemon sauce. nearly filling them. Beat together the eggs. put part of the milk. Bake slowly one hour. and when it has become cool stir into it six eggs. bake in a moderate oven half an hour. then remove it from the fire. and pour the mixture into buttered teacups. Serve with sauce of heated syrup and butter. half a cupful of sugar. half a cupful of sugar and a little salt. stirring constantly to prevent its adhering to the saucepan. One heaping pint of flour. sugar and one-half teaspoonful of ginger. one teaspoonful of salt. one tablespoonful of butter. Stir the butter into the meal and milk.

spread it on the pudding and put it into the oven to brown. sprinkle a little with dry flour and cover the . peaches. No. Most excellent._--The whites of four eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Two eggs well beaten. Half a pound of grated cocoanut Then mix with it half a cupful of stale sponge cake. Three of the whites of the eggs could be left out for a meringue on the top of the pudding. Cranberries. roll out a quarter of an inch thick. two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. COCOANUT PUDDING. with the grated cocoanut. currants. Stir together until very light half a cupful of butter and one of sugar. or any tart fruit is nice used with this recipe. half a cupful of sugar. Having stirred the whole very hard._Frosting. A cup of grated cocoanut put into the recipes of Cracker Pudding and Bread Pudding. 3. No. add two teaspoonfuls of vanilla. sifted flour enough to make a _stiff_ batter. saving a little of the frosting to moisten the top. makes good cocoanut pudding. Serve with sweet sauce. 2. add a _coffee_cupful of rich milk or cream. then put on grated cocoanut to give it the appearance of snowflake. Make a crust or paste of two cupfuls of flour. 2. No. BOILED OR STEAMED. two large teaspoonfuls of baking powder. wet up with milk or water. CHERRY PUDDING. stir again. leaving it large enough to lap over the top. one cupful of sweet milk. a pinch of salt and as many cherries as can be stirred in. Gather the paste closely over the top. a teaspoonful of salt. butter a large common bowl and line it with this paste. flavor with lemon. fill it with stoned cherries and half a cupful of sugar. cherries. or about three-quarters of an hour. CHERRY PUDDING. COCOANUT PUDDING. Boil one hour or steam and serve with liquid sauce. Beat six eggs very light and stir them gradually into the butter and sugar in turn. put into a buttered dish and bake until set. crumbled fine.

Dissolve a level teaspoonful of soda in a tablespoonful of warm water. It will be found best to prepare the ingredients the day before and cover closely. add the whites of the eight eggs. one pound of beef suet. until all are used. as the last thing. (The Genuine. Serve with sweet sauce. one nutmeg and a tablespoonful of mace.) Soak one pound of stale bread in a pint of hot milk and let it stand and cool.whole with a linen cloth. Stir in the fruit. chopped nuts. Serve with wine or brandy or any well-flavored sauce. cinnamon and cloves mixed. one heaping cupful of sugar. one pound of raisins. one cupful of seeded raisins. two cupfuls of fine bread crumbs. ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. a quarter of a pound of citron cut in slips and dredged with flour.) One cupful of finely-chopped beef suet. half a cupful of citron. one glass of wine. putting in the dissolved soda last and adding enough flour to make the fruit stick together. sugar. one of cloves. Serve with wine or brandy sauce. a teaspoonful of salt. add to it one-half pound of sugar and the yolks of eight eggs beaten to a cream. chopped fine and _salted_. sliced thin. When cold. Put it into a pot of boiling water and cook for an hour and a half. CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING. spices and salt in one cupful of milk. one pound of Zante currants. one cupful of chopped blanched almonds. two of cinnamon. (By Measure. then mix the remainder as follows: In a large bowl put the well-beaten eggs. Grate a loaf of stale bread. previously scalded and dredged with flour. leaving room for the pudding to swell and boil six hours. half a grated nutmeg and four well-beaten eggs. pour into a cloth. or enough for a pint of . tie it firmly. one after the other. Flour the fruit thoroughly from a pint of flour. which will take all the pint. bread crumbs and suet. fastening it with a string. Boil or steam four hours. stoned and floured. beat the whole well together and. BAKED PLUM PUDDING. one glass of brandy. It is best to prepare the ingredients the day before and cover closely. beaten to a stiff froth. washed and floured. one cupful of well-washed currants.

one nutmeg. soak and dry half a pound of currants. Put into a well-greased pudding-mold. then fruit again and cake. boil one quart of milk and turn boiling hot over the grated bread. Make a custard of a quart of milk. bake two hours. until the mold is nearly full. two cupfuls of fine bread crumbs. one cupful of sugar. Butter well the inside of a pudding-mold. and is quite rich for one containing neither eggs nor butter. Have ready a cupful of chopped citron. close covered. Sprinkle some of this fruit on the bottom of the mold. one of well-washed currants. in the meantime pick. raisins and currants. when the bread is ready mix with it the butter.crumbs. Steam not less than four hours. but it is equally good some days later. One-half of the above amount is more than eight persons would be able to eat. send to the table warm. one cupful of molasses. or a three-quart pail and cover closely. _Manhattan Beach Hotel. if kept closely covered meantime. one of chopped raisins. a pinch of salt. cloves and nutmeg. two tablespoonfuls of melted butter._ . Most excellent. cinnamon. stir them gradually in. half a pound of raisins. PLUM PUDDING. Seasoned with wine. one tablespoonful of mace and cinnamon mixed. sugar. Set this pail into a larger kettle. with half of a cupful of butter. beat eight eggs very light. one cupful of milk and flour enough to make a stiff batter. and half full of boiling water. let it stand and soak one hour. pour this over the cake without cooking it. light pudding is made by stirring thoroughly together the following ingredients: One cupful of finely-chopped beef suet. Serve with wine sauce or common sweet sauce. cinnamon. then slices of stale sponge cake. Eat with wine sauce. then add by degrees the raisins and currants dredged with flour. a quarter of a pound of citron cut in large slips. one spoonful of salt. stir the whole very hard. Serve with wine sauce or a custard. This delicious. shake over this some spices. This pudding is sure to be a success. adding boiling water as it boils away. CABINET PUDDING. one teaspoonful each of cloves. allspice and carbonate of soda. and when the mixture is quite cold. steamed again for an hour. spice and citron. cover and let steep an hour. WITHOUT EGGS. or wine and sugar. four eggs. put it into a buttered dish. adding a glassful of white wine. then steam one hour and a half.

Pour the preparation into this and bake in a moderate oven for forty minutes. Put the remainder of the milk in the double boiler. ORANGE PUDDING. taking out the seeds. No. the cornstarch made smooth with a little cold milk. leaving the door open. Return to the oven and cook ten minutes. Fresh fruit of many kinds can be used instead of cranberries. add a piece of butter as large as a nutmeg. the yolks of eight eggs and whites of four. No. Then put in a pint of the stewed fruit and sweeten to your taste. It must be ice cold when served. paste to line the pudding-dish. Stir it all well together until it is smooth and cooked. one coffeecupful of white sugar. 1. Serve with sweet sugar sauce. Peel and cut the oranges into thin slices. the yolks of three eggs. Stir all into the cooked mixture._ ORANGE PUDDING. When the bread is softened. then add the butter and set away to cool. Have a pudding-dish holding about three quarts lined with paste. add two eggs and beat thoroughly with the bread. Beat the remaining four whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and gradually beat in the powdered sugar. Now set the milk in a suitable dish into another of boiling water. Set away to cool. Five sweet oranges. _Maria Parloa. half a cupful of granulated sugar. Beat the whites to a stiff froth. spread over the top for frosting. let the milk get boiling hot. and the well-beaten yolks of the eggs and a little flavoring. Cover the pudding with this. Set into the oven a few minutes to brown. Mix the ground rice with a little of the cold milk. Stir for five minutes. 2. eight eggs. peaches and other fruits may be . one pint of milk. Pour boiling water on a pint of bread crumbs. Beat together the sugar. One pint of milk. Berries. pour over them the sugar and let them stand while you make the rest. Eat cold. one tablespoonful of ground rice. half a cupful of butter. Set it off and pour it over the oranges. Slices of peaches put in layers are delicious. and when it boils stir in the mixed rice. the juice of six oranges and the rind of three.BAKED CRANBERRY PUDDING. Grate the rinds and squeeze the juice of the oranges into this. one tablespoonful of cornstarch. melt a tablespoonful of butter and stir in. adding two tablespoonfuls of sugar.

which should be strained. eat cold. bread crumbs. Beat all together and. whites and yolks beaten separately. while baking. milk.substituted. also the grated rind. lining a deep pudding-dish with puff paste. beat the whites of the remaining five eggs to a stiff froth. When these ingredients are well mixed. and the juice._--One quart of milk. two cupfuls of bread crumbs. BAKED LEMON PUDDING. Half a cupful of chopped suet.) _Ingredients. When cool. the grated peel of two large lemons and the juice of one. one cupful of white sugar. butter the size of an egg. bake the lemon pudding in it. strew sifted sugar over and serve warm with the lemon sauce. whip in fine white sugar to taste. or not. from a half to three-quarters of an hour. put it back in the oven and brown a light straw color. draw it to the door of the oven and cover with a meringue made of the whites of the eggs. at pleasure. cover the top of the pudding (when baked) with the meringue and return to the oven for a moment to brown. one lemon. it requires no sauce. one large lemon--juice and grated rind. a cupful and a half of white sugar. (Queen of Puddings. sugar and flour well together. beat the sugar and yolks and add to the mixture. a teaspoonful of salt and two eggs. Heat the milk and pour over the bread crumbs. add the butter. one pint of bread crumbs. First mix the suet. cover and let it get soft. When done. Bake in a buttered dish until firm and slightly brown. whipped to a froth with four tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar and the lemon juice. with lemon sauce. . LEMON PUDDING. COLD. which should be the yellow grated from the outside. turn it out. one cupful of sugar. the yolks of ten eggs and whites of five. A small cupful of butter. put it into a well-buttered mold and boil for three and a half hours. moisten with the eggs and sufficient milk to make the pudding of the consistency of thick batter. one of flour. Eat warm. LEMON PUDDING. adding the lemon peel. BOILED LEMON PUDDING. four eggs.

This also may be turned while _hot_ into several small cups or forms previously dipped in cold water. stir in the butter and let it cool. This is good hot. stirring constantly and briskly for five minutes. add the well-beaten yolks of four eggs. Serve with any sweet sauce. This pudding. with butter and . and bake from half to three-quarters of an hour. put in the oven for two minutes to slightly brown. boil and stir the sago until clear. Should be boiled altogether. and pour it over the apples. with a pinch of salt. and then spread on the frosting. The small white sago called pearl is the best. SAGO APPLE PUDDING. When cool. let it stand in boiling water on the stove or range until the sago has well swelled. one tablespoonful of butter and the juice and rind of two lemons. While hot. Beat the whites of the eggs with three tablespoonfuls of powdered white sugar till they are a mass of froth. Beat the yolks and sugar together. be sure and keep the whites of the eggs on ice until ready for use and beat them in the coolest place you can find. If made in summer.One cupful of sugar. place them aside. Oranges may be used in place of lemons. To be eaten cold. Serve with cream and sugar. soaked for one hour. spread the pudding with either raspberry or strawberry jam. put in two tablespoonfuls of butter with one cupful of white sugar and flavoring. doing it very gradually. not baked. is equally as good. and steamed tender and put in the pudding-dish. ROYAL SAGO PUDDING. made with tapioca. adding water to make it thin. Bake in a well-buttered dish. which should be boiling on the stove. making it very smooth. then stir it into the remainder of the milk. Wet the cornstarch in some of the milk. put it into a saucepan. Take it from the stove. It should always be kept in a covered jar or box. six or eight apples pared and cored. One cupful of sago in a quart of tepid water. Three-quarters of a cupful of sago washed and put into one quart of milk. or quartered. as it will make a much richer frosting. four eggs. then remove it from the oven and place it to cool. two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch. Now stir in the lemon juice and grated rind. The large brown kind has an earthy taste. in one hour they will be fit to turn out. then stir them thoroughly into the milk and cornstarch. the whites and yolks beaten separately. put in a buttered pudding-dish. bake one hour. one pint of milk.

This is more of a blanc mange than a pudding. when _cool_. No. When done. Put in a mold. bake one hour in a moderate oven. beat up the four yolks and two whole eggs together very light with the sugar. fourteen even tablespoonfuls of grated bread crumbs. Serve with whipped cream or boiled custard. adding four tablespoonfuls of fine sugar. PLAIN SAGO PUDDING.sugar. 4. Make the same as TAPIOCA PUDDING. No. CHOCOLATE PUDDING. sugar to make very sweet. and four tablespoonfuls of vanilla chocolate grated and dissolved in a little milk. When cold. Put the milk on the range. CHOCOLATE PUDDING. six eggs. and just before it is served. or cold with cream and sugar. CHOCOLATE PUDDING. one cupful of sugar. One quart of sweet milk. 1. one tablespoonful vanilla. scald the milk and chocolate together. flavor with vanilla. Separate the yolks and whites of four eggs. One quart of milk. CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 3. Half a cake of chocolate broken in one quart of milk and put on the . pour into a buttered dish. Bake about twenty-five minutes. Beat the five whites of eggs to a stiff froth. No. No. and then to that remaining in the kettle add an egg beaten very light. three-quarters of a cupful of grated chocolate. three tablespoonfuls of cornstarch and three tablespoonfuls of sugar. have the four whites beaten with a little powdered-sugar and flavor with vanilla and use as a meringue. twelve tablespoonfuls grated chocolate. Make cornstarch pudding with a quart of milk. spread evenly over the top and brown slightly in the oven. be sure it is sweet enough. and when it come to a perfect boil pour it over the bread and chocolate. alternately the dark and light. add the yolks of five eggs. add the beaten eggs and sugar and vanilla. substituting sago for tapioca. remove about half and flavor to taste. 2.

Wash the tapioca and let it stew gently in the milk on the back part of the stove for a quarter of an hour. yolks and whites separately. add the whites beaten to a stiff froth. or any suitable pudding-dish. One-quarter cup of butter. This makes a most delightful dessert. if it seems too dry. then let it cool. pour the mixture in a dish. Rub the butter and sugar together. stir all together to a smooth paste. sugar and the rest of the tapioca. add more sugar at table. Soak over night a large teacupful of tapioca in cold water. mix with it the butter. put half of it in a buttered yellow-ware baking-dish. cover the top of the pudding with a meringue and set in the oven until a light brown. continue the alternate layers until the dish is full. sugar and eggs. STRAWBERRY TAPIOCA. making the last layer of . flavoring of vanilla or bitter almonds. beat the eggs. add four teaspoonfuls of cornstarch mixed with the yolks of three eggs and one cup and a half of sugar. mash the raspberries. two ounces of butter. either fresh or canned.range until it reaches boiling point. put in the pudding and bake in a moderate oven for an hour. Sprinkle sugar over the tapioca. four eggs. stir constantly until thick. six cupfuls of soft bread crumbs. beat the whites of the three eggs to a stiff froth and add a little sugar. cover the bottom with a layer of the crumbs. If the pudding is boiled. If not sweet enough. a cupful of sugar. one quart of milk. add a little more tapioca and boil it in a buttered basin one and a half hours. more water is needed. occasionally stirring it. Fill the dish with water. RASPBERRY PUDDING. Butter a dish. butter a pudding dish. TAPIOCA PUDDING. and flavor with either of the above ingredients. Eat cold with cream or Custard. in the morning. then a layer of the mixture. two cupfuls of jam. remove from the fire and flavor with vanilla. Five tablespoonfuls of tapioca. using peaches. which should be well-beaten. four eggs. then on this put a quart of berries. A similar dish may be made. and in baking. one-half cupful of sugar. remove the mixture from the range. Serve cold. which should cover the tapioca about a quarter of an inch. Bake in a moderately hot oven until it looks clear.

stirring all the time. Eat hot with hard sauce or butter. Apples or peaches may be substituted. . powdered sugar. powdered. a little salt. adding a teaspoonful of soda dissolved. sugar to taste. with sugar. half a cupful of white sugar. two cupfuls of fine. half a teaspoonful of baking powder. PEACH AND APPLE PUDDING. the water must boil when it is put in. Pare some nice ripe pears (to weigh about three-fourths of a pound). put them in your pudding-dish. set in boiling water with weight on cover to prevent mold from upsetting. put in buttered molds with tight top. salt. wiped and minced. boil three hours. add the flour. half a cupful of beef suet. and having made the following custard. add the cream by degrees. and boil three hours. Half a pound of good dried figs. a pinch of salt and a tablespoonful of flour. one teaspoonful of extract of nutmeg. two scant cupfuls of sweet milk. some lemon or orange peel. Take a pint of hot milk and stir in sifted Indian meal till the batter is stiff. you can use cranberries and sweet sauce. bake one hour in a moderate oven. APPLE CORN MEAL PUDDING. grate some nutmeg. tie in a cloth that has been wet. four eggs. FIG PUDDINGS.crumbs. Serve cold with sweetened cream. and stew about a quarter of an hour in two cupfuls of water. add the eggs. one pint of cream or milk. PEAR. put them in a saucepan with a few cloves. stirred in half a cupful of sifted flour.--pour this over the pears and bake in a _quick_ oven. then stir in a pint of whortleberries or chopped sweet apple. suet. washed. or put in a pudding-pan and tie a cloth over. and leave room for it to swell. add a teaspoonful of salt and half a cup of molasses. Beat three minutes. dry bread crumbs. CORN MEAL. This pudding may be made the same with any other kind of berries. FRUIT PUDDING. three eggs. Soak the crumbs in milk. beaten light. beat eggs and sugar well. Serve in the dish in which it is baked and serve with fruit sauce made with raspberries. flour and figs.

so that the rhubarb will be on top. Fruit puddings. join the edges well together. are very nice made in a basin. Ripe cherries. rolling it round to the thickness of half an inch. SNOW PUDDING. four spoonfuls of chopped suet and a teacupful of good molasses. Spread it over the rhubarb and bake till done. Boil for an hour. put the cloth over the whole. then put the remainder of the gooseberries in and the remainder of the sugar. such as apples and rhubarb. turn out on a dish. currants. such as green gooseberry. will not require so much sugar. tying it at the bottom. the basin to be buttered and lined with a paste. pour into a buttered dish and bake four hours. take half the fruit and lay it at the bottom of your basin. mix these well together. then the apples. or so long boiling. put in a pudding dish and sprinkle sugar over it. on that. add a little salt. untie the cloth. serve hot with sugar and wine sauce. Turn out on a platter upside down. should be done in this manner. greengages. This is the most simple. half a teaspoonful of soda and enough flour to make batter about as thick as for cake. then add half your sugar. plums and such like fruit.Pare and core twelve pippin apples. make a batter of one cupful of sour milk. or let it remain in the basin and serve with sugar over. after having made your paste. and boil in plenty of water. raspberries. Chop rhubarb pretty fine. then stir into one quart of new milk one quart of sifted corn meal. slice them very thin. draw your paste to the centre. a piece of butter the size of an egg. FRUIT PUDDINGS. A thin cover of the paste may be rolled round and put over the pudding. two eggs. adding a teaspoonful of soda dissolved. RHUBARB OR PIE-PLANT PUDDING. These puddings are also very good steamed. Fruit puddings of this kind. take out of the saucepan. cheap and luxuriant fruit pudding that can be made. . Serve with sugar and cream. then get a pint of gooseberries and three ounces of sugar.

and serve with cream. three eggs. pour over it a cupful of cold water and add one and a half cupfuls of sugar. beat all together until it is light and frothy. two tablespoonfuls of flour. put it on a glass dish. Two tablespoonfuls of flour. mix the cornstarch with a little cold milk. six tablespoonfuls of sugar. two tablespoonfuls of sugar. when 'soft. stir it until it has thickened well. add one cupful of boiling water and the juice of one lemon.One-half a package Cox's gelatine. then the whites of four well-beaten eggs. the yolks of four eggs. boil. Three tablespoonfuls of cornstarch. or until the gelatine will not settle clear in the bottom of the dish after standing a few minutes. butter. Butter well three saucers. SAUCER PUDDINGS. the yolks of five eggs. One quart of berries or any small fruit. a teacupful of milk. preserve of any kind. place over the top a layer of canned peaches or other fruit (and it improves it to mix the syrup of the fruit with the custard part). and beat up with the flour and sugar. simmer together and turn into molds. DELMONICO PUDDING. serve with cream. then put it into the oven until it is a light brown. four tablespoonfuls of sugar and the grated rind of a lemon. having added a little salt. then add the sugar and beat again till very light. pour it into a dish for the table and place it in the oven until it will bear icing. close them again. Mix the flour and sugar. mix all together and stir into one quart of milk just as it is about to boil. cover with frosting as for cake. two tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. beat the eggs light. . NANTUCKET PUDDING. This is a very delicate and delicious pudding. Remove them from the saucers when cool enough. beat the eggs. add them to the milk. cut in half. Serve with a custard made of one pint of milk. half fill them. beat the whites to a stiff froth with two tablespoonfuls of white sugar to an egg. and spread a thin layer of preserves between each half. and bake in a quick oven about twenty minutes. or with whipped eggs and sugar. browning lightly in the oven.

add them to the rice. drain it so as to remove all the water. New York City. flavor with lemon or vanilla. pour into a buttered dish and bake an hour in a moderate oven. while the rice is hot. a quarter of a pound of citron cut in slips. Let it get cold. or flavor with lemon or vanilla. Serve warm with rich hot sauce. three tablespoonfuls of white sugar and a little nutmeg. wash and boil. a teacupful of rice. mix well. add two tablespoonfuls of sugar. five eggs well beaten. One cupful of carefully sorted rice boiled in water until it is soft. _Astor House. and add one quart of new milk. when soft drain off the water. add to it a tablespoonful of cold butter._ RICE MERINGUE. while warm. mix with it a cupful of sugar. and one quart of cream. . then add. five tablespoonful of sugar. PLAIN RICE PUDDING. drop or spread it over the pudding and slightly brown it in the oven.TOAST PUDDING. stoned and cut in halves. Serve warm. then stir in a quart of sweet milk gradually. pour into a baking dish and bake about half an hour. one glass of wine. cool it. the well-beaten yolks of three eggs. removing the crust. a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg and one of ground cinnamon. Beat up four eggs very light. RICE PUDDING. beat the whites of the eggs. one tablespoonful of powdered nutmeg. a. when done. turn in the mixture and bake one hour in a moderate oven. a little salt. with sweet wine sauce. If you have cold cooked rice.) Wash a teacupful of rice and boil it in two teacupfuls of water. three tablespoonfuls of butter. Toast several thin slices of stale bread. first soak it in the milk and proceed as above. whites and yolks separately. Butter a pudding-dish. and pour over them hot stewed fruit in alternate layers. (Fine. butter them well. a quarter of a pound of Zante currants. When cool. Pick over. quarter of a pound of raisins.

No. one cupful of sugar. is also an improvement. a piece of butter as large as a walnut. let it remain in the oven about two hours (until it is the consistency of cream). four eggs. a pinch of soda and a pinch of salt. a cupful of sugar. two-thirds of a cupful of rice. put it into the pudding and ten drops of essence of lemon. a teaspoonful of cinnamon. line an earthen basin with part of it. cover with the balance of your rice. add a little salt. Wash two teacupfuls of rice and soak it in water for half an hour. pour the pudding into it and boil for two hours. 1. stir it once or twice until it begins to cook. sweeten to taste. BOILED RICE PUDDING. FRUIT RICE PUDDING. put in the last thing. Serve with sweet fruit sauce. a little water to cook it partially. Put it all in a bowl and beat it up until it is very light and white. a little nutmeg and a pinch of salt. fill nearly full with pared. add one quarter of a pound of butter. well buttered. To be eaten with sweet sauce. one wine-glassful of wine. and. let it come to a boil and remove from the fire. Do not butter your dish. cored and quartered apples. One cupful of cold boiled rice. and the yolks and beaten whites of four eggs. then turn off the water and mix the rice with half a pound of raisins stoned and cut in halves. 2. No. the grated peel with the juice of two lemons. One large teacupful of rice. Put on to boil one quart of milk. RICE PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS. tie a cloth tightly over the top and steam one hour. BOILED RICE PUDDING. Beat altogether for five minutes. Put into a deep pudding-dish. set into a moderate oven. when cool. . or any fruit you choose.RICE LEMON PUDDING. Butter a mold. and when it simmers stir in four tablespoonfuls of rice flour that has been moistened in a little milk. Eat cold. tie the whole in a cloth. dry. Beat four ounces of butter to a cream. Two quarts of milk.

first adding a cupful of stewed prunes. form it into balls. one cupful of molasses. The custard and balls should be flavored with the same. Bake half an hour and serve with sauce. Three cupfuls of flour. Bake for from fifteen to twenty minutes. place these rice balls around the inside of a deep dish. three well-beaten eggs. two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. add sugar to suit your taste.leaving room for the rice to swell to twice its natural size. one pint of flour. Let this come to a boil. There is no more delicate and delicious . well beaten. One quart of ripe fresh huckleberries or blueberries. three eggs. if the rice is not tender when the milk and water are absorbed. BLACKBERRY OR WHORTLEBERRY PUDDING. flavor with vanilla. A little cream improves it if poured over it when placed in saucers. half a cupful of milk. with the stones taken out. a little cloves and cinnamon. a teaspoonful of salt. then stir in gradually a little cold milk in which you have rubbed smooth a heaping tablespoonful of cornstarch. Roll the berries well in the flour and add them last of all. BAKED HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. Heat a little more than a pint of sweet milk to the boiling point. floured. or mold it into a compact form with little cups. PRUNE PUDDING. add a little more milk and water. about a teaspoonful of butter and a little grated nutmeg. a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little of the milk. RICE SNOW-BALLS. Serve with or without sauce. Wash two teacupfuls of rice and boil it in one teacupful of water and one of milk. separately. one cupful of sweet milk. Boil in a well-buttered mold two hours. when the rice is tender. and boil two hours in plenty of water. Stir in a quart of huckleberries. one tablespoonful of cold butter. fill the dish with a rich soft custard and serve either hot or cold. serve with wine sauce. two cupfuls of sugar. with a little salt. Serve with brandy sauce. according to the state of the oven. half a teaspoonful of mace or nutmeg. then pour it in a buttered pudding-dish.

line with puff paste and bake half an hour. dry them thoroughly and pick away any stalks or grit. almond. Wash the currants. grated. a teaspoonful of nutmeg. BOILED CURRANT PUDDING. leaving the fruit last. This pudding is very fine made with Boston crackers split open and placed in layers with stewed peaches. butter a deep dish. FRUIT PUDDING. then the hot stewed fruit. tie it up in a floured cloth. peach or rose-water. Put a plate over the top and. half a pound of currants. when cool. milk. Stew currants or any small fruits. flavor with vanilla. Then make a meringue for the top and brown.pudding than this. then bread. To a large sweet potato. eight eggs. placed in a suitable dish. then bread and fruit. SWEET-POTATO PUDDING. Serve with sugar and cream. A small cupful of fresh butter warmed. sweeten with sugar to taste and pour hot over _thin_ slices of bread with the crust cut off. chop the suet finely. a pinch of salt. one-half a cupful of chopped suet. set it on ice. This pudding is made without cooking and is nice prepared the day before using. which should be stirred in gradually. allow half a pound of . one cupful of sifted sugar creamed with the butter. first a layer of bread. yolks and whites beaten separately. Serve cold. TRANSPARENT PUDDING. Five cupfuls of sifted flour in which two teaspoonfuls of baking powder have been sifted. mix all the ingredients together and moisten with sufficient milk to make the pudding into a stiff batter. Serve with jelly sauce made very sweet. put it into boiling water and boil for three hours and a half. stir _hard_. but not melted. weighing two pounds. either fresh or dried. Beat the butter and sugar light and then add the nutmeg and the beaten eggs.

