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Present perfect continuous makes a connection between the past and the present, that is, describes an action

that began in the past and continues in the present and possibly the future
How it is formed
With the present of the verb to have + been + ing:

afirmative interrogative negative

I have been working. Have I been working? I haven't been working.


You have been working. Have you been working? You haven't been working.
He has been working. Has he been working? He hasn't been working.
She has been working. Has she been working? She hasn't been working.
It has been working. Has it been working? It hasn't been working.
We have been working. Have we been working? We haven't been working.
You have been working. Have you been working? You haven't been working.
They have been working. Have they been working? They haven't been working.

Use:

• to empathize the duration of an action that began in the past and continues in the present:

e.g.: She's been working all day and she's obviously very tired.

começou de manhã e ainda não parou

• to describe an action that began in the past, but that have effects in the present:

e.g.: Tom has been marking tests all week, so now he doesn't want to talk about school.

foi uma semana cheia de trabalho e por isso ele não quer falar disso

• to describe an action that causes anger or fury

e.g.: You've been using my t-shirts again! You know I don't like that!

quem fala está irritado

Time Expressions:

how long...? (há quanto tempo...?)

for (há)

since (desde)

lately (ultimamente)

recently (recentemente)