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LT: I can identify human influences on changing states of matter What is Cloud Seeding?

Common Read with a partner We think cloud seeding is….

Common Read on your own For Against

My opinion is:

Based on:

Cloud Seeding in Colorado A Moral Dilemma for Middle School Students
Original Dilemma Dave manages a ski shop in Vail, CO. He makes the majority of his annual income during ski season, and benefits from lots of snow. More snow brings in more visitors and means more money for him. He recently heard about something called cloud seeding, which could potentially increase the amount of snow in the valley by tens of inches. He discovered that cloud seeding is the primary weather modification activity recognized by the State of Colorado. Commercial companies inject silver iodine, dry ice, or salt into storm clouds. These chemicals act as nuclei for the formation of ice particles, thus increasing and controlling the amount of precipitation that falls from the skies, in the form of rain, snow, hail or fog. Looking into the technique further, he was surprised to learn that countries all over the world, including the United States, use cloud seeding to create snow for ski resorts, stop hailstorms, decrease drought and provide water for farmers and croplands. Dave is fully on board and completely supportive of cloud seeding efforts. However, after talking to his neighbors, and research and environmental scientists at the University of Colorado, he becomes disturbed by what he hears, and unsure of his position. Some studies have shown that after it falls from the clouds, silver iodine contaminates water, is deposited in soil and stream beds, into green vegetation and from there into insects, birds, animals and humans. Other unwanted consequences include excessive flooding, and prime conditions for avalanches. Currently, scientists at the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Meteorological Society conclude that while some precipitation occurs after cloud seeding, there is no conclusive cause and effect, or information as to long term effects on human and environmental health. Based on all this, should DaveZ support cloud seeding in the Vail Valley?

Cloud Seeding in Colorado
Dave manages a ski shop in Vail, CO. He makes the majority of his annual income during ski season, and benefits from lots of snow. He recently heard about something called cloud seeding, which could potentially increase the amount of snow in the valley by tens of inches. He discovered that cloud seeding is the primary weather modification activity recognized by the State of Colorado. Commercial companies inject silver iodine, dry ice, or salt into storm clouds. These chemicals act as nuclei for the formation of ice particles, and increase the amount of precipitation that falls from the skies, in the form of rain, snow, hail or fog. Looking into the technique further, Dave was surprised to learn that countries all over the world, including the United States, use cloud seeding to create snow for ski resorts, stop hailstorms, decrease drought and provide water for farmers and croplands. Dave wants more snow, and completely agrees with cloud seeding. However, after talking to his neighbors, and research and environmental scientists, he becomes unsure of his position. Some studies have shown that after it falls from the clouds, silver iodide can contaminate water, soil and vegetation. These chemicals can also harm insects, birds, animals and humans. Other unwanted consequences include excessive flooding, and avalanches. Currently, scientists at the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Meteorological Society conclude that while some rain, snow and fog occur after cloud seeding, they are unsure about the long-term effects on humans and environmental health. Based on all this, should Dave support cloud seeding in the Vail Valley?

Cloud Seeding in Colorado
Dave manages a ski shop in Vail, CO. More snow brings in more skiers, and makes him more money. He recently heard about a way for people to make snow, called cloud seeding, Cloud seeding is the main weather changing activity in Colorado. Companies will drop or shoot silver iodide, dry ice, or salt into storm clouds. These chemicals attach to ice particles, and make it rain, snow, hail or fog. Dave was surprised to learn that countries all over the world, including the United States, use cloud seeding as a way to create snow for ski resorts, stop hailstorms, stop drought and provide water for farmers and croplands. Dave wants more snow and agrees with cloud seeding efforts. Later on, after talking to his neighbors, and scientists, Dave changes his mind. Some studies have shown that after it falls from the clouds, silver iodide can pollute water, stick around in soil and streams, and get into plants. These chemicals can then make insects, birds, animals and humans sick. Other bad things include lots of flooding, and avalanches. Right now, scientists say that while it may snow, rain or fog after cloud seeding, they are unsure about the long-term effects on humans and environmental health. Based on all this, should Dave support cloud seeding in the Vail Valley?

Alternative dilemma: If the students think that Dave SHOULD support cloud seeding then consider…. -A new study comes out from the EPA that provides strong evidence that the chemicals from cloud seeding do indeed contaminate water. -Workers from commercial cloud seeding companies are found to have cancers, respiratory and blood disease, caused by exposure to the chemicals they work with everyday. If the students think that Dave SHOULD NOT support cloud seeding then consider… -Dave has 4 children under the age of 10, and his salary is the only source of income for his family, and snow is the prime resource that provides Dave, hotels, restaurants, ski resorts and other shops most of their money for the year. -A local seeding company guarantees that their new techniques will bring 48 inches of snow. -What would Vail be like without snow? How would the town function? Probe questions…. 1. What groups of people (or stakeholders) are impacted by cloud seeding?
2. Who should have more say in this issue?

3. What position do you think each stakeholder might take regarding the use of chemical dispersants? 4. To whom do these groups have obligations, and what is the nature of those obligations? (i.e. supporting families) 5. Which stakeholders aren't considered or considered legitimate and why? Which are given more legitimacy and why? What's you reaction to this? (i.e. Can the fish talk?)
6. What weight does $$ have on this issue? 7. Should humans be allowed to control natural processes like weather, population control, genetics, etc?

Issue Related:  Dave decides to take the issue to the Vail town council, trying to get them to ban the use of cloud seeding. His boss, however, threatens to fire him if he continues his activism. Should he continue to fight for the ban of cloud seeding in Vail?  Dave begins to complain about the use of cloud seeding to his coworkers, many of who are close friends. They begin to avoid Bill because he is acting like a radical activist and is making too big a deal of the issue. Should Bill

continue to fight the use of cloud seeding? General:  People are exposed to chemicals every day, many of which make life more convenient, and in this case, cloud seeding would bring more snow to the valley. We re often not sure the effects of these chemicals in our daily lives. Should chemicals be put on the market if they have not been proven to be safe?  When do the benefits of chemicals outweigh their possible harm; i.s. the use of chemicals in growing food? In house paint? In medicine? In treating cancer?  Should chemists develop chemicals that might hurt people, even if there aren't safety laws to ensure that chemicals are tested?  Should scientists test rats and other animals to determine if chemicals are safe for humans?