(Apple. half a pound of butter. cover the whole with a buttered plate and bake slowly for two hours. sprinkle it plentifully with white sugar. Stoned cherries. make a rich biscuit dough. one gill of strong wine or brandy. perhaps more. may be used. Butter a pudding-dish and line the bottom and sides with slices of stale cake (sponge cake is best). then more pineapple. place in the dish first a layer of pineapple. PINEAPPLE PUDDING. then strew with sugar. one grated nutmeg. cover the top with thinly-sliced bits of preserved citron or quince marmalade.sugar. . then roll it up. tuck in the ends. bake in a moderate but regularly heated oven. prick deeply with a fork. core and slice sour apples. with the addition of a glass of rich milk for each person at table. and so on until all is used. baste up the sides. roll not quite half an inch thick.) Peel. mash up fine. When the puddings are drawn from the fire. lay it in a steamer and steam hard for an hour and three-quarters. Serve it with lemon sauce. Fold the edges well together to keep the juices from running out. roll up. roll it out into a long narrow sheet. ORANGE ROLEY POLEY. and while hot add the sugar and butter. tie the ends. fresh or dried. plunge into boiling water and boil continually an hour and a half. Strew the top thickly with granulated white sugar and serve. Line tin plates with puff paste. Or wrap it in a pudding-cloth well floured. about quarter of an inch thick. dried fruits. Make a light dough the same as for apple dumplings. pare and slice thin a large pineapple. or any kind of berries. Fine. scatter over all a teaspoonful or two of grated orange peel. Pour over a small teacupful of water and cover with slices of cake which have been dipped in cold water. Boil it in a floured cloth one hour and a half. Boil the potato until thoroughly done. ROLEY POLEY PUDDING. one gill of sweet cream. a little lemon peel and four eggs. or raised biscuit dough may be used if rolled thinner. lay the slices on the paste. and pour in the mixture. Set aside to cool while you beat the eggs light and add the seasoning last. Spread thickly over it peeled and sliced oranges.

Set the mold. put in each a spoonful of the above batter. into a kettle and boil one hour. . Turn out of the mold and serve with some of the other custard poured over it. BANANA PUDDING. Mix well together one-half a coffeecupful of molasses. and has the merit of simplicity and cheapness. one-half a cupful of milk. one-half a teaspoonful of pure soda. half a cup butter. one and one-half cupfuls of good Graham flour. 1. Serve with or without sauce.FRUIT PUFF PUDDING. pour over the cake and bake one-half hour. SPONGE CAKE PUDDING. Into one pint of flour stir two teaspoonfuls baking powder and a little salt. cut in six or eight pieces. No. or any sauce that may be preferred. after being tightly covered. Steam four hours and serve with brandy or wine sauce. Butter pudding-mold. flavor and sweeten to taste. split and spread with butter and return them to the dish. This pudding is delicious made with strawberries and eaten with a sauce made of two eggs. one small teacupful of raisins. Make a sufficient quantity of custard to fill the mold and leave as much more to be boiled in a dish by itself. Bake a common sponge cake in a flat-bottomed pudding-dish. one egg. then sift and stir the mixture into milk. spices to taste. GRAHAM PUDDING. fill the mold with small sponge cakes or slices of stale plain cake that have been soaked in a liquid made by dissolving one-half pint of jelly in a pint of hot water. a cup of sugar beaten thoroughly with a cup of boiling milk and one cup of strawberries. 2. then add one of berries or steamed apples. SPONGE CAKE PUDDING. Place well-greased cups in a steamer. when ready to use. until very soft. one-quarter of a cupful of butter. The cake will swell and fill the custard. This makes a showy as well as a light and wholesome dessert. This will be of as fine a flavor and much better for all than if the cake had been soaked in wine. No. Make a custard with four eggs to a quart of milk. cover with another spoonful of batter and steam twenty minutes.

two eggs beaten. SUET PLUM PUDDING. Put into a bowl. One cupful of suet chopped fine. Two teaspoonfuls of baking powder in the flour improves this pudding. are a delicious dessert. one cupful of raisins. spices and . SUET PUDDING. half a teaspoonful of salt and enough flour to make a stiff batter. One cupful of chopped suet. and pour over it. Peaches cut up. Stir into it a tablespoonful of butter. and added when cold to thick boiled custard. The same. Boil one pint of milk and while hot turn it over a pint of bread-crumbs. put alternately a layer of cake and a layer of bananas sliced. flavor with a little wine. one pint of dried peaches stewed soft. made a little thinner. the pudding will be much lighter. flavor to taste. but thin enough to pour from a spoon. Or if made with sour milk and soda it is equally as good. When all is cool. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and heap over the whole. half a cupful of sugar and a pinch of salt. If sour milk is used in place of sweet. left a few hours in sugar and then scalded. one cupful of cooking molasses. one egg. PLAIN. one cupful of milk. add two well-beaten eggs. pare and cut into halves or quarters some juicy. boil three hours in a pudding-mold set into a kettle of water. one cupful of milk. Put into a well-buttered pudding-dish and bake half an hour. Make a soft custard. three and one-half cupfuls of flour. in a glass dish. DRIED PEACH PUDDING. eat with common sweet sauce. two of cinnamon and one of nutmeg. rather tart peaches. cover with a cloth and boil three hours. a little salt. one teaspoonful of cloves. and. put in sugar. made rather sweet. PEACH COBBLER. with a few raisins added and baked in a well-greased dish is excellent. one teaspoonful of soda.Cut sponge cake in-slices. Line a deep dish with rich thick crust.

a half teacupful of flour. bake with a rim of puff paste. Set in the oven and bake like dumplings. Scrape off what remains on the cob with a knife. to each pint of the pulp put two ounces of crumbed bread and four ounces of sugar. break up the top crust into small pieces and stir it into the fruit. serve hot or cold. or with a rich brandy or wine. put a piece of butter on each roll. Strew over a large handful of sugar. White currants may be used instead of red. Boil hominy in milk one hour. a tablespoonful of sugar. a little hot water. eat it with plenty of fresh butter. Take two dozen full ears of sweet green corn. then pour it on the eggs. according to the youngness and juiciness of the corn. . Currants are best made in this manner:-Press the currants through a sieve to free it from pips. Add four eggs well beaten. bake in hot oven for twenty minutes. score the kernels and cut them from the cob. Add a pint and a half or one quart of milk. Roll up the crust. spices if you like. add butter. one teaspoonful of extract of lemon or vanilla. Spread over with berries. This can be used as a dessert by serving a sweet sauce with it. GREEN CORN PUDDING. stew it slightly and put it in the lined dish. one and a half pints of milk. it answers as a side vegetable. If eaten plainly with butter. serve with cream. Other fruits can be used in place of peaches. cut it into little squares four inches wide and seven inches long. a half teacupful butter. Roll rich biscuit dough thin. Place it on the table browned and smoking hot. when done. one tablespoonful of butter. very palatable without sauce. Two-thirds of a cupful of hominy. one cupful of sugar. in hot oven two hours. and salt to taste. Served with sweet sauce. HOMINY PUDDING.flavoring to taste. BAKED BERRY ROLLS. pour in buttered pudding-dish. and put the rolls in a dripping-pan just a little apart. extract and sugar beaten together. cover with thick crust of rich puff paste and bake a rich brown. but more so with plain rich cream or cream sauce. Bake in a well-greased earthen dish. two eggs.

Well whisk the eggs. stir it into the boiling milk. Set saucepan or deep frying pan on the stove. sifting it through your fingers. This is a very pretty and ornamental dish for the supper-table. put them into a basin and stir to them the butter. Bake in a cool oven. Serve immediately with the following simple sauce. remove the bread. three ounces of butter. when half done. SUNDERLAND PUDDING. and then mix all well together.GENEVA WAFERS. eggs. Butter a baking sheet. One cupful of sugar. add the flour and enough milk to make it smooth. 1. etc. half a cupful of cold butter. and fill up with whipped cream. stir in the flour. This pudding is much improved by adding canned berries or fresh ones just before taking from the stove. Beat the eggs well. and is very nice and very easily made. and. Make a sauce very sweet to serve with it. when it boils have ready a dish of sifted flour. watch the pieces of paste. Return them to the oven until crisp. about a pint of flour. when it boils.] MINUTE PUDDING. three ounces of flour. roll them up like wafers and put in a small wedge of bread or piece of wood. lightly. Maple molasses is _fine_ with it. Butter the saucepan and put in the remainder of the milk well salted. a pinch of salt and a piece of butter as large as half an egg.. salt. MINUTE PUDDING. two eggs. [Illustration: STIRRING THE CRANBERRY SAUCE. and drop on it a teaspoonful of the mixture at a time. a handful at a time. add the flour and sifted sugar gradually. Two eggs. Turn it into a dish that has been dipped in water. No. No. One quart of milk. until it becomes smooth and quite thick. three ounces of pounded sugar. let it cook well. put into it a quart of sweet milk. It should be of the consistency of thick corn mush. Before serving. _viz_: Rich milk or cream sweetened to taste and flavored with grated nutmeg. a pint of milk. two . put a spoonful of preserve in the widest end. the bottom and sides well buttered. leaving a space between each. which should be beaten to a cream. to keep them in shape. 2.

lay the surface over with raisins and citron. Eat warm with sweetened cream. the yolks and whites separately beaten. then whites. boil from five to ten minutes. one cupful of rich milk--half cream. put the halves together. Beat until half cold and stir in the beaten yolks. add six eggs. bake from twenty minutes to half an hour. then stir in the sugar. jam or marmalade. Close the slit by pinching the edges with your fingers. which should be well whisked and omit the whites of two. pour . flavor with a little grated lemon rind and beat the mixture well. Cut a stale cake into slices an inch and a half in thickness. and put a liberal spoonful of the conserve within. if you can get it. stir in the butter and let it cool before the other ingredients are added to it. and boil fifteen minutes in milk and water. Scald the milk and pour over the crumbs. It should be as stiff as can possibly be stirred with a spoon. Make a batter of one quart of milk and about one pound of flour. turn out quickly and dexterously. They may be dropped by spoonfuls on buttered tins and baked. Soak and split some crackers. rather more than half fill them. Fill large cups half full with the batter. one cupful of sweet jelly. pull partly open. Butter some small cups. take out. half a teaspoonful of soda stirred in boiling water. flour and eggs. tie them in a bag. with a sharp knife make an incision in the side of each. and serve with fruit. a teaspoonful of salt and four tablespoonfuls of sugar. a little of which may be poured over them.cupfuls of sifted flour and five eggs. if cups are not convenient. READY PUDDING. custard or wine sauce. When done. A ROYAL DESSERT. Dip a spoonful at a time into quick boiling water. five eggs beaten very light. according to the size of the puddings. Serve hot with sauce or syrup. set in a quick oven and bake half an hour. Make the milk hot. delicious with rich sauce. Two cupfuls of _very_ fine stale biscuit or bread crumbs. QUICK PUDDING. JELLY PUDDINGS. finally the soda.

Remove from the fire and when cool stir into it half of a cupful of brandy or wine. any kind that you choose. dip the slices in the egg and fry them in butter to a light brown. add to it a cupful of boiling water. Put into each bowl. and serve hot. when done. half a cupful of butter. 1. for each guest. Stir a heaping teaspoonful of cornstarch in a little cold water to a smooth paste (or instead use a tablespoonful of sifted flour). with one cupful of sugar. Another dish equally as good. have ready two eggs well beaten. boil all together ten minutes. a piece of butter as large as an egg. This is an old-fashioned New England breakfast dish. COLD. It should be about as thick as thin syrup. then add the brandy and spices. It also answers for a dessert. HUCKLEBERRIES WITH CRACKERS AND CREAM. . Two cupfuls of powdered sugar. one wine-glassful of brandy. place over each slice of cake a layer of preserves or you may make a rich sauce to be served with it. then fry _lightly_ in fresh butter in a smooth frying pan. a teaspoonful of each. BRANDY OR WINE SAUCE. pour over them a syrup. when fried.over them a little good sweet cream. broken in not too small pieces. Pick over carefully one quart of blueberries and keep them on ice until wanted. cinnamon and nutmeg. beat it hard and set aside until wanted. BRANDY SAUCE. Should be put into a mold to look nicely and serve on a flat dish. a teaspoonful of powdered sugar and fill the bowl with the richest of cold sweet cream. [Illustration] SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. No. two soda crackers. add a few tablespoonfuls of berries. is to dip thin slices of bread into fresh milk. Warm the butter slightly and work it to a light cream with the sugar.

stir it until it cooks sufficiently to thicken like cream. a little at a time. No. . Brown over the fire three tablespoonfuls of sugar. unbeaten. which has been made hot. Cream together a cupful of sifted sugar and half a cupful of butter. two of powdered sugar. SAUCE FOR PLUM PUDDING. Serve warm. boiling hot. It may be served cold or hot. strain while hot. Take one cupful of butter. Be sure and not let it boil. the yellow rind of a lemon cut very thin. RICH WINE SAUCE. add the whites of the eggs.) Cream together a cupful of sugar and half a cupful of butter. GRANDMOTHERS SAUCE. Stir into this one wine-glass of wine or one of brandy. Beat butter and sugar to a cream. The sauce should be smooth and foamy.BRANDY OR WINE SAUCE. Beat this mixture well. and then the wine or brandy. Boil a teacupful of milk and turn it. stirring all the time. six whole cloves and a piece of stick cinnamon. place it in a saucepan over the fire. half a cupful of wine. add a cupful of water. 2. then pour it into a sauce bowl containing the juice of the lemon and a cup of brandy. the whites of two eggs. a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg. when light and creamy. (Superior. One cupful of butter. Beat the butter to a cream. one at a time. Add the sugar gradually and when very light add the wine. five tablespoonfuls of sherry wine or brandy and a quarter of a cupful of boiling water. a pinch of salt and one large cupful of hot cream or rich milk. Place the bowl in hot water and stir till smooth and frothy. LIQUID BRANDY SAUCE. Place the bowl in a basin of hot water and stir for two minutes. add the well-beaten yolks of four eggs. add a teaspoonful of ground cinnamon and an egg well beaten. this will cook the egg smoothly. Delicious. let the sauce boil. over the mixture slowly. two of powdered sugar.

Boil all together until it becomes the consistency of syrup. one egg beaten light. HOT. it should boil in the milk three or four minutes. One coffeecupful of granulated sugar. grate nutmeg upon the sauce and serve on a flat dish. Put half a pint of new milk on the fire and when it boils stir into it one teaspoonful of wheat flour. Beat to a cream one teacupful of butter and two teacupfuls of fine white sugar. Beat to a cream one teacupful of butter and two teacupfuls of fine . half of a cupful of water. substituting orange for lemon. COLD LEMON SAUCE. One cupful of sugar. juice and grated rind. then stir in the juice and grated rind of one lemon. remove it from the fire and add the grated rind and the juice of one lemon. LEMON CREAM SAUCE. ORANGE CREAM SAUCE. if flour is used in making them. A tablespoonful of lemon juice is an improvement. one lemon.SUGAR SAUCE. HOT. put in a tin basin and thicken over steam. COLD ORANGE SAUCE. half a cupful of butter. stir it well and serve hot in a sauce tureen. four ounces of sugar and the well-beaten yolks of three eggs. half a cupful of boiling water. Nice with cottage pudding. pies and fritters may be made in the same manner with any other flavoring. a piece of butter the size of a walnut. Flavor with lemon or vanilla extract. Creams for puddings. LEMON SAUCE. This is made as LEMON CREAM SAUCE.

thick cold cream.white sugar. flavor to taste. then stir in the grated rind of one orange and the juice of two. add a teacupful of boiling water. stir it constantly. OLD STYLE SAUCE. when nearly boiling. grate nutmeg upon the sauce and serve on a flat dish. half a cupful of butter. COLD CREAM SAUCE. Have ready a pint of cold water and cup of sugar mixed with some flavoring. When these are all stirred together. then add a cupful of sweet. A GOOD PLAIN SAUCE. then watch it carefully until it becomes a delicate brown color. A good sauce to go with plain fruit puddings is made by mixing one cupful of brown sugar. half a nutmeg grated. set it off from the fire. put into it half a cupful of sugar. then strain. put into a saucepan and let it boil until clear. Stir to a cream one cupful of sugar. Heat a pint of cream slowly in a double boiler. the whites of two well-beaten eggs. CREAM SAUCE. one large teaspoonful of flour. stir until all the orange juice is absorbed. turn it into the saucepan with the browned sugar and let it simmer for ten minutes. one cupful of best molasses. when it begins to be hot. Set it on the fire in a dish containing hot water to keep it warm until needed. half a cupful of butter. CARAMEL SAUCE. WARM. a little nutmeg or vanilla extract. until all the water evaporates. put into it four tablespoonfuls of white sugar and one tablespoonful of water. add the juice and grated rind of one lemon. stir it thoroughly and add. when cool. stirring once or more. . The wine or brandy may be omitted if preferred. then add half a glass of brandy or a glass of wine. Place over the fire a saucepan. Stir it continually for three or four minutes. Stir well and set it in a cool place. half a teaspoonful of cloves and cinnamon.

then take it off and stir in the brandy or wine gradually. one egg and the flour. MILK SAUCE. add flavoring to taste. One cupful of sugar. blanc mange and the like. and can be made very quickly. MILK OR CREAM SAUCE. Whisk an ounce of butter and a cupful of sugar to a cream and add to it a pinch of salt. Mix together half a pint of milk. two beaten eggs. if preferred. Very nice in place of cold cream.One pint of sour cream. one pint of milk. Heat the milk to boiling. add by degrees the beaten eggs and sugar. put in the flavoring and set within a pan of boiling water. see that it is free from lumps. simply sweetened with plenty of white sugar and flavored. Dissolve a tablespoonful of flour in cold milk. This is delicious with cold "Brown Betty"--a form of cold farina--cornstarch. stir this into the butter and add a dash of nutmeg. PLAIN COLD. Stir together one cupful of white sugar and half a cupful of butter until it is creamy and light. flavored with the juice of raspberries or strawberries. or any flavor. Beat hard and long until the sauce is very light. or beat into it a cupful of ripe strawberries or raspberries and the white of an egg beaten stiff. sugar to taste. FRUIT SAUCE. until wanted. stir until it begins to thicken. This is very nice. answers the purpose for some kinds of pudding. heat until near the boiling point and serve. flavoring to taste. brandy or wine. within a pan of boiling water. HARD SAUCE. Cream or rich milk. the juice and finely grated rind of a large lemon. CUSTARD SAUCE. . set.

and when the bottle is . Fill small bottles that are perfectly dry with the syrup. allow half a pound of sugar and six cherry kernels. when cool. seed the cherries and let them stand in a bowl over night. boil fifteen minutes. adding also two tablespoonfuls of butter. (For Cakes and Puddings. JELLY SAUCE. add a cupful of sugar and a tablespoonful of vinegar. Boil all together slowly. then stir into it a teaspoonful of cornstarch. flavor with a tablespoonful of vanilla or lemon extract. For each pound of cherry juice. and as soon as they open put them into a wide-mouthed bottle. dissolved in half a cupful of water or wine. Into a pint of water stir a paste made of a tablespoonful of cornstarch or flour (rubbed smooth with a little cold water).) Gather the leaves of roses while the dew is on them. when it is cold. add it to the jelly and let it come to a boil. SYRUP FOR FRUIT SAUCE.Two-thirds of a cupful of sugar. stir occasionally. COMMON SWEET SAUCE. weigh the juice. ROSE BRANDY. This is very good served with dumplings or apple puddings. add the sugar. in the morning. a pint of raspberries or strawberries. a tablespoonful of melted butter and a cupful of hot water. Any fruit jelly can be used. Take from the fire and add a piece of butter as large as a small egg. seal them and keep them in a cool place. then strain through a sieve. Set it in a dish of hot water to keep it warm until time to serve. Most excellent to put into pudding sauces. which has been dipped in boiling water. cork the bottles tightly. Cook well for three minutes. sour cherries). Melt two tablespoonfuls of sugar and half a cupful of jelly over the fire in a cupful of boiling water. press them through a fine cloth. removing the scum as fast as it rises. standing upright. An excellent syrup for fruit sauce is made of Morello cherries (red. removing all the scum.

throw in more cold water and remove the scum.) When you use lemons for punch or lemonade. You will find this brandy useful for many purposes. JELLIES. using white sugar. In the same way keep for use the kernels of peach and plum stones. we used pound for pound. repeat until it is clear and pours like oil from the spoon. [Illustration] PRESERVES. ETC. It will be fit for use in three or four weeks and may be frequently replenished. as most preserves are put up in sealed jars or cans. dark sugar can be used by being clarified. In the old way of preserving. less sugar seems sufficient. let it boil up again. which produces the nicest syrup. do not throw away the peels but cut them in small pieces--the thin yellow outside (the thick part is not good)--and put them in a glass jar or bottle of brandy. and also that which is dry. if made bright and clean. (For Cakes and Puddings. if possible. Fruit should be boiled in a porcelain-lined or granite-ware dish.full pour in the best of fourth proof French brandy. pounding them slightly before you put them into the brandy. three-quarters of a pound of sugar is generally all that is required for a pound of fruit. copper or metal. Fruit for preserving should be sound and free from all defects. now. LEMON BRANDY. which is done by dissolving two pounds of sugar in a pint of water. boil it again. take it off and remove the scum. but other utensils. answer as well. It is sometimes considered preferable to wine as a flavoring to pastries and pudding sauces. add to it the white of an egg and beat it well. throw in a little cold water. when they were kept in stone jars or crocks. put it into a preserving kettle on the fire and stir with a wooden spoon. Any of the fruits that have been preserved in syrup may be converted . As soon as it begins to swell and boil up.

they should be immediately re-boiled with more sugar. while the fluid parts of the syrup gently evaporate. When cool. by first draining them from the syrup. Stone the cherries (opening them with a sharp quill) and save the juice that comes from them in the process. Keep all preserves in a cool. In this way it is. There cannot be too much care taken in selecting fruit for jellies. in drawers or boxes. to save them. It is perfectly harmless and tasteless. in bunches. weigh them and to each pound allow a pound of loaf sugar. then put on the lid or cover. When either preserves or canned fruits show any indications of fermentation. As you stone them. throw them into a large pan or tureen and strew about half the sugar over them and let them lie in it an hour or two after they are all stoned. Large glass tumblers are the best for keeping jellies. winch can be easily removed when the jelly is used. Take large. the juice should not be stirred. and then drying them in a stove or very moderate oven. which will gradually penetrate the fruit. for if the fruit is over ripe. They should be dried in the stove or oven on a sieve. for by being opened frequently they soon spoil. dry closet. ripe Morello cherries. a paper should be cut to fit and placed over the jelly. are extremely elegant and have a fine flavor. any amount of time in boiling will never make it jelly--there is where so many fail in making good jelly. much better than large vessels.into dry preserves. with thick paper rubbed over on the inside with the white of an egg. also. and saved to use over again another year. It is much better to be generous with the sugar at first than to have any losses afterwards. Mold can be prevented from forming on fruit jellies by pouring a little melted paraffine over the top. fresh powdered sugar being sifted over them every time they are turned. adding to them a quantity of powdered loaf sugar. PRESERVED CHERRIES. the jelly will not be clear. and turned every six or eight hours. it will harden to a solid cake. that orange and lemon chips are preserved. if allowed to boil under. Currants and cherries preserved whole in this manner. Afterwards they are to be kept in a dry situation. and another important matter is overlooked--that of carefully skimming off the juice after it begins to boil and a scum rises from the bottom to the top. but the scum carefully taken off. Then put them into a preserving kettle with the .

Take them out carefully with a perforated skimmer and fill your _hot_ jars nearly full. Now take them out and seal perfectly tight. the fruit will keep for several years. TO PRESERVE BERRIES WHOLE. then set the jars in a pot of _cold_ water on the stove. Put the sugar into a preserving kettle. If this process is followed thoroughly. bring to a boil slowly about twenty minutes. skimming them frequently. Keep in a cool. seal them _hot_. Pour this syrup into the jars over the berries. (Excellent. wash if absolutely necessary and put in glass jars. Take three quarts of the cranberries and put them into a stewpan with a pint and a half of water.remainder of the sugar and boil and skim them till the fruit is clear and the syrup thick. which should be like a thick jelly. dry place. Then squeeze the juice through a jelly bag. and let the water boil and the fruit become scalding hot. pick over immediately.) Buy the fruit when not _too ripe_. Cover the pan and boil or stew them till they are all to pieces. stirring it up frequently. The cranberries must be large and ripe. and let it come slowly to a boil. put them with the sugar over the fire in a porcelain kettle. PRESERVED CRANBERRIES. filling them up to the brim. pour the cranberry juice over it and let it stand until it is all melted. clear and of a bright color. When done. PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES. Let them boil till they are tender. Wash them and to six quarts of cranberries allow nine pounds of the beat loaf sugar. PRESERVED EGG PLUMS. put them warm into jars with the syrup. For every pound of fruit weigh a pound of refined sugar. boil the juice a few minutes longer and fill up the jars. . Put in the preserving kettle a pound of sugar and one cupful of water for every two pounds of fruit. Then place the kettle over the fire and put in the remaining three quarts of whole cranberries. filling each one about two-thirds full.

put the sugar on a slow fire in the preserving kettle. turn those at the bottom to the top carefully with a skimmer several times. until the whole are done. PRESERVED GREEN TOMATOES. free from imperfections. return the first to the kettle. close as usual. then lift them out with a perforated skimmer and place them singly in a large dish to cool. cut them in halves. In like manner quince. place the first in glass jars. apricot. when it is boiling hot. let them boil gently until a pure. PRESERVED PEACHES. pour the hot syrup over them. then put another layer of plums in the syrup and let them cook and cool in the same manner. let the syrup boil until it is quite thick. greengage and other fruit preserves are made. uniform color. carefully replace the broken skins so as not to spoil the appearance of the plums. let them cook until they lose their color a little and the skins begin to break. plum. Let them remain open one night. or a fork with fine prongs. when they are cold.Use a pound of sugar for a pound of plums. When the peaches are cold put them carefully into jars and pour the syrup over them. take out the stones and pare them neatly. take each half up with a spoon and spread them on flat dishes to become cold. put to this quantity six . or strain the syrup. but taking out the seeds. when the last layer is finished. when all are done. the jelly should be of the color and consistency of rich wine jelly. set it over a moderate fire. and place a layer of them in the syrup. leaving any sediment which has settled at the bottom. cherry. When all are done. do not hurry them. put to each pound of sugar a teacupful of water. and boil until transparent. Take one peck of green tomatoes. pour it into a large pitcher and let it set to cool and settle. put in the peaches. then cover. Peaches for preserving may be ripe but not soft. stir it until it is dissolved. Slice six fresh lemons without removing the skins. do the same with each layer. wash the plums and wipe dry. then prick each plum thoroughly with a needle. in every case fine large fruit should be taken. Some of the kernels from the peach-stones may be put in with the peaches while boiling. and the slightest bruises or other fault should be removed. as they cool. with as much water as will melt the sugar and let it simmer slowly. apple. clear. while the latest cooked are cooling. take as many pounds of white sugar as of fruit. When they are clear.

