P. 1
PSM: Sr Mary Lou Stubbs Dance Planning for Effective Ministries

PSM: Sr Mary Lou Stubbs Dance Planning for Effective Ministries

|Views: 28|Likes:
PSM: Sr Mary Lou Stubbs Dance Planning for Effective Ministries
PSM: Sr Mary Lou Stubbs Dance Planning for Effective Ministries

More info:

Published by: Catholic Charities USA on Dec 13, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/04/2013

pdf

text

original

Planning for Effective Ministries

Sister Mary Lou Stubbs, DC  Parish Partnership Program   Catholic Charities  Diocese of Ogdensburg    If you’d like to develop and/or revitalize ministries within your parish to be more  effective—do the Community Planning Waltz: one, two, three; assess, develop,  evaluate…one, two, three; assess, develop, evaluate…  Keeping the simple “one, two, three” steps in mind will help any group, large or small  become increasingly inventive and effective in the programs they offer in their  parishes and communities.  Your pre‐dance preparation includes gathering together persons and groups who have interest in or  influence on what it is you are trying to do and coming to a common understanding about what it is you  are considering. In planning terms you are gathering your constituencies and defining your basic  mission. Using the dance analogy, it means getting the people who will be involved in the party together  to agree that you’re going to have a dance for the community, and establish work committees. 

The first step is to assess! Successful programs are those which are needed, wanted, and 
possible.  Find out the facts about the needs in your geographic area from data collection sources like the  U.S. Census Bureau QuickFactsi, County Health Rankingsii, Kids Countiii or other demographic  studies. This “secondary research” information has been collected in a scientific manner. You  can get cold, hard facts—you don’t have to become a research scientist, you just have to ask the  computer!  Become aware of what the people you hope to help actually want by asking them in an  organized and unbiased way. Collect information about what they perceive as important, who  they want to reach out to, what outcomes they would like to see. This “primary research” can  be done in interviews, surveys, or focus groups. To find out what people see as valuable—you  don’t have to guess, you just have to ask the folks!  Seek out the resources, systems and groups that are already in place to make things possible.  This is also called “assets analysis” and is stewardship at its highest. Open your awareness to  what is around you—buildings, communication opportunities, services, people with talents, etc.  Gifts are there for the sharing—you don’t have to cry over a glass that is half‐empty, you have a  glass that is  half‐full, so check the pantry!  Take the three separate lists of needed, wanted, and possible and see where they have  common elements, that is, where they overlap. Where the center section of the three circles 

overlap, list the issues that are common to all three. This list will provide initial opportunities to  consider for programs and projects which can be effective and successful.
Wanted

Needed

Possible

   

The second step is to develop! 
  You will now have a list of opportunities—so line them up in order of priority. Some of them will  be closely related and doing one will cause the related ones to happen as a result, this domino  effect can be helpful in meeting your goals more efficiently.  Now you must clarify what outcomes you want to work toward. Of those opportunities you  have to make a difference in your community, which are the most valuable or important  changes you want to work toward at this time. Pick out one to three priority opportunities and  put the rest aside for another day and another dance.  You already know a lot about your priority areas because of your research, but you may need to  gather some more information, which is directly focused on your chosen opportunities.  Now develop a written image of what your program will look like when it is fully  functional a few years from now. This Vision Statement will concisely describe  the “who, for whom, what, where, why, and how” elements so clearly that  anyone can read it and “see” what you are going to do.  Next, break the Vision Statement up into big parts which can be worked on by sub‐groups—each  of those three or four parts will become a Goal when it is stated in a way which will allow you to  know when you’ve reached it. For example, if your program requires transportation your goal  might be to acquire a van and drivers and you’ll know you’ve reached the goal when you can  climb into the van and shake hands with the driver.  Obviously, each Goal is going to be reached by many smaller steps, or Objectives, these also  need to be clearly stated so you can tell if you’re headed the right way or need to find a  different path to your goal.  It is only now—when you can see your vision, know its vital components, and take appropriate  steps toward it—that you can develop the tools to move the project toward its defined  outcomes. These tools become your programs. But just as in a dance you need to choose the  right partner, take the right steps, and move in coordination with others on the dance floor, you  also need to adjust your movements when what you are doing doesn’t work or the music  changes. This flexibility will make you a better dancer.     

The third step is to evaluate! 
  It is as important in planning as it is in dancing not to trip. Tripping is distracting and can be discouraging  if it makes you fall. Prevent major trip‐ups throughout your planning and implementation of programs  by using Evaluation.  When you dance you keep your eye on simple measurements, which indicate distance to the  edge of the dance floor, the people around you, and your partner’s feet in order to dance  successfully.  In planning you keep your eye on simple measurement which indicate you’re getting the  desired outcomes (results), outputs (vital elements), and process (daily activities).  Information must be collected as demonstrations of effectiveness and as  indicators of opportunities to improve how you are doing things. The quicker you  catch a misstep, the easier it is to regain your balance.   As you evaluate, you can use the information you gather to adjust your program, report your  results to constituents and supporters, and celebrate your accomplishments!   

Enjoy the dance!   
                                                                                                  
i

 Quickfacts.census.gov   Countyhealthrankings.org  iii  Datacenter.kidscount.org 
ii

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->