A nice way is to stick a clove in the blossom end of each pear. to impart a pleasant flavor. lift out as they are done with a drainer and lay on a dish. let them simmer over a slow fire until transparent. the fruit will remain unbroken and present a beautiful and inviting appearance. but on no account stir them. cover them with water and boil for half an hour.) Peel and core large firm apples (pippins are best). both on account of the flavor and size. orange peel or mace. When all are cooked. PRESERVED QUINCES. Let them remain in the syrup until both are perfectly cold. Have two fresh lemons cut in thin slices. Then. one pound of sugar. Make a nice syrup of nearly one cupful of water and one pound of sugar. One pound of fruit.pounds of sugar. and allow it to boil ten minutes before putting in the quinces. pare off the peeling thin. and put the juice back into the kettle and boil the quinces in it a little at a time until they are tender. allowing a pint to one pound of fruit. core and quarter your fruit. if liked. When the syrup has been well skimmed and is clear. Throw them into water as you pare them. for this fruit seems to . Then strain and. while they are boiling occasionally slip a silver spoon under them to see that they do not burn. pour it boiling hot over the apples. return to the kettle. PRESERVED APPLES. and when clarified by boiling and skimming put in the pears and stew gently until clear. Pare. common white. PRESERVED PEARS. throw into this liquor the sugar. When all the minutiae of these directions are attended to. with enough lemon peel. on a slow fire. and boil until transparent and the syrup thick. Boil the parings in water for fifteen minutes. adding three-quarters of a pound of sugar to each pint of water. and when the fruit is being put in jars lay a slice or two in each. which must be drained from the water in which they have hitherto stood. Ginger root may be added. then weigh it and allow an equal quantity of white sugar. if the liquid seems scarce add more water. covering closely. as measured at first. Quinces may be steamed until tender. Take the parings and cores and put in a preserving kettle. say one hour and a quarter. then strain through a hair-sieve. (Whole. let them boil until they change color. Choose rather pears like the Seckle for preserving.

put it in a preserving kettle. after scattering a few bits of alum amongst it. let the syrup boil or simmer gently until it is thick and rich and when nearly cool. and put in the pieces _without_ the sugar. cover the kettle and boil them gently until transparent throughout. cover it and set it over the fire and let them boil gently until they are tender and clear. and lose nothing in appearance. The next day secure the jars. Simmer the fruit for two hours. and from the same water take what you need for making their syrup. The usual manner of preserving it by putting it into the syrup without first boiling it. take it out. then take them from the water. makes it little better than sweetened leather. or cut them in four or six and shape each piece like a whole pineapple. when it is so. stir it until it is all dissolved. Pour in water to cover the whole and place a thick cloth over the kettle. cut the watermelon rind into pieces. A layer of vine-leaves must cover each layer of melon rind. If you can procure only large pears to preserve. into a dish. a pound for each pound of fruit. cut them into halves. TO PRESERVE WATERMELON RIND AND CITRON. Pineapple done in this way is a beautiful and delicious preserve. pour it over the fruit. PINEAPPLE PRESERVES. or even slices. Another acceptable addition to pear preserves may be found instead. parboil them until tender before beginning to preserve. Put to the water white sugar. then put in the pineapple. Spread the melon rind on a dish to cool. Melt the sugar. If the pears are hard and tough. Pare off the green skin. Twist off the top and bottom and pare off the rough outside of pineapples. by adding the juice and thinly pared rind of one lemon to each five pounds of fruit. so that they can get done more quickly. using a pint of water to a pound and a half of sugar. by sticking a fork in the centre of each slice. . and mix with it some beaten white of egg. let it cool and put it in glass jars. put a teacupful of water. as before directed. then weigh them and cut them in slices. chips or quarters.require some extraneous flavor to bring out its own piquancy. to each pound of fruit. either. Boil and skim the sugar. Line your kettle with green vine-leaves. Weigh the pieces and allow to each pound a pound and a half of loaf sugar. or with a skimmer.

adding half a pint of water to every three pounds of sugar used until the pumpkin becomes tender. and let it remain all night. Also green limes. then drain off the syrup. rejecting all that is in the least degree blemished. in a place free from damp. Weigh the pumpkin. first paring off the outer skin and cutting them into quarters. sweet pumpkin. and pour it boiling over the pumpkin. To each pound of pumpkin allow one pound of roughly pounded loaf sugar. A little bruised ginger and lemon rind. PRESERVED PUMPKINS. keep them in a box. Citrons may be preserved in the same manner. It is not fit for use immediately. Obtain a good. may be boiled in the syrup to flavor the pumpkin. Put the rind in jars and pour over it the syrup. TO PRESERVE AND DRY GREENGAGES. and put it into a lined saucepan with the sugar and water. with paper between each layer. Weigh the fruit. the fruit must be used before it is quite ripe and part of the stalk must be left on. put the slices in a pan or deep dish in layers. pour it over the rind. skim. and put them in an oven or warm spot to dry. one quarter pint of water. The next morning. and drain the greengages. where let it remain for a week. let it simmer for three minutes. and the last time place the greengages. To every pound of sugar allow one pound of fruit. it is done. when drained. and drain the syrup away. allowing one lemon to a quart of syrup. boil the syrup again. Boil the fruit in this for ten minutes. take out the rind. remove it from the fire. halve it. and let the whole remain for two or three days. boil it until it is quite thick. The next day boil up the syrup and put in the fruit again. on a hair-sieve. with the sugar sprinkled between them. then turn the whole into a pan. which should have been previously boiled together to a rich syrup. one gill of lemon juice. Boil all together. take out the seeds and pare off the rind. When it is thick enough to hang in a drop from the point of a spoon. thinly pared. For this purpose. . put in the rind and let it boil two hours. cut it into neat slices. pour the lemon juice over the top. boil the syrup with lemon juice. Continue this process for five or six days.When quite clear.

apricots. Strawberries. You may use as much of one sort of fruit as you like. and it may be put in from day to day.) Housekeepers who dislike the tedious. We have found it good eight months after making. Every sort of fruit may be used.. perfectly ripe fruit. beginning with strawberries and ending with plums. apricots. TO PRESERVE FRUIT WITHOUT 'SUGAR. and. blackberries. stir every day so that the sugar will be dissolved. Cherries. strawberries. Half the quantity of spirits may be used. Cover the jars tight and put them in a dry place. apricots and peaches peeled and cut in quarters or eighths or dice. Put one quart of white. (New Mode. sliced pineapple. may be preserved in the following manner--to be used the same as fresh fruit. using a clean. if you like. The first is for "tutti frutti. wooden spoon kept for the purpose. Gather the fruit before it is very ripe._A Southern Recipe. and will keep for a number of months. no fire being needed in their preparation. The second is as follows: Take some pure white vinegar and mix with it granulated sugar until a syrup is formed quite free from acidity. which you put in the brandy. currants and grapes. the following two recipes. plums. will appreciate. quinces may be steamed until tender. The preserve will be ready for use within a week after the last fruit is put in. as they make the color of the preserve very rich. old-time fashion of clarifying sugar and boiling the fruit. and the daily stirring must never be forgotten. in prime condition and perfectly dry. just as you happen to have it. raspberries. peaches. etc. Then for every pound of fruit. plums. are all used. The contents will keep for six or eight months. Plums and grapes should be peeled and seeded. for that is the secret of success." and has been repeatedly tested with unvarying success. fine Batavia brandy into a two-gallon stone jar that has a tightly fitting top. cherries also must be seeded. gathered in dry weather. use three-quarters of a pound of granulated sugar. Be sure and have at least one pound of black cherries. and the flavor of the fruit will be excellent. cherries (sweet and sour). The jar must be kept in a cool. put it in wide-mouthed . preserving. dry place._ PRESERVING FRUIT. gooseberries. Pour this syrup into earthen jars and put in it good.

the jelly will form within an hour. set in the bottles. boil the juice just twenty minutes from the time it begins fairly to boil. a stout. put the sugar into shallow dishes or pans. and heat it in the oven. apples and other fruits are reduced to a paste by jamming. A new method of preserving fruit is practiced in England. place this in a kettle of tepid water and set on the fire. coarse one. putting in a few handfuls each time. withdraw the spoon when all is thoroughly dissolved. and between each squeezing turning it inside out to scald off the pulp and skins. then fill the saucepan with water to the necks of the bottles. let the jelly come to a boil to make all certain. close and tie up as you do preserves. Pears. with hay between them to prevent their touching. by this time the sugar should be _very_ hot. closely covered. watching and stirring it to prevent burning. hard. pressing the bag. and. until the fruit is broken to pieces. No peeling or coring is required. so that it may be had at any time of the year and bears long sea-voyages with out detriment. while it is boiling. withdraw the kettle instantly from the fire. let it stand until the bottles are cold. and fill with the scalding liquid. put some hay in a large saucepan. differing with the supply and price of the latter. strain. roll your glasses and cups in hot water. which is then pressed into cakes and gently dried. and set it over the fire until the water is nearly boiled. so there is no waste. stirring rapidly all the time. then take it off. When required for use it is only necessary to pour four times their weight of boiling water over them and allow them to soak for twenty minutes and then add sugar to suit the taste. The fine flavor of the fruit is said to be retained to perfection. seal the corks. FRUIT JELLIES.bottles made for the purpose. throw it into the boiling juice. set the juice on alone to boil. when the fruit will be found equal to fresh. let it boil. NEW METHOD OF PRESERVING FRUIT. to each pint of juice allow a pound of loaf sugar. fill them as full as they will hold and cork them tight. Take a stone jar and put in the fruit. . The cost of the prepared product is scarcely greater than that of the original fruit. when cold. CURRANT JELLY. Keep them in a cool place until wanted. the keeping qualities are excellent.

Currants for jelly should be perfectly ripe and gathered the _first_ week of the season. Pour it into hot jelly glasses and seal when cool. and this must be removed and the whole strained again through the jelly bag. core and cut them small. put them into a stone jar. and an equal weight of powdered white sugar is to be added. then turn it into pots or tumblers and. they lose their jelly property if they hang on the bushes too long. rub off the down from them. produced by fermentation. stirring them up occasionally. This is to be stirred constantly until entirely dissolved. and set in a vessel of hot water over the fire. (New Method. In about twenty-four hours a considerable amount of froth will cover the surface. QUINCE JELLY. Then squeeze them through a coarse cloth or towel. CURRANT JELLY. Quinces for jelly should not be quite ripe. The currants are to be washed and squeezed in the usual way. which will keep as long as if it had been cooked. stirring frequently. or until it congeals in the spoon when held in the air. without mashing. stir it until it is all dissolved. Skim it before it boils. put them in a preserving kettle with a teacupful of water for each pound. when cold. Put the sugar into a porcelain kettle. Wild frost grape jelly is nice made after this recipe. and set away in a cool place in the cellar. to each pint of the liquor put a pound of sugar. At the end of another twenty-four hours a perfectly transparent jelly of the most satisfactory flavor will be formed. until by cooling some on a plate you find it a good jelly. pour the juice over it. and then put into jars. put them in a thin muslin bag with the liquor. they should be a fine yellow. then set it over the fire and let it boil gently. and become too juicy--the juice will not be apt to congeal. tied up tightly and set away. press them very lightly. To each pint of juice allow a pound and a quarter of refined sugar. boil about twenty minutes. let them stew gently until soft.) This recipe for making superior jelly without heat is given in a Parisian journal of chemistry. which may be worth trying by some of our readers. . then weighed. keep the water around it boiling until the currants are all broken. secure as directed for jellies. and the juice placed in a stone or earthen vessel. Strip them from the stalks.

and let them cook slowly until the apples look red. the fresh fruit is not obtainable. cover down. and place this jar. strain the fruit through a fine hair-sieve or cloth. Pour into a colander. keeping as hot as possible. and. measure it and allow to every pint of juice a pound of sugar and half the juice of a lemon. covered. Select apples that are rather tart and highly flavored. pour the jelly into small pots. Take the cider just as it is made. boil quickly for ten minutes. slice them without paring. return to the kettle. measure the juice. and to every pint allow the above proportion of white sugar. flat. Try a little. GRAPE JELLY. when a little is poured on a plate. The juice of apples boiled in shallow vessels. very large and shallow. cover with water. pour all into a preserving kettle and cook slowly for a few minutes to extract the juice. without a particle of sugar.RASPBERRY JELLY. and boil half an hour. allowing a pound of sugar to every pint of juice. and then through a flannel jelly-bag. measure the juice. boil it in a pan. place in a porcelain preserving kettle. Let the raspberries be freshly gathered. drain off the juice. in winter. Put the juice and sugar into a preserving pan. remove and put into glasses. if possible. quite ripe. while that from light fruit is like amber. and boil fast for at least half an hour. carefully remove all the scum as it rises. APPLE JELLY. which will be in from three-quarters to one hour. When the juice is well drawn. and if it seems done. delicious jelly imaginable. not allowing it to ferment at all. Mash well the berries so as to remove the skins. put them into a large jar after breaking the fruit a little with a wooden spoon. pick from the stalks. place it over the fire. when. Red apples will give jelly the color and clearness of claret. makes the most sparkling. and keep in a dry place. To each pint of juice allow one pound of sugar. a few quince seeds boiled with the berries the first time tend to stiffen it. in a saucepan of boiling water. and let this run through a jelly-bag. which must be carefully washed. strain through a colander. . This jelly answers for making raspberry cream and for flavoring various sweet dishes. and boil gently until the jelly thickens. for if not allowed to cool before putting again on the stove the jelly conies much stiffer.

Pare the oranges. strain the jelly. and add when the juice has boiled twenty minutes. strain the apples through a coarse flannel. . Pare the peaches. Stir them often until the fruit is well cooked. and removing all the seeds. and to every pint of the juice add the juice of a lemon. CRAB-APPLE JELLY. then slice them. Place them in a kettle with enough water to cover them. Grate the yellow rind of two Florida oranges and two lemons.FLORIDA ORANGE JELLY. take out the stones. allowing rather more sugar. measure again. except that you scald the lemons and squeeze out the juice. Put the juice and sugar together. let it come to a boil and take instantly from the fire. then add the syrup. then put in bottles and cork tight. then strain. meantime. boil and skim it until it is cream. and cool it in molds wet in cold water. The apples should be juicy and ripe. then proceed as for currant jelly. then strain it through a flannel bag and let it stand until it becomes cool. ORANGE SYRUP. squeeze and strain the juice from the pulp. more water is added as it evaporates while cooking. allowing a pound of sugar to each pint of juice. put in the grated rind a quarter of a pound of sugar. and boil these ingredients together until a rich syrup is formed. and squeeze the juice into a porcelain-lined preserving kettle. afterward put into a preserving kettle over the fire. or more if the fruit is sour. the black spots in the cores removed. and a gill of water. The fruit is then quartered. To one pint of juice allow one pound and three-quarters of loaf sugar. adding the juice of two more oranges. add to them about a quarter of the kernels. stirring it over the fire until it is entirely dissolved. When boiled to a pulp. with a teacupful of water in the bottom to prevent burning. PEACH JELLY. Lemon syrup is made in the same way. heat the sugar very hot. dissolve two ounces of gelatine in a quart of warm water.

adding a _very_ little water.ORANGE MARMALADE. Pare half the oranges and cut the rind into shreds. put into small jars. Boil in three waters until tender and set aside. When all appears well dissolved. Take six fine large cooking apples. not to break up the fruit. Press brandied tissue paper down closely to the fruit. simmer for one-half hour and put into pots air-tight. Mold. Grate the rind of the remaining oranges. (A French Marmalade. and put them to stew with the apples and enough water to prevent their burning. split and stone two and a half pounds of raisins. unless the oranges are very juicy. quarter all the oranges and take out the seeds. or to dish up for eating with cream. and using but half the grated peel. LEMON MARMALADE Is made as you would prepare orange--allowing a pound and a quarter of sugar to a pound of the fruit. Boil and skim five or six minutes. A nicer way still is to put away in tumblers with self-adjusting metal tops. if you like. STRAWBERRY JAM. RAISINS. take off. stirring until the sugar is dissolved. tied up with bladder or paper next the fruit. to cut in thin slices for the ornamentation of pastry. When well stewed. and boil twenty minutes longer. and throw away every bit of the thick white inner skin. beat it through a strainer bowl. Chop or cut them into small pieces. To each pound of fine and not too ripe berries.) This recipe is particularly valuable at seasons when fruit is scarce. cloths dipped in wax over all. heat this. together with a wine-glass of Medeira wine and half a pound of sugar. allow three-quarters of a pound of sugar. peel them. or put away in small preserve jars. and lastly through a sieve. Put them into a preserving pan and stir gently. then the chopped fruit and grated peel. put them over a slow fire. put in the boiled shreds and cook ten minutes. Allow pound for pound. drain all the juice that will come away without pressing them over the sugar. When cold. An excellent way to seal jellies and jams is as the German women do: cut round covers from writing paper a half-inch too large .

or until it thickens well. I have removed covers heavy with mold to find the preserve intact. Peaches and pears should be peeled for brandying. RASPBERRY JAM. Make a syrup of the sugar and enough water to dissolve it. pour the hot syrup over the fruit and seal. A circular paper dipped in brandy and laid over the toothsome contents before covering. drain this off before adding the clear syrup. Stem. Plums should be pricked and watched carefully for fear of bursting. If picked at the right stage the jam will be amber colored and firm. BRANDIED PEACHES OR PEARS. Having removed the fruit carefully. a reddish liquor oozes from it. leaving out the currant juice. dry and cool place. smear the inside with the unbeaten white of an egg. put the fruit in and boil five minutes. cover with brandied paper and tie a thick white paper over them. one pint of best white brandy. four pounds of sugar. tie over with a cord. and it will dry quickly and be absolutely preservative. after the fruit is taken from the fire. will prevent any dampness from affecting the flavor. and very much nicer than if the fruit is preserved when ripe. let the syrup boil fifteen minutes longer. To four pounds of fruit add half a teacupful of water. Mash the whole well in a preserving kettle. Let this come to a boil. then put into small jars. Keep in a dark. A NEW WAY OF KEEPING FRUIT. If. boil until soft and add four pounds of sugar and boil until clear. wash and weigh. Put up in glass jars. Blackberry or strawberry jam is made the same way. To five or six pounds of fine red raspberries (not too ripe) add an equal quantity of the finest quality of white sugar.for the tops. Pick the gooseberries just as they begin to turn. GOOSEBERRY JAM. add the brandy and take the kettle at once from the fire. Four pounds of fruit. . add about one quart of currant juice (a little less will do) and boil gently till it jellies upon a cold plate.

. securely tied on. The fruit thus protected will keep an indefinite period. then fill immediately with the hot. and pour a little jelly successively over each. sections of oranges. only long enough for the sugar to penetrate. They must be perfectly . Harder fruits like pears. pineapples. Suspend in the centre of the jelly mold a bunch of grapes. in a tin pan of hot water on the stove. while the mold is on ice and the first layers are hardening. [Illustration] CANNED FRUITS Berries and all ripe. and they cannot pass through the cotton batting. or brandied fruits. Prepare and cook the fruit precisely as for canning in glass jars. The following directions are given for the process: Use crocks. fill to the top. half to three-quarters of a pound is considered sufficient. fill your dishes with fruit while hot and immediately cover with cotton batting. cherries. berries. scalding fruit. and pour in a little jelly when quite cold. Do not re-heat the jelly. occasionally screw down the tops tighter. stone butter-jars or any other convenient dishes. Cooking the fruit expels all these. The great secret of canning is to make the fruit or vegetable perfectly air-tight. Remember that all putrefaction is caused by the invisible creatures in the air. roll them in the hot water. It must be put up boiling hot and the vessel filled to the brim. or currants on their stems. Strew sugar over them. but keep it in a warm place. etc. MACEDOINES. arranging in circles. and the glass contracts and allows the air to enter the cans. require longer boiling. but not set. It will be remembered that Tyndall has proved that the atmospheric germs cannot pass through a layer of cotton. allow them to stand a few hours. It makes a very agreeable effect. as the fruit shrinks as it cools. By a little ingenuity you can imbed first one fruit and then another. which should also be heated.It is stated that experiments have been made in keeping fruit in jars covered only with cotton batting. Have your jars conveniently placed near your boiling fruit. mellow fruit require but little cooking. then merely scald with the sugar. and at the end of two years the fruit was sound. and seal quickly with the tops. quinces.

Use a brush in covering the corks and as they cool. After one week. remembering to take them out when you begin to fill up the jars. to six pounds of sugar add half a tumbler of water. . until upon tipping the vessel to one side you can see some liquid. are much nicer and keep for years with careful usage. They can be restored to normal condition usually by letting them lie in water in which you have put a little ammonia. three ounces of beeswax. dry place. They should be kept in a dark closet. but frequently a half hour is needed to restore their elasticity. remaining until it was made to boil around them. put in the kettle a layer of sugar and one of peaches until the whole of both are in. Pack in a cool. Place in a basin of cold water. cracks or signs of ferment. then fill the jars. though not _soft_. steam the corks and pare them to a close fit. for we consider glass jars with stoppers screwing down upon India-rubber rings as the best for canning fruit in families. cool. to make nice canned fruit. Fruit must be of fine flavor and _ripe_. to prevent a yellowish crust. If you are obliged to use common large-mouthed bottles with corks. but away from the fire. Let the sugared fruit remain on the range. dip the mouth into the melted wax.air-tight. Peaches should be thrown into cold water as they are peeled. Mix in this proportion: One part of ammonia and two parts water. one and one-half ounces of tallow. CANNED PEACHES. and although somewhat more expensive than tin in the first instance. Use glass jars for fruit always. tie them up and put into the kettle. dark and dry cellar. The rubber rings used to assist in keeping the air from the fruit cans sometimes become so dry and brittle as to be almost useless. examine for flaws. CANNED GRAPES. The jars to be kept in a dark. and the fruit should be cooked in a porcelain or granite-iron kettle. Wash about eight peach leaves. driving them in with a mallet. In this way you will find out if the glass has been properly annealed. taking them out of hot water into which they were put when cold. Sometimes they do not need to lie in this more than five minutes. Use the following wax for sealing: One pound of resin. To one pound of peaches allow half a pound of sugar.

having the skins boiling. in a little water. When the pulp seems tender. as they are tough.There is no fruit so difficult to can nicely as the grape. have ready the jars with their fastenings. . CANNED STRAWBERRIES. as the seeds are objectionable. CANNED FRUIT JUICES. Cut the fruit half an inch thick. CANNED PINEAPPLE. then add the skins. boil syrup five minutes and skim or strain if necessary. if not too much. and fastened up tight as quickly as possible. boil the pulp. To one quart jarful of quince. and when boiling put in the quinces. The jars must be filled so that the syrup overflows. keep tightening them up. take a coffeesaucer and a half of sugar and a coffeecupful of water. then put in the berries very carefully. let as many as can be put carefully in the preserve kettle at once be placed on a platter. TO CAN QUINCES. fill and shut up as soon as possible. make syrup with two and a half pounds of sugar and nearly three pints of water. As soon as they come thoroughly to a boil put them in warm jars and seal while boiling hot. After the berries are picked over. and when the quince is clear and tender put rapidly into the jars. stand the jars in a pan of boiling water on the stove. put it through the sieve. in one kettle. put the sugar and water on the fire. by observing the following instructions you will find the grapes rich and tender a year from putting up. if tender. Squeeze the pulp from the skin. hard in another kettle. Use the best white sugar. when cut and ready to can. fruit and syrup together. then add the fruit and let it boil up. boil until thick and can in the usual way. with the water they boil in. until the seeds begin to loosen. Cut the quinces into thin slices like apples for pies. We use a large coffeecupful of sugar for a quart can. have cans hot. As the cans cool. To each pound of fruit add three-fourths of a pound of sugar. For six pounds of fruit. till the juice is drawn from them. pour it into the kettle and let it come to a boil and remove the scum which rises. let them stand two or three hours.

lift the boiler from the fire. Split the kernels lengthwise with a knife. place the boiler on the fire and _boil_ three hours without ceasing. The jars should be filled to the brim to prevent air from getting in. They will keep two or three years in this way. Will keep a long time. as this will enter the can easily. putting it by for this purpose. the same as canned fruit. over the cans put a layer of cloth. etc. Put it in a porcelain kettle. On steady boiling depends much of your success. and the tomatoes are then put into the preserving kettle. use the small end of a potato masher. bring it to the boiling point. then a layer of cans. It will take from ten to a dozen large ears of corn to fill a one-quart can. To each pint of juice add one cupful of white granulated sugar. thus leaving the hulls upon the cob. press out the juice and strain it through a flannel cloth. dark closet. TO CAN CORN. Very ripe tomatoes are the best for the purpose. they are put into the jars while boiling hot and sealed tightly. and bottle while hot in small bottles. then place a cloth in the bottom of a wash boiler to prevent breakage. and set in a cool. Select clean ripe fruit.Canned fruit juices are an excellent substitute for brandy or wine in all puddings and sauces. CANNED TOMATOES. When the cans are full. It must be sealed very tight while it is _hot_. Fill the boiler in this manner. Canning tomatoes is quite a simple process. which are apt to injure the flavor. then cover the cans well with cold water. To press the corn in the can. which is easily removed. Fill cans full of cut corn. It is a good plan to can the pure juices of fruit in the summer time. A large or small quantity may be done at a time. This loosens the skin. pressing it in very hard. After boiling three hours. let . On this put a layer of cans in any position you prefer. They are first put into a large pan and covered with boiling water. screw cover on with thumb and first finger. and brought to a boil. After boiling slowly one-half hour. set over a moderate fire without the addition of water or any seasoning. then scrape with the back of the knife. and they should be put in glass jars in preference to those of tin. this will be tight enough.

skim and pour at once into jars. then put them over a moderate fire and allow to come to a boil. but on no account open them after canning. let them remain until cold. and in this way "mince pies" can be had in the middle of summer as well as in winter. Put the sugar and plums alternately into the preserving kettle. first pricking the plums to prevent their breaking. Wrap each can in brown paper to exclude the light and keep in a cool._ CANNED PLUMS. dry cellar and be very sure the rubber rings are not hardened by use. CANNED MINCE MEAT. and put into glass jars and sealed perfectly tight. _Mary Currier Parsons. shake the can so they can be filled well. String beans are cut as for cooking and canned in the same manner. but by shaking the cans they may be filled quite full. Pour into the cans enough cold water to fill to overflowing. You cannot press the peas in the can as you did the corn. merely filled with the cut corn. then tighten again. dark place. cover and screw down the tops. and if the cans are sealed properly. You will observe that in canning corn the cans are not wrapped in a cloth nor heated. then take the cans from the boiler and tighten. The rings should be renewed every two years. Fill the can full of peas. pepper or sugar should be added. then screw the cover tight as you can with your thumb and first finger and proceed exactly as in canning corn. TO CAN PEAS. I would advise the beginner to use new rings entirely. and set in a cool. Mince meat for pies can be preserved for years if canned the same as fruit while _hot_. No seasoning of salt. To every pound of plums allow a quarter of a pound of sugar. One glass quart jar will hold enough to make two ordinary-sized pies.the water cool. Let them stand on the back of the stove for an hour or two. running a silver spoon handle around the inside of the jar to break the air-bubbles. the meat will be just as fine when opened as when . The corn in the can will shrink considerable in boiling. for poor rings cause the loss of canned fruit and vegetables in many cases.

seal tight. the same as canned fruit. Boiled cider is an article rarely found in the market. cut them from the stone in one piece. make a syrup of three-quarters of a pound of sugar and a little water. Put in stone or glass jars. stew them until tender. place in a dark. removing the stones. Cut up pumpkin or squash into small pieces. put in the peaches. Boiled cider. and keep in a cool place. shortly after it is made. allow two pounds of sugar to six pounds of fruit. and before fermentation takes place. PEACH BUTTER. Stir often and do not let them burn. was indispensable to the making of a good "mince pie. and is far superior to fruit cake made without it. CANNED PUMPKIN. in our grandmothers' time. Place five quarts of _sweet_ cider in a porcelain-lined kettle over the fire. and boil very slowly one hour. using _sweet_ cider. carefully watching it that it does not burn. cool closet. then mash them very fine with a potato masher. Pare ripe peaches and put them in a preserving kettle. with sufficient water to boil them soft. boil it slowly until reduced to one quart. keeps longer. made hot. a few at a . PEACHES DRIED WITH SUGAR. and a gill of which being added to a rule of "fruit cake" makes it more moist. nowadays. first cutting off the peel. CANNED BOILED CIDER. then sift through a colander. which cannot be substituted by any other ingredient. To each quart of peaches put one and one-half pounds of sugar. but can be made by any one. Pumpkins or squash canned are far more convenient for ready use than those dried in the old-fashioned way. Have ready your cans. and then fill them with the hot pumpkin or squash. It is then ready to use any time of the year. add no seasoning.first canned. with but little trouble and expense. Peel yellow peaches." adding the proper flavor and richness. turn into glass jars while hot and seal tightly.

if any syrup is left. YELLOW COLORING. sweet puddings and confectionery. Take two cents' worth of cochineal. and then filter it through fine muslin. Then strain it. add to them a piece of alum the size of a cherry stone and boil them with a gill of soft water in an earthen vessel. Take them up carefully on a dish and set them in the sun to dry. a little at a time. Take twenty grains of cochineal and fifteen grains of cream of tartar finely powdered. add half alcohol to it. then mixing with the . Then strain it through muslin. To color fruit yellow. and let them cook gently until quite clear. RED OR PINK COLORING. [Illustration] COLORING FOR FRUIT. lay them lightly in a jar with a little sugar sifted between the layers. To color icing. slowly. Strew powdered sugar over them on all sides. put it into an earthen vessel with a very small quantity of cold. then take it up. Cork the bottle tight. Take a little saffron. soft water. ETC. Lay it on a flat plate and bruise it with the blade of a knife. spread it on dishes to cool and finish as may be directed. squeezing a little juice through it. Put it into half a teacupful of alcohol. DEEP RED COLORING. If a little alcohol is added it will keep any length of time. Always ready for immediate use. for half an hour.time. and keep it tightly corked in a phial. Let it stand a quarter of an hour. remove to fresh dishes. boil the fruit with fresh lemon skins in water to cover them until it is tender. put the grated peel of a lemon or orange in a thin muslin bag. When they are quite dry. and let it steep till the color of the infusion is a bright yellow. Strawberry or cranberry juice makes a fine coloring for frosting.

. CARAMEL OR BURNT SUGAR. sauces or gravies. then spread them on a baking-sheet and dry them in a warm place.--into the sugar grains made as above. etc. for the reason that when albumen (and the white of egg is nearly pure albumen) is put into a liquid that is muddy. Or make the juice very strong and add a quart of alcohol. Put one cupful of sugar and two teaspoonfuls of water in a saucepan on the fire. or indigo. perhaps. from substances suspended in it. Take fresh spinach or beet leaves and pound them in a marble mortar. SUGAR GRAINS. These are made by pounding white lump sugar in a mortar and shaking it through sieves of different degrees of coarseness. Bottle it air-tight. or liquid carmine. take off the green froth as it rises. let it boil a few minutes and when cold. give it a boil in a saucepan. thus accumulating grains of different sizes. on boiling . saffron. as well as some other fluids. bottle. take the juice when you have pressed out a teacupful. If you wish to keep it a few days. then add a half cupful of water and a pinch of salt. If you want it for immediate use. GREEN COLORING. until each grain is stained. stir constantly until it is quite a dark color. Stir a little coloring--as the essence of spinach.sugar. SUGAR GRAINS. COLORED. For coloring soups. TO CLARIFY JELLY. and mix it with the article you intend to color. The white of egg is. They are used in ornamenting cake. and adding to it a piece of alum the size of a pea. or prepared cochineal. rouge. the best substance that can be employed in clarifying jelly. They are used in ornamenting cake.

and put into the pan four cupfuls of sugar. Icing can only be made with powdered sugar which is produced by grinding or crushing loaf sugar nearly as fine as flour. ICING OR POWDERED SUGARS. Loaf sugar will generally do for all candy-making without further clarification. will need clarifying. and so continue until no scum rises. Remove the pan. it is not re-boiled to procure its white color. dark-colored cocoanut. and the sugar comes out with a dry. Then remove as before. CONFECTIONERY In the making of confections the best _granulated_ or _loaf_ sugar should be used. Brown or yellow sugars are used for caramels. The process is as follows: Beat up well the white of an egg with a cupful of cold water and pour it into a very clean iron or thick new tin saucepan. It is a centrifugal sugar--that is. white grain. Put on the stove and heat _moderately_ until the scum rises.coagulates in a flocculent manner. (Beware of glucose mixed with sugar. rises with them to the surface as a scum. according to the kind of candy to be made. and skim off the top. and pulled molasses candies generally. but is moistened with water and then put into rapidly-revolving cylinders. Occasionally sugar made into candies. for soft. mixed with a cupful of warm water. according to their weight. and. or sinks to the bottom. The quantities of sugar and water are the same in all cases. The uncrystalized syrup or molasses is whirled out of it. then place on the fire again until the scum rises again. Confectioners' A is superior in color and grain to the Havana.--This is powdered loaf sugar. and for refined or loaf sugar a quarter will do. Havana is the cheapest grade of white sugar and a shade or two lighter than the brown. This recipe is good for brown or yellowish sugar. white sugars. . half the white of an egg will do. entangling with the impurities. taffy.) Sugar is boiled more or less. "creams" or syrups. and it is necessary to understand the proper degree of sugar boiling to operate it successfully.

remove the pan to the table. For hard. and those used for fruit and confectionery. set it back . and other superior uses. and will roll into a ball between the fingers. pour the whole into the bowl. stir or beat it with a large spoon. stirred to a cream. if it becomes creamy. and then grow stiffer until you find it necessary to take your hands and work it like bread dough. should be removed. when nearly cold. take it in your lap. Take out a small spoonful. and fit for use as a colored sugar in crystallized goods. not the poor kind usually sold at the grocer's. the syrup should be boiled until. or it will stick to them. For common crack candies. or pudding-stick. If it is not boiled enough to cream. The hands should be buttered when handling it.GRANULATED SUGAR--This is a coarse-grained sugar. Essences and extracts should be bought at the druggist's. but if intended for soft. Put four cupfuls of white sugar and one cupful of water into a bright tin pan on the range and let it boil without stirring for ten minutes. generally very clean and sparkling. and if it threads. when a little is dropped in _cold_ water. or else it will grain. the sugar can be kept from graining by adding a teaspoonful of vinegar or cream of tartar. brittle candies. and long silk-like threads hang from it when exposed to the air. on page 444. that when a fork or splinter is dipped into it the liquid will run off and form a thick drop on the end. If it looks somewhat thick. and. test it by letting some drop from the spoon. The top of the inside of the dish that the sugar or molasses is to be cooked in should be buttered a few inches around the inside. will be most suitable. and rub it against the side of a cake bowl. When cool enough to bear your finger in it. The syrup never to be stirred while hot. French candies. FRENCH CREAM CANDY. Colorings for candies should be harmless. It will soon begin to look like cream. it prevents the syrup from rising and swelling any higher than where it reaches the buttered edge. This same syrup answers for most candies and should be boiled to such a degree. it will crack and break when biting it.

giving them a second coat of candy. and crowding an almond meat half way into one side. it does not look like lard or thick cream. FRUIT CREAMS. it should look clear as jelly. continue to dip them until all are used. it is because you did not let it get cool enough before beating. If. Having cracked some English walnuts. taking them out on the end of a fork and placing on buttered paper. They look nice colored pink and flavored with vanilla." put it into a cup and setting the cup into a vessel of boiling water. warm it. should the cream get too cold. drop the walnut meats into it. when the boiled sugar is cool enough to beat. It is not boiled enough if it does not harden so as to work like dough. Take a piece of "French Cream" the size of a walnut. using care not to break the meats. or as long as is necessary. one at a time. a little citron. This is the foundation of all French creams. Practice and patience will make perfect. if it looks rough and has turned to sugar. or packed in plates and cut into small cubes. several points are to be remembered. place one-half of each nut upon each side of the ball. after it is beaten. and should not stick to the hands. Make into bars or flat cakes. After it is turned into the bowl to cool. taking care not to cook it too much. then go over again. figs. taking a piece about as large as a hazel nut. and is sandy or sugary instead. or made into any shape imitating French candies. Add the flavoring as soon as it begins to cool. heating it until it turns like thick cream. currants. A pretty form is made by coloring some of the cream pink. till it looks like a bursting kernel. in this case put it back into the pan with an ounce of hot water. and cook over just enough. pressing them into the ball. Add to "French Cream" raisins. chopped and mixed thoroughly through the cream while quite warm.upon the range and let it remain one or two minutes. by testing in water as above. . To be successful in making this cream. and sliced off. It can be made into rolls. WALNUT CREAMS. it is because it has been boiled _too much_. or has been _stirred_. In working. Walnut creams can be made by another method: First take a piece of "French Cream.

COCOANUT CREAMS. Make the "French Cream" recipe. pressing all together. and lay it upon a buttered dish. which is done by just letting the cream soften and stirring in a little finely grated chocolate. and divide into three parts. Take the balls of cream. you can add a drop of vanilla. make a flat ball of it. and the third part color brown with chocolate. Take the white cream. VARIEGATED CREAMS. color one pink with cochineal syrup. leaving it in a nice. but it _must_ be kept _hot_. RASPBERRY CREAMS. pour the melted chocolate over them with a teaspoon and when well covered. work in the same way as the white and lay it upon the white. one at a time. dip the hand in alcohol. do not let it cook. If you choose." and form it into small cone-shaped balls with the fingers. Use "French Cream. Melt one cake of Baker's chocolate in an earthen dish or small basin. Lay them upon paper to harden until all are formed. then the chocolate in the same manner. If it does not work easily. on the tines of a fork. The pink is colored by dropping on a few drops of cochineal syrup while the cream is warm and beating it in. Take the pink cream. as you prefer. square cake.CHOCOLATE CREAMS. Stir enough confectioners' sugar into a teaspoonful of raspberry jam . If too soft to work into balls. slip them from the fork upon oiled paper." work them both together with your hand till the cocoanut is all well mixed in it. make into balls the size of hazelnuts and dip twice. Trim the edges off smooth. and pat it out flat until about half an inch thick. It is necessary to work it all up as rapidly as possible. leaving one part white. as in the foregoing recipes. add confectioners' sugar to stiffen. by setting it in the oven it will soon melt. and lay upon the pink. then cut into slices or small cubes. flavoring the melted "French Cream" with vanilla. Take two tablespoonfuls of grated cocoanut and half as much "French candy.

to form a thick paste. Draw it into sticks the size you wish. hickory nuts. One pound of granulated sugar. Make the '"French Cream. stirring it until it has melted. Lay aside to harden. Boil all except the flavoring. roll it into balls between the palms of your hands. giving them two coats. while the cream is quite soft. butter the size . two cupfuls of brown sugar. one small tablespoonful of glycerine. and cut off with shears into sticks or kiss-shaped drops. then drop a few drops of cochineal coloring to make it a pale pink. Grate fine maple sugar and mix. STICK CANDY. or half a teaspoonful of cream of tartar. and then form into balls. being careful not to add enough to prevent its hardening. with "French Cream. Chop almonds. NUT CREAMS. Walnut creams are sometimes made with maple sugar and are very fine. rose or lemon. for coloring. It may be colored if desired. in quantity to suit the taste. one cupful of water. stir into it the nuts. butternuts or English walnuts quite fine. or until crisp when dropped in water. or if not it will _turn back to clear syrup_. without stirring.) CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. bars or squares. add half a teaspoonful of soda. twenty minutes or half an hour." and before adding all the sugar. Just before pouring upon greased platters to cool. pour two teaspoonfuls of flavoring over the top. Flavor with vanilla. Remember to _keep stirring_ the melted cream. Put a lump of "French Cream" into a teacup and set it into a basin of boiling water. After pouring upon platters to cool." make any shape desired. one cupful of West India molasses. When partly cool. pull it until very white. MAPLE SUGAR CREAMS. One cupful of grated chocolate. a quarter of a cupful of vinegar. or a few drops of raspberry juice. Several kinds of nuts may be mixed together. Now dip these little balls into the sugar cream. (See page 444. one cupful of milk or cream.

They are rather more trouble to make than other kinds. stirring constantly. they will turn a faint yellow brown before the sugar changes color. or they will lose flavor. If it sugars before it is all dropped. Use currant juice instead of water. stirring them occasionally. then drop quickly upon white paper. CURRANT DROPS. let them fry. and just moistened with boiling water. . but well repay it from their novel flavor. One cupful of sugar crushed fine. with a smooth stick. then take from the fire and add cream of tartar the size of a pea. You will find them delicious.of an egg. Turn it out on to buttered plates. _almost_ brittle. mark it in small squares so that it will break easily when cold. Beat briskly until the mixture whitens. do not wait an instant once this change of color begins. then mix a very little more sugar. These are grilled almonds." then throw in the almonds. Put it in a pan and heat. as it were. to moisten a quantity of sugar. let it warm with the rest a moment. then boiled five minutes. Some like it flavored with a tablespoonful of vanilla. stirring constantly. These are a very delicious candy seldom met with out of France. be sure not to let it boil. Blanch a cupful of almonds. and stir them until the syrup has turned back to sugar and clings irregularly to the nuts. LEMON DROPS. as they are to alternate at dinner with the salted almonds now so fashionable. Have the cream of tartar and oil of peppermint measured while the sugar is boiling. add a little water and boil a minute or two. dry them thoroughly. Upon a coffeecupful of finely powdered sugar pour just enough lemon juice to dissolve it. in this syrup. remove them from the fire. and when it begins to stiffen. mix well and add four or five drops of oil of peppermint. drop on paper. boil until thick. GRILLED ALMONDS. Boil a cupful of sugar and a quarter of a cupful of water till it "hairs. and boil it to the consistency of thick syrup. then. PEPPERMINT DROPS.

To test it. Mark it off in squares before it gets too cool. one and one-half pounds of granulated sugar. cut in squares. add any kind of nuts you fancy. put them in after the syrup has thickened and is ready to take from the fire. Three pounds of white sugar. beat slowly until the sugar is melted. Boil _without stirring_ till it will snap and break. half a pint of vinegar. Drop this on buttered plates in drops. Peanuts should be fresh roasted and then tossed in a sieve. Put sugar and milk of cocoanut together. add a quarter of a teaspoonful of soda. Mark off into inch squares when partly cold. half a cupful of water.and so that it appears brittle when dropped in cold water. When making molasses candy. Use prepared cocoanut when other cannot be had. pour out on buttered tins. Use any nuts with this recipe. vinegar and water together into a thick saucepan. or half a teaspoonful of cream of tartar. to free them of their inner skins. One cocoanut. COCOANUT CANDY. When it begins to thicken. Three cupfuls of white sugar. taking care not to disturb it any more than is necessary. Will take about two days to harden. add cocoanut (finely grated). add the nuts. Drop it into cold water. Put the sugar. SUGAR NUT CANDY. . Just before taking from the fire. take up a very small quantity as quickly as possible directly from the centre. boil ten minutes longer. one pound of hickory nut kernels. Pour on buttered plates. stir constantly to keep from burning. a quarter of a pound of butter. NUT MOLASSES CANDY. then boil five minutes. BUTTER-SCOTCH. a tablespoonful of butter and eight drops of extract of lemon. a quarter of an inch thick. half a pint of water. half a cupful of vinegar. pour into well-buttered biscuit tins. Pour into buttered plates. and remove from the fire the moment the little particles are brittle. set away to cool and harden. butter.

No. dissolved in two quarts of water. then throw in three quarts nicely popped corn. and mark into inch squares before it cools. Stir the corn with the hands or large spoon thoroughly. boil until ready to candy. take the kettle from the fire and stir until it cools a little. Of course it must have your undivided attention from the first. MAPLE WALNUTS. Press some of the hard frosting between the two halves of the walnut and let it harden. OR BUTTER-SCOTCH. salt it and keep it warm. 2. then mold into balls with the hands. Boil over a slow fire until it hardens when dropped in cold water. Take three large ears of pop-corn (rice is best). POP-CORN CANDY. and in this way you may have each kernel separate and all coated with the sugar. 1. or in this proportion. any nuts are delicious prepared in this way. Having popped your corn. and butternuts and English walnuts also. Two cupfuls of sugar. POP-CORN BALLS. After popping. dip the walnut meats (which you have taken care to remove from the shells without breaking) in a syrup made by boiling for two or three minutes two tablespoonfuls of maple sugar in one of water. grated rind of half a lemon. two cupfuls of dark molasses. stir vigorously until the sugar is evenly distributed over the corn. shake it down in pan so the unpopped corn will settle at the bottom. to prevent scorching. Beat the white of one egg to a stiff froth. Dates may be prepared in this way. No. POP-CORN CANDY. stir in enough powdered sugar to make it like hard frosting.EVERTON TAFFY. three tablespoonfuls of water and one cupful of white sugar. one cupful of cold butter. Almonds. English walnuts. Pour thinly into tins well buttered. in fact. Put into an iron kettle one tablespoonful of butter. sprinkle over with a whisk broom a mixture composed of an ounce of gum arabic and a half pound of sugar. or. boil all a few minutes. put the .

in a warm place on the back of the stove. one-quarter of a pound of gum arabic. Boil two ounces of dried hoarhound in a pint and a half of water for about half an hour. For the candy. salt and the sugar or molasses. One cup of sugar. which is easily made: Peel and quarter the oranges. Pour in buttered pans. Boil to amber color. make a syrup in the proportion of one pound of sugar to one pint of water. Two cupfuls of sugar. an eighth of an inch thick. FIG CANDY. until the gum is dissolved. boil over a hot fire until sufficiently hard. one pint of water. Let the mixture stand. then draw forward and cook until thick. Candied orange is a great delicacy. when the sugar will crystallize. roll up in a scroll. one cup of light brown or white sugar. well-greased tins and mark into sticks or small squares with a knife as soon as cool enough to retain its shape. JUJUBE PASTE. Do not stir while boiling.nice white popped in a greased pan. HOARHOUND CANDY. take one cup of molasses. Stir with a spoon until thoroughly mixed. strain and add three and a half pounds of brown sugar. let them drain on a fine sieve placed over a platter so that the syrup will not be wasted. as the excellence of this commodity depends entirely upon the united flavor of the corn. Flavor with the essence of lemon and a grain of cochineal. one-fourth teaspoonful cream of tartar. No flavor should be added to this mixture. Pour on the corn. CANDIED ORANGES. then mold into balls with the hand. let it boil until it will harden in water. Any fruit the same. one tablespoonful of vinegar. These are nice served with the last course of dinner. one-third cup of water. let them drain thus until cool. pour out in flat. it should be limber and bend when cold. when cool. Boil until it will harden in water. stir in the . then take it from the fire and dip the quarters of orange in the syrup. try in cold water.

then pour it out into well-buttered flat tins. drop the flavoring on the top as it begins to cool and when it is pulled. half a pint of raisins." CANDY ROLEY POLEY. put in a piece of butter as large as a walnut. take up the candy with your hands well buttered then pull and double. stirring it often to prevent burning. Wash the figs. blanch the almonds. If flavoring is desired. Now put in half a teaspoonful of baking soda. one pint of peanuts before they are hulled. until the candy is a whitish yellow. open and lay in a tin pan and pour the candy over them. Take two pounds of coffee-sugar and moisten with vinegar. then stir in the mixed fruits and nuts. STRAWBERRY CONSERVE. Or you may dip them in the syrup the same as "Candied Oranges. one cupful of brown sugar. stew till it hardens. Test it by taking some out and dropping a few drops in a cup of cold water. Take half a pint of citron. . Pour into a wet cloth and roll it up like a pudding. stone the raisins. When partly cooled. It may be cut in strips and rolled or twisted. Sprinkle the sugar over the fruit at night. half a pound of figs. allowing half a pound of loaf sugar to one pound of fruit. in the morning. Let it get cold and slice off pieces as it may be wanted for eating. a quarter of a pound of shelled almonds. If it hardens quickly and breaks short between the teeth it is boiled enough. but take off before it gets to the brittle stage. beat it with a spoon six or eight times. cut up the citron. put it on the fire in a kettle and boil until the berries are clear. twisting the ends of the cloth to mold it. Spread on dishes and put in the sun until dry. after which roll the fruit in sugar and pack in jars. a piece of butter the size of half an egg. and hull the peanuts. cut up the figs into small bits. and stir it well. Let it boil over a slack fire until it begins to look thick.cream of tartar just before taking from the fire. into a six-quart kettle. MOLASSES CANDY. Prepare the fruit as for preserving. the whole will be flavored. and so on. Put one quart of West India molasses.

and stew a few minutes. allowing a quarter of a pound of sugar to one of fruit. pare. and will keep perfectly from season to season. Soak the cocoanut. or. beaten stiff. As soon as the juice seems set in the peaches. turn the other side to the sun. put over the fire in porcelain. Two cupfuls of grated cocoanut. with a very little water. add gradually the sugar. Any of the fruits that have been preserved in syrup may be converted into dry preserves. Stew as many peaches as you choose. mash it up smooth as it cooks. Place them singly on a plate. by rolling the mixture. sifting over them more sugar. until they will not take up any more. the whites of three eggs. if desiccated. only a little flavoring or spice is added to them. School-children regard it as a delightful addition to their lunch of biscuit or cold bread. Apple and quince leather are made in the same fashion. fig-drums. in milk enough to cover it. with your fingers make. what is still nicer. one cupful of sugar.PEACH CONSERVE. They make an excellent sweetmeat just as they are. COCOANUT CARAMELS. They should be turned every few hours. Lay them in the sun. When they are thoroughly dry. two tablespoonfuls of flour. The next morning roll them again. with the cup or hollow side up. or. then beat the whites of the eggs. strewing them thickly with powdered sugar. . Roll the peaches in it several times. Place them on buttered sheets of tin covered with buttered letter paper and bake in a moderate heat about fifteen or twenty minutes. by first draining them from the syrup and then drying them slowly on the stove. and when it is dry enough to spread in a thin sheet on a board greased with butter. into cone shapes. wrapped up in a cloth. when dry it can be rolled up like leather. Halve the peaches and take out the stones. Have ready some powdered white sugar on a plate or dish. set it out in the sun to dry. cocoanut and flour. PEACH LEATHER. They should cool before removing from the tins. that the juices may not run out. pack them in glass jars. if wanted for table use. DRIED PRESERVES.

This cream can be worked in candies similar to the French cooked cream. FRUIT AND NUT CREAMS. After forming into these little balls or cones. butternuts." similar to that which is cooked. add to it an equal quantity of cold water. then stir in XXX powdered or confectioners' sugar until you have it stiff enough to mold into shape with the fingers. Several kinds of nuts may be mixed together. bars or squares. or make them in the morning and leave them until afternoon. CHOCOLATE CREAM DROPS. cubes or lozenge shapes." while soft. Ordinary powdered sugar. roll it until well covered. to harden. currants.CANDIES WITHOUT COOKING. hickory nuts. . These are made or molded into cone-shape forms with the fingers. when rubbed between the thumb and finger has a decided grain." The secret lies in the sugar used. or English walnuts. as the quantity you wish to make will require. which makes them very desirable. lay them upon plates or waxed paper and set them aside to dry. figs and citron. FRENCH VANILLA CREAM. from the uncooked "French Cream. stirring into it chopped almonds. before the sugar is all mixed in. Raisins seeded. but the confectioners' sugar is fine as flour. chopped fine. The candies made after this process are better the day after. Then melt some chocolate (the best confectioners') in a basin set in another basin of boiling water. Flavor with vanilla to taste. and mixed with the uncooked "French Cream. which is the XXX powdered or confectioners' sugar. and the creams are hard enough to handle. and set them aside to harden. take one at a time on a fork and drop into the melted chocolate. lay them on oiled paper until the next day. Break into a bowl the whites of one or more eggs. then slip from the fork upon oiled or waxed paper. when melted. After it is formed in balls. then forming them into balls. makes a delicious variety. Very many candies made by confectioners are made without boiling. and they are equal to the best "French Creams. Nuts also may be mixed with this cream.

. The coconut cream may be made into a flat cake and cut into squares or strips. add fresh grated cocoanut to taste. Make the uncooked cream as in the foregoing recipe. COCOANUT CREAMS. COFFEE.ORANGE DROPS. also brown by adding a few spoonfuls of grated chocolate. then rolling them in grated cocoanut. Color a faint yellow. BEVERAGES. TEA. taking care to reject the seeds. using lemons in place of orange. These may be colored pink with a few drops of cochineal syrup. it will be ruined by the addition of water that has been boiled more than once. Grate the rind of one orange and squeeze the juice. no matter how excellent your coffee or tea may be. With this uncooked cream. This is delicious candy. the three colors are very pretty together. and give the tea a dark. as most of its natural properties escape by evaporation. then stir in confectioners' sugar until it is stiff enough to form into balls the size of a small marble. add to this a pinch of tartaric acid. dead look. Water left in the tea-kettle over night _must never be used for preparing the breakfast coffee_. Boiling water is a very important desideratum in the making of a cup of good coffee or tea. add sufficient confectioners' sugar to mold into balls and then roll the balls in the fresh grated cocoanut. but the average housewife is very apt to overlook this fact. Do not boil the water more than three or four minutes. The same process for lemon drops. leaving a very insipid liquid composed mostly of lime and iron. all the recipes given for the cooked "French Cream. which ought to be the reverse." may be used: English walnut creams. that would ruin the best coffee. longer boiling ruins the water for coffee or tea making. variegated creams. Take the cream while soft. etc.

Three-quarters of a pound of Java and a quarter of a pound of Mocha make the best mixture of coffee. for five or ten minutes. In general. stir it down with a silver spoon or fork. Place it on the back of the stove or range where it will keep hot (and not boil). well beaten. and pour on to it a quart of boiling water. and let boil five minutes. To one pint of cream add the white of an egg. this is to be put in cups with sugar. Coffee is supposed to act as a preventative of gravel and gout. adding a half cupful of _cold_ water. when taken in excess. and add rest of water. some of the more disagreeable consequences incident to the use of ardent spirits. pour on coffee half as much boiling water as will be needed. are injuriously affected by the moderate use of tea and coffee in connection with food. The medical properties of these two beverages are considerable. they themselves produce. let it froth.THE HEALING PROPERTIES OF TEA AND COFFEE. then stir down grounds. then let it stand where it will keep hot. but not boil. it will settle in about five minutes. Send to the table _hot_. Equal parts of Mocha and Java coffee. and without nourishing food. Serve with good cream and lump sugar. Both tea and coffee powerfully counteract the effects of opium and intoxicating liquors: though. as it rises and begins to boil. Boil hard for ten or twelve minutes. Remove from the fire and pour out a cupful of coffee. Put it into the coffee boiler. FILTERED OR DRIP COFFEE. . VIENNA COFFEE. Tea is used advantageously in inflammatory diseases and as a cure for the headache. then pour back into the coffeepot. or enfeebled or effeminate constitutions. however. Mix one egg with grounds. stirred with one egg and part of the shell. and hot coffee added. temporarily at least. allow one heaping tablespoonful of coffee to each person and two extra to make good strength. One full coffeecupful of ground coffee. none but persons possessing great mobility of the nervous system. and to its influence is ascribed the rarity of those diseases in Prance and Turkey. COFFEE.

It is better to use a china or porcelain teapot. when the pot is well warmed. never . Fit the bag into the pot. pour some boiling water in it. Serve with cracked ice in each tumbler. Allow two teaspoonfuls of tea to one large cupful of boiling water. Making it in this manner prevents the necessity of pouring the coffee from one vessel to another. Beat the white of an egg. remove the bag. and the bag must be well made that none of the grounds may escape through the seams and so make the coffee thick and muddy. put the ground coffee into the bag. bright and clean. but keep very hot. It is difficult to distinguish this from fresh cream. Many drop a tiny piece of sweet butter into their cup of hot coffee as a substitute for cream. let it steep or "draw" ten or twelve minutes. and to every tablespoonful allow a cupful of boiling water. and to this ring sew a small muslin bag (the muslin for the purpose must not be too thin). and send the coffee to table. and. The water should be poured on the coffee gradually so that the infusion may be stronger. Send _hot_ to the table. the coffee to be one part Mocha to two of Java.For each person allow a large tablespoonful of finely ground coffee. pour over as much boiling water as is required. close the lid. Make more coffee than usual at breakfast time and stronger. SUBSTITUTE FOR CREAM IN COFFEE. Patented coffeepots on this principle can be purchased at most house-furnishing stores. put in the tea. pour on about a cupful of _boiling_ water. new. to almost boiling. but if you do use metal let it be tin. which cools and spoils it. stirring it so that it will not curdle. ICED COFFEE. TO MAKE TEA. put to it a small lump of butter and pour the coffee into it gradually. Now fill up with as much boiling water as is required. When cold put on ice. when all the water has filtered through. where it will not boil. and. Scald the teapot. set it on the fire in a warm place. Have a small iron ring made to fit the top of the coffeepot inside.

Don't add milk or sugar. if I remember the cyclopaedia aright. Allow half a cupful of grated chocolate to a pint of water and a pint of milk. serve a spoonful of thick whipped cream with each cup. Use the black or green teas. It is of course used without milk. A Chinese being interviewed for the _Cook_ says: Drink your tea plain. add two cupfuls of good milk. Rub the chocolate smooth in a little cold water and stir into the boiling water. It may be prepared some hours in advance. It is bottled and placed in the ice chest till required. and when it has boiled sufficiently. Stir it with a spoon as soon as it boils up. and the addition of sugar serves only to destroy the finer tea flavor. or both. . To make tea to perfection. or which has previously boiled. They throw in the chocolate just as the water commences to boil. albumen or some other stuff. and the tea a delicate amount of tannin. Sweeten to your taste. CHOCOLATE. ICED TEA. add the milk and boil ten minutes more. or if it be allowed to overboil. mixed. or leather. Milk contains fibrin. The water should be allowed to remain on the leaves from ten to fifteen minutes. COCOA. is tannate of fibrin. the leaves of the tea will be only half-opened and the tea itself will be quite spoiled. Is now served to a considerable extent during the summer months. Water which has been boiling more than five minutes. If you do you are drinking tea-ate of iron. If the water does not boil. The French put two cupfuls of boiling water to each cupful of chocolate. and should be made stronger than when served hot. as fancied. epicures never do.use it when the tin is worn off and the iron exposed. Mixing the two makes the liquid turbid. Boil twenty minutes. should on no account be used. Tea-brokers and tea-tasters never do. the Chinese never do. People who put milk in tea are therefore drinking boots and shoes in mild disguise. This turbidity. boiling water must be poured on the leaves directly it boils. stirring it often.

Rub cocoa smooth in a little cold water. In some cases of gastric ulcer and cancer of the stomach. Buttermilk. indeed. BUTTERMILK AS A DRINK. add milk and boil five minutes more. it is believed to exercise a general impression on the liver. just before bottling you may add a small quantity of brandy or whisky. highly extolled its virtues. has latterly been coming somewhat into vogue. It should stand for a month to ferment. It is a decided laxative to the bowels. combined with its laxative properties. Long experience has demonstrated it to be an agent of superior digestibility. and may be prescribed with advantage in some kidney troubles. It is. It resembles koumiss in its nature. and in an editorial article the _Canada Lancet_. . either exclusively. Sweeten in cups so as to suit different tastes. It is well adapted to many cases where it is customary to recommend lime water and milk. 1. The currants should be quite ripe. and which has become sour by fermentation. Owing to its acidity. milk already partly digested. the coagulation of the coagulable portion being loose and flaky. It is a diuretic. so generally regarded as a waste product. when it will be ready for bottling. Boil twenty minutes._ CURRANT WINE.Six tablespoonfuls of cocoa to each pint of water. with the exception of that article. adding a half pint of water and less than a pound of sugar to a quart of the mashed fruit. _Medical journal. have ready on the fire a pint of boiling water. not only as a nutrient. Stir well up together and pour into a clean cask. or covered with a piece of lace. a fact which must be borne in mind in the treatment of typhoid fever. It is invaluable in the treatment of diabetes. mash and strain them. stir in grated cocoa paste. but as a therapeutic agent. sugar to taste. Stem. a true milk peptone--that is. refreshing and digestible of the products of milk. it is the only food that can be retained. stirring often. Buttermilk may be roughly described as milk which has lost most of its fat and a small percentage of casein. No. and not of that firm indigestible nature which is the result of the action of the gastric juice upon cow's sweet milk. it is the most grateful. some time ago. or alternating with skimmed milk. leaving the bung-hole open. as much milk as water. and which may be turned to advantage in the treatment of habitual constipation. and.

boil it over a slow fire till all dissolved. then place dissolved isinglass in a gallon of blackberry juice. leaving the top open until fermentation ceases and it looks clear. draw off and keep in a cool place. then draw off through a jelly-bag._ BLACKBERRY WINE NO. Other berry wines may be made in the same manner. put in several sheets of brown paper and let them remain in it three days. give them a boil together and pour all into the vessel. Draw off and cork tightly. will insure you excellent wine. Then draw off the clear juice in another vessel.CURRANT WINE. Let stand six to ten days in first vessel with top. Put into a jug or small keg. carefully skimming off the scum that will rise to the top. cover up. put the skins in a . 2 Berries should be ripe and plump._ BLACKBERRY WINE. bruise well until all the berries are broken. and stir thoroughly. crush the berries well with a wooden masher. and add one pound of sugar to every ten quarts of the liquor. 2. Mash the grapes and strain them through a cloth. then skim again and pour through a funnel into your cask. Cover your blackberries with cold water. _Long Island Recipe. let them stand twenty-four hours. then strain again and bottle. No. 1. _Orange County Recipe. put into wide-mouthed jars for several days. then strain. These directions. and to one gallon of juice put three pounds of common brown sugar. GRAPE WINE. which will occur in three or four days. add two quarts of soft water and three pounds of brown sugar. No. To each quart of currant juice. Put into a large wood or stone vessel with a tap. if carefully followed out. Steep four ounces of isinglass in a pint of wine for twelve hours. let stand until berries begin to rise to top. Let stand a few days to ferment and settle. when cool enough to bear your hand. There let it remain undisturbed till March. pour on sufficient boiling water to cover them.

when worked sufficiently. accelerate the fermentation with yeast. bruised. FLORIDA ORANGE WINE. put the sugar. squeeze the oranges. skim off what rises every morning. boil this liquor till the egg swims above the liquor. add spring water. and put it into a tight cask with a small cake of compressed yeast to about ten gallons of wine. and strain the juice through a hair-sieve. pour it upon the orange rind and let it stand over night. strain the juice thus obtained into the first portion. three months after it is bottled. after squeezing them. To some new honey. put a whole egg into it. Let your wine remain in the cask until March. A glass of brandy added to each gallon of wine after fermentation ceases is generally considered an improvement. in six weeks draw off into bottles. measure the juice after it is strained and for each gallon allow three pounds of granulated sugar. with barely enough water to cover them. put three pounds of sugar to one gallon of the mixture. METHELIN. then boil the syrup until it looks clear under the froth. To every fifteen gallons add two ounces of white Jamaica ginger. peel off the yellow rind very thin. and this fine wine can be made at a small expense. strain the syrup. and leave the bung out of the cask until the wine ceases to ferment. and let the wine stand about nine months before bottling it. strain. strain it the second day. one ounce of cloves and mace. the hissing noise continues so long as fermentation is in progress. Wipe the oranges with a wet cloth. all bruised together and tied up in a muslin bag. then bung it up. one and one-half ounces of cinnamon. This is a very ancient and popular drink in the north of Europe. OR HONEY WINE. covered with a cloth. bung up. when it should be drawn off and bottled. it can be used. let it stand in an open tub to ferment. Put the juice in a cask and leave it open for twenty-four hours. strained. when fermentation ceases. . There are seasons of the year when Florida oranges by the box are very cheap. and put clay over the bung to keep the air out. close the cask by driving in the bung.tub. then next add the orange juice and again let it stand over night. for a period of from three to seven days. pour it in a cask. the white and shell of the egg (crushed small) and the water over the fire and stir them every two minutes until the eggs begin to harden. of egg which will form on the surface. the white and shell of one egg and one-third of a gallon of cold water.

CHERRY BOUNCE. strain the syrup. one-fourth ounce of mace. with sufficient water to make a tolerably sweet liquor. two teaspoonfuls of cloves. Boil all together for one-fourth of an hour. Take two pounds of raisins. seed and chop them. A common way of making cherry bounce is to put wild cherries and whisky together in a jug and use the liquor as wanted. bottle and put in a cool place for ten days or so. ferment this with yeast and proceed as per previous formula. one tablespoonful of cinnamon. four quarts of black currants. stir in well and bottle. _Sack Mead_ is made by adding a handful of hops and sufficient brandy to the comb liquor. a pound of white sugar and about two gallons of boiling water. then strain and bottle. Make a with a gill of water and a pound of white sugar to every two of liquor thus prepared. BLACKBERRY CORDIAL. from which the honey has been drained. and to each pint add a glass of French . BLACK CURRANT WINE. then strain and add the sugar. Four quarts of whisky. Let soak two or three weeks and then drain off the liquor. To one gallon of wild cherries add enough good whisky to cover the fruit. a lemon. one-half ounce of powdered cinnamon. set away again for three weeks longer._--Boil the combs. and tightly cork._Another Mead. add to one pint of juice one pound of white sugar. Crush the currants and let them stand in the whisky with the spices for three weeks. four pounds of brown or white sugar. Mash the cherries without breaking the stones and strain through a jelly-bag. Warm and squeeze the berries. add this liquor to that already drained off. Pour into a stone jar and stir daily for six or eight days. Strain. RAISIN WINE. one tablespoonful of cloves. when the wine will be ready for use.

boil it three hours. give a tablespoonful after each discharge until the complaint is in subjection. cut in slices. 1. which will be in about twenty-four hours. and let it ferment for a day or two.brandy. Strain it through a sieve. When the attack is violent. Take five quarts of water. stir into it a large tablespoonful of the best yeast. Let it ferment. and half an ounce or less of the essence of spruce. or a pound of brown sugar. cover it and let it stand until next day. six ounces of hops. Simmer them over a slow fire for half an hour. add to it five quarts of water. No. Allow an ounce of hops and a spoonful of ginger to a gallon of water. Squeeze the juice of the lemons and oranges. as desired. two pounds of broken loaf sugar and two gallons of soft boiling water. four ounces of bruised ginger root. boil this again twenty minutes. and put into a clean tight cask. Two or three doses of a tablespoonful or less will check any slight diarrhoea. and is a pleasant and safe remedy. Put into a kettle two ounces of powdered ginger root (or more if it is not very strong). when cool. . then bottle it for use. When well boiled. then strain the liquor. SPRUCE BEER. Grate the yellow rind of four lemons and two oranges upon two pounds of loaf sugar. strain it and put in a pint of molasses. strain and add four pounds of sugar. add a bottle of champagne and the whites of eight eggs beaten to a stiff froth. GINGER BEER. HOP BEER. It will arrest dysentery if given in season. two large lemons. mix with the sugar. For winter use snow instead of ice. in twenty-four hours it will be ready for bottling. When luke-warm put in a pint of yeast. When the liquor is nearly cold. Excellent for children when teething. half an ounce of cream of tartar. You can boil the sprigs of spruce fir in place of the essence. ROMAN PUNCH. After it has fermented. It may be frozen or not. bottle for use. add a teacupful of yeast.

as this makes what is called a semi or half ice. Make two quarts of lemonade. Mix well and serve in high glasses. to use with it. . a pint of Jamaica rum. Bottle for use. two tablespoonfuls of powdered loaf sugar. The essence of sassafras. can. and a small wine-glassful of pale brandy. warm it on the stove to about blood heat. Put into a box or boxes a quarter of a pound of carbonate of soda. Half the quantity can be made. It will be fit for use next day. be obtained at the druggist's. wholesome and pleasant beverage for warm weather. or part rum and brandy. stir into it a half teaspoonful of the soda and it will immediately foam up to the top. Mix thoroughly. It is usually served at dinners as a _coup de milieu_. To prepare a glass of sassafras mead for drinking. cork it tightly and keep it in a cool place. rich with pure juice lemon fruit. Take two quarts of new milk. and a quarter of a pound of tartaric acid. of course. Transfer it to clean bottles (it will fill about half a dozen). strain it into a large jug or pan. add one tablespoonful of extract of lemon. DELICIOUS JUNKET. put a large tablespoonful of the mead into half a tumbler full of ice-water. 2. pour it into a glass or china bowl and stir into it two tablespoonfuls of prepared rennet. No. SASSAFRAS MEAD. a pint and a half of good West India molasses. then mix in a teaspoonful (not more) of essence of sassafras. RASPBERRY SHRUB. dissolved. Mix gradually with two quarts of boiling water three pounds and a half of the best brown sugar. Sassafras mead will be found a cheap. Work well and freeze. half a pound of loaf sugar. tartaric acid and carbonate of soda.ROMAN PUNCH. just before serving. Stir it well and when cool. One quart of raspberry juice. Let it stand till cold and eat with sugar and rich cream. add for each quart of ice half a pint of brandy and half a pint of Jamaica rum.

put in the soda. When well mixed. then take six pounds of white sugar and make a thick syrup. let it stand over night. FOR A SUMMER DRAUGHT. half a small teaspoonful of carbonate of soda. By using oils or other fruits. Coffee-sugar. Stir each and pour together. the whites of ten eggs. NOYEAU CORDIAL. grate the rind of six in it. you can make as many flavors from this as you desire. a tumblerful of cold water. twenty drops of oil of lemon. LEMON SYRUP. and divide into two parts. and stir well about thirty minutes. four pounds. A tablespoonful in a goblet of water will make a delicious drink on a hot day. three nutmegs. well beaten. for future use. Take the juice of twelve lemons. The juice of one lemon. three pints of water. . When it is quite cool. securely corked. each one-third full of water. as the gum and eggs hold the gas.CREAM SODA WITHOUT THE FOUNTAIN. strain the juice into it. WINE WHEY. and when boiling. and when cold they are ready for use by pouring three or four spoonfuls from both parts into separate glasses. and you have a nice glass of cream soda which you can drink at your leisure. pounded sugar to taste. with sufficient pounded sugar to sweeten the whole nicely. Shake well. gum arabic. stir well and drink while the mixture is in an effervescing state. one ounce. throw in two wine-glasses of sherry. remove from the fire and strain. grated. and squeeze as much oil from the grated rind as will suit the taste. when the curd forms. strain the whey through a muslin bag into tumblers. Squeeze the juice from the lemon. Sweeten one pint of milk to taste. strain and add it to the water. Mix all and place over a gentle fire. into one-half put eight ounces of bicarbonate of soda. Put in bottles. into the other half put six ounces of tartaric acid. or extract equal to that amount.

Mix well together and allow to stand forty-eight hours. one glass of old whisky. and strain the whole through a jelly-bag. stir in as much white sugar as they will dissolve. well stirred together. EGG FLIP. MILK PUNCH. OR MULLED ALE. Beat the yolks of twelve eggs very light. then pour the hot ale to it. a pound and a half of loaf sugar. one grated nutmeg. and three pints of rich milk. FINE MILK PUNCH. half a pint of brandy. or make a larger quantity (in the above proportions) and bottle it. PARE off the yellow rind of four large lemons and steep it for twenty-four hours in a quart of brandy or rum. grate a little nutmeg over the top of the glasses. You may either use it as soon as it is cold. two grated nutmegs and a quart of water. It will keep several months. add a piece of butter or a glass of brandy and serve it with dry toast. TO MAKE HOT PUNCH. Then mix with it the juice of the lemons. made boiling hot. This liquor will be much improved by adding half a pint of apricot or peach juice. covered closely. warm and stir it till sufficiently thick. a wine-glassful of brandy or rum. one large lemon. Half a pint of rum. one pint of . quarter of a pound of sugar. EGG NOG. Add a quart of rich unskimmed milk.To one gallon of proof spirit add three pounds of loaf sugar and a tablespoonful of extract of almonds. Serve with a straw in each glass. One pint of milk made very sweet. half a teaspoonful of nutmeg. beat up six eggs and mix them with a little cold ale. Beat the whites to a froth and stir in last. now strain through thick flannel and bottle. pour in gradually one glass of brandy to cook the egg. pour it back and forth several times to prevent its curdling. Boil one quart of good ale with some nutmeg.

add the strained juice. after the bottles and jars are thoroughly washed and dried. smoke them with sulphur in this way: Take a piece of wire and bend it around a small piece of brimstone the size of a bean. after the brimstone has burned away. STRAWBERRY AND RASPBERRY SYRUP. (This is an old-style punch. Fahrenheit. then put the sugar into a punch bowl. mix thoroughly and the punch will be ready to serve. and cover with a cork. and to insure success. set the brimstone on fire. Take one cupful of ripe hulled berries. stir well together. Many housekeepers. This makes a nice. express the juice and to each quart add three and a half pounds of granulated sugar. allowing the juice to drop in a vessel beneath. the processes of mixing must be diligently attended to. add the lemon juice (free from pips) and mix these two ingredients. brandy and nutmeg.) LEMONADE. STRAWBERRY WATER. It is very important in making good punch that all the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated. Mash the fresh fruit. Three lemons to a pint of water makes strong lemonade. will keep for an indefinite time. and strained or filtered previous to dissolving the sugar. The juice of soft fruits is best when allowed to drop therefrom by its own weight. Rub the sugar over the lemon until it has absorbed all the yellow part of the skin. put it in the jar or bottle. rub through and filter till clear. well together. cool drink on a warm day and easily to be made in strawberry season. mixing with the mass a quarter of a pound of pulverized sugar and half a pint of cold water. fill the vessel with the syrup or preserves and cover . Pour the mixture into a fine sieve. canned hot in glass jars. sweeten to your taste. lightly mash the fruit and then suspend in a cloth. Pour over them the boiling water. mix thoroughly and set in ice chest till wanted.boiling water. crush with a wooden spoon. add the rum. heated to 180 deg. The juice. bending the other end over the mouth of the vessel. of one lemon and one and a half pints of cold water.

then mash and strain through a cloth as long as it runs clear. then let stand in the sun four hours. Koumiss is prepared by dissolving four ounces of white sugar in one gallon of skimmed milk. set in a warm place until fermentation is well under way. and lay the bottles on their sides in a cool cellar. make it very sweet with loaf sugar. There is no sulphurous taste left by the process. Seal it up in bottles. and lay them on their sides in the cellar. In three days.tightly. squeeze out the juice and put in a pint of good brandy. a tablespoonful in a glass of ice-cold water. HOME-MADE TABLE VINEGAR. Cover sliced pineapples with pure cider vinegar. pour over them a quart of good vinegar. when cool. air-tight. a quart of good cider vinegar. is fine. Put a quart of raspberries into a suitable dish. and placing in bottles of the capacity of one quart. then strain through a flannel bag and pour this liquor on another quart of berries. add one pound of white sugar. take from the fire. add two ounces of baker's yeast or a cake of compressed yeast to each bottle. KOUMISS. any kind of highly flavored fruit. Cork and tie securely. cover them with sawdust. Strain it. Fine. Turn over a quart or ripe raspberries. pour two tablespoonfuls to a tumblerful of ice-water. mix well. let them stand three or four days. and. When used. to every three quarts of juice add five pounds of sugar. fermentation will have progressed sufficiently to permit the koumiss to be in good condition. Blackberries and raspberries. 2. RASPBERRY VINEGAR. RASPBERRY VINEGAR. PINEAPPLE VINEGAR. Boil it altogether about ten minutes. do this for three or four days successively and strain it. mashed. . skim carefully until nothing rises to the surface. to drink in warm weather. in fact. bottle it. No. NO. let it stand twenty-four hours. 1. bottle and seal it.

and stir it till dissolved. in a blue paper twenty grains of tartaric acid. occasionally pressing down the pineapple with a spoon. SEIDLITZ POWDERS. INEXPENSIVE DRINK. . allowing a small half pint to each pineapple. Drink it quickly. Then put the mixture from the blue paper into another tumbler with the same quantity of water. pour into your cask or bottle and let it stand from four to six months. and it will effervesce immediately. Put the contents of the white paper into a tumbler. This beverage will be found delicious. Fold in a white paper a mixture of one drachm of Rochelle salts and twenty-five grains of carbonate of soda. cover the top with thin muslin and leave it in the sun. VERY STRONG TABLE VINEGAR. Cover the pitcher and let it stand till quite cool. not quite half full of cold water. and sprinkle among them plenty of powdered white sugar. one gallon of common molasses and two quarts of yeast. putting into each glass some more sugar and a bit of ice. In three or four weeks it will be good vinegar. when you will have vinegar so strong that it cannot be used at table without diluting with water. They should all be pulverized very finely. Put them with all their juice into a large pitcher. PINEAPPLE-ADE. Then set the pitcher for a while in ice. pour the first into the other. then cut the slices into small pieces. Lastly. Take two gallons of good cider and thoroughly mix it with two pounds of new honey. It is the best ever procured for pickling purposes. Pour on boiling water. When the powders are dissolved in both tumblers. strain the infusion into another vessel and transfer it to tumblers. covering it up at night and when it rains. If cider can be used in place of rain-water the vinegar will make much sooner--will not take over a week to make a very sharp vinegar.Put in an open cask four gallons of warm rain-water. and stir that also. while foaming. Excellent for pickling purposes. Pare and slice some very ripe pineapples.

geese. POULTRY AND GAME. mint. grouse or prairie chickens. smoked halibut. winter squash. cress. tame pigeons. scallops. half a cupful of good molasses. halibut.. MEATS. pumpkins. kale-sprouts. finnan haddie. bass. such as sage. shad. turkeys. frozen bluefish.--Haddock. white and sweet potatoes. onions. celery. smelts. green turtle. parsnips. also frozen salmon. VEGETABLES. beets. the canvas-back duck being the most popular and highly prized.--Beef. dill. thyme.A very nice. turnips. snipes. cauliflower. smoked salmon. being chiefly used in stuffing and soups. oysters. fresh codfish. lavender. MEATS. etc. FEBRUARY. antelope. lamb. pork. carrots. mutton. white bait. mutton. capons. chickens. hard crabs. swans. partridges.--Beef. both dry and green. lamb. prawns. put into one quart pitcher of ice-water. parsley. [Illustration] THE VARIETIES OF SEASONABLE FOOD TO BE OBTAINED IN OUR MARKETS DURING THE YEAR. chives. pickerel. Jerusalem artichokes. antelope. Brussels-sprouts. fresh salmon. A tablespoonful of ground ginger added makes a healthful beverage. are always in season. flounders. sweet basil. turbot. hares. JANUARY. leeks. woodcocks. summer savory. red-snapper.--Cabbage. quails. Frozen fresh mackerel is found in our large cities during this month. borage. wild ducks.--Rabbits. . diamond-back terrapin. and for flavoring and garnishing certain dishes. Garden herbs. FISH. cheap drink which may take the place of lemonade and be found fully as healthful is made with one cupful of pure cider vinegar. pork. oyster plant. may be procured green in the summer and dried in the winter. chiccory.

parsnips.--Chickens. pork.--White potatoes. radishes. prawns. mushrooms raised in hot houses. golden plover. VEGETABLES. snipes. MARCH.--Cabbage. whitefish. celery.--Beef. parsnips. wild ducks. sweet potatoes. sweet potatoes. carrots. salsify-chives. mushrooms. herring. onions. scallops. capons. pompano. white potatoes. swan. APRIL.--Halibut.--Chickens. sheep's-head. prawns. oyster plant. flounders. chicken halibut. smoked haddock. geese. eels. striped bass. cress. white perch. Jerusalem artichokes. soft-shell crabs--which are in excellent condition this month. celery. finnan haddie. mutton. green geese. fresh codfish.POULTRY AND GAME. shad. rabbits. flounders. terrapin. sturgeon. French artichokes. oysters. chiccory. snipes.--Striped bass. live lobsters. live codfish. turnips. turkeys. pumpkins. whitefish. yellow perch. POULTRY AND GAME. salmon-trout. MEATS. white bait. live lobster. parsley and other garden herbs. lamb. artichokes. ducks. capons. soft-shell clams. Brussels-sprouts. grouper. turnips. rabbits. and pigeons. fowls. pullets. cabbage. Brussels-sprouts. pickerel. haddock. rhubarb and cucumbers raised in hot beds. wild pigeons. Spanish mackerel. scallops. green turtle. beets. fresh salmon. smoked halibut. pheasants. wild ducks. Shad are plentiful this month. hard crabs. turkeys. catfish. . young ducks. a panfish. smoked salmon.--Partridges. winter squash. lamb. salmon. ducks. squabs. pork. oysters. onions. FISH. fowls. okra. hares. smoked salmon. smoked halibut. veal.--Beef. mutton. dry shallots and garden herbs for seasoning put up in the dried state. veal. carrots. Herring. pompano. halibut. smelts--green and frozen. capons. green turtle. pickerel. VEGETABLES. greens. POULTRY AND GAME. boneless dried codfish. salt codfish. MEATS. leeks. red-snapper. sheep's-head. salmon-trout. FISH. red-snapper.

haddock. porgies. pompano. FISH. rhubarb. lamb. okra. sorrel. whitefish. sheeps-head. lobsters. cucumbers. veal. ducks. black bass. kale-sprouts.--Chickens. smoked fish. mutton. flounders. young ducks. chives. smoked halibut. shad. frogs' legs. whitefish. VEGETABLES. string beans. cress.--New potatoes. kingfish. butterfish. beets. sheep's-head. green turtle. striped bass.--Fowls. crayfish. kingfish. frogs' legs. MEATS. lettuce.FISH. tomatoes. catfish. halibut. eels. frogs' legs. carrots.--Fresh salmon. fresh mackerel. weakfish. bluefish. salmon. beets. white perch. young turkeys. bluefish. striped bass. carp. halibut. egg-plant. FISH. radishes. clams. crayfish. bluefish. green geese. asparagus. spring chickens. live lobsters. blackfish. white bait. soft crabs. shad.--Beef. spinach. parsnips. salt mackerel. rhubarb. cucumbers. prawns. turnips. flounders. red-snapper. MEATS. egg plant. smoked salmon. pigeons. hard crabs. peas. smelts. carrots. clams. white and sweet potatoes. asparagus. leeks. pickerel. weakfish.--Haddock. artichokes. blackfish. pork. flounders. salmon-trout. Spanish mackerel. brook-trout. skate or rayfish. skate or ray fish. Brussels-sprouts. carp. prawns. scallops. eels. brook trout. salmon. oysters. mutton.--Beef. striped bass. pompano.--Halibut. chicken halibut. green turtle. crayfish. lamb. veal. MAY. sea bass. smoked haddock. porgies. peas. sturgeon. turnips. salt codfish. . chickens. fresh mackerel. squash. string beans. artichokes. plovers. Spanish mackerel. young turkeys. POULTRY AND GAME. cabbage. salads generally. VEGETABLES. lettuce. butterfish. POULTRY AND GAME. sweet potatoes. radishes. JUNE. kidney beans. fresh cod.--Onions. cauliflower. dandelion. fresh mackerel. Pigeons. cabbage. young onions. white bait. clams. soft crabs. geese. mushrooms.

salsify. rhubarb and all kinds of garden herbs. greens. plover. spinach.--Beef. rhubarb. radishes. pickerel. halibut. egg plant. fresh mackerel. wild pigeons. crayfish. haddock. pork. young ducks. sea bass. weakfish. lettuce. mint. swordfish. chickens. butterfish. peas. ponito. cucumbers. squid. prawns. flounders. string beans. fresh mackerel. various kinds of greens and salads. cress. mushrooms. green turtle. green corn. onions. sorrel. young geese. VEGETABLES. fowls. cucumbers. kingfish.--Fowls.--Potatoes. cod. tomatoes. string beans. porgies. horse-radish. white bait.-tame rabbits. green string beans.--Spanish mackerel. snipe.--Beef. radishes. halibut. brook trout. tomatoes. peas tomatoes. catfish. frogs' legs. MEATS. cauliflower Irish potatoes. carrots. pompano.VEGETABLES. sea bass. turkey-plouts. plovers. mutton. artichokes. clams. FISH. MEATS. butterfish. white bait. VEGETABLES.--Venison. JULY. cabbage onions. FISH--Striped bass. a sweet panfish.--Potatoes. crayfish. mushrooms. artichokes. lettuce. oyster plant. POULTRY AND GAME. woodcock. moonfish--a fine baking or boiling fish. squabs. peas. clams. turnips. mutton. eels. salmon.--Carrots. sweet potatoes. summer squash. flounders. eels. black bass. kingfish. haddock. soft crabs. endive. celery. turkeys. butter beans. asparagus. asparagus. porgies. perch. . POULTRY AND GAME. sheep's-head. striped bass. pigeons. lettuce. tantog. parsnips. green turtle. soft crabs. lobsters. lamb. beets. veal. celery. carrots. chives. cod. green geese. spinach. brook trout. radishes. bluefish skate. squabs. lamb. bluefish. salmon. moonfish. blackfish. sheep's-head. lima beans. pork. frogs' legs. prawns. skate or rayfish. black bass. onions. veal. cauliflower. artichokes. AUGUST. guinea-fowls. doe-birds.

beets. lamb. celery. crayfish. peas. FISH. endive. cress. mutton. halibut. rhubarb. woodcock. flounders. VEGETABLES. crayfish. venison. lobsters. pullets. bluefish. partridges. lamb. eels. pickerel.--Striped bass. pickerel. wild geese. geese. veal. garlic. soft crabs. . sea bass. haddock. lobsters. onions. pompano. white bait. yellow perch. oysters. squids. cucumbers. doe-birds. parsley. tomatoes. grouse.--Salmon.--Potatoes. shallots. salads of all kinds. antelope. pheasants. wild pigeons. squabs. mutton. cabbages. sheep's-head. wall-eyed pike. weakfish. weakfish. reed-birds. fresh mackerel. MEAT. frogs' legs. pumpkins. scallops. squash. pork. cero. white perch. skate. terrapin. squabs. chickens. young geese. catfish.SEPTEMBER. green turtle. porgies. hard crabs. FISH. corn. Spanish mackerel. woodcock. pompano. wild ducks. flounders. the canvas-back duck being the most highly prized. peas. green-peppers. grouper. veal.--Turkeys. tomatoes. mushrooms. striped bass. reed-birds. smelts. parsnips. fresh cod. celery. smelts. parsnips. butterfish. artichokes. lima beans. golden plover. Spanish mackerel. carrots. POULTRY AND GAME. VEGETABLES. lettuce. spinach. turnips. herrings. moonfish.--Larks. MEATS. partridges. pork. cisco. cabbages. haddock. carp. cauliflowers. black bass. whitefish. soft crabs. turnips. spotted bass. salmon-trout. green corn. mushrooms. white bait. blackfish. young turkeys. POULTRY AND GAME. halibut codfish. gray plover. swans and brant fowls. clams. for its delicate flavor. sorrel. hard crabs. beans. wall-eyed pike. cero. beets. salsify. egg plant.--Beef. onions. sea bass. sweet potatoes. frogs' legs. a large fish similar to the Spanish mackerel. OCTOBER. squash. carrots. sweet herbs of all kinds.--Beef.--Potatoes. red-snapper. Brussels sprouts. carp. prawns. wild ducks. bluefish. string beans. pigeons. fowls. whitefish. salsify. fresh mackerel. plover. venison. cauliflower. snipe. grouse. snipes.

cisco. turkeys. partridges. veal. yellow perch. oysters. cabbages. halibut. turnips. black bass. skate. venison. mushrooms. grouper. wild duck. carrots. wild geese. prawns. prawns. mint. pumpkins. all sorts of salads and sweet herbs. grouse.--Striped bass. green turtle. turkey. haddock. sage and small salads. cabbages. soups. whitefish. hard crabs. may be found either green or dried the year round. pickerel. fowls. green turtle. leeks. crayfish. a sweet panfish. parsnips. pickerel. venison. wall-eyed pike. pumpkins. scallops. DECEMBER.Potatoes.--Beef. wild geese. blackfish. pheasants. onions. chickens. snipe. salmon-trout. striped bass. fresh cod. FISH. fowls. MEATS.--Rabbits. fresh mackerel. black bass. winter squash. woodcock. horse-radish. FISH. turnips.--Beef.--Potatoes. artichokes. antelope. geese. Garden herbs which are mostly used for stuffings and for flavoring dishes. shad. bluefish. quails. onions. mutton. canvas-back duck. POULTRY AND GAME. oysters. Melons can be had at most of our markets from July 1st until the 15th . salmon-trout. veal. frogs' legs. VEGETABLES. etc. dried peas. fresh cod. beets. parsley. POULTRY AND GAME. cusk. haddock. shad. winter squash.--Rabbits. pork.. garlic. pullets. cisco. woodcock. dried beans. wild ducks. pork. soft crabs. pigeons. shallots.--. skate. pheasants. sturgeon. scallops. Brussels-sprouts. hares. shallots. or for garnishing. quails. wall-eyed pike. MEATS. whitefish. mullet. terrapin. beets. yellow perch. grouse. terrapin. redfish or spotted bass. halibut. white bait. parsnips. always in season. hard crabs. mutton. celery.NOVEMBER. ducks. mushrooms. salmon. hares. blackfish. partridges. flounders. parsley. frogs' legs. tame duck. salmon. snipe. carrots. catfish. crayfish. red-snapper. eels. VEGETABLES. dried beans. chiccory.--Turbot.

SUPPER. * * * * * JANUARY. Rusks 256. Baked Sweet Potatoes 198.of October. . Cold Roast Turkey 82. Baked Apples 515. Tea 460. Hominy 274. Crullers 317. they are received from the South in the early part of the season. Boston Oyster Pie 76. DINNER. Sliced Oranges. Celery Salad 174. Boiled White Fish 59. [Illustration] MENUS BREAKFAST. Coffee 458. Potatoes a la Creme 193. Parker House Rolls 253. Ham Omelet 233. and are not as fresh and good as those ripened in our own vicinity. LUNCH AND DINNER FOR THE HOLIDAYS And for a Week in Each Month In the Year. BREAKFAST. Toast 276. NEW YEAR'S DAY. Fruit Cake 290.

Julienne Soup 33. Potted Ham 152. Lobster Salad 171. Graham Gems 259. Cheese Cream Toast 223. Fruits. Chicken Pie 89. Orange-water Ice 380. Cranberry Sauce 163. Nuts. Oatmeal. with Cream 274. Coffee 458. BREAKFAST. Eggs on Toast 279. . Roast Turkey 82. Mashed Potatoes 192. Plain Celery 175. Raisins. Spiced Currants 189. Cold Raised Biscuit 251. Celery Salad 174. Mince Pie 338. Boiled Onions 198. Baked Pickerel 51. Broiled Mutton Chops 139. Oranges. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458. Olives. Fancy Cakes 310. Wine Sauce 417. SUNDAY. Tomato Sauce 159. Baked Winter Squash 212. English Plum Pudding 396. Oyster Stuffing 83. Cheese. Confectionery. Favorite Warmed Potatoes 195. SUPPER.Oysters on Half Shell.

LUNCHEON. Cold Roast Venison 104. Jelly Kisses 372. Coffee 458. MONDAY. Waffles 260. DINNER. Boiled Rice 275. Coffee 458. Raisins. Toast 276. Citron Cake 295. . Baked Lemon Pudding 399. Oysters on Half Shell. Potato Fillets 196. Currant Jelly 431. DINNER. Broiled Oysters 73. Sauce Maitre d'Hotel 160. Mock Turtle Soup 39. 1 196. Nuts. BREAKFAST. Celery. Fruit. Potato Salad 175. Chicken Patties 88.Gooseberry Jam 435. Pickled White Cabbage 182. Tea 460. Roast Haunch of Venison 104. Tea 460. Potato Croquettes No. Creamed Parsnips 204. Boiled Halibut 57. Baked Apples 515. Rye Drop-cakes 261. Pork Cutlets 147. Canned Peaches 439. with Maple Syrup.

French Griddle-cakes 265. Welsh Rarebit 224. Boiled Sweet Potatoes 198. Crackers. Saratoga Chips 193. Porterhouse Steak 110. Oyster Soup 46. Olives.Macaroni Soup 40. Royal Sago Pudding 401. Sliced Oranges. Boston Cream Pie 331. Chocolate 461. Molasses Cup Cake 308. Cucumber Pickles 180. Boiled Leg of Mutton 137. Coffee 458. Scalloped Onions 199. Hominy Croquettes 274. Roast Loin of Pork 145. Scrambled Mutton 141. Hominy 274. Stewed Carrots 213. BREAKFAST. Brown Bread 244. Apple Sauce 162. Cheese. LUNCHEON. Sweet Sauce 421. Cheese Fondu 222. TUESDAY. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. DINNER. Currant Jelly 431. Coffee 458. Steamed Cabbage 201. Pickled Green Peppers 183. . Caper Sauce 158. Raspberry Jam 436.

BREAKFAST. THURSDAY. Roast Fillet of Veal 127.Crullers 317. Fried Sweet Potatoes 198. Strawberry Jam 435. Rusks 256. Macaroni a la Creme 217. Cocoanut Tarts 341. BREAKFAST. Cheese. Coffee 458. Green Tomato Pickles 181. WEDNESDAY. Coffee 458. Coffee 458. Cheese. Pork Tenderloins 147. Parker House Rolls 253. . Piccalili 186. Wheat Bread 240. Stewed Codfish 64. DINNER. Cold Roast Pork 145. Omelet 230. Parsnip Fritters 203. Lemon Pie 328. Fried Mush 273. Browned Potatoes 192. Old-fashioned Apple Sauce 162. Beef Soup 31. Tea 460. LUNCHEON. Tomato Sauce 159. Fruit.

Coffee 458. Boiled Cabbage 200. FRIDAY. Coffee 458. Ham Toast 279. DINNER. Sardines.Stewed Peaches. Sally Lunn 255. Chicken Cream Soup 34. Fruit Jumbles 315. Boiled Potatoes 192. Baked Eggs on Toast 279. Coffee 458. Cold Slaw 173. Soft Ginger Cake 306. Stewed Beef Kidney 124. Raised Doughnuts 317. BREAKFAST. Charlotte Russe 361. Boiled Turnips 214. Codfish Balls 63. Corn Meal Mush 273. Orange Marmalade 434. Preserved Strawberries 425. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Veal Croquettes 129. Egg Muffins 257. Oat Flakes 275. Cocoa 461. Crisp Potatoes 195. Canned Plums 442. Fruit. . LUNCHEON. Boiled Corned Beef 118. Beets Boiled 210. Cheese Toast 277.

Beef Hash 123. Browned Potatoes 192. Fried Raw Potatoes 194. Wheat Bread 240. Celery 175. LUNCHEON. Grafton Milk Biscuits 254. Apple Sauce 162. Deviled Lobster 69. BREAKFAST. DINNER. Suet Plum Pudding 413. Hollandaise Sauce 161. Scalloped Oysters 76. Fruit. Peach Butter 443. Brandy Sauce 417. Cold Corned Beef 118. Baked Halibut 58. Coffee 458. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Vegetable Hash 212. Graham Bread 243. Buckwheat Cakes with Maple Syrup 265-266. Coffee 458. Head Cheese 154. Celery Soup 43. Golden Spice Cake 303. . Grape Jelly 433. Tea 460. Scalloped Fish 64. Fried Salsify 209. Sponge Drops 312.LUNCHEON. SATURDAY. Cracked Wheat 275.

Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458. DINNER. Steamed Potatoes 194. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Chocolate 461. Oyster Sauce 157. Cookies 315. FEBRUARY. Boiled Rice 202. Mock Turtle Soup 39. Egg muffins 257.Cream Cake 300. Coffee 458. Cheese. Fricassee Chicken 87. DINNER Oysters on Half Shell. Tomato Soup 38. Boiled Turkey 84. Oranges. BREAKFAST. Baked White Fish 56. Ladies' Cabbage 201. Bechamel Sauce 160. Cold Slaw 173. Boiled Sweet Potatoes 198. Clam Fritters 78. Apple Pie 326. Country Sausage 153. . Oatmeal with Cream 274. WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY. Mock Ice 354. Baked Omelet 234. Mashed Potatoes 192.

Fried Eggs 228. Marble Cake 297. Virginia Corn Bread 247. Scalloped Onions 199. German Doughnuts 318. Soda Biscuit 251. Salmi of Game 103. Raisins and Nuts. SUNDAY BREAKFAST Old-fashioned Apple Sauce 162. Braised Ducks with Turnips 97. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Lobster Salad 171. English Pound Cake 294. Graham Mush 273. Potato Croquettes 196. Mashed Potatoes 192. . Candied Fruits. Coffee 458. Potato Croquettes 196. DINNER Ox-tail Soup 34 Baked White Fish (Bordeaux Sauce) 56. Tea 460. Wheat Bread 240. SUPPER Cold Boiled Turkey 84.Stewed Tomatoes 204. Coffee 458. Variegated Jelly 374. Bavarian Cream 349. Broiled Ham 152. Chicken Salad 171. Timbale of Macaroni 217. Washington Poe 365. Olives. Pineapple Preserves 427.

Potato Biscuit 254. Coffee 458. LUNCHEON. Sliced Cucumber Pickle 180. Cheese. Orange Short-cake 270. French Cabbage 201. Fruit. Stewed Parsnips 203. Vermicelli Soup 42. Spanish Cream 349. Chocolate 461. Fruit. SUPPER Boston Oyster Pie 76. Cranberry Pie 335. Cold Boiled Tongue 124. Fried Chicken 90. Warmed-up Duck 98. Fried Sweetbreads 135. Stewed Brisket of Beef 120. BREAKFAST. Mixed Pickles 187. DINNER. Lemon Jelly 373.Celery Salad 174. Coffee 458. Stewed Apricots. Celery 175. Almond Macaroons 372. Potato Puffs 193. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Coffee 458. Sliced Bologna Sausage 152. Scalloped Potatoes 194. Ginger Snaps 309. Flannel Cakes 262. Sago Apple Pudding 401. Tea 460. . Milk Toast 277. MONDAY. Canned Grapes 439.

Tea 460. Sunderland Pudding 415. Coffee 458. Baked Ham 151. Fried Sweet Potatoes 198. Newport Waffles 260. Cold Sliced Beef 120. Fried Apples 147. Stewed Beets 210. Scotch Mutton Broth 32. Light Biscuit 252. Fried Pork Chops 148. Fruit. Lemon Cookies 316. Coffee 458.TUESDAY. Hominy 274. Custard Sauce 420. LUNCHEON. Hamburger Steak 123. Tea 460. BREAKFAST. Jelly Fritters 369. Tennessee Muffins 258. Wheat Bread 240. Grilled Pork 149. DINNER. Saratoga Chips 193. Veal Croquettes 129. Corn Meal Mush 273. Sweet Pickle 188. LUNCHEON. WEDNESDAY. Sliced Ham 151. . Coffee 458. Brown Bread 244. Potato Snow 194. Sliced Oranges. Puff Ball Doughnuts 319. Tomato Catsup 176. Favorite Warmed Potatoes 195. BREAKFAST. Lemon Toast 367. Scalloped Oysters 76. Scalloped Tomatoes 204. Potato Puffs 193.

Coffee 458. with Raspberry Jam 415. Coffee 458. Orange Jelly 377. Cheese. Fruit. French Rolls 253. Boiled Squash 212. Wonders 318. Preserved Cherries 424. Stewed Onions 199. Boned Leg of Mutton. Stewed Salsify 209. Tomato Sauce 159. Pickled Oysters 185. Steamed Sweet Potatoes 198. Roasted 136. Hashed Mutton on Toast 138. LUNCHEON. THURSDAY. Tapioca Cream Soup 41. Potato Croquettes 196. Hot Slaw 173. BREAKFAST. Crackers. Coffee 458. Feather Cake 300. Delicate Indian Pudding 395. . Neapolitaines 313.DINNER. Mullagatawny Soup 38. DINNER. Wheat Bread 240. Chocolate 461. Tapioca Blanc Mange 358. Bananas. Curry Chicken with Rice 93. Samp 275. Pickled Onions 184. Fried Potatoes 194. FRIDAY. Boiled Potatoes 192. Mashed Turnips 214. Broiled Veal Cutlets 129.

Boiled Cod with Oyster Sauce 65. Veal Hash on Toast 280. French Stew 119. Lobster Soup 46. Muttonettes 140. Boiled Salt Mackerel 60.BREAKFAST. Cocoanut Pudding 395. BREAKFAST. Baked Potatoes 197. Coffee 458. Oranges. Fish Omelet 233. Tea 460. Sweet Omelet 368. DINNER. Olives. Fried Pickled Pigs' Feet 151. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Fried Sweet Potatoes 198. Coffee 458. . Lobster Croquettes 69. Rusks 256. Fried Cabbage 201. Potato Puffs 193. Wheat Bread 240. Corn Meal Griddle-cakes 263. Cup Cakes 311. Coffee 458. Banana Cream 352. SATURDAY. Boiled Rice 275. Cold Slaw 173. Apple Jelly 433. LUNCHEON. English Crumpets 272.

Beef a la Mode 113. Coffee 458. Grafton Milk Biscuits 254. * * * * . Fruit. Raised Biscuit 251. Lemon Sauce 418. Little Plum Cakes 313. Cheese Fondu 222. Porterhouse Steak 110. Oat Flakes 275. Turtle Bean Soup 37. DINNER. Corn Meal Puffs 395. Chowchow 183. SUNDAY. Sliced Oranges. SUPPER.LUNCHEON. Oyster Omelet 233. Dried Beef with Cream 121. * MARCH. Baked Potatoes 197. Sourcrout 202. Chocolate Custard Pie 328. Cocoa 461. Macaroni a la Italienne 216. BREAKFAST. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Potato Salad 174. Coffee 458. Calf's Head Cheese 132. Sour Milk Griddle-cakes 263.

Coffee 458. Roast Beef 109. MONDAY. Honey. Fish Fritters 65. Egg Sauce 156. Warm Soda Biscuits 251. Tapioca Cream Custard 352. Scalloped Cheese 212. Fried Ham and Eggs 150. Lemon Cookies 316. Plain Muffins 258. Cheese. Boiled Parsnips 203. BREAKFAST. Swiss White Soup 42. LUNCHEON. Yorkshire Pudding 110. . Chocolate 461.Lobster Patties 70. Spinach with Eggs 212. Browned Potatoes 192. Baked Apples 515. Coffee 458. Tea 460. Cold Roast Beef 109. DINNER. Sponge Drops 312. Hominy 274. Chicken Croquettes 90. Brown Bread 244. Potato Salad 174. Boiled Fresh Mackerel 61. Crisp Potatoes 195. Plum Preserves 425. Rhubarb Pie 333. Indian Loaf Cake 248. Baked Potatoes 197.

Hominy Croquettes 274. Split Pea Soup 35. Steamed Potatoes 194. . Bananas. Spiced Beef Relish 119. Coffee 458. Coffee 458. Stewed Carrots 213. Orange Tarts 340. Braised Veal 132. Roast Chicken 86. Hasty Cooked Potatoes 195. Mixed Pickles 187. Consomme Soup 33. Egg Biscuit 252. Lemon Trifle 356. Canned Peaches 439.DINNER. Stewed Beets 210. DINNER. Mashed Potatoes 192. Fried Mush 273. Fruit. Plain Sauce 420. LUNCHEON. Oyster Stew 72. Almond Pudding 390. TUESDAY. Fried Veal Chops 128. Cabbage with Cream 200. Wheat Bread 240. BREAKFAST. Tea 460. Superior Bread Pudding 389. Tomato Toast 278. Spiced Currants 189. Rusks 256.

THURSDAY. BREAKFAST. Coffee 458.Angel Cake 302. Country Sausages 153. Cold Slaw 173. Wine Jelly 373. BREAKFAST. Macaroni and Tomato Sauce 218. Potato Puffs 193. DINNER. Potato Croquettes 196. Tea 460. Fruit. Baked Calf's Head 132. Vegetable Soup 42. LUNCHEON. Cheese. Cracked Wheat 275. East India Pickle 187. Coffee 458. Stewed Onions 199. Baked Omelet 234. Boiled Potatoes 192. Coffee 458. Cream Toast 277. Apple Custard Pie 326. Beaten Biscuit 254. Cocoanut Cookies 316. Lemon Marmalade 435. . Apple Pudding 403. WEDNESDAY. Chicken Patties 88. Bread Griddle-cakes 264.

Fruit. Olives. Spiced Beef 112. Veal Hash on Toast 280. Crullers 318. Potato Croquettes 196. Fricasseed Tripe 126. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Scrambled Eggs 327. Jam Tarts 343.Stewed Prunes. Spinach with Eggs 212. BREAKFAST. LUNCHEON. Chocolate 461. Corn Meal Fritters 266. Boiled Rice 275. Cream Toast 277. Feather Griddle-cakes 262. Plain Charlotte Russe 362. Baked Potatoes 197. Coffee 458. Chicken Salad 171. Coffee 458. Grape Jelly 433. Pork Cutlets 147. Oyster Soup 46. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458. Scalloped Tomatoes 204. . Saratoga Chips 193. FRIDAY. DINNER. Fried Pan Fish 51. Peach Jelly 434. Hashed Beef on Toast 280.

Cracker Pudding 393. Boiled Cabbage 200. Stewed Codfish 64. Fried Potatoes 194. DINNER. Maitre d'Hotel Sauce 160. Tomato Soup No.LUNCHEON. Coffee 458. Fried Parsnips 203. Pan Oysters 74. Ham Omelet 233. Fruit. Potatoes a la Creme 193. LUNCHEON. Delicate Cake 295. Hominy 276. Tea 460. Brown Bread. Boiled White Fish 59. Cucumber Pickle 180. Brown Bread 244. Rice Croquettes 274. Potato Snow 194. 2 38. Cold Spiced Beef 112. Apple Fritters 267. Calf's Liver and Bacon 134. Lemon Jelly 373. Fruit Sauce 421. . Cider Apple Sauce 162. SATURDAY. Cream Short-cake 269. Egg muffins 257. BREAKFAST. and Ham 151. Coffee 458.

Baked Mutton Cutlets 140. Stewed Celery 209. Warmed Potatoes 195. Apple Dumplings 384. Chocolate 461. Shirred eggs 227. with Banana Filling 289. Roast Sweet Potatoes 198. Coffee 458. Philadelphia Pepper Pot 37. Wheat Bread 240. BREAKFAST. Coffee 458. Baked Custard 345. Chocolate 461. Layer Cake 304. Welsh Rarebit 224. Mashed Turnips 214. * * * * . DINNER. Raisins. Cold Roast Chicken 86. Lobster Salad 171. Nuts. Sweet Sauce 421. DINNER. Baking Powder Biscuit 251. Veal Cutlets Broiled 129. French Rolls 253. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Mayonnaise Fish 62. SUPPER. * APRIL. SUNDAY. Stewed Apples 370.Strawberry Preserves 425.

Leg of Mutton a la Venison 132. Broiled Halibut 58. French Rolls 253. Stewed Onions 199. Sauce Tartare 156. Rolled Jelly Cake 304. Mutton Pudding 141. Oyster Patties 75. Currant Jelly 431. Creamed Parsnips 204. Brown Bread 238. Coffee 458. . Mock Turtle Soup 39. Lettuce with Cream Dressing 170. Broiled Shad 55. Cup Custard 345.Cream of Spinach Soup 34. Oyster Roast 74. LUNCHEON. Radishes. Lettuce Salad 174. MONDAY. Tea 460. Saratoga Chips 193. Delmonico Pudding 406 Pineapple Sherbet 380. Fruit. Tenderloin of Beef 113. Steamed Potatoes 194. Omelet of Herbs 231. BREAKFAST. Coffee 458. Steamed Cabbage 201. DINNER. Sliced Oranges. Hominy 276. Boiled Potatoes 192. Raised Muffins 257.

Fried Tripe 125. LUNCHEON. Light Biscuit 252. Olives. Fruit. Frizzled Beef 118. . Jelly Puddings 415. Mashed Turnips 214. Celery Soup 43. Grilled Salt Pork 149. Roast Beef Pie with Potato Crust 116. TUESDAY. Sally Lunn 255. Pickled Cabbage 182. Coffee 458. Golden Cream Cake 300. Peach Meringue Pie 327. Raisins. Oat Flakes 275. Coffee 458.Snow Pudding 410. Stewed Prunes. Crisp Cookies 316. Brain Cutlets 133. French Stew 119. DINNER. Coffee 458. Nuts. BREAKFAST. Chocolate 461. Hominy Croquettes 274. Potato Puffs 193. WEDNESDAY. Potato Puffs 193. Orange Cocoanut Salad 368. Toast 276.

Parker House Rolls 253. Cracked Wheat 275. Grafton Milk Biscuits 254. Boiled Fillet of Veal 127. Chicken Omelet 233. Baked Apples 515. Dried Beef with Cream 121. Coffee 458. Almond Jumbles 315. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Boiled Rice 275. THURSDAY. Mutton Chops Fried 139. Chowchow 183. Baked Sweetbreads 135. Fruit. Wheat Bread 240. Steamed Brown Bread 245. Radishes 175. DINNER. Sponge Cake 293. Baked Potatoes 197. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Coffee 458. Oranges. . Quince Preserves 427. Lemon Jelly 373. Fried Eels 56. LUNCHEON. Boiled Sweet Potatoes 198. Mock Cream Pie 331.BREAKFAST. Tea 461. Veal Collops 128. BREAKFAST. Mullagatawny Soup 38.

Brown Bread 244. Rissoles of Chicken 88. Cocoa 461. Beef Soup 31. FRIDAY. DINNER. LUNCHEON.Dipped Toast 276. Potted Fish 62. Stewed Codfish 64. Stewed Kidneys 124. Banana Pudding 412. Lettuce 176. Macaroni and Cheese 217. Pickled Peppers 183. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Raisins. Boiled Potatoes 192. Hot Cross Buns 255. BREAKFAST. Pressed Beef 119. Nun's Toast 277. Coffee 458. Bread Omelet 234. Bananas. Jam Tarts 343. Fried Parsnips 203. with French Dressing 170. Fried Dinner Rolls 271. Canned Peaches 439. Potato Biscuit 254. . Coffee 458. LUNCHEON. Coffee 458. Chicken a la Terrapin 95. Browned Potatoes 192. Nuts. Baked Potatoes 197.

DINNER. Stewed Apricots. Sweet Potatoes Fried 198. Broiled Ham 151. Newport Waffles 260. . Veal Croquettes 129. Ginger Snaps 309. Flannel Cakes 262. Fried Eggs 228. Coffee 458. Fig Pudding 404. SATURDAY. Samp 275. Potato Croquettes 196. Radishes 175. Tea 460. Scalloped Potatoes 194. Pot Roast 112. Chocolate 461. Canned Grapes 439. LUNCHEON. Olives. Onion Soup 41. Chocolate Eclairs 308. Scalloped Cheese 222. Boston Brown Bread 244. BREAKFAST.Lemon Cake 295. Fruit. Peach Jelly 434. DINNER. Veal Stew 131. Baked Shad with Dressing 55. Vermicelli Soup 42. Coffee 458. Spinach with Eggs 212.

with Mayonnaise 169. with Mint Sauce 160. DINNER. Saratoga Chips 193. Fried Chicken 90. BREAKFAST. Preserved Pears 427. Cream of Asparagus Soup 36. Lobster Patties 70. Almond Cake 303. Coffee 458. Scalloped Clams 79. Sliced Pineapple. * * * * . Sally Lunn 255. Mushroom Omelet 233. Boiled Onions 198.Mashed Potatoes 192. * MAY. Coffee 458. Raisins. Boiled New Potatoes 192. Boiled Bass 55. Lettuce 176. Tea 460. Lady Fingers 312. Sauce Tartare 156. Roast Lamb 142. SUPPER. Pineapple Charlotte Russe 364. Nuts. Ham Salad 172. Rusks 256. Wheat Bread 240. Veal Loaf Sliced 131. Oat Flakes 275. SUNDAY.

Rhubarb Pie 333. French Bread 246. Coffee 458. Milk Toast 277. Boiled Rice 275. Lobster Salad 171. with Mayonnaise 169. Beefsteak Pie 117. Rice Croquettes 274. Nuts. TUESDAY. Broiled Lamb Chops 139. Coffee 458. MONDAY. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. . Coffee 458. Egg Muffins 257. DINNER. Macaroni Soup 40.Green Peas 211. Lettuce 176. Chocolate 461. Rice Meringue 407. Oranges. Horse-radish 176. Ladies' Cabbage 201. String Beans 208. Fruit. Layer Cake with Fig Filling 289. Raisins. Chicken Turnovers 95. Mashed Potatoes 192. Cabinet Pudding 398. Jelly Kisses 371. LUNCHEON. Custard Ice-cream 377. Cheese. Cold Roast Lamb 142. BREAKFAST.

Veal Pie 130. Broiled Shad 55. Sour Milk Biscuits 251. Corn Bread 247. Spinach with Egg 212. WEDNESDAY. Stewed Rhubarb. Fruit. Hamburger Steak 123. Bean Salad 175. Browned Potatoes 192.BREAKFAST. Wheat Bread 240. . Fried Mush 273. Roast Loin of Veal 126. Tea 460. Swiss White Soup 42. Scrambled Eggs 227. New Boiled Potatoes 192. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Cold Cream Sauce 399. LUNCHEON. Chocolate 461. Coffee 458. LUNCHEON. Broiled Ham 152. DINNER. Cheese Fondu 222. Peach Butter 443. French Rolls 253. New Potatoes a la Creme 193. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458. Parker House Rolls 253. Coffee 458. Pineapple Fritters 267. String Beans 208. Tomato Sauce 159. Stewed Peaches. Baked Onions 199. Cookies 315. Election Cake 300. Transparent Pudding 410. Potato Croquettes 196. Frogs' Legs Fried 80. BREAKFAST.

Chocolate Pudding 401. Bean Salad 175. Potato Snow 194. Boiled Turnips 214. Cold Tongue 125. Coffee 458.DINNER. BREAKFAST. Whipped Cream 349. Macaroni a la Italienne 216. LUNCHEON. Orange Jelly 374. Walnut Catsup 177. . Burnt Almond Charlotte 364. Fruit. Light Biscuit 252. Split Pea Soup 35. Plain Crumpets 272. Coffee 458. Nuts. Wheat Griddle-cakes 262. Plain Omelet 230. Tripe Lyonnaise 126. New Potatoes a la Creme 193. Beefsteak 110. Sliced Pineapple. Tea 460. Fried Sweetbreads 135. Julienne Soup 33. Cornstarch Cakes 312. Chicken Pot-pie 94. Cheap Cream Cake 306. Boiled Potatoes 192. Lettuce Salad 174. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Boiled Beef Tongue 124. Preserved Apples 426. DINNER. Hominy 276. THURSDAY. Raisins.

BREAKFAST. Fruit.Coffee 458. Steamed Halibut 57. Canned Peaches 439. Coffee 458. Asparagus Omelet 232. Cold Lemon Pudding 400. Chocolate 461. LUNCHEON. Egg Sauce 156. Oranges. FRIDAY. Irish Potato Soup 43. DINNER. Brown Bread 244. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Lamb Stew 143. German Bread 234. SATURDAY. Fresh Salmon Fried 52. Veal Olives 129. Coffee 458. Jelly Fritters 369. Green Peas 211. Molasses Cup Cakes 308. Dandelion Greens 213. BREAKFAST. Steamed Sweet Potatoes 198. Warmed Potatoes 193. Boiled Eggs 226. Lettuce Salad 174. Cream Waffles 260. . Stewed Rhubarb.

Spiced Beef 112. Hominy 276. BREAKFAST. Crab Apple Jelly 434. Clam Fritters 78. Spinach with Eggs 212. Poached Eggs 228. Pineapple Pie 334. Chocolate 461. DINNER. Strawberries and Cream. Graham Gems 259. Boiled New Potatoes 192. Fruit. * JUNE. Coffee 458. Eggs aux Fines Herbes 228. Dessert Puffs 366. Coffee 458. SUNDAY. Sliced Tomatoes. String Beans 208. Wheat Drop Cakes 262. Potatoes a la Creme 193. Fried Brook Trout 58. LUNCHEON. Radishes 175. * * * * . Fried Spring Chicken 90. Baked Mutton Chops with Potatoes 140. Ox-tail Soup 34. Coffee Cake 299.Cracked Wheat 275. Dipped Toast 277.

Summer Squash 211. Sliced Tomatoes with Mayonnaise 169. Cold Pressed Lamb 143. Coffee 458. Continental Hotel Waffles 260. Steamed New Potatoes 194. Raspberries. LUNCHEON. Buns 255. Stewed Apricots. Stewed Whole Spring Chicken 87. Queen's Cake 302. Angel Cake 302. DINNER. Scalloped Crabs 61. Boiled Salmon 52. SUPPER. Strawberry Ice-cream 378. Coffee 458. Chocolate Blanc Mange 359. Beet Greens 213. Green Pea Soup 36. Fried Chicken a la Italienne 90. Mushrooms on Toast 278. Steamed Potatoes 194. MONDAY. Graham Mush 273. Bechamel Sauce 160. Wheat Bread 240. BREAKFAST. . Pickled Salmon 53. Coffee 458. Raw Cucumbers 175. Sweetbread Croquettes 135. Tea 460.Corn Meal Muffins 258.

Iced Tea 461. Veal Pie 130. Brunswick Jelly Cakes 313. Lettuce 176. Beef Soup 31. with Cream. New Potatoes 192. Bean Salad 175. Cucumbers a la Creme 206. DINNER. . Coffee 458. Coffee 458. Strawberry Short-cake 270. Warmed Potatoes 195. with Noodles 43. Green Currant Pie 332.Scalloped Chicken 92. Cheese. Chocolate 461. Cold Sliced Tongue 125. Pop-overs 262. French Stew 262. Cold Custard Pie 331. Oat Flakes 275. French Dressing 176. Raspberries and Cream. White Sauce 156. Hominy Croquettes 274. LUNCHEON. Ham Omelet 233. Boiled Custard 346. Soft Shell Crabs Fried 71. BREAKFAST. Toast 276. White Mushroom Soup 31. TUESDAY. Milk Biscuits 254. Sliced Cucumbers. DINNER. Asparagus 210.

Sliced Tomatoes. with Croutons 45. Golden Cream 350. Saratoga Chips 193. Tea 460. Cheese. Young Onions. BREAKFAST. Brown Bread 244. Coffee 458. with Whipped Cream 349. Coffee 458.Roast Beef 109. Caper Sauce 158. DINNER. Veal Soup 32. Green Gooseberry Tart 341. Spinach with Eggs 212. String Beans 208. Raised Muffins 257. Wafers 310. Potatoes a la Creme 193. LUNCHEON. Cocoanut Macaroons 372. . Fried Potatoes with Eggs 197. Coffee 458. Tomato Sauce 159. Pineapple Fritters 267. Asparagus on Toast 210. Crab Salad 173. Strawberry Short-cake 270. Cracked Wheat 275. Mayonnaise 169. Fried Cauliflower 200. Roast Beef Pie 117. Cherries. WEDNESDAY. Soda Biscuit 251. Cheese. Broiled Lamb Chops 139. Boiled Chicken 83. Steamed New Potatoes 194.

Chicken Omelet 233. Tomato Salad 174. Broiled Fore-quarter of Lamb 143. French Style 47. Tomato Sauce 159. Chocolate 461. Potato Fillets 196. BREAKFAST. Lettuce with Mayonnaise 169. String Beans 208. Potato Croquettes 196. Corned Beef Hash 123. Coffee 458. Scalloped Eggs 226. Sliced Tomatoes. Broiled Spanish Mackerel 60. DINNER. BREAKFAST. LUNCHEON. . Strawberries and Cream. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. Coffee 458. Grafton Milk Biscuits 254. Cream Short-cake 269. Cherry Pudding 396. FRIDAY. Boiled Rice 275. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Clam Soup. Smothered Beefsteak 114.THURSDAY. Cauliflower 200. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Sliced Pineapple. Strawberry Bavarian Cream 350. Pound Cake 294. Cream Toast 277.

Rice Croquettes 274. Mixed Summer Salad 170. American Toast 277. Porterhouse Steak Broiled with Water-cress 110. Cold Pressed Beef 119. French Bread 246. SATURDAY. Stewed Green Currants. Coffee 458. Baked Blue Fish 56. Sliced Cucumbers 175. Pastry Ramakins 223. Buns 255. DINNER. Clam Chowder 79. Summer Squash 211. Tea 460. Fricassee Chicken 87. . Steamed Oatmeal 276. LUNCHEON. Dressed Cucumbers 175.French Rolls 253. Fancy Cakes 310. Coffee 458. Wheat Bread 240. Rusks 256. Strawberries and Cream. Currants. New Boiled Potatoes 192. LUNCHEON. Cream of Asparagus 36. Charlotte Russe 362. Coffee 458. Tomato Sauce 159. New Potatoes and Cream 193. Muttonettes 140. BREAKFAST.

Cauliflower 200. Scrambled Tomatoes 206. Warmed Potatoes 195. Cold Sliced Lamb 140. * JULY. Iced Tea 460. Fried Chicken 90. DINNER. Sponge Cake 292. Beet Greens 213. Coffee 458. BREAKFAST. Crab Pie 71. FOURTH OF JULY. SUPPER. Scalloped New Potatoes 194. Tomato Soup 38. Toast 276. Cheese. Strawberries and Cream.Cup Cakes 311. Mock Ice 354. Tennessee Muffins 258. Coffee 458. * * * * . Cherry Pie 332. Variegated Cakes 311. Cheese Toast 277. Graham Bread 243. Red Raspberries and Cream. Water-cress Salad 176. Roast Loin of Mutton 136. Radishes 175. Blackberries.

Blackberries. Strawberries. Boiled Cod 65. Spiced Beef Tongue 125. Hominy 274. Coffee 458. BREAKFAST.Tea 460. DINNER. Poached Eggs 227. Fresh Cherries. Clam Soup 47. Crumpets 272. Vanilla Ice-cream 376. Cream of Spinach Soup 34. Cucumbers Sliced 175. Roast Lamb 142. Sliced Tomatoes with Mayonnaise 169. Spinach with Eggs 212. Chicken Patties 88. Naple Biscuits 362. Green Peas 211. Wheat Bread 240. SUNDAY. SUPPER. Lobster Patties 70. Mint Sauce 160. New England Corn Cake 246. Tea 460. Saratoga Chips 193. Coffee 458. Broiled Chicken 89. DINNER. with Lobster Sauce 157. Chocolate Macaroons 373. White Fruit Cake 291. New Potatoes Boiled 192. .

Green Peas 211. New Potatoes with Cream 193. Plain Omelet 230. Crab Sated 173. Currant Fritters 266. Cold Roast Lamb 142. Sauce Maitre d'Hotel 160. Warmed Potatoes 195. BREAKFAST. Stuffed Baked Tomatoes 204. Green Corn 206. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Beef a la Mode 113. Chocolate Ice-cream 377. DINNER. Coffee 458. . Raspberries. White Sauce 156. Boiled Potatoes 192.Boiled Blue Fish 56. Julienne Soup 33. French Bread 246. Cauliflower 200. Blackberry Pudding 409. Dry Toast 276. Salmon Croquettes 66. Coffee 458. LUNCHEON. Veal Chops Fried 128. Cottage Pudding 395. Floating Islands 358. Cocoa 461. Potato Salad 175. Corn Pudding 207. Tomato Sauce 159. Lettuce Salad 177. Raised Muffins 257. Stewed Pears 370. Roast Lamb 136. MONDAY.

with Biscuit 95. Cold Sliced Beef 112. BREAKFAST. Cheese. Light Biscuit 252.Sponge Cake 292. Raspberries. Ribbon Cake 302. Brown Bread 244. Lobster Croquettes 69. Chicken Stewed. BREAKFAST. Cheese Souffle 222. Blackberries. Coffee 458. Steamed Potatoes 194. Cucumbers Sliced 175. Ripe Currant Pie 332. Graham Bread 243. Cracked Wheat 275. TUESDAY. Stewed Corn 207. DINNER. LUNCHEON. Beefsteak Broiled 110. Coffee 458. Vermicelli Soup 42. WEDNESDAY. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. . Cream Toast 277. Tomato Salad 174. Tea 460. Snow Cream 353. Coffee 458. Green Gooseberry Tart 341.

Broiled Lamb Chops 139. Chicken Turnovers 95. Scalloped Mutton and Tomatoes 142. Chocolate 461. Spinach with Eggs 212. Layer Cake 304. Red Raspberries. Silver Cake 296. Coffee 458. THURSDAY. Banana Filling 289. Coffee 458. Potato Fillets 196. Potatoes a la Creme 193. Coffee 458. Fresh Salmon Fried 52. LUNCHEON. Tennessee Muffins 258. Beef Hash 123. Lettuce with Mayonnaise 169. Fried Tomatoes 205. Boiled Potatoes 192.Steamed Oatmeal 276. Graham Mush with Maple Syrup 273. Dry Toast 276. . BREAKFAST. Young Onions. Dipped Toast 276. Cornstarch Pudding 392. Spring Vegetable Soup 42. Raspberries with Cream. DINNER. Beefsteak Pie 117. Clam Fritters 73. Buns 255. Raised Biscuit 251. LUNCHEON.

Baked Potatoes 197. Broiled Chicken on Toast 93. Perch Fried 51. Green Corn Fritters 269. Blackberries. Dressed Cucumbers 175. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. Tea 460. Stewed Tomatoes 204. Boiled Rice 275. Brain Cutlets 133. BREAKFAST. LUNCHEON. Cocoa 461. French Bread 246. Gumbo Soup 41. Boston Cream Cakes 307. Parker House Rolls 253. Wheat Bread 240. Scrambled Eggs 227. Fried Potatoes 194. Fresh Currants. . Coffee 458. DINNER. DINNER. Syllabub 355. Stewed Green Peas 211. Cauliflower 200. Cherry Roley Poley 411. Cherry Pie 332.Sliced Veal Loaf 131. Lettuce 176. with Mayonnaise 169. Roast Beef Pie with Potato Crust 116. FRIDAY. Berry Tea Cake 261. Coffee 458.

Philadelphia Jumbles 314.Clam Chowder 79. Raspberry Sherbet 380. Coffee 458. New Beets Boiled 210. Tomato Salad 174. Custard Pie 331. Iced Tea 460. Bean Salad 175. Crisp Potatoes 195. Rice Pudding 407. Sponge Drops 312. Corn Meal Mush 273. and Caper Sauce 158. . Summer Squash 211. Brown Bread 238. Transparent Pudding 410. Mock Oysters 77. Scalloped Clams 79. LUNCHEON. Fricassee Salmon 53. Salmon 52. Broiled Ham 152. Coffee 458. French Stew 119. Beefsteak 110. Stewed Gooseberries. DINNER. Newport Breakfast Cakes 271. Chicken Turnovers 95. Vegetable Omelet 231. Green Pea Soup 43. New Potatoes with Cream 193. New Potatoes Scalloped 194. BREAKFAST. SATURDAY. Corn Bread 247.

SUPPER. Raspberries. Egg Sauce 156. Baked Pickerel 51. Custard Pudding 391. Frozen Peaches 379. Boiled Rice 275. DINNER. Broiled Spanish Mackerel 60. Stuffed Baked Tomatoes 204. Eggs aux Fines Herbes 228.Red Raspberries and Cream. Rusks 256. Tea 460. Fruit Jumbles 314. Consomme Soup 33. Potato Salad 175. Lamb Sweetbreads 142. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. SUNDAY. White Mountain Cake 301. . Coffee 458. Wheat Bread 240. Stewed Ducks 97. BREAKFAST. Peaches and Cream. Pickled Salmon 53. Cold Boiled Chicken 87. Warmed Potatoes 195. French Rolls 253. * * * * * AUGUST. Coffee 458. Cabbage with Cream 200. Lobster Salad 171.

Lettuce with French Dressing 170. Coffee 458. Potato Fillets 196. . BREAKFAST. DINNER. BREAKFAST. Mutton Cutlets 140. Peach Fritters 267. Peach Trifle 357. Hominy 276. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Tomato Toast 278. Cauliflower 200. MONDAY. Brown Bread 244. Damson Pie 334. Boiled New Potatoes 192. LUNCHEON. Coffee 458. Chocolate 461. Stewed Plums. Egg Muffins 257. Cheese. Roast Beef's Heart 124. German Bread 247. TUESDAY. Tomato Soup 38. Blackberries. Veal Pot-pie 130. Vegetable Omelet 231. Sponge Cake 292.Coffee 458. String Beans 208. Cucumbers Sliced 175.

Cracked Wheat 276. Scotch Mutton Broth 32. Fresh Pears. Sliced Beef Heart 124. . Buns 255. Fruit. Lettuce 174. Corn Pudding 207. Coffee 458. Pear Pickle 189. Meat Omelet 231. Broiled Fore-quarter of Lamb 143. Coffee 458.Frizzled Beef 118. BREAKFAST. LUNCHEON. Fried Tripe 125. Brain Cutlets 133. Plum Cobbler 413. Boiled Eggs 226. Tea 460. Wheat Bread 240. Stuffed Baked Tomatoes 204. DINNER. Saratoga Chips 193. Coffee 458. WEDNESDAY. Lemon Jelly 373. Dipped Toast 276. Green Peas 211. Breakfast Puffs 272. LUNCHEON. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Apricot Meringue Pie 332. French Dressing 170. New Potatoes and Cream 193. Huckleberry Griddle-cakes 265. Cookies 315.

Sliced Pressed Lamb 143. Calf's Liver and Bacon 134. Steamed Chicken 87. DINNER. Coffee 458. Chocolate 461. Dressed Cucumbers 175. Walnut Cake 305. Fried Sweet Potatoes 198. Green Corn Fritters 269. Musk Melon. Coffee 458. . Oatmeal with Cream 274. Dry Toast 276. Boiled Sweet Potatoes 198. Fried Chicken a la Italienne 90. Peaches and Cream. Light Biscuit 252. Sponge Cake 292. LUNCHEON. Rice Pudding 408. THURSDAY. Blackberries and Cream. Young Onions. Stuffed Egg Plant 208. Cream of Spinach Soup 34. Broiled Tomatoes 205. New England Corn Cake 246. French Bread 246. BREAKFAST. Peaches and Cream. Iced Tea 460. Tomatoes with Mayonnaise 169. Crisp Potatoes 195.Broiled Salmon 52. Green Corn Boiled 206. Tomato Sauce 159.

Raised Muffins 257. Mixed Summer Salad 170. Coffee 458. Cream Tarts 343. Fruit. Huckleberry Pudding 409. Spinach with Eggs 212. Coffee 458. Lettuce Salad 174. Corn Meal Mush 273. Potato Croquettes 196. DINNER.DINNER. Beef Croquettes 121. Fried Blue Fish 51. Bechamel Sauce 160. New Potatoes Boiled 192. Dried Beef. . Scalloped Lobster 69. Sweet Potatoes Fried 198. Tea 460. German Bread 247. Green Pea Soup 36. Rich Wine Sauce 417. Whole Peaches. BREAKFAST. Grape Pie 334. with Cream 121. Baked Salmon Trout 59. Stewed Brisket of Beef 120. LUNCHEON. Brown Bread 244. Fried Egg Plant 208. Huckleberry Short-cake 271. Corn Soup 35. FRIDAY. Hashed Mutton 138. Peach Cream 353. Tomatoes with Mayonnaise 169. Lima Beans 209.

* * * * * SEPTEMBER. Chicken Cream Soup 34. DINNER. Wheat Bread 240. Fresh Greengages. Cheese. SATURDAY. Steamed Potatoes 194. Dressed Cucumbers 175. . LUNCHEON. Green Peas 211. Boiled Potatoes 192. Cup Cakes 311. Broiled Chicken 93. French Bread 246. Graham Gems 259. Tomato Omelet 232. Coffee 458. Crab Salad 173. Cold Fruit Pudding 392. Irish Stew 141. Cheese. Cream Toast 277. Broiled Ham 152. Coffee 458. Oat Flakes 275. Coffee 458. Chocolate 461. BREAKFAST.Wafers 310. Huckleberry Pie 333. Boiled Corn 206. Peaches and Cream.

Lobster Croquettes 69. BREAKFAST. Beef Soup 31. SUPPER. Tomato Salad 174. Stuffed Egg Plant 208. Musk Melon. DINNER. Coffee 458. Rochester Jelly Cake 303. Graham Gems 259. Cheese. Cold Slaw 173. Fried Smelts 58. Hollandaise Sauce 161. Potted Ham 152. Rice Omelet 232. Tutti Frutti Ice-cream 378. Tea 460. . Cream Cake 300. MONDAY. Peach Meringue Pie 327. Corn Meal Mush 273. Wheat Bread 240. Roast Partridges 101. Veal Hash on Toast 280. BREAKFAST. Sliced Peaches. Stewed Corn 207. Coffee 458.SUNDAY. French Bread 246. Small Oyster Pies 78. Mashed Potatoes 192. Potatoes a la Creme 193. with Croutons 45. Boiled Fresh Mackerel 61.

Peach Pudding 403. Coffee 458. Mixed Summer Salad 170. Brown Bread 244. Salmi of Game 103. TUESDAY. Coffee 458. Cheese. with Whipped Cream 349. Tenderloin of Beef 113. LUNCHEON. Potato Croquettes 196. with Peach Cream Filling 288. Graham Mush with Maple Syrup 273. Potato Fillets 196. Watermelon Pickle 188. DINNER. Cocoanut Tarts 341. Baked Potatoes 197. Dry Toast 276. Chocolate 461. Vegetable Soup 42. Cold Beef Tongue 124. Veal Collops 128.Peaches and Cream. Layer Cake 304. Ham Toast 279. Newport Breakfast Cakes 271. Broiled Lamb Chops 139. Potato Puffs 193. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Huckleberries. Coffee 458. BREAKFAST. Lima Beans 208. Raised Muffins 257. Fried Tomatoes 205. . Egg Biscuit 252. Fried Tomatoes 205.

BREAKFAST. Fried Smelts 58. Floating Islands 358. Vermicelli Soup 42. French Bread 246. WEDNESDAY. Baked Mutton Cutlets 140. Coffee 458. Huckleberry Cake 308. Wheat Bread 240. DINNER. Baked Beets 210. Sweet Potatoes Baked 198. Parker House Rolls 253. Potato Salad 175. Boiled Potatoes 192. Lemon Cake 295. Beef Hash 123. Boiled Eggs 226. Cold Roast Warmed 122. Potato Biscuit 254. Cheese Fondu 222. . Sliced Tomatoes. LUNCHEON. Chocolate 461. Plum Pie 334. Tea 460. Fish Salad 172. Coffee 458. Oat Flakes 275. Corn Pudding 207. Peach Cobbler 413. Ham Toast 279.LUNCHEON. Horse-radish 176. Cheese.

Tea 460. . Light Biscuit 252. Roast Tame Duck 96. Cold Berry Pudding 388. BREAKFAST. Dry Toast 276. Grape Pie 334. Feather Cake 300. DINNER. Corn Soup 35. Coffee 458. String Beans 208. Boiled Lemon Pudding 400. Bread Omelet 234. Hamburger Steak 123. Fried Corn 207. Hominy 276. Saratoga Chips 193. Tapioca Cream Custard 352. Lettuce 176. Grilled Bacon 149. with Mayonnaise 169. Baked Tomatoes 205. Duck Pie 98. Whole Pears. THURSDAY. LUNCHEON. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. Tomato Salad 174. Browned Potatoes 192. Graham Bread 243. Coffee 458. Steamed Leg of Mutton 138. Split Pea Soup 35.DINNER. Peach Meringue 354. Stewed Salsify 209. Currant Jelly 431.

Cauliflower 200. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Corn Bread 247. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458. Coffee 458. SATURDAY . German Custard 347. White Sauce 156. Cucumbers Sliced 175. DINNER. Grape Jelly 433. Coffee 458. Cheese. FRIDAY BREAKFAST. Hashed Mutton 138. Mashed Potatoes 192. Oatmeal with Cream 274. LUNCHEON.Watermelon. Cold Greens 213. Beefsteak Rolls 115. Scalloped Eggs 226. Jumbles 314. Country Plum Charlotte 364. Boston Cream Cakes 258. Tennesee Muffins 258. Warmed Potatoes 195. Chocolate 461. Broiled Spanish Maceral 60. Clam Soup 47. Fruit. Tomato Sauce 159. Musk Melon. Fried 52. Fresh Salmon.

LUNCHEON. Browned Potatoes 192. Peaches and Cream. Dry Toast 276. Stewed Kidneys 124. Potato Croquettes 273. Coffee 458. Roast Lopin of Veal 126. Twist Bread 246. Sally Lunn 255. * * * * * OCTOBER. DINNER. Fresh Apricots Cracked Wheat 275. BREAKFAST. Almond Cake 303. Succotash 208.BREAKFAST. Grapes. Lyonaise Potatoes 196. . Coffee 458. SUNDAY. Bean Salad 175. Breaded Chicken 92. Tomatoes with Mayonnaise 169. Sponge Drops 312. Baked Custard 345. Mashed Squash 212. Hukleberries and Cream Tea 460. Grilled Salt Pork 149. Gumbo Soup 41.

Broiled Veal Cutlets 129. Boston Brown Bread 244. Caulilower 200. Coffee 458. Broiled Halibut 38. Scalloped Tomatoes 204. MONDAY. Brown Sauce 161. Hasty Cooked Potatoes 195. Peach Meringue Pie 327. BREAKFAST. Stewed Quinces.Oatmeal with Cream 274. Fancy Cakes 310. Lamb 136. DINNER. Steamed Potatoes 194. SUPPER. Tea 460. Cold Slaw 173. French Cocoanut Pudding 395. Wheat Bread 240. . Buckwheat Cakes 266. Pop-overs 262. Minced Egg 229. Sauce Tartare 136. Ox-tail Soup 34. Boiled Onions 198. Oyster Stew 72. Fruit Coffee 458. Grape Trifle 357. Milk Toast 277. Cold Pork and Beans 149. Blue Fish Fried 56. Chicken Salad 171. Roast Beef 109. Crisp Potatoes 195.

Fried Potatoes 194. . Boiled Potatoes 192. TUESDAY. LUNCHEON. Calf's Liver and Bacon 134. DINNER. French Bread 246. New England Corn Cake 246. Mashed Turnips 214. Potato Croquettes 196. Baked Pears 370. Onion Omelet 234. Coffee 458. Roast Pheasants 101. Chocolate Eclairs 308. Peach Fritters 267. Lobster Salad 171. Dry Toast 276. Cold Roast Pheasant 101. Apple Custard Pie 326. Country Plum Charlotte 364. BREAKFAST.Brown Bread 244. LUNCHEON. Julienne Soup 33. Chocolate 461. Coffee 458. Cabbage with Cream 200. Baked Quinces 371. Cracked Wheat 375. Tomato Salad 174. Fried Eggs 228. Graham Bread 243. Coffee 458. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Cold Roast Beef 109.

Brown Bread 244. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Mashed Squash 212. . French Rolls 253. Game Soup 32. Scrambled Mutton 141. Coffee 458. Scalloped Oysters 76. Grapes. Cold Slaw 173. Tomato Omelet 232. Peach Cobbler 413. Ginger Bread 306. Braised Leg of Mutton 137. English Crumpets 272. Potatoes a la Delmonico 197. DINNER. BREAKFAST. Boiled Fillet of Veal 127. Layer Jelly Cake 289. Corn Pudding 207. Sardines. Sliced Oranges. French Custard 346. Boiled Sweet Potatoes 198. Mock Turtle Soup 39. WEDNESDAY. Fried Egg Plant 208. Warmed Potatoes 195. LUNCHEON. Mashed Potatoes 192.Tea 460. Coffee 458. Cocoa 461. Beefsteak Broiled 110. DINNER.

Steamed Potatoes 194. Cheese Souffle 222. Blanc Mange 359. Tripe Lyonnaise 126. Potato Salad 175. Baked Quinces 371. BREAKFAST. Dry Toast 276. Lettuce Salad 174. Veal Croquettes 129. Potatoes a la Creme 184. Coffee 458. Tea 460. THURSDAY. Crisp Cookies 316. Pot Roast 112. Boiled Rice 202. French Cabbage 201. Lima Beans 209. Broiled Grouse 101. Coffee 458. Apple Snow 356. Fruit. Saucer Puddings 406. Grape Pie 334.Olives. Coffee 458. Plum Puff Pudding 411. LUNCHEON. Swiss White Soup 42. Raised Muffins 257. Dominoes 310. FRIDAY. . Buns 255. DINNER.

Potato Fillets 196. . LUNCHEON. BREAKFAST. Chocolate 461. Wheat Bread 240. Spiced Plums 189. Saratoga Chips 193. Fried Egg Plant 208. Plain Charlotte Russe 362. Mutton Cutlets 140. Potato Snow 194. Eels Fried 56. Muttonettes 140. Stewed Plums. Quince Jelly 432. DINNER. French Bread 246. Baked Smelts 59. Cauliflower 200. Whole Pears. Oat Flakes 275. Hominy 276. Tomato Sauce 159. Silver Cake 296. Onion Soup 41.BREAKFAST. Beef Croquettes 121. Stewed Crab Apples. Coffee 458. Coffee 458. Beef Hash 123. Raisins. SATURDAY. Oyster-pot Pie 76. Corn Meal Griddle-cakes 263. Egg Muffins 257. Nuts.

Quince Trifle 357. * * * * * NOVEMBER. Buckwheat Cakes 266. with Noodles 43. Veal Soup 32. Tomato Salad 176. Rusks 256. LUNCHEON. DINNER. Coffee 458. Dried Beef with Cream 121. Coffee 458. Cold Roast Turkey 82. Ham Salad 172. Mashed Potatoes 192. Hickory Nut Cake 305. Oat Flakes 275. Fried Salsify 209.Dry Toast 276. Tea 460. Baked Onions 199. Codfish Balls 63. Coffee 458. Browned Potatoes 192. Maple Syrup. Baked Omelet 234. THANKSGIVING DAY. SUPPER. BREAKFAST. Wheat Bread 240. Sliced Oranges. Chocolate Pie 328. Chicken Pot-pie 94. Broiled Porterhouse Steak 110. . Grapes.

Hasty Cooked Potatoes 195. Fried Smelts 58. Wheat Bread 240. Coffee 458. Potato Salad 175. DINNER. White Fish Fried 51. Cracked Wheat 275. Preserved Egg Plums 425. Jelly Omelet 234. Pumpkin Pie 336. Mashed Potatoes 192. Tea 460. Fruits. Eclairs 308. Crullers 317. Charlotte Russe 361. BREAKFAST. Boiled Onions 198. Cheese. Coffee 458. SUPPER. Stewed Crab Apples. Chicken Salad 171. SUNDAY. Almond Ice-cream 380. Tennessee Muffins 258. Lemon Jelly 373. Oysters on Half Shell. Roast Turkey 82. Mince Pie 338. Olives. Cranberry Sauce 163.Scalloped Oysters 76. Cream Short-cake 269. Venison Pastry 105. Cream of Chicken Soup 34. Baked Squash 212. . Hickory Nut Cake 305. Sauce Tartare 156. Parsnip Fritters 203.

Grapes. Roast Wild Duck 98. Baked Squash 212. Cookies 315. Jelly Kisses 371. Baked Plum Pudding 397. Cold Pickled Beets 210. Welsh Rarebit 224. Mullagatawny Soup 38. Baked Potatoes 197. Gooseberry Jam 435. Chicken Salad 171. Coffee 458. Currant Jelly Sauce 161. BREAKFAST. . Breakfast Puffs 272. LUNCHEON. Sweet Sauce 421. Mashed Potatoes 192. Golden Spice Cake 303. Boiled Beets 210. Oyster Sauce 157.Pickled Pigs' Feet 151. Fruit. Cold Roast Duck 98. Light Biscuit 252. MONDAY. French Bread 246. Tea 460. Small Oyster Pies 78. Hominy 276. Preserved Cherries 424. Fricasseed Tripe with Oysters 126. Boiled Codfish 63. Scalloped Potatoes 194. Fried Sweet Potatoes 198. DINNER. Coffee 458. Brown Bread 244.

Orange Jelly 374. Newport Waffles 260. Chocolate Custard Pie 328. Roast Leg of Pork 145. Scalloped Mutton and Tomatoes 142. Leg of Mutton a la Venison 138. Mashed Turnips 214. Potato Puffs 193. Tea 460. Beaten Biscuit 254. Pumpkin Pie 236. Stewed Prunes. LUNCHEON. Steamed Potatoes 194. Nut Cakes 318. Lima Beans 209. Hominy Croquettes 274. Snipe on Toast 100. Ox-tail Soup 34. Cold Slaw 173. Stewed Onions 199. Scrappel 158. Browned Potatoes 197. . DINNER. Coffee 458.Cocoa 461. Wheat Bread 240. Cheese. Coffee 458. Ladies' Cabbage 201. BREAKFAST. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Mixed Pickles 187. TUESDAY. DINNER. Vermicelli Soup 42.

Apple Corn Meal Pudding 404. Coffee 458. Lobster Salad 171. Blanc Mange 359.Celery Salad 174. Fruit. Wine Sauce 417. Pickled White Cabbage 182. Scalloped Onions 199. . Chocolate 461. Turtle Soup from Beans 37. Spiced Beef 112. Graham Mush 273. Dry Toast 276. Country Sausages 153. German Bread 247. Coffee 458. Crackers. Baked Sweet Potatoes 198. Cranberry Tart Pie 335. Mashed Potatoes 192. Lemon Tartlets 339. Oranges. Fried Parsnips 203. THURSDAY. Cheese. Cold Roast Pork 145. BREAKFAST. Boiled Eggs 226. WEDNESDAY. LUNCHEON. DINNER. Doughnuts 316. Saratoga Chips 193. Coffee 458. Buckwheat Cakes 266. Apple Sauce 162.

Raisins. Broiled Veal Cutlets 129. Brown Bread 244. Nuts. DINNER. Olives. Boiled Potatoes 192. Coffee 458. . LUNCHEON. Fruit. Raised Biscuit 251. Cream Waffles 260. BREAKFAST. Oat Flakes 276. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Grandmother's Sauce 418. Squirrel Soup 37. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Bananas. Feather Cake 300. Fish Omelet 233. Warmed Potatoes 195. Beef Croquettes 121. Celery Salad 174. Fried Oysters 72. Striped Bass Fried 51.BREAKFAST. Mashed Squash 212. Fried Cabbage 201. Roast Loin of Mutton 136. Stewed Apricots. Coffee 458. Canned Peaches 439. Minced Eggs 229. Tea 460. FRIDAY. Apple Puff Pudding 389.

Potatoes a la Creme 193. Boiled Turnips 214. . Halibut on Toast 281. Hard Sauce 420. Dry Toast 276.Corn Bread 247. Grape Jelly Pie 335. BREAKFAST. Steamed Potatoes 194. Chocolate 461. Wheat Griddle-cakes 266. LUNCHEON. French Bread 246. Plain Omelet 230. Veal Stew 131. Coffee 458. Fish Chowder 63. Baked Pickerel 51. Porterhouse Steak Broiled 110. Fruit. Pickled Mangoes 184. Apple Custard Pudding 391. Coffee 458. Baked Sour Apples 515. Cold Roast Mutton 136. Coffee 458. DINNER. Boiled Rice 275. Savory Biscuits 312. Rabbit Pie 103. Nut Cakes 318. Potato Salad 175. LUNCHEON. SATURDAY. Potato Puffs 193. Plain Celery. Wheat Bread 240.

DINNER. Boiled Rice 275. Celery Soup 43. Wheat Bread 240. Tea 460. . CHRISTMAS DAY. Peach Jelly 434. Sourcrout 202. Cold Slaw 173. Feather Griddle-cakes 262. Boiled Ham 151. Oxford Dumplings 385. * * * * * DECEMBER. Cream Tarts 325. SUPPER. Lemon Sponge 335. Cold Roast Goose 86. Sweet Sauce 421. Broiled Salt Mackerel 60. Chocolate Eclairs 308. Coffee 458. Coffee 458. Baked Sweet Potatoes 198. Oyster Patties 75. Potato Fillets 196.Grafton Milk Biscuits 254. Stewed Parsnips 203. Fruit. Lima Beans 209. BREAKFAST. Poached Eggs a la Creme 228. Buns 255. Oranges. Tea 460. Charlotte Russe 361.

Game Soup 32. Canvas Back Duck 99. Sauce 417. Delicate Cake 295. Celery Salad 174. Creamed Parsnips 204. Little Plum Cakes 313. Oysters on Half Shell. Mashed Turnips 214. Apple Sauce 162. Egg Muffins 257. Christmas Plum Pudding 397. BREAKFAST. Boiled White Fish 59.DINNER. Pickled Pigs' Feet Fried 151. Sauce Maitre d'Hotel 160. Boiled Rice 202. . Coffee 458. Steamed Oatmeal 276. Confectionery. Salted Almonds 366. Coffee 458. Oyster Toast 278. Lobster Salad 171. Cold Potted Beef 120. SUPPER. Roast Goose 86. Saratoga Chips 193. Boiled Potatoes 192. Wheat Bread 240. Stewed Onions 199. Potato Puffs 193. Panned Oysters 74. Vanilla Ice-cream 376. SUNDAY. Rusks 256. Orange Jelly 374. Mince Pie 338. Fruits. Grapes.

Orange Cream 352. Citron Cake 295. Onion Soup 41. Cold Roast Goose 86. Mince Pie 338. Chicken Cream Soup 34. Stewed Celery 209. Apple Sauce 162. Sliced Oranges. . Cranberry Sauce 163. Boiled Potatoes 192. Hashed Beef on Toast 280. Boiled Halibut 57. French Rolls 253. MONDAY. Chocolate 461. Lobster Salad 171. Scalloped Cheese 222. Brown Bread 244. French Bread 246. Coffee 458. Ham Salad 172. DINNER. Codfish Steak 66. LUNCHEON. Graham Mush 273. Scalloped Clams 79. DINNER. Cheese. Roast Spare Rib 146. Roast Goose 86. BREAKFAST. Apple Meringue Pie 327. Mashed Turnips 214. Sauce Hollandaise 161. Tea 460. Lyonnaise Potatoes 196. Coffee 458.Quince Jelly 432.

Boiled Rice 275. Coffee 458. DINNER. Parsnip Fritters 203. Mashed Potatoes 192. Warmed Potatoes 195.Browned Potatoes 192. Baked Corn Meal Pudding 393. TUESDAY. Pastry Sandwiches 312. Coffee 458. Baked Squash 212. Bread Omelet 234. . Stewed Carrots 213. Mince Pie 338. Wheat Bread 240. Graham Bread 243. Stewed Prunes. Hard Sauce 420. Boiled Parsnips 203. Sliced Head Cheese 154. Tea 460. Scotch Mutton Broth 32. Coffee 458. Apple Tarts 342. LUNCHEON. Cold Slaw 173. Plain Celery. Buckwheat Cakes 266. Pork Chops and Fried Apples 147. Boiled Onions 198. BREAKFAST. Boiled Rice Dumplings with Custard Sauce 384. Piccalili 186. Boiled Turkey 84. Oyster Dressing 83. Cheese. Fruit.

Codfish Balls 63. Plain Sauce 420. Steamed Cabbage 201. . Birds' Nest Pudding 387. Mutton-Chops Broiled 139. Bakers' Doughnuts 317. Coffee 458. New England Corn Cake 246. Lamb Sweetbreads 142. BREAKFAST. LUNCHEON. Coffee 458. Turkey Hash 85. Potato Fillets 196. Dry Toast 276. THURSDAY. Hominy 276. Rice Croquettes 274. Raised Biscuits 251. Oyster Soup 46. Stewed Peaches. Continental Hotel Waffles 260. BREAKFAST.WEDNESDAY. Tomato Sauce 159. Cocoa 461. Potato Puffs 193. Brown Sauce 161. Cider Apple Sauce 162. Saratoga Chips 193. Cheese. Wheat Bread 240. with Tomato Sauce 159. Almond Custard 347. Cracked Wheat 275. DINNER. Lobster Salad 171. Broiled Rabbits 103. Crackers. Sliced Beef Tongue 124.

Green Tomato Pickles 181. Oatmeal with Cream 274. Fried Onions 199. Beef Croquettes 121. White Fish Fried 51. Feather Griddle-cakes 262. Layer Cake 304. Apple Sauce 162. Oyster Salad 172. with Apple Filling 288. Nuts. . Snow Pudding 405. Milk Biscuits 251. FRIDAY. DINNER. Boiled Turnips 214. Fried Sweet Potatoes 198. Squash Pie 337. Baked Potatoes 197. Cold Pork and Beans. Cold Spiced Tongue 125. Coffee 458. Cheese Cream Toast 223. Twist Bread 246. Grilled Bacon 149. Browned Potatoes 192. BREAKFAST.Coffee 458. Brown Bread 244. LUNCHEON. Beef a la Mode 113. Pickled Onions 184. Raisins. Tea 460. LUNCHEON. Vegetable Soup 42. Coffee 458. 149.

Lamb Stew 143. Celery Salad 174. Oat Flakes 275.Angel Cake 302. Preserved Pears 427. Codfish Steaks 66. BREAKFAST. Chicken Omelet 233. French Bread 246. Coffee 458. Graham Griddle-cakes 264. Tea 460. Bananas. Baked Beets 210. Potato Salad 175. Ginger Cookies 309. Pea Soup 43. . Chocolate 461. Chicken. Oyster Fritters 75. Coffee 458. Tapioca Cream Soup 41. Sweet Sauce 421. Cheese. Baked Apple Dumplings 384. SATURDAY. with Macaroni 96. Mashed Potatoes 192. Pork Cutlets 147. Preserved Citron 428. Hasty Cooked Potatoes 195. with Croutons 45. Potato Snow 194. DINNER. Bakers' Custard Pie 330. Boiled Tripe 125. DINNER. LUNCHEON. Wheat Bread 240.

Raisins. Potage tortue a l'Anglaise Consomme Printaniere Royale. Amontillado. Accompanied by: Chateau Margause. Boston Pork and Beans 149. Canape a la Russe. Saumon. Timbales a la Talleyrand. Nuts. HORS D'OEUVRES. RELEVES. Blue Points. POISSONS. Accompanied by: Haute Sauterne. Cucumber Salade. POTAGES.Creamed Parsnips 204. Cold Slaw 173. Coffee 458. Accompanied by: Rauenthaler Berg. Filet de Boeuf a la Richelieu. Sauce Hollandaise. Sauce Menthe. Pommes de Terre Duchesse. . Accompanied by: Ernest Jeroy. Sugar Sauce 418. STATE DINNER AT WHITE HOUSE. Lemon Pie 328. SPECIAL MENUS. Grenadines de Bass. Apple Fritters 267. Selle d'Agneau.

Liqueurs. Lettuce and Tomato Salade.ENTREES. . Pudding Diplomate. MRS. Cafe. Accompanied by: Moet & Chandon. '88. JUNE 4th. Fancy Ice-cream. Cakes. Coquilles de Ris de Vean. Petite Pois. Soft Shell Crabs. German Asparagus. GENERAL GRANT'S BIRTHDAY DINNER. Tea. Accompanied by: Clas de Vougeot. Punch Cardinal. Gelee au Champagne. ROTI. Mottos. Coffee. Fruits. CLEVELAND'S WEDDING LUNCH. Consomme en tasse. Fruits. Accompanied by: Chateau Iquem. Cotelettes d'Agneau d'or Maison. Snipes on Toast. Canvas Back Duck. Plombiere aux Framboise. Ris de Veau a la Perigneux. Fromage. ENTREMETS. Terrapin a la Maryland.

Salade de Laitue. Ailes de Poulets a la Perigord. sauce Creme. Accompanied by: Nuits. Pommes de terre a la Parisienne. Accompanied by: Amontillado. Cornets a la Chantilly. Croute aux Mille Fruits. Sorbet Fantaisie. ENTREMETS SUCRES. Accompanied by: Haute Sauterne. . Coucombres. RELEVE. Caisses de ris de Vean a l'Italienne. POTAGES. Fruites de riviere Hollandaise vert pre. Accompanied by: Ernest Jeroy.Clams. ENTREES. Consomme Imperatrice Bisque de Crabes. Squabs. VARIES HORS D'OEUVRE VARIES. POISSON. Bouchees a la Regence. Asperges. Accompanied by: Johannisberger. Filet de Boeuf a la Bernardi. Petits Pois au Beune. ROTI. Gelee a la Prunelle. Haricots verts.

Huitres en Coquilles.PIECES MONTEES. German Asparagus. Puree St. Filets Mignons a la Provencale. Accompanied by: Amontillado. Fromage. Glace Varietees. Punch au Kirsh. MENU FOR 4 COVERS. Broiled Blue Fish. MENU FOR 6 COVERS. Petits Fours. Huitres en Coquille. Cucumbers. Cafe. Lettuce Salad. Cafe. Plombiere aux Fraises. Maitre d'Hotel. Germain. Potage Julienne aux Quenelles. Consomme Pate d'Italie. Quails Bardes sur Cronstade. Fruits. . Larded Sweetbread a la Meissoniere. Pommes d'Auphine. Accompanied by: Sauterne. Paupiettes de Turbots a la Joinville. Fruits.

Cafe. Huitres en Coquille. Bass a la Regence. Potatoes Windsor. Currant Jelly. Sauce Hollandaise. Pommes Duchesse. Timbales a l'Ecossaise.Cucumbers. Accompanied by: Rauenthaler Berg. Lettuce and Tomato Salad. Filet of Beef Larded a la Parisienne. . Sorbet Venetienne. Squabs with Water-cresses. Accompanied by: Hochheimer. Bisque of Lobster. Accompanied by: Moet & Chandon. Accompanied by: Chateau Latour. Lamb Broth with Vegetables. Marrow Sauce. Fruits. Olives. Croutes aux Champignons a la Parisienne. MENU FOR 8 COVERS. Creme Bavaroise au Chocolat. Accompanied by: Haute Sauterne. Artichauts. Radishes. Small Tenderloin Sautes. Saddle of Mutton. Accompanied by: Amontillado. Lamb Chops a la Marechale. Fromage.

Accompanied by: Moet & Chandon. Canvas Back Duck. Truites Saumone au Beurre de Montpellier. Cafe. Petits Pois Garnis de Fleurous. Marechale. Consomme de Volaille. Punch Maraschino. Terrapin a la Maryland. Huitres a la Poulette.Accompanied by: Ernest Jeroy. Lettuce Salad. Olives. Radishes. Cauliflower au Gratin. Accompanied by: Johannisberger. Souffle a l'Orange. Tartelette Potatoes. Cucumbers. Bouchees a la Bohemienne. Cotelettes de Pigeon. Artichauts a la Barigoule. Accompanied by: Chateau Latour. Accompanied by: Haute Sauterne. Fruits. Fromage. Filets Mignon de Boeuf a la Trianon. Celery au Jus. MENU FOR 10 COVERS. Sweetbreads a la Pompadour. .

Pommes Parisienne. Artichauts Bottoms. Radishes. Accompanied by: Haute Sauterne. Accompanied by: Chas. Accompanied by: Moet & Chandon. Pouding Nesselrode. Pompano Maitre d'Hotel. de Vougert. Consomme Royal. Accompanied by: Amontillado. . Celery Mayonnaise. Canvas Back Ducks. Cotelettes d'Agneau a la Puree de Colen. Bass a la Regence. Cream of Asparagus. Sorbet Dunderberg. Fromage. Accompanied by: Moselbluemchen. Tarrapin a la Richelieu. MENU FOR 12 COVERS. Filet of Boeuf a la Pocahontas. Olives. Caviar sur Toast. Becassines au Cresson.Punch Romaine. Fruits. Little Neck Clams. Accompanied by: Nuits. Cafe. Lettuce Salad.

Haricots verts. RELEVE. ROTI. Pommes de terre Parisienne. Fruits. ENTREES. Cepes a la Bordelaise. Timbales a la Reyniere. Cafe. Consomme Francatelli. HORS D'OEUVRE. Ailes de Poulets a la Hongroise. Omelette Celestine.French Peas. Fromage. Sorbet a la Prunelle. . MENU FOR 24 COVERS. *** Huitres. Filet Turbot Portugaise. Bisque d'Ecrevisses. POISSON. Faisan rotes Franque de Cailles. Selle d'Agneau a la Colbert. POTAGES. Asperges Sauce Creme. Celery Mayonnaise.

Caviar on Toast. Tea. Game Pig. Glaces Fantaisies. Assorted Candies. Nesselrode Puddings. Currant Jelly. Westphalia Ham a la Gelee. Claret and Champagne Jellies. Galautine of Faison. COLD SERVICE. . Radishes. BUFFET FOR 1. Russian Salad. Biscuits Glacee. Saddle of Venison. Boned Turkey. Fillet of Beef. Consomme on Tasse. Water Ices. Cold Turkey. Lobster and Shrimp Salad. Sandwiches. Cold Salmon Mayonnaise.000 PEOPLE. Assorted Cakes. Fruits.ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. Celery. Cold Game in Season. Mayonnaise of Chicken. Cafe. Neapolitaine Ice-cream. Charlotte Glacee. Petits Fours. Croutes aux Ananas.

The most distinguished guests sit on his right and left. Two of them are served from the kitchen. and the third from the pantry. The President's Secretary issues invitations by direction of the President to the distinguished guests.Coffee. If their wives are present they will occupy these seats. Lemonade. and the gentlemen will be seated next to the President's wife whose seat is directly opposite the President. and are divided into three distinct parts. The President's seat is in the middle of the table. . [Illustration] A card corresponding with his name is placed on the napkin belonging to the cover of the seat he will occupy. whereon the name and seat of the respective guest and the lady he is to escort to dinner are marked. MANAGEMENT AND DIRECTION OF DINNERS AND RECEPTIONS ON STATE OCCASIONS AT THE WHITE HOUSE. Official dinners all over the world are always served after the French fashion. Etiquette as observed in European courts is not known at the White House. The Usher in charge of the cloak-room hands to the gentleman on arrival an envelope containing a diagram of the table (as cut shows).

which are all understood as desserts. cakes. The third includes ice. III--Glass for Rhine Wine. . so as not to obscure the view of the guests. so as to show monogram in the middle.] A--Plate. cheeses. All principal dishes which are artistically decorated are shown to the President first.The first part of the dinner served French style includes from oysters on the shell to the sherbets. plain square folded. is much preferred. (See diagram.) [Illustration: DIAGRAM ILLUSTRATING HOW TO ARRANGE GLASSES ON TABLE. fruits. Gentlemen's bouttonieres consist only of one rosebud. Fancy folding of the napkins is considered out of fashion. V--Glass for Champagne. Corsage boquets for ladies consist of not more than eight large roses tied together by silk ribbon. II--Glass for Sherry. with the name of the lady stamped on in gold letters. then are carried around the table before being carved by the Steward in the pantry. Flower decorations on the table are to be in flat designs. VI--Glass for Burgundy. and are dressed in the pantry. The following diagram will illustrate the arrangement of the glasses on the table. The second service continues to the sweet dishes. IV--Glass for Water. I--Glass for Sauterne.

the condition of the patient should be considered. Liquors. boiled in a small basin or cup. Printed menus are never used on any official occasion. wine. simply dressed. As a rule. a bread pudding from stale bread crumbs.Boquets for ladies are to be placed on the right side. cigars are served on a separate table after the ladies have retired to the parlor. Long cooking hardens the albumen and makes the milk very constipating. rabbit. game. fish. the same dish too frequently set before an invalid often causes a distaste. As there are so many small. care should be taken not to heat the milk above the boiling point